Wiki Tags Archives: Advocacy

Governing

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Governing:  The Future of States and Localities

ISSN:  1930-6954 1

Website: http://www.governing.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Governing: The Future of States and Localities takes on the question of what state and local government looks like in a world of rapidly advancing technology. Governing is a resource for elected and appointed officials and other public leaders who are looking for smart insights and a forum to better understand and manage through this era of change. Governing’s beat is the collision of technology and society and the fallout consequences, intended and unintended, that confront public leaders and increasingly influence their policy, legislation and strategies to govern. ” 2

Target audience: Governing’s audience consists of governors, mayors, county executives, city and county council members, state legislators, state and local agency executives and those holding key professional government positions.3

Publisher: e.Republic, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium:Governing’s information platform includes a robust website, newsletters and custom content. Governing magazine ended its 32 year run as a print publication in August 2019.” 6

Content: “The scope of topics we cover are as broad as the challenges we face: artificial intelligence, privacy, big data, security, the future of work, urban planning, financial systems and more.” 7

Frequency of publication:

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Voices of the Governing Institute 

Types of contributions accepted: Governing content is staff written and the publication does not typically accept unsolicited submissions for publication.  However, submitted material is occasional accepted for the Voices of the Governing Institute section of the website. “Voices is curated by the Governing Institute, which seeks out practitioners and observers whose perspective and insight add to the public conversation about state and local government.”8

Submission and review process: “For more information or to submit an article to be considered for publication, please contact editor John Martin.”9

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers great potential for increasing the visibility of public libraries with the government administrators who fund and support them (or not). Library leader Ken Haycock highly recommends Governing, saying that “We need to read and reflect but also contribute to these important publications.” Haycock points out that public librarians have much to gain by writing for such publications “to ensure that their celebrations and concerns are front and center with those who make decisions affecting their future.”10 (**Note, as of November 8, 2020, this resource link is inactive.**)

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Governing has 4.6million annual online visitors and over 7million annual page views, which means about 500k monthly visitors and 692k average monthly page views. There are 94k newsletter subscribers and 97k social media followers. 11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Audience is American, and the text is written in English.

Reader characteristics:  According to the current media kit, about 80% of Governing’s audience works in the public sector, 55% are elected and senior government officials. Of those involved in government, approximately 70% are at the state and local levels. 12

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of specialized LIS subject matter will be little. LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum. This is a well-educated, intelligent, and influential audience who would be interested in library issues pertaining to policy and government in local or state jurisdictions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal represent all levels of government and hold positions in management, as elected or appointed officials, or staff.  An audience of decision-makers such as these provides an excellent opportunity for an LIS author to not only further his/her/their career, but to possibly influence real change for local or state libraries.

Last updated: November 8, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. Governing.”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1049629903
  2. “About Governing.”, Governing.com, accessed November 8, 2020, http://www.governing.com/about
  3. “About Governing.”
  4. “About Governing.”
  5. “About Governing.”
  6. “About Governing.”
  7. “About Governing.”
  8. “Voices of the Governing Institute,” Governing.com, accessed September 28, 2016, http://www.governing.com/gov-institute/voices
  9. “Voices of the Governing Institute.”
  10. “Governing: Connecting Leaders,” Ken Haycock & Associates Inc Blog, April 4, 2011, http://kenhaycock.com/governing-connecting-leaders/
  11. “Media Kit.”, Governing.com, accessed November 8, 2020, https://media.erepublic.com/document/GOV19_MediaKit_Andrea.pdf
  12. “Media Kit.”
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Mother Jones

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mother Jones

ISSN: 0362-8841 (Print) and 2169-7396 (Online)1

Website: http://www.motherjones.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: America’s longest-established investigative news organization. , Mother Jones “goes deep on the biggest stories of the moment, from politics and crime and justice, to education, climate change, and food.”2

“Our mission is to deliver hard-hitting reporting that inspires change and combats ‘alternative facts’.” 3

Mother Jones’ founders envisioned a magazine devoted to a new brand of socially conscious journalism—one that took on corporate as well as political power. Twenty-five years later, that mission remains as timely as ever.” 4

Mother Jones has also remained a strong voice for social justice: Racial discrimination, women’s rights, environmental justice, and the plight of immigrant farmworkers are all issues you will find covered in the magazine from its first year of publication to the present. Another major theme over the years has been the bloated American military budget and the way the United States uses its superpower influence overseas.” 5

“Our bias is for the truth, for fairness and justice, for a democracy in which facts matter and all can participate. It’s not a partisan position—we believe these values are bigger than party—but it is a point of view, and we believe journalism should be transparent about its values. We also believe in investigating any story worth digging into, and in rigorously following the facts where they lead; our fact-checking and verification protocol is one of the most extensive in the industry.” 6

Target audience: Readers who are interested in politics, environmental issues, and social justice.

Publisher: The Foundation for National Progress.7

Peer reviewed? No. 8

Type: Civilian news magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Investigative journalism covering politics, the environment, and culture.9 “We’re interested in just about anything that will raise our readers’ eyebrows, but we focus especially on these areas: national politics, environmental issues, corporate wrongdoing, human rights, and political influence in all spheres.” 10

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://motherjones.com/about/writer-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: “While much of our content comes from staff writers and freelancers with whom we’ve had long-standing relationships, Mother Jones magazine and MotherJones.com will consider solidly reported, hard-hitting, groundbreaking news stories. We’re also open to thought-provoking, timely opinion and analysis pieces on important current issues.” 11

“Our readership is nationwide, so please, no local issues unless they have national interest or implications. At the same time, anything that has already been covered extensively in the major national media will probably not work for us, unless you have some new unique angle. We will look at cultural essays, but not travel pieces. Save yourself and us time and effort by taking a good look at our site and/or the magazine before you send a query.”12

Submission and review process: Freelance writers should submit a query by email. Per their guidelines, “Tell us in no more than a few paragraphs what you plan to cover, why it’s important and interesting, and how you will report it. The query should convey your approach, tone, and style, and should answer the following: What are your specific qualifications for writing on this topic? What ins do you have with your sources? If other major stories have been done on this topic, how will yours be different—and better? Please also include a line or two about your background and two or three of your most relevant clips (links are fine).” 13

Web pieces are generally fewer than 1,500 words. Because we have staff reporters it is extremely rare that we will pay for a piece whose timeliness or other qualities work for the web only. Magazine pieces can range up to 5,000 words. There is at least a two-month lead time.” 14

Editorial tone: Investigative and Informative

Style guide used: No style guide is mentioned.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although first-time authors may have a difficult time getting published with Mother Jones, the magazine has a large base of politically-conscious readers, which would provide a wonderful stage for any LIS authors who have a very specific agenda. Since the scope of the publication involves investigative and informative journalism, LIS authors could potentially write about field trends, controversies, and challenges to LIS. For example, here are some recent publications pertinent to LIS:  The Library Worker Whose Bosses Blew Her Off When She Asked Questions, Books Have the Power to Rehabilitate. But Prisons Are Blocking Access to Them, and A Library Straddling the Border is Giving Immigrant Families a Safe Place to Reunite.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation:   “Mother Jones has expanded its audience reach from 600,000 to nearly 14 million readers in the past decade. This includes over 13 million unique online visitors each month and 200,000 print subscribers.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in the United States.16 Published in English.

Reader characteristics:  “Mother Jones readers are informed about key issues and are concerned about their impact on public life. Interested in many subjects, from politics and social justice to education and the environment, our readers seek news coverage that provides an accurate and nuanced view of the world around them.” 17

Per their media kit, 53% are women, 94% attended college, 80% are homeowners.  “According to recent subscriber studies, Mother Jones readers say/do the following: 98% willing to pay more for high-quality items, 84% consider themselves intellectuals, 84% environmental impact is important when considering a purchase, 80% social responsibility influences how they invest, 73% advise their friends and family on books, music, movies, TV, and other media, 84% willing to pay more for organic food.” 18

“Mother Jones readers are more engaged in public life than most. 83% vote in federal, state, and municipal elections and sign petitions for various causes. 75% of  readers say they were motivated to take an action in the real world as the result of a Mother Jones article.” 19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Though it is likely there are a number of LIS professionals that read this publication, the primary audience would not be informed about LIS issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the readers of Mother Jones are well-educated and expect straightforward, thoughtful writing that broadens their knowledge of the world. Readers care about social issues and will most likely be receptive to stories about libraries and library advocacy.

Last updated: October 2, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Mother Jones.”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 2, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1601669942449/73143
  2. “What is Mother Jones?”, MotherJones.com, accessed September 12, 2018, http://www.motherjones.com/about
  3. “What is Mother Jones?”
  4. “History.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 2, 2020, https://www.motherjones.com/about/history/
  5. “History.”
  6. “FAQ.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 2, 2020, https://www.motherjones.com/about/faq/
  7. “What is Mother Jones?”
  8. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://www.motherjones.com/about/writer-guidelines
  9. “What is Mother Jones?”
  10. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  11. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  12. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  13. Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  14. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  15. “Mother Jones Profile.”, GuideStar.org, accessed October 2, 2020, https://www.guidestar.org/profile/94-2282759
  16. “Contact Us.” MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://www.motherjones.com/about/contact
  17. “Media Kit-2020.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 2, 2020, https://assets.motherjones.com/advertising/2020/Mother_Jones_2020_MediaKit.pdf
  18. “Media Kit-2020.”
  19. “Media Kit-2020.”
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INALJ (I Need a Library Job)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: INALJ ( formerly, I Need A Library Job)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its tenth year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Types of contributions accepted: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Submission and review process: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: N/A

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.5

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published span a broad range of topics. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. About INALJ
  4. Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ content is updated daily during weekdays. [4. “About INALJ

  5. About INALJ.”
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Bitch Media

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bitch Media

ISSN: 1524-5314 (Print) and 2162-5352 (Online)1

Website: https://bitchmedia.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “Bitch Media’s mission is to provide and encourage an engaged, thoughtful feminist response to mainstream media and popular culture.”2

“Bitch seeks to be a fresh, revitalizing voice in contemporary feminism, one that welcomes complex arguments and refuses to ignore the contradictory and often uncomfortable realities of life in an unequivocally gendered world.”3

“Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.”4

Target audience: Largely women, but meant for anyone who is interested in a modern feminist discussion on media and popular culture. According to the website, Bitch has a diverse audience and is “uniquely situated to draw in young readers who are at a critical moment in their lives—a moment when they are discovering feminism and activism, finding answers to who they are, and questioning the definitions of gender, sexuality, power and agency prescribed by the mainstream media.”5

Publisher: Bitch Media.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: Lay publication, with emphasis on politically and socially minded individuals.8

Medium: Quarterly Magazine, Weekly Podcast, and Daily Online Content. 9

Content: “Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.” Media includes Movies, television, news magazines, fashion magazines, blogs, comics, advertising, music, computer games. 10

Frequency of publication: The print magazine is published quarterly, online content is published five days a week.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “We are looking for discussion-provoking critical essays that are well researched with evidence to back up claims, timely statistics, and connections between one’s personal experience and larger social forces. Interviews with feminist culture-makers are welcome, as are book, film, and music reviews and nuanced analyses of particularly horrifying and/or inspiring examples of pop culture. First-person essays are great, but please read our print magazine and website to get a sense of how our contributors strike a happy balance between the personal “I” and the larger subject matter at hand.”12

Bitch accepts nonfiction pieces only, and does not accept fiction, poetry, “personal essays, experimental lyric essays, or anything that reads like a dissertation.”13 Each issue has a theme, but the themes are meant to serve as jumping-off points rather than rigid guidelines. Be sure to check the website for upcoming topics, but the editors encourage pitches for articles that would suit the magazine but don’t fit an upcoming theme.14

Potential contributors are encouraged to consider which section of the magazine would best fit their idea before submitting a pitch. Features are “2,200 to 3,000 words of meaty critiques, essays, and articles on pop culture from a feminist perspective.” These pieces should be filled with “personal insight and wit,” and may vary in format, such as interviews, reported pieces, critical essays, or even timelines, charts, and comics.15 Dispatches are “1,200 word missives from the front lines of real, imagined, or fictional worlds and places.” 16 “Culture is where Bitch brands its cultural authority through essays about books, music, and screen; profiles of individuals and those who are creating and defining cultural moments; and interviews with those working in publishing, Hollywood, podcasting, and other areas who are helping us imagine new possibilities for representation and inclusion.”17

“Payment varies but is generally $700-$1000 for features, $350 for dispatches, and between $250-$700 for culture stories. All of our writers are paid. Please send all materials through our submission manager. Submit to the section of the magazine that best fits your pitch.” 18

Submission and review process: Both finished work and query letters are accepted. If sending only a query, include clips and/or writing samples. Submissions, query letters, and pitches are accepted through their link to Submittable. Bitch accepts online pitches on a rolling basis. view open calls and submit your pitches through the website found within the writers-guidelines. “Due to the volume of pitches we receive, we are unable to respond to every pitch and will only respond to the pitches that we accept.” 19

Editorial tone: Serious, and seriously tongue-in-cheek. This is not a scholarly publication and sarcasm is rampant, but Bitch remains a very thoughtful and provocative media organization.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and information science is a field that is historically dominated by women, and perhaps due to that, it is a profession filled with preconceived notions and attitudes about women as librarians (think severe, hair-buns, glasses, and sensible shoes). Bitch is an excellent forum to discuss how we as librarians (both male and female) are seen in popular culture, what that image represents, and if that image affects how the populace sees us. It would be a good forum to discuss how gender, sexuality, and feminism play a role in our profession, as well as an outlet to discuss how other LIS issues are affected by or are affecting popular culture and the media. LIS authors with a background or interest in women’s studies or literature might be interested in writing feature articles, though an interdisciplinary perspective is key.

Bitch began as a zine, and has grown into an independent, nonprofit, feminist media organization.20 But that independent spirit, snarky attitude and distrust of the status quo have remained. The magazine endeavors to be a “tool kit” that engages readers in analysis that promotes activism and social change, and LIS authors with an interest in social justice, critiques of mainstream culture, and independent thinking would be at home here. Come with a strong opinion, say it well and say it with wit.21

This organization recognizes the value of libraries as places of critical inquiry, and supports a Bitch Community Lending Library that houses a diverse selection of 2,000 feminist materials to the community in the magazine’s home of Portland, Oregon. “Our library holds over 2,500 books, zines, magazines, and DVDs that explore feminism, media studies, pop culture, queer studies, race studies, sex and sexuality, body image and much more. The library also holds rare issues of ROCKRGRL and Sassy magazines which are available for browsing in our cozy reading room. The books in our catalog are available to search online.” 22

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has 80,000 readers, while the website receives nearly 5 million unique visitors each year.23

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bitch subscribers reside in 46 countries and all 50 states, with 78% of readers living in urban areas or college towns.24 This magazine focuses on popular culture and media images almost exclusively in the United States. Bitch will repeatedly refer to people, places, ads, and events that will only make sense to a person who has an idea of the major figures or subjects in American popular culture.

Reader characteristics: The majority of Bitch’s readers are between the ages of 25 and 34. They are well educated, tech savvy, and have Internet access. Bitch readers are also civic-minded and politically aware, with 85% having voted within the last year, and 51% having contacted their elected officials in the past year. They overwhelmingly identified as politically liberal, progressive, or radical.  They donate to causes and campaigns that are important to them. They read in their spare time, with 63% reading more than 10 hours a week. They are vocally and financially supportive of music, theater, and the arts. They are well-traveled: 48% traveled overseas in the past three years, and 92% traveled domestically in the last year. Bitch readers are conscientious consumers: 82% go out of their way to shop at independent retailers, 84% purchase environmentally friendly products and services, and 44% independently research a company’s mission or labor practices before buying its products.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Little to none. The odds are good that the reader has spent time in libraries of some kind (academic, school, and public), and shares values the library upholds, such as intellectual freedom and equal access to information.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This organization’s readership is large, and while readers are largely unfamiliar with LIS topics, virtually any LIS subject relating to feminism (e.g., gender prejudices within LCSH subject headings) would be welcomed here. This audience wants something that is thought-provoking, well written, and entertaining. They want to discuss thematic figures of women, femininity and gender within pop culture and society as a whole.26

Readers are overwhelmingly well-educated, socially and politically progressive women who live in urban areas. Do not assume there will be a great deal of knowledge or even interest in many library issues or concerns, but there will be an interest in how librarianship as a profession and threats against freedom of information affect the position of women and minorities in American society. Persuasive and thoughtful writing is more important than citations, statistics, or user studies (though referring to any of these will help solidify the author’s argument). Remember that these readers don’t just read about a topic, they do something about it. This is an audience whose members just might write to their legislators about a library issue or volunteer at their local library, if those issues resonate with them. This is a great audience to reach, not only because it shares LIS values but because it has the potential to be an advocate for LIS issues.

Last updated: August 30, 2020


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Bitch, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/93747762
  2. “About Us.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 23, 2018, https://bitchmedia.org/about-us
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “About Us.”
  7. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “About Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  13. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  14. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  15. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  16. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  17. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  18. “Contributor’s Guidelines.”
  19. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  20. “About Us”
  21. “About Us.”
  22. “Bitch Community Lending Library.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/library
  23. “Get that Life: How I Co-founded Bitch Media.”, Cosmopolitan.com, accessed September 7, 2016, http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/a57736/andi-zeisler-bitch-media-get-that-life/
  24. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016,  https://bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/Bitch-Media-Sponsorship-Kit.pdf
  25. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”
  26. “About Us.”
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Children and Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Children and Libraries

ISSN: 1542-9806 (Print) and 2374-7641 (Online)1

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Children and Libraries (CAL) is the official, refereed journal of the Association for Library Service to Children. It primarily serves as a vehicle for continuing education of librarians working with children, and showcases current scholarly research and practice in library service to children and significant activities and initiatives of the Association.”2

Target audience: CAL is “read by librarians who work with children, birth to age fourteen, in public and school libraries.”3

Publisher: Association for Library Services to Children/American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Children and youth; LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Current scholarly research and practice in library service to children with highlights of significant activities and programs of the association8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: CAL publishes full-length scholarly research articles; “best practice” pieces on children’s programming (usually 1,500 words or less); and ends each issue with a brief feature by a children’s librarian, a light essay, humorous story, interview, or interview with a children’s author (up to 300 words). 10

Submission and review process: Submissions via email as Microsoft Word attachments are preferred. Manuscripts will be acknowledged upon receipt and scholarly articles will be evaluated by at least two referees. Authors of scholarly articles can expect the review process to take four to eight months.11

Editorial tone: Academic or informal, depending on the submission type.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are involved and interested in providing library services to children would benefit from submitting an article to this journal. Having an article published in Children and Libraries increases prestige for the author as the publication is distributed nationwide and in some foreign countries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are not available, Children and Libraries is delivered to members of the ALSC at a discounted rate and is a benefit of membership. In addition there are individual subscribers and copies distributed for marketing purposes.14 ALSC has a membership network of more than 4,000.15 Children and Libraries is also available online, with the four most recent issues available only to members but older issues open to all.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the official journal of the ALSC the audience of members extends to every state in the nation and to some foreign countries.17 ALSC is conscious of different cultures and is the national home of El día de los niños – El día de los libros (Children’s Day – Book Day) program. They have also developed the ALSC Every Child Ready to Read project, which aims to promote early literacy skills in children from birth to age five.18 These programs reflect the organization’s support for diversity and dedication to service to all children.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Children and Libraries are made up of children’s librarians, including school librarians, reading teachers, library directors, book reviewers, university professors, library support staff, and retired library professionals. Readers will be familiar with the fundamentals and values of school libraries, public libraries, and community programs that serve children. Readers can be expected to be LIS professionals and to have advanced degrees. Many may work in schools or in public libraries and deal directly with children. Readers have interests in children’s education, literacy programs, continuing education for library professionals, and collection development of children’s materials in schools and libraries.19

ALSC boasts a network of “more than 4,000 children’s and youth librarians, children’s literature experts, publishers, education and library school faculty members, and other adults committed to creating a better future for children through libraries.”20 These readers are dedicated to children around the country and promote practices that improve children’s library services. The ALSC supports equity of access and the continued development of multicultural, multilingual library staff.21 Cultural diversity is a value of the organization, evident in the various articles in CAL that cover service and programs to patrons of different ethnic backgrounds.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers can be expected to be familiar with LIS jargon and issues facing children and libraries. The readers of CAL have experience with current technologies and the latest trends in library services for children.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are professionals who are concerned with issues pertaining to children and libraries. Readers work in school libraries, public libraries, or have contact with children. These professionals seek out literature that is specific to library service for children and this journal meets those needs. Readers wish to be informed of the latest trends, research involving children, literacy, and collection development in order to meet the needs of their young patrons. Writers interested in writing for this publication would be most successful addressing these needs.

Last updated: May 5, 2020


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed  May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/
  2. Children and Libraries: Journal of the ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal
  3. Advertising in CAL,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/advertising
  4. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  5. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  6. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  7. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  9. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  10. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  11. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  12. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  13. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  14.  Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/subscriptions
  15. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  16. “Children and Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Services to Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal
  17. “Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020,  http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/subscriptions
  18. “ALSC Initiatives,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/initiatives
  19. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, Accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  20. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  21. “The Importance of Diversity in Library Programs and Material Collections for Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/ALSCwhitepaper_importance%20of%20diversity_with%20graphics_FINAL.pdf
  22. “Back Issues of Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/back-issues
  23. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
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Tame the Web

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web 

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From Tame the Web‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Category topics (dropdown menu at bottom of the site) include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture, and many others.2

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

Wholehearted Librarianship: this Stephen Barnes quote gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content, “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”3

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his page here.4

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Home,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  3. “Home,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  4. “About Michael Stephens,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-michael-stephens/
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base line

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: base line

ISSN: 1943-65481

Website: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: base line is the official publication of the Map and Geospatial Information Round Table (MAGIRT). MAGIRT “leads and inspires information professionals at all levels of expertise in their work with map and geospatial information resources, collections, and technologies in all formats, through community, education, and advocacy.”2 “The purpose of base line is to provide current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”3

Target audience: As per MAGIRT’s site: “People interested or involved in any aspect of map or geospatial librarianship.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Each issue “provide(s) current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”9

Frequency of publication: base line is published electronically six times a year: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. All older issues of base line are now freely available on the MAGIRT website.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: On the first page of each issue: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Types of contributions accepted: base line calls itself “a medium of communication for members of MAGIRT and information of interest is welcome.”11 Articles related to cartography, geography, “related governmental activities, and map librarianship ” would be welcome.12

Submission and review process: Depending on article content, contributions can be sent to one of the editors, check the first page of the latest publication. These are the editors as of April 2020:

Editor: John A. Olson
Government and Geo-Information Librarian
Syracuse University
Tel: 315-443-4818 E-mail: jaolson@syr.edu

Distribution Manager: Mike Smith
Subject Specialist for Maps, California Gov Info, GIS
Coordinator, UCSD
Tel: 858/534-1248 E-mail: mls003@ucsd.edu

Cataloging Editor: Tammy T. Wong
Cartographic Materials Cataloger
Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress
Tel: 202/707-6735 E-mail: twon@loc.gov

Digital Mapping Editor: VACANT

New Maps and Books Editor: Kim Plassche
Sciences Librarian, Liaison to Geography & GIS
University at Buffalo
Tel: 716/645-8168 E-mail: kf43@buffalo.edu13

Editorial tone: Articles tend towards an informal, but professional voice.14

Style guide used: Not specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although there is an informality in tone to this publication, there is still room for a more professional article related to geospatial information. This publication offers a good opportunity for a writer with experience in this field of librarianship to be published.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As a benefit of membership in MAGIRT, base line reaches 313 members on top of being freely available on the web.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in the U.S. and is written in American English.16 As members hail from across North America, authors should avoid using local terminologies or dialects, and should be tailored to a national audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers are mostly members of MAGIRT. As such, one can assume that the majority of readers are “involved in the geospatial librarianship world.”17

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized LIS knowledge can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of base line are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to MAGIRT committee work and topics related to geospatial librarianship. Members of MAGIRT seem eager to “connect with like-minded people, to learn, or to impart…knowledge.”18 Although the pool of readers is relatively small, the LIS author who is interested in geospatial information will find a supportive and interested readership in base line.


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Base Line, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521734545098/483555
  2. American Library Association. (2020). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  3. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  4. American Library Association. (2020). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  5. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  6. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  7. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  8. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  9. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  10. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  11. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  12. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  13. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  14. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  15. American Library Association. (2020). MAGIRT Map & Geospatial Resources: About MAGIRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://magirt.ala.libguides.com/resources
  16. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  17. American Library Association. (2020). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
  18. American Library Association. (2020). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
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Archival Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archival Outlook

ISSN: 1520-33791

Website: http://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook

Purpose, objective, or mission: A newsletter €œmembership benefit€ for members of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) that updates readers on the work of the Society and its many component groups and reports on regional, national, and international news of relevance to members of the profession.2

Target audience: Those interested in or specializing in the archival profession or one of its allied fields.3

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA)4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Print issues are mailed exclusively to members, but digital versions are available to the general public on the SAA website.8

Content: Features often cover best-practice and how-to articles on timely archival topics; notable collections, projects, or advocacy work; how archives are used by the public; and profiles of archives or archivists at work. SAA aims to nurture both new voices and established writers; the content is primarily written by the organization’s members and those in the profession.9

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly: January/February, Marcy/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook

Types of contributions accepted: A range of relevant topics will be considered, but articles typically focus on best practices, unique collections, notable achievements by an archivist or archives, and updates on the Society and its component groups. Articles should include “some kernel of information that will enlighten the reader professionally.”11 Illustrations are encouraged. Articles should run 700 words for a one-page story or 1,200 words for a double-page spread.12

Submission and review process: Send queries and article ideas to the current Editorial and Production Coordinator via email. This position is currently held by Abigail Christian.13

Editorial tone: This is the member newsletter, not the official journal. While the articles are highly relevant to the archival profession, the tone is more friendly and laid back.14

Style guide used: No style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newsletter is a perfect place for students in the archive sector to share short articles or feature stories on news, information, special projects or advocacy, or profiles of SAA members. It is neither peer reviewed nor the official SAA scholarly journal, so it is most likely not an avenue for publishing in efforts to gain tenure, but it would be an excellent place to start writing about all things archives, explore different topics within the archives world, or share information about relevant individuals, organizations, and conferences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 6,200+ members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Society is based in Chicago and is North America’s oldest and largest national archival professional association.16 Outlook is written in English.17 The newsletter accepts international updates and news, but is a North American publication.18

Reader characteristics: The newsletter can have a very insider, quirky tone because it is directed at SAA community members. A unique feature is the use of visuals (mostly archival photos) to tell a story or as stand-alone pieces.19 If a LIS student came across an interesting visual, this would be the place to share it. The publication’s articles are largely written by members and those in the archives profession. The newsletter is strictly for those in the archival profession, or those interested in it. This does not just mean those in library-specific archives: professionals from all sectors within the profession are profiled and encouraged to share news and updates.20 Readers are positively archival advocates. This is a newsletter that is very proud of being all about archives and celebrating archival and library professionals.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the readership is comprised of professional archivists, LIS knowledge and language is encouraged, though education level and degrees may vary.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication have one crucial aspect in common: their love of archives. Articles need to focus on positive aspects of the profession -€“ this is not the venue to share negative comments or criticisms, although critiques might be accepted, and definitely reviews of new exhibits, books, or professionals would be fine. The level of LIS knowledge is high -€“ this is not a newsletter for neophytes but is directed toward professionals. However, its tone is friendly, open, and welcoming to anyone with an interest in archives. This would be a fun, interesting place to publish with the aim to keep readers up to date as well as entertained.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook
  2. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership,” accessed June 30, 2019, http://www2.archivists.org/membership
  3. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  4. ProQuest, “Archival Outlook,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402338917688/244199
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  8. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  9. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  10. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  11. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  12. Society of American Archivists, “Submit an Article,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/archival-outlook/submitanarticle
  13. Society of American Archivists, “Submit an Article.”
  14. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  15. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook Display Ad Information,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/advertising/archival-outlook
  16. Society of American Archivists, “Who We Are,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/aboutsaa
  17. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  18. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  19. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook: Back Issues by Year,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook/back-issues
  20. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  21. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook: Back Issues by Year.”
  22. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
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SNAP Section Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: SNAP (Students & New Archives Professionals) Section Blog

ISSN: N/A

Website:  https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SNAP Section is a sub-group formed within the Society of American Archivists (SAA) to focus on student and new professional goals and issues.1 The SNAP Blog provides SNAP Section members with a forum sharing information in a more public forum, in conjunction with other social media outlets.2 The blog meets supports SNAP’s goals to “provide a forum to share concerns and learn from each other” and to “facilitate remote participation in the group through social media and other online resources.”3

Target audience: Entry level or student archivists, particularly those involved in the SAA: students, interns, new professionals, early-career archivists, and those still looking for their first professional job. Per the bylaws, any member or nonmember of SAA, including new and more experienced archives professionals, may participate in SNAP in accordance with the most current Guidelines for Roundtables as set forth by the SAA Council.4

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Sharing information relevant to the student and new archive professional community, including archive-relevant blogs, regional meetings or courses, project ideas, general Q&A regarding research, professional and student issues, and the Ask An Archivist Q&A section.9

Frequency of publication: Updated as often as members post online. Recently the rate has been about three times per month.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/

Types of contributions accepted: Blog reviews, accounts of regional meetings or courses, project ideas, and anything of interest to the archival community.11 Special columns offer more structured writing opportunities, and can be found here.12

Submission and review process: Authors who want to contribute to the blog should submit a contact form with information about themselves and about the topic they plan to write about.13 It can be assumed that the blog team will work with authors to develop their idea and get it posted.

Editorial tone: Informal.14

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The SNAP Section Blog is an excellent forum for sharing archival information and concerns among a like-minded group. It should be easy for novice writers to practice publishing their thoughts, ideas, and announcements in this public forum. Posting on this blog promises networking potential, as well as the possibility of becoming a strong voice in the newest generation of archivists, who may bring to light new perspectives on issues not emphasized to more established archivists.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently 218 people follow the blog,15 though the number of views that blog posts receive on the site and on linked-to social media could potentially be much greater.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience is largely North American, as the blog concerns members of the SAA. English is the primary language. Recent blog posts demonstrate comfort with social media and current internet language.16

Reader characteristics:  Since the Section focuses on students and new professionals, members are likely overall to be younger than their other SAA Section counterparts, though new archive professionals may be older individuals in the midst of a career change. Readers may also be more established archivists who want to keep up with what issues their new colleagues find important.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Some LIS terminology and understanding is expected; but this is not a professional-grade publication, just sharing among peers. Contributors writing about their personal experiences in the field are not necessarily expected to walk readers through each step of what their work entails.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The SNAP Blog offers an excellent venue for new and student archivists to share knowledge, insights, and new ideas about their profession.19 This is a very organized, enthusiastic group of students and new professionals who are addressing the needs of those LIS professionals new to archival librarianship. Readers are hoping to learn career tips, gain insight on issues they have different perspectives on, and network with other professionals. Write from personal experience and with passion for maximized readership.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section/snap-mission-statement
  2. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  3. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.”
  4. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  5. Society of American Archivists, “Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Section,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section
  6. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.
  7. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  8. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  9. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  10. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section,” Accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com
  11. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  12. Students & New Professionals Section, “Series,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/series/.
  13. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  14. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  15. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  16. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  17. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  18. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  19. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
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American Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Libraries

ISSN: 0002-9769 (Print) and 2163-5129 (Online)1

Website: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: American Libraries is “the flagship publication of the American Library Association,” dedicated to publishing news “about all matters of import to libraries and librarians.”2 Per the Editorial Policy, part of the ALA Policy Manual section 10.2: the editor is charged with “a particular responsibility to convey to the membership and other readers full and accurate information about the activities, purposes, and goals of the Association.”3

Target audience: ALA members, the majority of whom are professional librarians in the United States.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news magazine.7

Medium: American Libraries is a print publication, with occasional digital supplements. American Libraries Online is the online edition.8

Content: American Libraries “features articles on professional concerns and developments, along with news of the Association, library-related legislation, and libraries around the country and the world. Expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.” 9

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published 6 times per year, with a digital-only July/August issue and occasional digital supplements.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: American Libraries solicits contributions of 600-1,500-word articles, including book reviews, features and opinion pieces on topics of general interest to members of the American Library Association. Letters to the editor are also accepted.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email to americanlibraries@ala.org. Hard copies may be mailed to American Libraries, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611. After submission, there may be “editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that in their opinion support the article’s focus. Editors will make every possible effort to review copy with the author prior to publication, especially regarding any proposed substantive changes.” Authors should hear back about their manuscripts within 4-8 weeks.12

Editorial tone: “Informal, but informative. Factual articles must be inviting and readable, with all statements backed by responsible research and interviews with several expert sources.” The editor encourages the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues.”13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.).14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This 100+-year-old magazine is a well-respected publication with a wide audience. It would not be scholarly enough in tone to carry much weight for someone building up publications for tenure, but it is a credible, professional publication that provides a forum for practical information sharing among members of the LIS community. American Libraries publishes feature stories and opinion pieces as well as letters to the editor, and occasionally opportunities for columnists arise. Strong writers with appropriate story ideas should be encouraged to submit work here, whether they are LIS practitioners, educators, or students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 62,000 member organizations, individual members, and paid subscribers.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A geographic breakdown could not be found, though American Libraries does offer rates for the US, Canada, and International subscriptions.16 It is probably safe to assume that the majority of ALA members reside and work in the United States. American Libraries is published in English, and readers are likely to be completely comfortable communicating in English. However, overuse of regionalisms should be avoided to appeal to the diverse and widespread American audience.17

Reader characteristics: Because readers are usually members of the ALA, the vast majority work in a variety of libraries and have a high level of education.18 As librarians, these readers are likely to be interested in library topics and sympathetic to library issues. However, it is not safe to assume that readers are homogeneous in terms of how they believe problems should be solved. Letters to the editor and point-of-view pieces indicate that readers can be highly opinionated. The editorial policy states that the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.”19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to know a lot about general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors would want to avoid highly specialized topics and language. For example, public librarians may not be familiar with (or interested in) the particular jargon and issues of military librarians, and technology specialists may not be familiar with the jargon of catalogers.[19. American Libraries, “About.”

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because this is a professional rather than a scholarly publication, appropriate submissions would be practical rather than theoretical. Possibilities might include current topics in librarianship, or unique twists on topics of general interest to the broad LIS community such as management, advocacy, and general-interest technologies. American Libraries readers have in common a professional or personal interest in libraries, but the audience is large, and readers’ specialized interests will be quite diverse. For this magazine, general library topics would be appropriate — articles on things like library technology, marketing, or management, the kinds of topics that would be relevant to all librarians, no matter what kinds of libraries they worked in.

Authors could assume that American Libraries readers would understand general library language and that basic terms would not need to be explained (the editors of American Libraries, for example, assume that readers will understand ALA’s common acronyms, such as ACRL). However, authors should try to avoid the kinds of topics or jargon that might be related to a specific library environment or aspect of librarianship, such as academic libraries or cataloging. Articles on highly specific topics or for particular ALA subgroups would be better directed toward the publications of the related ALA divisions, such as College and Research Libraries News or Children and Libraries.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

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