Wiki Tags Archives: Advocacy

McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A daily humor website, “McSweeney’s exists to champion ambitious and inspired new writing, and to challenge conventional expectations about where it’s found, how it looks, and who participates. We’re here to discover things we love, help them find their most resplendent form, and imagine new ways to bring them to you, Dennis. (If you are not Dennis, kindly ignore the aforementioned.)” 1

“McSweeney’s, however, delivers its humor in a high-brow lit mag sort of way. It’s a place where you can simultaneously experience the comic satisfaction of watching a great sitcom and the glorious smugness of reading a New Yorker think piece.” 2

Target audience: Individuals who enjoy humor/satire  in writing.

Publisher: McSweeney’s Publishing. 3

Peer reviewed? No. 4

Type: Civilian publication

Medium: Website and e-newsletter.

Content: Content is intended to be humorous/satire.  “The thing we are most proud of is that for many of our contributors, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency is the only place they’ve ever published publicly. At some point, something funny or odd occurred to them – a list, a new food review, a short imagined monologue – and they had a place to put that funny and odd thing in order to share it with the world, a private joke made public.” 5

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/guidelines-for-web-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: All types of submissions are allowed. Lists, open letters to people who are unlikely to respond, monologues, food reviews, etc. “Submissions should be shortish. By shortish we mean an absolute maximum of 1,200 words, but in truth we veer toward pieces that are under 1,000 words, and snuggle closest to ones that are even shorter than that. Your subject line should contain some indicator of what is contained in your submission.” 6

Submission and review process: There are separate email addresses depending on the nature of your submission. The website notes DO NOT send the same submission to multiple addresses, it is unnecessary as it all goes to the same editor. Please paste the entire document into the email message. Please don’t share Google docs or links to your private blogs. Also, very important: do not send us attachments. 7

General website submissions should be sent to websubmissions@mcsweeneys.net.

Timely submissions should be sent to timelysubmissions@mcsweeneys.net. This inbox is for super topical pieces riffing on big news stories of the last 24-48 hours.

Lists submissions should be sent to lists@mcsweeneys.net.

Open Letters to People or Entities Who Are Unlikely to Respond submissions should be sent to openletters@mcsweeneys.net.

Reviews of New Food submissions should be sent to newfood@mcsweeneys.net.

“We get hundreds of submissions a week and, like we have mentioned, there’s just one editor reading them all. So, it’s only natural that this editor will be drawn to submissions with funny, eye-catching titles that cleverly reveal the premises of pieces.” 8

Editorial tone: Light and comedic/satirical

Style guide used: None Specified. “Please do not format your piece in an unusual way. Do not use colors or fun fonts.” 9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors may have as good a chance as anyone for getting a submission accepted in McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Their whole publication process seems to be highly informal, but the quality is certainly on par with journals that have higher subscription/circulation rates. An exploration of McSweeney’s multiple related websites is a must to see if your writing project is a match for their style. LIS authors might contribute a fiction or nonfiction piece inspired by their experience as library professionals, keeping in mind that the purpose of such pieces should ultimately be to entertain the reader, rather than function as straightforward articles on an LIS-related issue.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Tendency’s biggest hits have gotten millions of pageviews, and many stories do well, reaching tens of thousands.” 10 The website has a social media following of over 180,000 on Facebook, over 274,000 on Twitter, and over 48,000 followers on Instagram.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication first started in San Francisco, CA, but coverage geographically spans the globe. Content is published in English.

Reader characteristics: While no information regarding reader demographics is provided, a review of publication suggests readers are intelligent, open minded, literary, and comfortable thinking outside of the box, especially in a satirical way.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Limited, the same as the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With this publications, LIS authors have an opportunity to engage with readers from a fun, satirical viewpoint, one not typically taken for LIS. While the readership may enjoy high brow humor, there is the potential to address LIS trends, barriers, ethics, and beyond as long as it comes with a comedic edge. The key is to be creative in approach. With shorter word limits, LIS authors can convey concepts in small, precise ways that do not need to meet  academic-level research and review standards.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/about-us
  2. “McSweeney’s,” ndsmcobserver.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://ndsmcobserver.com/2016/11/mcsweeneys-internet-tendency-dont-worry-not-bottomless-pit-procrastinatory-doom/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Submission Guidelines,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/guidelines-for-web-submissions
  5. “Patreon,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.patreon.com/mcsweeneysinternettendency
  6. “Submission Guidelines.”
  7. “Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines.”
  9. “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. “McSweeney’s Meets Internet,” NiemanLab.org, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.niemanlab.org/2016/07/mcsweeneys-meets-internet-a-little-publisher-survives-holding-tight-to-its-eclectic-literary-roots/
Continue Reading

Los Angeles Times

**Please Excuse the Mess, Profile Update in Progress**

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Los Angeles Times (LA Times)

ISSN: 0458-3035 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 138 years.”2

“Bringing truth to power through creative storytelling, original reporting and accountability journalism that impacts lives and pushes change.” 3

Website: http://www.latimes.com/

Target audience: Residents of Southern California and beyond. “Millennials, Gen X, Multicultural Influencers, Affluent Consumers, Families and Parents, Boomers.” 4

Publisher: Los Angeles Times Media Group.5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online. Archives are available online from the founding of the paper in 1881.6

Content: News reports, investigative journalism, editorials, reviews, and various columns. The website’s sections include news at the Local, Nation, World level, as well as Business, Climate & Environment, Entertainment & Arts, Food, Housing & Homeless, Lifestyle, Opinion, Politics, Science, Sports, and Travel. Several more options can be found viewing the Site Map. 7 Of interest to LIS writers, there is a special Books sub-section under Entertainment, including fiction and nonfiction book reviews and features.

Frequency of publication: Daily. 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html

Types of contributions accepted: Op-ed articles are welcome on any subject. Per the website, “Most articles are about 750 words in length, though some are shorter, and on Sundays we can sometimes run pieces as long as 1,200 words 9 For more information on op-ed pieces, see former editor Nicholas Goldberg’s explanation of op-ed processes and goals. 10

Letters to the Editor are another option if you wish to respond to anything already published. They are limited to 150 words. 11

Blowback, is another opportunity to publish within the Times. “Got a beef with the L.A. Times? Read something in the paper that really ticked you off, but haven’t got a place to make your opinion heard? Want to write an article about it and get it into The Times? Blowback is The Times’ forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds. It is the missing link between the 150-word letter to the editor and the Op-Ed piece, and you’re invited to participate. We’re willing to post Blowback items on both news and opinion pieces, but our focus is on opinion. The idea is to present countering opinions, not to provide a forum for pointing out errors or critiquing bias in the Times’ news coverage.12

Submission and review process:  Op-Ed articles: Email op-ed submissions to oped@latimes.com. We make every effort to read manuscripts promptly. If the article is accepted for publication, you will hear from a Times editor within five days. We regret that the volume of submissions we receive means that we cannot respond individually to each article, nor can we provide feedback to proposals or queries. 13

Letters to the Editor: Complete the form located here . “We generally do not publish more than one letter from a single person within any 60-day period. Letters become the property of The Times and may be republished in any format. They typically run 150 words or less and may be edited. You will be contacted if your letter is a candidate for publication.” 14

Blowback: Email Blowback submissions to blowback@latimes.com. 15

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Los Angeles Times is read by a general audience (not necessarily confined to Southern California) who wants to be ahead of the local and world news. Op-ed pieces about new digital collections, expanded library services, or opening of a new library branch would benefit LIS authors. You might also consider submitting a press release or event listing regarding a library event.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Los Angeles Times is “the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country, with a daily readership of 1.3 million and 2 million on Sunday, more than 30 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.6 million.” 16

According to their current media kit, The Times has 46 Million unique visitors, 90 Million page views, 7 Million+ social followers, 332,000 monthly shares on Apple News, 845,000 video views, 4.4 Million weekly print + digital readers in Los Angeles, 2.9 million weekly print readers, 1.8 million Sunday print readers, and 1.2 Million daily print readers. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Los Angeles Times is regional to Southern California, but it’s journalism and reporting covers content on a global scale. While printed in English, Los Angeles Times En Español is also available.

Reader characteristics: “We reach distinct, affluent and diverse audiences of multiple generations, demographics, preferences and interests.” 18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Being a lay publication, Los Angeles Times will require LIS jargon-free contributions. While readers may be familiar with library issues, like Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) and Dewey call numbers, generally authors should avoid writing on heavily specialized library topics such as OpenURL link resolver software technology or collection management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The newspaper’s readers are spread all over the world. They are everyday patrons and potential donors, suggesting they may wish to keep their submissions LIS jargon free and stay away from highly specialized topics. There is potential for publishing on a myriad of topics through the Op-Ed avenue that may be of interest to readers.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Los Angeles Times, WorldCat.org, accessed March 24, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/los-angeles-times/oclc/474112039
  2. “About,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, https://www.latimes.com/about
  3. “Media Kit,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://mediakit.latimes.com/
  4. “Media Kit.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Archives,” LATimes.com, accessed October 23, 2018, https://latimes.newspapers.com/
  7. “Site Map,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-sitemap-htmlstory.html
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html
  10. “Op-Ed, Explained,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/news/la-oe-pages23oct23-story.html
  11. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  12. “About Blowback,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/readersreact/la-op-blowback-about-story.html
  13. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  14. “Submit a letter to the Editor,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/submit-letter-to-the-editor
  15. “About Blowback.”
  16. “About.”
  17. “Media Kit.”
  18. “Media Kit.”
Continue Reading

Mental Floss

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mental Floss

ISSN: Print: 1543-4702 (ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Whether we’re covering history, science, pop culture, language, music, true crime, or entertainment, we help our audience feel smarter. Our New York City-based team of editors and writers—as well as our worldwide network of contributors—answers life’s big questions, uncovers fascinating facts, and finds stories so interesting that our readers absolutely must share them.”2

Mental Floss delivers smart, fun and shareable content in an upbeat and witty environment. An encyclopedia of everything, we answer life’s big questions and uncover stories so interesting our readers absolutely must share them. We take all culture and make it pop culture.” 3

Target audience: “Curious People.” 4

Publisher: Minute Media. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online. Print issues ceased in 2016. 6

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects with a focus on shareability.7

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for new voices to write about the diverse verticals we cover, whether that’s history, science, entertainment, language, pop culture, art, or beyond.” 8

PITCHES WE CAN USE 9
Lists

Lists are an overview of a topic in digestible-nugget form. Each list will cover the who, what, when, and where of the subject, plus its significance, and pay particular attention to quirky or little-known facts about the subject. Pitches may focus on the below topics:

Subjects that have a major anniversary coming up
Historical figures and events
Movies and TV series
Music
Literature and art
Language
Food and drink
Helpful tips and life hacks
Scientific discoveries, phenomena, and figures
Pop culture fads, events, and personalities

Features

Features are reported stories that delve into a topic from a particular angle and with strong characters and storytelling. Features can be short (500 words) or longer (800-1500 words). Areas ripe for features include:

Historical events that put current events into perspective
Exploring and/or answering a big question
Science stories that explain a new field of research or highlight a scientist’s ongoing work
A deep dive into a pop culture event or phenomenon in history
True crime and unsolved mysteries
Features about odd, unique, or little-known historical events and people

PITCHES WE CAN’T USE 10
Short, timely news stories: these pieces are covered by our staff writers
Science articles based on a single study: these are also covered by staff writers
First-person articles or personal essays
Fiction, memoir, or poetry
Current politics or political opinion
Stories based solely on PR pitches

Tips provided by Mental Floss: Keep your pitch short (1-2 paragraphs) and let them know if you have a particular expertise on the subject. Include a link to your portfolio/work samples. Do not pitch or send completed articles.  Take the time to brainstorm a possible headline for your story, and include that as part of the subject line, i.e. Freelance Pitch: 50 Amazing Facts About Animals. Having a headline can help us better understand the angle you plan to use with your story. 11

Submission and review process: “Expect a response to your pitch within two weeks. If you do not receive a response after two weeks, you can assume it’s a pass. Due to the number of pitches we receive each day, we are unfortunately not able to respond to every pitch we receive.” 12

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Since its founding in a Duke University dorm room in 2001, Mental Floss has reached more than 1 billion readers with smart, quirky content presented in a witty, upbeat voice. We reach more than 19 million users per month across our site, social media accounts, and popular YouTube channel.” 13

According to Visitor’s Worth website, Mental Floss has approximately 58,000 daily visitors, with 154,000 daily page views. 14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Visitor’s Worth website, the most traffic for the publication comes from audiences in the United States, but the website also has a following in the UK, Canada, India, and Germany. 15 The website publishes in the English language.

Reader characteristics: In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “About Us,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “Mental Floss,” MinuteMedia.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.minutemedia.com/mentalfloss
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Mental Floss.”
  6. “Life After Print for Mental Floss,” FolioMag.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.foliomag.com/life-after-print-for-mental-floss/
  7. “About Us”
  8. “Pitch,” MentalFloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss
  9. “Pitch.”
  10. “Pitch.”
  11. “Pitch.”
  12. “Pitch.”
  13. “About Us.”
  14. “www.mentalfloss.com,” VisitorsWorth.com, accessed December 5, 2020,  http://visitorsworth.com/www.mentalfloss.com
  15. “www.mentalfloss.com.”
Continue Reading

GOOD

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

ISSN: Print: 1935-1488 (Ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: “We are GOOD & Upworthy—a social impact company with a mass audience. We believe your purpose should be contagious. We work with brands and communities to create participatory campaigns and shareable stories that drive powerful results across business and society. Since 2006, we’ve been on a mission to help people and organizations be a force for good, together. ” 2

Target audience: People who want to make a difference in the world.

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC. 3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and e-Newsletter. GOOD used to print a quarterly magazine but that has ceased, no information on the print publication could be found as of November 27, 2020.

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently, the e-newsletter, The Daily Good, is emailed daily. 5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: As of November 27, 2020, the links to the submission guidelines are no longer active.  Within the website, clicking the “FAQ” and “Newsletter” links sometimes found at the bottom yielded error messages. Performing a website and Google search yielded no results.

Types of contributions accepted: Searching the website could only locate https://goodinc.com/contact which states, “We are not hiring. But we are always on the lookout for new talent, email your resume to jobs@goodinc.com.” and “Say hello. Email us at howdy@goodinc.com” 6

Submission and review process: None could be located. From the main menu clicking “Submit a Tip” and “Contact Us” take the user to the contact page as described above.

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD‘s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and  the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 100 Million Monthly Audience. [ 7. “About.”]

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English. 7

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.8 (*Note: As of December 5, 2020, the link to the 2016 Media Kit is no longer active)

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy, they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. Good, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1607192246377/626469
  2. “About.”, GoodInc.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://goodinc.com/
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Contact.”, GoodInc.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://goodinc.com/contact
  7. “About.”
  8. “GOOD Media Kit 2016.” GoodInc.com, accessed October 17, 2018, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
Continue Reading

Book Riot

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Book Riot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.bookriot.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Book Riot is the largest independent editorial book site in North America, and home to a host of media, from podcasts to newsletters to original content, all designed around diverse readers and across all genres.” 1

“We’re dedicated to the idea that writing about books and reading should be just as diverse as books and readers are. We began with the goal of leading a new discussion around books, readers, and publishing. Individually and collaboratively, we do the work each day to innovate fresh content and services to our readers, amplify marginalized voices, and challenge ourselves and our community to be inclusive.” 2

Target audience: People who love books and reading about books.

Publisher: Riot New Media Group. 3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: “The content is comprised of humor, reviews, commentary, and news as well as editorials on topics related to the reading experience. Book Riot addresses new technology in the literary space and developments in the publishing industry.” 4

Frequency of publication: New content is posted daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot

Types of contributions accepted: “If you can write something smart or funny or interesting or provocative about books in the space of about 600-800 words, we’re interested in hearing from you. Your samples should be things you think could go up on Book Riot just as they are. We recommend that one be an entry for the Our Reading Lives series, and the other on any topic of your choosing.” 5

DO NOT submit “traditional book reviews, interviews, or links to Goodreads, LibraryThing, Amazon, etc. Also, please do not submit image-heavy pieces; we want to get a feel for your voice and writing style.”6

DO NOT send “writing samples unrelated to books and reading. Your samples should show us that you understand how we do things here at the Riot and that you can do it too. Want to learn more about who we are? Poke around the site, and check us out on InstagramTwitterFacebook, and our content on Goodreads.” 7

Submission and review process: “Please note that due to the high volume of applications we receive, we cannot respond to each one. We’re currently accepting applicants on a rolling basis. If you are accepted, you’ll hear back within one month of submitting your application.” 8

Editorial tone: Sometimes serious, sometimes silly, but never stuffy or boring.

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you love books and have blogging experience, this is a great place to submit writing. The pieces are fun, cover a wide range of books, and aren’t limited to just reviews: the site loves top 10 lists of all flavors, introductions to authors you’ve never read, giveaways, and posts about current events like Amazon acquiring Goodreads and how that will affect readers. The site isn’t peer reviewed and might not help you gain tenure, but it’s a wonderful community of book lovers who will most likely appreciate an LIS writer’s perspective on reading.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 3.2m+ global monthly unique visitors, 1.1M+ email subscribers, 1.5m+ Social connections. 9 

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Book Riot states it is the largest independent editorial book site in North America. 10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 50% of readers are between the ages of 18-35, 16% of readers are between the ages of 35-45, 64% are female, 51% have children, 45% attended college with 26% attended grad school. Readers have “above average” household income. Reader industries include education and library, business services and retail. Reader interests include books and literature, comics and animation, cooking, and pets. 11

Audience Bookish Habits: Average 80 books read per year, spend an average of $371 per year on books, 34% are currently in a book club, 46% have subscribed to a book subscription service. 12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will most likely have some knowledge, but this is strictly a civilian publication that doesn’t want to be too stuffy, so keep the LIS jargon out of your submissions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

If you have blogging experience and a good social media presence, this would be an ideal site to pitch ideas. Think beyond mere book reviews; Book Riot is the place for more thoughtful, interesting, or just plain fun commentary around reading or books. Readers will be receptive to a librarian’s perspective and insight, and the field is wide open for LIS-related ideas that can appeal to a lay reader.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/about/
  2. “Join Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/join-us/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Advertise.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/advertise/
  5. “Write for Book Riot.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot
  6. “Write for Book Riot.”
  7. “Write for Book Riot.”
  8. “Write for Book Riot.”
  9. “Media Kit.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fFONL49_WYqrqOhjDjc6oxZechhDbdq-/view
  10. “Media Kit.”
  11. “Media Kit.”
  12. “Media Kit.”
Continue Reading

The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Philanthropy

ISSN: 1040-676X (Print) and 1943-3980 (Online)1

Website: http://www.philanthropy.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “From deeply reported stories on the big ideas that shape the work of charities and foundations to the practical guidance in our online resource center, only the Chronicle of Philanthropy provides nonprofit professionals, foundation executives, board members, and others with the indispensable information and practical advice they need to help them change the world.” 2

“Our news and opinion pages fuel the national conversation about the role nonprofits play in society. The Chronicle’s special reports, benchmarking data, and popular webinars are essential information for nonprofit professionals. 3

Target audience: Nonprofit professionals, foundation executives, board members, etc. 4

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: News stories, opinion pieces, tips and advice, people and awards. 7

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published twelve times a year, while the website is updated daily.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.philanthropy.com/page/contact-us/

Types of contributions accepted: “The Chronicle of Philanthropy welcomes news pitches that pertain to nonprofit organizations and foundations.” 9

What Kinds of News Stories Do We Prefer?

  • We’re writing for a national audience, so if you have a compelling local story, it should also be relevant to nonprofit practitioners across the country.
  • If we’ve just written about a similar development at a different organization, we probably won’t cover it again soon.
  • We like: Stories about best or innovative practices in fundraising and managing organizations. Profiles of interesting (and especially effective but lesser-known) charity leaders, fundraisers, and donors. New trends in giving or fundraising. Anything that our readers can learn from and adapt to make them more effective.
  • We usually don’t cover: Galas. Celebrity events. Groundbreakings and ribbon cuttings. Gifts of less than $1 million unless they are out of the ordinary. 10

Submission and review process: “Send pitches to either one reporter or one editor or, if you’re not sure, copy no more than two staff members on one message. BCC’ing or sending separate emails to multiple people can lead to confusion and will likely delay our response.” 11

“Use your email’s subject line to state your purpose: “Story idea about a successful billion-dollar capital campaign,” for instance. Avoid being cute (“You’ll never guess what WE did!”) or vague (“Press release from Such-and-Such Organization”). We’re eager to hear your news, but we’re pressed for time, and these types of subject lines make it more likely your pitch will be deleted without being opened.” 12

Editorial tone: Official and straightforward.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication provides the potential for publishing to an audience interested in fundraising techniques, strategic planning and budgeting, and community work with nonprofits. Writing to this audience could help promote the LIS field to potential investors and community partners.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Philanthropy.com has 257,000+ unique monthly visitors online, the newsletter has 160,000+ recipients each week, there are 20,000+ paying subscribers representing the most loyal audience in the nonprofit world. 13

Audience location: The Chronicle writes primarily for a national audience though their reach extends across the globe. All articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: “Decision makers at four in five of the largest and most influential charitable organizations in America read the Chronicle to advance their missions.” 14

75% of the top 400 American fundraising charities and 90% of the 50 largest private foundations are premium readers. 51% of individual subscribers at fundraising nonprofits and 84% of individual subscribers at private foundations are executive leaders, 49% of individual subscribers at fundraising nonprofits work in development or fundraising.” 15

“84% of readers consider The Chronicle of Philanthropy essential to their understanding of the nonprofit sector and philanthropic world. 72% use the information in The Chronicle to make a decision.” 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of the subject matter does not deal with LIS information. While it is better that LIS jargon is not used, the information that any LIS writer wished to share with the readers of this publication would be common between both LIS and philanthropy readers.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

It is obvious from recently published articles that all writings presented to the editors of this publication should have a forward spin on them. Articles should focus on the needs or interests of the reader. An article on black men in nonprofit organizationsor lack thereofnot only gives numbers and explains why there are fewer in this demographic working non-profit, but also discusses solutions. Any LIS related article must look at the LIS world from the eyes of that world’s grant writers and fundraisers.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1606532777917/170649
  2. “About”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/about-the-chronicle-of-philanthropy/?cid=cpf_abt
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Subscribe.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/subscribe?cid=CS-COP-H-SUB
  7. “The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 23, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/
  8. “About Us.”, Chronicle.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/about-us/
  9. “Contact Us.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/contact-us/
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “Contact Us.”
  12. “Contact Us.”
  13. “Advertise.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://marketingsolutions.philanthropy.com/
  14. “About.”
  15. “Advertise.”
  16. “Advertise.”
Continue Reading

Governing

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Governing:  The Future of States and Localities

ISSN:  1930-6954 1

Website: http://www.governing.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Governing: The Future of States and Localities takes on the question of what state and local government looks like in a world of rapidly advancing technology. Governing is a resource for elected and appointed officials and other public leaders who are looking for smart insights and a forum to better understand and manage through this era of change. Governing’s beat is the collision of technology and society and the fallout consequences, intended and unintended, that confront public leaders and increasingly influence their policy, legislation and strategies to govern. ” 2

Target audience: Governing’s audience consists of governors, mayors, county executives, city and county council members, state legislators, state and local agency executives and those holding key professional government positions.3

Publisher: e.Republic, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium:Governing’s information platform includes a robust website, newsletters and custom content. Governing magazine ended its 32 year run as a print publication in August 2019.” 6

Content: “The scope of topics we cover are as broad as the challenges we face: artificial intelligence, privacy, big data, security, the future of work, urban planning, financial systems and more.” 7

Frequency of publication:

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Voices of the Governing Institute 

Types of contributions accepted: Governing content is staff written and the publication does not typically accept unsolicited submissions for publication.  However, submitted material is occasional accepted for the Voices of the Governing Institute section of the website. “Voices is curated by the Governing Institute, which seeks out practitioners and observers whose perspective and insight add to the public conversation about state and local government.”8

Submission and review process: “For more information or to submit an article to be considered for publication, please contact editor John Martin.”9

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers great potential for increasing the visibility of public libraries with the government administrators who fund and support them (or not). Library leader Ken Haycock highly recommends Governing, saying that “We need to read and reflect but also contribute to these important publications.” Haycock points out that public librarians have much to gain by writing for such publications “to ensure that their celebrations and concerns are front and center with those who make decisions affecting their future.”10 (**Note, as of November 8, 2020, this resource link is inactive.**)

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Governing has 4.6million annual online visitors and over 7million annual page views, which means about 500k monthly visitors and 692k average monthly page views. There are 94k newsletter subscribers and 97k social media followers. 11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Audience is American, and the text is written in English.

Reader characteristics:  According to the current media kit, about 80% of Governing’s audience works in the public sector, 55% are elected and senior government officials. Of those involved in government, approximately 70% are at the state and local levels. 12

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of specialized LIS subject matter will be little. LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum. This is a well-educated, intelligent, and influential audience who would be interested in library issues pertaining to policy and government in local or state jurisdictions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal represent all levels of government and hold positions in management, as elected or appointed officials, or staff.  An audience of decision-makers such as these provides an excellent opportunity for an LIS author to not only further his/her/their career, but to possibly influence real change for local or state libraries.

Last updated: November 8, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. Governing.”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1049629903
  2. “About Governing.”, Governing.com, accessed November 8, 2020, http://www.governing.com/about
  3. “About Governing.”
  4. “About Governing.”
  5. “About Governing.”
  6. “About Governing.”
  7. “About Governing.”
  8. “Voices of the Governing Institute,” Governing.com, accessed September 28, 2016, http://www.governing.com/gov-institute/voices
  9. “Voices of the Governing Institute.”
  10. “Governing: Connecting Leaders,” Ken Haycock & Associates Inc Blog, April 4, 2011, http://kenhaycock.com/governing-connecting-leaders/
  11. “Media Kit.”, Governing.com, accessed November 8, 2020, https://media.erepublic.com/document/GOV19_MediaKit_Andrea.pdf
  12. “Media Kit.”
Continue Reading

Mother Jones

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mother Jones

ISSN: 0362-8841 (Print) and 2169-7396 (Online)1

Website: http://www.motherjones.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: America’s longest-established investigative news organization. , Mother Jones “goes deep on the biggest stories of the moment, from politics and crime and justice, to education, climate change, and food.”2

“Our mission is to deliver hard-hitting reporting that inspires change and combats ‘alternative facts’.” 3

Mother Jones’ founders envisioned a magazine devoted to a new brand of socially conscious journalism—one that took on corporate as well as political power. Twenty-five years later, that mission remains as timely as ever.” 4

Mother Jones has also remained a strong voice for social justice: Racial discrimination, women’s rights, environmental justice, and the plight of immigrant farmworkers are all issues you will find covered in the magazine from its first year of publication to the present. Another major theme over the years has been the bloated American military budget and the way the United States uses its superpower influence overseas.” 5

“Our bias is for the truth, for fairness and justice, for a democracy in which facts matter and all can participate. It’s not a partisan position—we believe these values are bigger than party—but it is a point of view, and we believe journalism should be transparent about its values. We also believe in investigating any story worth digging into, and in rigorously following the facts where they lead; our fact-checking and verification protocol is one of the most extensive in the industry.” 6

Target audience: Readers who are interested in politics, environmental issues, and social justice.

Publisher: The Foundation for National Progress.7

Peer reviewed? No. 8

Type: Civilian news magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Investigative journalism covering politics, the environment, and culture.9 “We’re interested in just about anything that will raise our readers’ eyebrows, but we focus especially on these areas: national politics, environmental issues, corporate wrongdoing, human rights, and political influence in all spheres.” 10

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://motherjones.com/about/writer-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: “While much of our content comes from staff writers and freelancers with whom we’ve had long-standing relationships, Mother Jones magazine and MotherJones.com will consider solidly reported, hard-hitting, groundbreaking news stories. We’re also open to thought-provoking, timely opinion and analysis pieces on important current issues.” 11

“Our readership is nationwide, so please, no local issues unless they have national interest or implications. At the same time, anything that has already been covered extensively in the major national media will probably not work for us, unless you have some new unique angle. We will look at cultural essays, but not travel pieces. Save yourself and us time and effort by taking a good look at our site and/or the magazine before you send a query.”12

Submission and review process: Freelance writers should submit a query by email. Per their guidelines, “Tell us in no more than a few paragraphs what you plan to cover, why it’s important and interesting, and how you will report it. The query should convey your approach, tone, and style, and should answer the following: What are your specific qualifications for writing on this topic? What ins do you have with your sources? If other major stories have been done on this topic, how will yours be different—and better? Please also include a line or two about your background and two or three of your most relevant clips (links are fine).” 13

Web pieces are generally fewer than 1,500 words. Because we have staff reporters it is extremely rare that we will pay for a piece whose timeliness or other qualities work for the web only. Magazine pieces can range up to 5,000 words. There is at least a two-month lead time.” 14

Editorial tone: Investigative and Informative

Style guide used: No style guide is mentioned.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although first-time authors may have a difficult time getting published with Mother Jones, the magazine has a large base of politically-conscious readers, which would provide a wonderful stage for any LIS authors who have a very specific agenda. Since the scope of the publication involves investigative and informative journalism, LIS authors could potentially write about field trends, controversies, and challenges to LIS. For example, here are some recent publications pertinent to LIS:  The Library Worker Whose Bosses Blew Her Off When She Asked Questions, Books Have the Power to Rehabilitate. But Prisons Are Blocking Access to Them, and A Library Straddling the Border is Giving Immigrant Families a Safe Place to Reunite.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation:   “Mother Jones has expanded its audience reach from 600,000 to nearly 14 million readers in the past decade. This includes over 13 million unique online visitors each month and 200,000 print subscribers.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in the United States.16 Published in English.

Reader characteristics:  “Mother Jones readers are informed about key issues and are concerned about their impact on public life. Interested in many subjects, from politics and social justice to education and the environment, our readers seek news coverage that provides an accurate and nuanced view of the world around them.” 17

Per their media kit, 53% are women, 94% attended college, 80% are homeowners.  “According to recent subscriber studies, Mother Jones readers say/do the following: 98% willing to pay more for high-quality items, 84% consider themselves intellectuals, 84% environmental impact is important when considering a purchase, 80% social responsibility influences how they invest, 73% advise their friends and family on books, music, movies, TV, and other media, 84% willing to pay more for organic food.” 18

“Mother Jones readers are more engaged in public life than most. 83% vote in federal, state, and municipal elections and sign petitions for various causes. 75% of  readers say they were motivated to take an action in the real world as the result of a Mother Jones article.” 19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Though it is likely there are a number of LIS professionals that read this publication, the primary audience would not be informed about LIS issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the readers of Mother Jones are well-educated and expect straightforward, thoughtful writing that broadens their knowledge of the world. Readers care about social issues and will most likely be receptive to stories about libraries and library advocacy.

Last updated: October 2, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Mother Jones.”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 2, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1601669942449/73143
  2. “What is Mother Jones?”, MotherJones.com, accessed September 12, 2018, http://www.motherjones.com/about
  3. “What is Mother Jones?”
  4. “History.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 2, 2020, https://www.motherjones.com/about/history/
  5. “History.”
  6. “FAQ.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 2, 2020, https://www.motherjones.com/about/faq/
  7. “What is Mother Jones?”
  8. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://www.motherjones.com/about/writer-guidelines
  9. “What is Mother Jones?”
  10. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  11. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  12. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  13. Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  14. “Freelance Writer Guidelines.”
  15. “Mother Jones Profile.”, GuideStar.org, accessed October 2, 2020, https://www.guidestar.org/profile/94-2282759
  16. “Contact Us.” MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://www.motherjones.com/about/contact
  17. “Media Kit-2020.”, MotherJones.com, accessed October 2, 2020, https://assets.motherjones.com/advertising/2020/Mother_Jones_2020_MediaKit.pdf
  18. “Media Kit-2020.”
  19. “Media Kit-2020.”
Continue Reading

INALJ (I Need a Library Job)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: INALJ ( formerly, I Need A Library Job)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its tenth year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Types of contributions accepted: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Submission and review process: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: N/A

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.5

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published span a broad range of topics. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. About INALJ
  4. Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ content is updated daily during weekdays. [4. “About INALJ

  5. About INALJ.”
Continue Reading

Bitch Media

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bitch Media

ISSN: 1524-5314 (Print) and 2162-5352 (Online)1

Website: https://bitchmedia.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “Bitch Media’s mission is to provide and encourage an engaged, thoughtful feminist response to mainstream media and popular culture.”2

“Bitch seeks to be a fresh, revitalizing voice in contemporary feminism, one that welcomes complex arguments and refuses to ignore the contradictory and often uncomfortable realities of life in an unequivocally gendered world.”3

“Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.”4

Target audience: Largely women, but meant for anyone who is interested in a modern feminist discussion on media and popular culture. According to the website, Bitch has a diverse audience and is “uniquely situated to draw in young readers who are at a critical moment in their lives—a moment when they are discovering feminism and activism, finding answers to who they are, and questioning the definitions of gender, sexuality, power and agency prescribed by the mainstream media.”5

Publisher: Bitch Media.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: Lay publication, with emphasis on politically and socially minded individuals.8

Medium: Quarterly Magazine, Weekly Podcast, and Daily Online Content. 9

Content: “Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.” Media includes Movies, television, news magazines, fashion magazines, blogs, comics, advertising, music, computer games. 10

Frequency of publication: The print magazine is published quarterly, online content is published five days a week.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “We are looking for discussion-provoking critical essays that are well researched with evidence to back up claims, timely statistics, and connections between one’s personal experience and larger social forces. Interviews with feminist culture-makers are welcome, as are book, film, and music reviews and nuanced analyses of particularly horrifying and/or inspiring examples of pop culture. First-person essays are great, but please read our print magazine and website to get a sense of how our contributors strike a happy balance between the personal “I” and the larger subject matter at hand.”12

Bitch accepts nonfiction pieces only, and does not accept fiction, poetry, “personal essays, experimental lyric essays, or anything that reads like a dissertation.”13 Each issue has a theme, but the themes are meant to serve as jumping-off points rather than rigid guidelines. Be sure to check the website for upcoming topics, but the editors encourage pitches for articles that would suit the magazine but don’t fit an upcoming theme.14

Potential contributors are encouraged to consider which section of the magazine would best fit their idea before submitting a pitch. Features are “2,200 to 3,000 words of meaty critiques, essays, and articles on pop culture from a feminist perspective.” These pieces should be filled with “personal insight and wit,” and may vary in format, such as interviews, reported pieces, critical essays, or even timelines, charts, and comics.15 Dispatches are “1,200 word missives from the front lines of real, imagined, or fictional worlds and places.” 16 “Culture is where Bitch brands its cultural authority through essays about books, music, and screen; profiles of individuals and those who are creating and defining cultural moments; and interviews with those working in publishing, Hollywood, podcasting, and other areas who are helping us imagine new possibilities for representation and inclusion.”17

“Payment varies but is generally $700-$1000 for features, $350 for dispatches, and between $250-$700 for culture stories. All of our writers are paid. Please send all materials through our submission manager. Submit to the section of the magazine that best fits your pitch.” 18

Submission and review process: Both finished work and query letters are accepted. If sending only a query, include clips and/or writing samples. Submissions, query letters, and pitches are accepted through their link to Submittable. Bitch accepts online pitches on a rolling basis. view open calls and submit your pitches through the website found within the writers-guidelines. “Due to the volume of pitches we receive, we are unable to respond to every pitch and will only respond to the pitches that we accept.” 19

Editorial tone: Serious, and seriously tongue-in-cheek. This is not a scholarly publication and sarcasm is rampant, but Bitch remains a very thoughtful and provocative media organization.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and information science is a field that is historically dominated by women, and perhaps due to that, it is a profession filled with preconceived notions and attitudes about women as librarians (think severe, hair-buns, glasses, and sensible shoes). Bitch is an excellent forum to discuss how we as librarians (both male and female) are seen in popular culture, what that image represents, and if that image affects how the populace sees us. It would be a good forum to discuss how gender, sexuality, and feminism play a role in our profession, as well as an outlet to discuss how other LIS issues are affected by or are affecting popular culture and the media. LIS authors with a background or interest in women’s studies or literature might be interested in writing feature articles, though an interdisciplinary perspective is key.

Bitch began as a zine, and has grown into an independent, nonprofit, feminist media organization.20 But that independent spirit, snarky attitude and distrust of the status quo have remained. The magazine endeavors to be a “tool kit” that engages readers in analysis that promotes activism and social change, and LIS authors with an interest in social justice, critiques of mainstream culture, and independent thinking would be at home here. Come with a strong opinion, say it well and say it with wit.21

This organization recognizes the value of libraries as places of critical inquiry, and supports a Bitch Community Lending Library that houses a diverse selection of 2,000 feminist materials to the community in the magazine’s home of Portland, Oregon. “Our library holds over 2,500 books, zines, magazines, and DVDs that explore feminism, media studies, pop culture, queer studies, race studies, sex and sexuality, body image and much more. The library also holds rare issues of ROCKRGRL and Sassy magazines which are available for browsing in our cozy reading room. The books in our catalog are available to search online.” 22

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has 80,000 readers, while the website receives nearly 5 million unique visitors each year.23

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bitch subscribers reside in 46 countries and all 50 states, with 78% of readers living in urban areas or college towns.24 This magazine focuses on popular culture and media images almost exclusively in the United States. Bitch will repeatedly refer to people, places, ads, and events that will only make sense to a person who has an idea of the major figures or subjects in American popular culture.

Reader characteristics: The majority of Bitch’s readers are between the ages of 25 and 34. They are well educated, tech savvy, and have Internet access. Bitch readers are also civic-minded and politically aware, with 85% having voted within the last year, and 51% having contacted their elected officials in the past year. They overwhelmingly identified as politically liberal, progressive, or radical.  They donate to causes and campaigns that are important to them. They read in their spare time, with 63% reading more than 10 hours a week. They are vocally and financially supportive of music, theater, and the arts. They are well-traveled: 48% traveled overseas in the past three years, and 92% traveled domestically in the last year. Bitch readers are conscientious consumers: 82% go out of their way to shop at independent retailers, 84% purchase environmentally friendly products and services, and 44% independently research a company’s mission or labor practices before buying its products.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Little to none. The odds are good that the reader has spent time in libraries of some kind (academic, school, and public), and shares values the library upholds, such as intellectual freedom and equal access to information.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This organization’s readership is large, and while readers are largely unfamiliar with LIS topics, virtually any LIS subject relating to feminism (e.g., gender prejudices within LCSH subject headings) would be welcomed here. This audience wants something that is thought-provoking, well written, and entertaining. They want to discuss thematic figures of women, femininity and gender within pop culture and society as a whole.26

Readers are overwhelmingly well-educated, socially and politically progressive women who live in urban areas. Do not assume there will be a great deal of knowledge or even interest in many library issues or concerns, but there will be an interest in how librarianship as a profession and threats against freedom of information affect the position of women and minorities in American society. Persuasive and thoughtful writing is more important than citations, statistics, or user studies (though referring to any of these will help solidify the author’s argument). Remember that these readers don’t just read about a topic, they do something about it. This is an audience whose members just might write to their legislators about a library issue or volunteer at their local library, if those issues resonate with them. This is a great audience to reach, not only because it shares LIS values but because it has the potential to be an advocate for LIS issues.

Last updated: August 30, 2020


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Bitch, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/93747762
  2. “About Us.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 23, 2018, https://bitchmedia.org/about-us
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “About Us.”
  7. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “About Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  13. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  14. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  15. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  16. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  17. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  18. “Contributor’s Guidelines.”
  19. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  20. “About Us”
  21. “About Us.”
  22. “Bitch Community Lending Library.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/library
  23. “Get that Life: How I Co-founded Bitch Media.”, Cosmopolitan.com, accessed September 7, 2016, http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/a57736/andi-zeisler-bitch-media-get-that-life/
  24. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016,  https://bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/Bitch-Media-Sponsorship-Kit.pdf
  25. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”
  26. “About Us.”
Continue Reading