Wiki Tags Archives: Advocacy

Stanford Social Innovation Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR)

ISSN: 1542-7099 (Print)1

Website: http://www.ssireview.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “To advance, educate, and inspire the field of social innovation by seeking out, cultivating, and disseminating the best in research- and practice-based knowledge.”2 The goal is to bring together academic theory and practice to create ideas for achieving social change, and to inform and inspire new social change.

Target audience: Leaders in nonprofit organizations, foundations, or other philanthropic institutions, along with people working in business, government, academia, and other fields.3

Publisher: Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society at Stanford University.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The website is extensive, and includes links to past issues as well as original content: blogs, webinars, podcasts, SSIR events. The SSIR covers people and organizations whose work has an impact on business, nonprofit, and government sectors, particularly those with cross-sector ideas and solutions to global issues. Subjects include social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, and philanthropic strategies, as well as educational reform, poverty alleviation, and environmental protection.7

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: External authors (anyone outside SSIR’s editorial team) can submit articles under Features, which run 4000-4500 words; 3500-4500 word Case Studies; 1500-word Viewpoint articles; 800-word Books (formerly called Reviews); or blog posts for the website, running between 600-800 words.9 The guidelines list specific details for each submissions category that writers should take into consideration.

Submission and review process: Submissions are sent via a brief email pitch, Word format, to SSIR editors covering the specific section you’re submitting under. Submission guidelines list the current editor of each section and how to contact them, and detail the questions to cover in the pitch.10

You’ll get acknowledgment of your proposal within 1-2 weeks. The review process takes up to two months, as each editor (including managing and academic editors, depending on the proposal) participates in the review, and then sends the proposal to the editorial committee, who makes the final decision. A list of criteria for submissions is found in the guidelines.11

Additionally, SSIR editors and stable freelance journalists write articles under What Works, What Didn’t Work, What’s Next, Reviews of books, Q&A and Research. You can submit pitches for these categories as well, for a particular person, organization, trend or research. The website also details what the editors want to see for ideas for these sections.12

Editorial tone: Easy to read, thoughtful articles chock full of information and interesting ideas, theories, suggestions, and solutions to global challenges.

Style guide used: If the submission is accepted, SSRI editors will work closely with the author on style guides and citations.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Submissions on LIS issues would do well in the SSIR, if approached from an innovative, thought-provoking way, such as describing grass-roots LIS efforts and their outcomes, or discussing LIS in a global setting, or how LIS practices can be used to promote social change. Writers need to make sure the topic submitted would be relevant or interesting to all the SSIR’s readers, so it should not be too LIS specific. Real-world examples described through research or firsthand experience are ideal. LIS efforts on providing information to mass populations, particularly underserved, or information technologies that bridge communities and allow information sharing would most likely do well in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print magazine has a circulation of 13,000, while the website averages 165,000 unique visitors per month.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is published by Stanford University, which is located in Santa Clara County, CA, and the print magazine is sold in newsstands across the United States and Canada. English is the primary language of this Silicon Valley publication, however, in an email to the author on October 5, 2020, Eric Nee, Editor-in-Chief of SSIR indicated that the “SSIR has five partner organizations around the world–Tokyo, Beijing, Seoul, Abu Dhabi, and Monterrey, Mexico) who have a license to produce SSIR in Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Arabic, and Spanish.”

Reader characteristics: Per the submission guidelines: “SSIR’s readers are highly educated, widely read, and well informed about the field of social innovation. They want to be provoked, surprised, and presented with memorable information and rigorous analysis. They don’t want long-winded arguments, insider jargon, or excessively narrow and technical writing.”

Readers are overwhelmingly CEO’s, presidents, or senior executives of their organization. Half work for nonprofits, and a small group are philanthropists or foundation leaders.15

The writing is smart and well researched, and poses interesting questions and theories to readers, assuming that everyone is at the same high level of education and that readers are interested in viewing challenges from a global perspective.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Not a publication specifically aimed at the LIS community, and, per their submission guidelines, readers don’t want “insider jargon.”16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Articles submitted to the SSIR should be timely, forward-thinking, and offer solutions as well as pose questions for readers, who are thought leaders and executives looking for new ways to lead their organizations and foster social change. The LIS field is ripe for this type of exploration, and SSIR readers would most likely benefit from learning about innovations in the LIS world.

Last updated: October 5, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  Stanford Social Innovation Review, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522204526301/455334
  2. “Overview,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/about/overview
  3. “Submission Guidelines,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines
  4. Overview.”
  5. Submission Guidelines.”
  6. Overview.”
  7. Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “All Issues,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/issue
  9.  “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. Submission Guidelines.”
  11. Submission Guidelines.”
  12. Submission Guidelines.”
  13. Submission Guidelines.”
  14. “Information for Advertisers,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/advertising
  15. Submission Guidelines.”
  16. Submission Guidelines.”
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Boing Boing

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Boing Boing

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://boingboing.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “A Website devoted to technology and culture. We publish feature articles, links to things we find interesting online, podcasts, videos and comics created by the Boing Boing editorial team and other invited contributors. We also provide a discussion forum so you can participate in the conversation; and sell merchandise in the Boing Boing Shop.”1 Boing Boing allows users to submit interesting, cool, newsworthy links to articles, videos, and any minutia you find interesting.

Target audience: If you’re interested in anything outside the mainstream, this would be the place to look. The website is hailed as a bastion of free speech and imagine sharing; it was founded by an editor of Make Magazine, which is dedicated to all things DIY, and the four primary editors have all written for Wired Magazine.2

Publisher: Happy Mutants, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication / online forum.5

Medium: Online

Content: A blog/forum that shares member-reader links of all sorts -informational, fun, noteworthy.

Frequency of publication: Blog updated with at least several new posts per day.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Forum Rules

Types of contributions accepted: Any kinds.

Submission and review process:

“You can browse the Site without logging in. However, to participate in our Discussion Forum, you need to create an account. We use the Discourse.org forum platform and the creators CDCK host it on their servers and run it for us. To participate in the forum, you may create a new account, use an existing Discourse.org user name and password or log-in using one of your social networking user name and passwords.” 6

Editorial tone: As informal, but informative, as possible. Headlines and pictures are purposely titillating or attention grabbing. Example: under the “Science” category is the headline: “Anne of Green Gables Had Herpes (and you probably do, too),”an article about herpes. Or “The Librarian and the Hot Rod Shop,” a post about a mobile initiative that provides library resources to people who are unaware of the library, or can’t make it to the local branch.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have any little library related tidbit to share, this is a great website on which to post it. These are non-reviewed blog posts, so it’s not a site that will help towards your tenured work or that you should cite in a scholarly article, but it’s a great source for getting and sending information to a curious, intelligent, and supportive audience. It would be a great first start for book reviews, for example, or just to write about or re-post some interesting library-related news.

Creative Commons License: non-commercial sharing, with attribution. Just make sure you say where your link/review/article originated.7

Of note to LIS writers: a team from the American Library Association ran a Boing Boing member interest group called Library Boing Boing from 2012 to 2014. See Library Boing Boing, and their first Boing Boing post; the full collection is tagged LIBRARYLAB. To learn more, see the LibraryLab community on the ALA Connect website.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: In an article in Fast Company, according to Quantcast data, it gets about 2.5 million unique visitors a month. The article also states that, in 2004-2005, it “had become one of the most-read and linked-to blogs in the world.”8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Quantcast data, Boing Boing reaches an international audience, though 63% of its readers are in the United States.9 English is the primary language, but as the site also links to websites, videos, etc., as long as you explain the reason for submitting your article/website/repost, the language of the thing itself isn’t too strict. Culture is progressive and friendly, hacker-ish and non-mainstream.

Reader characteristics: Quantcast data reports that the majority of readers are white, male, and highly educated.10 Hackers, DIY-ers, those who like to stay current on news/gadgets/things, and anyone with an eye on web culture and interesting news of all kinds will gravitate towards the blog. The blog’s bias lies on the side of being, for the most part, uncensored and relishing in re-posting links that test freedom of speech and censorship in the online community. They are very much an “anything goes” site, as long as “anything” is interesting to readers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: More civilian than professional; LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum, use layman’s terms and just get your point across in the least scholarly tone possible. The readership comprises a savvy group of people, but they are not all LIS aficionados, so use regular, everyday terms when describing your link and why you find it interesting.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Boing Boing would be a great place to post information relevant to the library community: its readers, while very much an online-loving group, seem to enjoy hearing about LIS-related news, particularly if it has to do with free speech, public access, or challenges to the LIS community. They are well-read, spoken, and intelligent, and, with the inclusion of the LIS-specific posting group, would appreciate links coming from the Library world. Although not scholarly in tone, the links posted can be of scholarly caliber, and the blog has garnered attention and awards, and holds a certain status in the blogosphere; posts here are likely to be reposted elsewhere and shared.

Last updated: September 1, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”, BoingBoing.net, accessed September 10, 2016, http://boingboing.net/tos
  2. “Boing Boing.”, Wikipedia, accessed October 24, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boing_Boing
  3. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  4. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  5. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  6. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  7. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  8. “10 Tips from Boing Boing on Making Online Content Sing.”, FastCompany.com, accessed September 10, 2016, http://www.fastcompany.com/3005636/10-tips-boing-boing-making-online-content-sing
  9. “boingboing.net.”, Quantcast.com, accessed September 10, 2016, https://www.quantcast.com/boingboing.net
  10. “boingboing.net.”
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International Journal of Library Science

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Journal of Library Science

ISSN: 0975-75461

Website: http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the publication website, the goal of the International Journal of Library Science “. . . is to publish refereed, well-written original research articles and studies that describe the latest research and developments in the area of library science and information.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals, instructors, and students.3

Publisher: CESER Publications.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the publication’€™s website, the journal is broad-based, covering all areas of library science, technology, information, and interdisciplinary research.8

Frequency of publication: Three times a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Scholarly research articles covering a wide range of areas including education for librarianship, information policy, information communication technologies, equity of access, sustainability, the Children’s Internet Protection Act, censorship, information literacy, decreased funding for established libraries, intellectual property rights, intellectual freedom, the digital divide, open access publishing, the Patriot Act, public lending rights, and current digital technologies.10

Submission and review process: The journal follows a double blinded peer review process.11 Along with a manuscript submission, authors are asked to submit a cover letter including contact information, an abstract of at most 250 words, the full title and running title of the submission, and up to five keywords. Manuscripts should not exceed 6,000 words.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: No editorial style is specified, though examples of the preferred reference style are provided.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The International Journal of Library Science provides an excellent opportunity for LIS authors desiring publication. The journal publishes in all areas of LIS, as demonstrated by its exhaustive subject list. This is particularly attractive venue for LIS authors wishing to have an international presence.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific circulation information is provided. The journal is available online, and expands its distribution by offering email updates on the release of new issues.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As an online journal published in English, it may be assumed that the International Journal of Library Science has an international readership.16

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide any details on reader characteristics. The authors are LIS and education instructors, students, and professionals throughout the world, so a similar readership may be assumed. The journal appears to be content neutral and objective.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers will likely be aware of current LIS issues, technologies, and jargon.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the International Journal of Library Science is wholly comprised of scholarly articles, potential authors should maintain a formal tone and approach. Potential LIS authors should also be mindful that this journal truly has international circulation and avoid regional jargon or bias.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523477918686/687098
  2. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  3. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  4. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  5. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  6. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  7. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  8. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  9.  International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  10. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=issue&op=archive
  11. “Editorial Policies,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. “Subscriptions,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=subscriptions
  16. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  17.  International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  18. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
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InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies

ISSN: 1548-33201

Website: http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “InterActions is a peer-reviewed, open access journal committed to the promotion of interdisciplinary and inclusive scholarship. The journal brings together senior and emerging scholars, activists, educators, and professionals whose work covers a broad range of theory and practice.”2

This student journal aims to promote scholarship that examines education and information studies through interdisciplinary perspectives. According to the editors, the field of education and information studies is frequently the place where the social sciences and humanities meet. InterActions seeks to be a forum for these meetings, soliciting work that “critiques the inequities and dominant norms within societies, education systems, and academia which perpetuate the marginalization of populations and the exclusion of their knowledge while maintaining unjust policies and systems.”3

Target audience: LIS, education, and other graduate students, professors, emerging and established scholars and professionals, and activists4

Publisher: University of California at Los Angeles Graduate School of Education and Information Studies5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS, social sciences, and education; scholarly7

Medium: Online open access8

Content: Articles, review essays, interviews, and book reviews. Considerations for publication include the “€œadvancement of important and current conversations in education and information studies, their scholarly competence and originality, and their contribution to the journal’€™s goals of informed critique, interdisciplinary dialogue, and social justice.”€9

InterActions is “€œparticularly interested in work that analyzes inequities and links research to larger social and political contexts. InterActions encourages contributions that utilize inclusive and critical frameworks in politically engaged ways.”10

Frequency of publication: Semiannual11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: This publication accepts manuscripts from practitioners, activists, and both established and emerging scholars in all fields of study. Types of contributions sought include:

  • Articles (less than 7,500 words)
  • Literary reviews (less than 5,000 words)
  • Interviews (less than 5,000 words)
  • Book reviews & Exhibition reviews (less than 1,100 words)
  • Research in brief (less than 3,000 words)12

Submission and review process: Manuscripts undergo a double-blind review by editors selected from the editorial advisory board or by graduate students with expertise in the manuscript’€™s topic. The peer review committee decides if a publication will be accepted as is, revised, or rejected.13 InterActions does not accept material that is simultaneously submitted to other journals or has been previously published published elsewhere. All submissions except for book reviews should be submitted with an abstract of 400 words or less.14

Individuals submitting manuscripts need to create an account with Berkeley Electronic Press. The online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages, with title, abstract, and author information entered separately from the main text.€15

Authors retain all rights to their work, but grant the journal the right to make published content available in perpetuity. The California Digital Library also retains the right to display and distribute content published in this journal.16

Editorial tone: Tone is scholarly, but ranges from clear, direct language to the complex and intellectually rigorous syntax of poststructuralism.17

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition18

InterActions also provides tips for reviewing a manuscript before submission.19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

InterActions is unique among LIS journals LIS in that it seeks interdisciplinary articles that advance social justice. Potential contributors might be LIS practitioners, educators, students, or professionals with an interest in LIS and its ability to satisfy a human need or solve a social problem. This publication values unique voices and critical analysis, as well as more liberal-leaning content. Creative applications of LIS theory in unexpected contexts (such as a study of information-seeking behavior within the queue for the Kogi Beef truck, published in the spring 2011 issue), or the application of theory from other disciplines, such as critical theory, to LIS methodology are the norm.20

A review of recent articles indicates a special emphasis on critical theory–particularly in a sociological context–which is a trend among students at UCLA’€™s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. The wide range of topics covered includes classifications systems, linguistics, pedagogy, cultural studies, civil rights, science, and political economy.21 Work submitted to InterActions should be linked to a larger social and political context.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No information available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in Los Angeles,22 and many readers may be located in Southern California or affiliated with the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. However, this journal’s inclusion in the California Digital Library creates opportunities for wider readership. InterActions is published in English, but appears to aim for an international audience. As with all scholarly articles, avoid colloquialisms and explain any region-specific content or terms used.23

Reader characteristics: This publication’€™s readers are likely well educated and interested in how LIS and education can contribute to dialogue and transformation within larger social and political contexts. This publication’s target audience includes graduate students, professors, emerging and established scholars and professionals, and activists in the fields of LIS, education, or elsewhere.24

As a field of study, LIS research can tend to be conservative and insular. InterActions aims to publish papers that challenge this trend, looking critically at the world and applying “€œalternative and liberatory visions, methodologies, and practices”25 to social issues in the fields of information science and education. Readers are likely progressive and liberal-leaning. This publication is committed social justice and critical inquiry, values that likely resonate with readers.26

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter. However, as this is an interdisciplinary publication, authors should explain any specialized terms that a graduate student in another field might not be familiar with.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal appreciate careful research and critical analysis, mixing high and low art, and exploring traditional and nontraditional subjects. They are interested in work that is politically and socially engaged, and has value in contexts outside of academia. Papers that offer critical commentary on current issues and promote perspectives that can serve the cause of social justice will appeal to this audience. All the better if they are provocative.

When considering writing for this student journal, expect a high level of  intellectual engagement from readers, who will be looking for “€œfresh and progressive analyses and research”28 that satisfies a human need or solves a human problem. Prospective authors should consider the advice for publication provided by the InterActions manuscript revision tip sheet.29

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1.  InterActions (Oakland): UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523477354232/585059
  2. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California at Los Angeles Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  3. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  4. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  5. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  6. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  7. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  8. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  9. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  10. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  11. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  12. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  13. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  14. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  15. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  16. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  17. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  18. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  19. “What to Look For When Reviewing a Manuscript–Or, How to Get Your Own Manuscript Published,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/brand/gseis_interactions/Reviewing_a_MS.pdf
  20. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  21. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  22. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  23. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  24. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  25. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  26. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  27. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  28. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  29. “What to Look For When Reviewing a Manuscript–Or, How to Get Your Own Manuscript Published” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/brand/gseis_interactions/Reviewing_a_MS.pdf
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The Atlantic

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Atlantic

ISSN: 1072-7825 (Print) and 2151-9463 (Online).1

Website: http://www.theatlantic.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “We reach thinking people—and make them think harder. The Atlantic’s audience is influential, curious, and eager to leave a lasting mark on the world. Never ones to shy away from change, they seek out new ideas, challenge conventions—including their own—and ultimately aim to foster progress.”2

Target audience: For general audiences interested in current topics and foreign affairs.

Publisher: Atlantic Media Company.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: General interest magazine with varied topics from politics, foreign affairs, and culture.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: News stories, articles, fiction pieces, and interviews.

Frequency of publication: Published 10 times a year.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/categories/360000916494-Editorial-Inquiries

Types of contributions accepted: According to their guidelines, “The Atlantic magazine is always interested in great nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. A general familiarity with what we have published in the past is the best guide to our needs and preferences.” Additionally, “The Atlantic wants to hear what you think. . . Visit our Contact Us form and select Letter to the Editor to send an email directly to the Letters section of The Atlantic.5 If you want to send an email from your personal email to the editors at The Atlantic, include “your full name, your mailing address and a phone number where we can contact you.6

Submission and review process: All manuscripts should be submitted as a Word document or PDF. Succinct pitches may be submitted in the body of an e-mail. Send nonfiction manuscripts or pitches to submissions [at] theatlantic.com; fiction manuscripts to fiction [at] theatlantic.com; poetry to poetry [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about politics to politics [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about culture and books to culture [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about business to business [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about science, technology, and health to science [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about family to family [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about education to education [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about global issues to global [at] theatlantic.com; and pitches or commentaries about ideas to ideas [at] theatlantic.com.7 Letters to the Editor are to be sent via the form on the “Contact Us” page. 8

Editorial tone: Writing is sophisticated but easy to read.

Style guide used: None offered.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because The Atlantic welcomes unsolicited manuscripts, there is potential for LIS authors to inform a general audience of library news and events. This is not a scholarly journal, yet there is plenty of prestige in being published here as it is more than 160 years in publication.9 LIS professionals and novice writers have an opportunity to expound on topics of interest and perhaps find ideas for scholarly works. Fiction and poetry submissions are also welcomed; it appears that many LIS professionals find this to be a stimulating outlet for non-scholarly writing. Topics that might be suitable for this venue are technological change in libraries, political and social issues surrounding libraries, and the paperless academic library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 1.9 million print readers and 33.7 million global unique digital visitors.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information regarding audience location is not provided, though international subscriptions are available.11 Content is published in English.

Reader characteristics: No information could be located regarding the specific reader characteristics for readers of The Atlantic.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are not likely to know a lot about LIS subject matter if they are simply reading this magazine. A recent article, “Is Google Making Us Stupid,” published here would indicate that readers have some interest in computers and technology; researching the magazine index could not locate any specific articles on library and information science. As this audience is considered affluent and well educated, they are likely to read other magazines and have formulated opinions on LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Atlantic are interested in smart writing and provocative, thought-provoking conversations. LIS topics and issues that need influential advocates would certainly find them here. Articles should be well written, directed toward an educated audience, limit library jargon (or explain each thoroughly), and provide documented corroboration for their issues. References are not a requirement; however, if the author is seeking advocacy for LIS issues, articles will need facts, not just opinions, and perceptive readers will be able to distinguish between the two. Authors must be determined and resolute in their submission process, as The Atlantic receives too many submissions annually to consider them all.

Last updated: September 20, 2020


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. The Atlantic, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed September 20, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522204779230/42396
  2. “Advertising,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 22, 2018, https://advertising.theatlantic.com/
  3. The Atlantic.
  4. The Atlantic.
  5. “Editorial Inquiries,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/categories/360000916494-Editorial-Inquiries
  6. “Submit a Letter to the Editor,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/articles/360011374674-Submit-a-Letter-To-The-Editor
  7. “Submit a piece for editorial consideration at The Atlantic,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/articles/360011374734-Submit-a-piece-for-editorial-consideration-at-The-Atlantic
  8. Submit a Letter to the Editor.
  9. “History”, TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://www.theatlantic.com/history/
  10. Advertising.”
  11. “Subscribe,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed November 20, 2016, https://w1.buysub.com/pubs/A5/ATL/cds_forms.jsp?cds_page_id=171695&cds_mag_code=ATL&id=1479664672189&lsid=63251157521048080&vid=1&cds_response_key=I16LAUS
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The Sun Magazine

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Sun Magazine

ISSN: 0744-96661

Website: http://thesunmagazine.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Sun is an independent, ad-free magazine that for more than forty years has used words and photographs to evoke the splendor and heartache of being human. Each monthly issue celebrates life, but not in a way that ignores its complexity. The personal essays, short stories, interviews, poetry, and photographs that appear in The Sun’s pages explore the challenges we face and the moments when we rise to meet them.”2

Target audience: The target audience is the general public; specifically, The Sun targets readers who are intelligent, educated, concerned about community and social issues, and enjoy reading stories, essays, and interviews that they might not find in more mainstream publications.

Publisher: The Sun Publishing Company, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Essays, interviews, fiction, poetry, and black and white photography.5

Frequency of publication: Monthly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing

Types of contributions accepted: The Sun accepts submissions of essays, interviews, fiction, poetry, and photos. There is no minimum word count, but submissions of longer than 7,000 words are rarely accepted. The Sun favors personal writing, but is also looking for “provocative pieces on political and cultural issues.”7 Interview pieces should focus on “innovative and provocative thinkers,” and The Sun is particularly interested in interviews with women and people of color.8 Submissions may also be made to magazine’s “Readers Write” series, in which readers respond to a given theme each month with a short, nonfiction piece.9 Black and white photos are also accepted. The Sun is not interested in photojournalism, but instead, photos that show “unique perspectives on the world around us — especially human interactions.” 10

Submission and review process: The Sun does accept submissions online via Submittable. As of September 2020, mail-in submissions are suspended due to the coronavirus. Submissions must be typed (single-spaced is acceptable for poetry, double-spaced for all other types) and sent with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The review process typically takes three to six months but may be longer. Queries are suggested prior to submitting interview pieces. Interview pieces can be lightly edited prior to submission and will be further revised upon acceptance.11

Editorial tone: Personal, provocative writing preferred.12

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Sun offers an excellent opportunity for LIS authors to reach a more mainstream audience than an industry publication. Since it appeals to people who tend to be educated, socially active, and well-read, The Sun provides an audience who will likely be interested in issues facing libraries and their roles in society and community, including funding challenges, services to minorities, and trends in information literacy. Interestingly, The Sun provides subscriptions for free or at reduced rates to institutions such as prisons and homeless shelters (and often includes submissions from inmates and other “marginalized” members of society)13 Therefore, it would provide a forum for submission of pieces concerning library services to these populations.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 70,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Sun’s publication is read and distributed throughout the United States. At this time, The Sun is only available in English. However, it does appeal to a multicultural, multi-generational audience, often presenting viewpoints from minority and disenfranchised populations.

Reader characteristics: Reader information is unavailable. The magazine’s content would suggest that readers care about human issues and are informed about national and global politics. The Sun is available in many jails, prisons, treatment centers, and homeless shelters, so many readers are in fact currently homeless or incarcerated.15

This publication is not targeted toward any particular profession. It does attract a number of writers and other artists, as well as those who have an appreciation for good writing and photography. Many of the readers who send letters to The Sun or submit to the “Readers Write” section work in the nonprofit sector, or in various “human service” fields such as addiction treatment, counseling, health care, and services to homeless people.

The Sun is a liberal publication, with an audience that likely embraces diversity, is politically active and involved in social activism, and values creativity and artistic expression. It is likely that readers hold education, literacy, and librarianship in high esteem, but may not necessarily be well-versed in issues relating to these areas.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since The Sun is a civilian publication that does not specialize in library and information science, audience knowledge of LIS subject matter cannot be assumed. It can be assumed that readers are supporters of libraries, and may have knowledge of library services from the patron’s point of view. While it is likely that issues facing libraries may be of interest to this publication’s readership, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Sun share an interest in the arts and in creating a better world for the future. They are concerned about the environment, education, and other issues that will have a long-term impact on our world. They may be politically active, usually at the grass-roots level.

The Sun‘s audience will be interested in and responsive to articles such as those about the roles of libraries as cultural institutions; funding challenges faced by public libraries; educational opportunities offered to children through library programs; services to immigrants and other non-native English speakers; and services to populations such as homeless adults and children and inmates.

Authors who are interested in being published in The Sun will want to ensure that their submissions deal with current issues facing libraries. They will want to focus less on the technical aspects of librarianship, and more on the social and cultural implications. They may want to consider interviews with leaders in the field of library and information science who are implementing innovative programs and ideas, especially those who are working to bring library services to traditionally underserved populations.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1.  The Sun Magazine, WorldCat, accessed March 28, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/sun/oclc/243522787
  2. “About The Sun,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/about_the_sun
  3. About The Sun.”
  4. “Submission Guidelines Writing,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016,  http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing
  5. About The Sun.”
  6. About The Sun.”
  7. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines Interviews,” TheSunMagazine.org, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/interviews
  9. “Submission Guidelines Readers Write,” TheSunMagazine.com accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/readers_write
  10. “Submission Guidelines Photography,” TheSunMagazine.org, accessed September 8, 2020, https://thesunmagazine.org/submit#photography
  11. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  12. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  13. “FAQ,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/faq
  14. About The Sun.”
  15. FAQ.”
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San Francisco Chronicle

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: San Francisco Chronicle

ISSN: 1932-8672 (Print) 1

Website: http://www.sfchronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The San Francisco Chronicle is, “…committed to coverage of subjects that are uniquely important to our readers: local issues and those topics with national impact such as economy, politics, technology, ecology, as well as breaking news, crime, education, national and foreign news.”2

Target audience: Readers throughout the Bay Area.3

Publisher: Hearst Communications, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Local, state and national news, sports, politics, business, travel, entertainment and food. Online version also includes blogs.6

Frequency of publication: Daily in print; updated more frequently online.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sfgate.com/chronicle/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: The Chronicle accepts Letters to the Editor and Op-Ed pieces.7

Submission and review process: Submission is via an online form on the website and the review process depends on the type of submission. Limit on length of articles is: Op-Ed pieces (700 words), Letters to the editor (200 words).8 No information is provided as to acceptance rates or method of acceptance.

Editorial tone: Freewheeling. The newspaper, and especially the online edition, takes a tone of local interest that may mirror its audience. The Bay Area community is thought to be more liberal than other parts of the country.

Style guide used: None specified for the type of contributions accepted.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication’s participation in Chronicle in Education,9 which provides teacher lessons and information, suggests an active community involvement and would make the Chronicle a possible publication for an LIS-related article.

Chronicle readers pride themselves on being intelligent and well educated and keeping abreast of current events, especially at the local level. Publication in this newspaper offers a unique opportunity for those in the library field to inform and instruct a huge lay audience about issues facing libraries today. The Sunday edition’s Insight section “aims to provide a forum to shake up conventional wisdom and provoke fresh thinking.”10 This might be an excellent arena for librarians to bring library-related issues to the forefront of the public’s awareness.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print version: daily circulation of  176,721; Sunday circulation of 211,774.11. Online version: 3.4 million unique visitors a month and 14.5 million pageviews a month.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: San Francisco, California, United States; online features are available worldwide. English.

Reader characteristics: 57$ of the readers have a college degree, with a median household income of $127,036. The median age of readers is 50, and 77% do not have children.13 It is likely that the interests of the Chronicle’s readers are local issues, and those affecting middle-class families. Considering the industries of San Francisco and the Bay Area, readers are likely to work in technology and computer jobs, the arts, and tourism. San Francisco is famous for being politically, socially, and economically progressive. Overall, its constituents are antiwar, pro-equal rights (including gay marriage), and San Francisco was one of the first cities in the country to give library cards to individuals experiencing homelessness.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The newspaper does not regularly focus on LIS subject matter, but local library issues and concerns might be raised in an editorial piece.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience of the San Francisco Chronicle are educators, parents, cab drivers, in the mayor’s office; they are you and me. With this in mind, authors should avoid library jargon (e.g., MARC, CONSER, AACR2) and specialized library science themes. Topics dealing with promoting library services, such as lobbying for the public’s free and open access to information, new reading programs, and issues with banned books, would be appropriate as this newspaper is targeting the general public.

Last updated: September 13, 2020


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. San Francisco Chronicle, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522201781182/551873
  2. “San Francisco Chronicle,” Hearst.com, accessed September 16, 2018, http://www.hearst.com/newspapers/san-francisco-chronicle
  3. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  4. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  5. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  6. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  7. “We Welcome Your Opinion,” SFGate.com, accessed September 13, 2020, https://www.sfchronicle.com/submit-your-opinion/
  8. We Welcome Your Opinion.”
  9. “San Francisco Chronicle,” NIEonline.com, accessed November 4, 2016, http://nieonline.com/sfchronicle/
  10. We Welcome Your Opinion.”
  11. “Media Kit 2020,” Hearst.com, accessed September 13, 2020, https://marketing.sfgate.com/hubfs/Media_Kit_and_File_Assets/MEDIA_KIT_GENERAL.pdf?hsLang=en
  12. Media Kit 2020.”
  13. Media Kit 2020.”
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Harper’s Magazine

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Harper’s Magazine

ISSN: 0017-789X1

Purpose, objective, or mission:Harper’s Magazine, the oldest general-interest monthly in America, explores the issues that drive our national conversation, through long-form narrative journalism and essays, and such celebrated features as the iconic Harper’s Index. With its emphasis on fine writing and original thought Harper’s provides readers with a unique perspective on politics, society, the environment, and culture.”2

“Our mission is to inform, to argue, to interest and to question conventional wisdom. In doing this, we establish an emotional bond with readers, drawing them into the pages and challenging them to think differently on the widest possible spectrum of topics.” 3

Website: http://harpers.org/

Target audience: According to the 2016 Media Kit, Harper’s speaks to “readers looking for perspectives not generally found in mainstream media. Harper’s is “written with the belief that readers still care about issues, are still willing to risk changing their views and are still willing to participate in our democracy.”4

Publisher: Current publisher is John R. MacArthur, with Harper’s Magazine Foundation. 5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: Civilian.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Essays, fiction, and reporting. Topics covered include politics, society, the environment, and culture. 7

Frequency of publication: Monthly 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions Information can be found here:  http://harpers.org/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: According to their website, “Writers wishing to submit nonfiction to Harper’s Magazine are invited to send queries to the address below, accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. The magazine will neither consider nor return unsolicited nonfiction manuscripts. Harper’s will consider unsolicited fiction. Unsolicited poetry will not be considered or returned. 9

Submission and review process: All fiction submissions and nonfiction queries must be sent by mail to:

Harper’s Magazine.
666 Broadway, 11th Floor
New York, NY 1001210

Editorial tone: This magazine’s tone lends itself to high literary thought. Harper’s prides itself “on (its) fine writing and original thought, (and) provides readers with a unique perspective on politics, society, the environment, and culture.”11

Style guide used: None offered.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although this publication does not accept unsolicited nonfiction, potential contributors are invited to send nonfiction queries. The LIS author may win a solicitation for nonfiction if the query is unusual and exceptional enough to pique the editor’s interest. As unsolicited fiction will be considered, this may provide a more realistic opportunity for the LIS writer. A work of fiction that involves libraries or library issues could prove to be a unique contribution to this forum. Although this is not a scholarly publication, Harper’s has been in publication for 170 years and enjoys a prestigious position in the literary publishing industry.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to its 2020 Media Kit, Harper’s  has a “total audience” of over 600,000.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: It seems that the readership is primarily based in the United States, there is an international subscription option that is also available.13 The magazine is published in English.

Reader characteristics: Ratio of readership is 66% male and 34% female, with a median age of 48 years old. Mean household income is $116,200, with professional or managerial careers represented by 26.75% of readers. Readers are educated, with 39% holding post-graduate degrees. Readers are presented as more cultured and well-traveled than the average American with comparison statistics outlined in the Media Kit.14

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers are unlikely to have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter. However, as this is an affluent, informed, and intelligent audience, they have likely formed opinions on general LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Harper’s Magazine are a highly educated, affluent group. They have graduate degrees, are professionals and managers, and are financially well-off. They are a politically- and civically-engaged audience. In its Media Kit for advertisers, Harper’s bills itself as a “tool for change, a place for ideas and the people who have them. We attract the finest writers today and encourage them to do their best.”15

For these reasons, authors’ queries and submissions should be unique, well-written, directed to a well-educated audience, and limited in library jargon. The LIS writer who can provide a different viewpoint, that challenges mainstream thinking, would find an engaged audience at Harper’s Magazine.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1.  Harper’s Magazine, WorldCat, accessed September 8, 2020, https://www.worldcat.org/title/harpers-monthly-magazine/oclc/803607184
  2. “About.”, Harpers.org, accessed September 8, 2020, http://harpers.org/about
  3. “2016 Media Kit.,” Harpers.org, accessed September 8, 2020, http://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/2016-Media-Kit.pdf
  4. “2016 Media Kit.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Submissions Information.”, Harpers.org, accessed September 8, 2020, http://harpers.org/submissions/
  7. “About.”
  8. “About.”
  9. “Submissions Information.”
  10. “Submissions Information.”
  11. “About.”
  12. “2020 Media Kit.”, Harpers.org, accessed September 8, 2020, https://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Harpers-Magazine-2020-Media-Kit.pdf
  13. “Subscribe.”, Harpers.org, accessed September 8, 2020, https://w1.buysub.com/pubs/HS/PRS/USCanada_Subscription_wDiscount_v2.jsp?cds_page_id=235595&cds_mag_code=PRS&id=1599597480653&lsid=32521538006082768&vid=1
  14. “2016 Media Kit.”
  15. “2016 Media Kit.”
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