Wiki Tags Archives: Opinion

The Librarian Parlor

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Librarian Parlor or LibParlor

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://libparlor.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “. . . a space for conversing, sharing expertise, and asking questions about the process of developing, pursuing, and publishing library research.”1

Target audience: All library, archives, and information workers especially those new to the research community.2

Publisher: The Librarian Parlor. 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional or trade publication. 

Medium: Online.

Content: Any topic relevant to the LIS profession, with an emphasis on material about research in the LIS field. 

Frequency of publication: “LibParlor posts are published to the website on Tuesdays about twice a month at 1 PM EST.”3

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/ 

Types of contributions accepted: The following are the types of contributions accepted for this publication: “informative or reflective blog posts; how-tos (develop research agenda, write proposals, submit IRB, etc); quick tips list; recommended reading; how it started, how it’s going; series; and webinar.”4

Submission and review process: Authors can submit their proposals for articles through this submission form: https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/submit-an-idea/. After submitting, authors will hear back from an editor within one week. 

Editorial tone: “Posts should be written for an audience new to research, not to experts. This is an informal, conversational space, and we like the tone of our blog to reflect that. We encourage you to write in the first-person and avoid passive voice.”5

Style guide used: The Editorial Policies Guidelines can be found at  https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/editorial-guidelines/

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors: LibParlor is an excellent place for LIS professionals new to research to publish their work in and to find a supportive community–professionals can seek connections with other members, find collaborators for projects, or share opportunities for editing works, participating in research, etc.6

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No readership numbers could be gathered for this publication, however, the LibParlor Twitter account (@libparlor) has 2,546 followers.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LibParlor, although not specifically stated, seems to be aimed at a United States readership. The material on the site is written in English. 

Reader characteristics: Regarding their writers and their audience, the publication states “We intentionally work towards providing space for those with a variety of types of work experience such as non-tenure track librarians and library workers without the librarian title, as well as those with different lived experiences, such as people with disabilities, librarians of color, non-binary, and LGBTQ+ folks.”8

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: Due to the targeted LIS readership of this publication, readers will have more knowledge of LIS topics and jargon than the general population. However, the articles should be written so that those new to research can understand it.9

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LibParlor provides LIS professionals, particularly those new to research in the field, with a place to gain experience in publishing as well as a place to build connections with other professionals. 

Last updated: April 6, 2021


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About”, libparlor.com, accessed April 6, 2021, https://libparlor.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Editorial Policies Guidelines”, libparlor.com, accessed December 6, 2020, https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/editorial-guidelines/
  4. “Ways to Contribute”, libparlor.com, accessed December 6, 2020, https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/ways-to-contribute/
  5. “Editorial Policies Guidelines.”
  6. “Classifieds”, libparlor.com, accessed April 6, 2021, https://libparlor.com/classifieds/
  7. “The Librarian Parlor”, twitter.com, accessed April 6, 2021, https://twitter.com/libparlor?lang=en
  8. “About.”
  9. “Editorial Policies Guidelines.”
Continue Reading

McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A daily humor website, “McSweeney’s exists to champion ambitious and inspired new writing, and to challenge conventional expectations about where it’s found, how it looks, and who participates. We’re here to discover things we love, help them find their most resplendent form, and imagine new ways to bring them to you, Dennis. (If you are not Dennis, kindly ignore the aforementioned.)” 1

“McSweeney’s, however, delivers its humor in a high-brow lit mag sort of way. It’s a place where you can simultaneously experience the comic satisfaction of watching a great sitcom and the glorious smugness of reading a New Yorker think piece.” 2

Target audience: Individuals who enjoy humor/satire  in writing.

Publisher: McSweeney’s Publishing. 3

Peer reviewed? No. 4

Type: Civilian publication

Medium: Website and e-newsletter.

Content: Content is intended to be humorous/satire.  “The thing we are most proud of is that for many of our contributors, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency is the only place they’ve ever published publicly. At some point, something funny or odd occurred to them – a list, a new food review, a short imagined monologue – and they had a place to put that funny and odd thing in order to share it with the world, a private joke made public.” 5

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/guidelines-for-web-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: All types of submissions are allowed. Lists, open letters to people who are unlikely to respond, monologues, food reviews, etc. “Submissions should be shortish. By shortish we mean an absolute maximum of 1,200 words, but in truth we veer toward pieces that are under 1,000 words, and snuggle closest to ones that are even shorter than that. Your subject line should contain some indicator of what is contained in your submission.” 6

Submission and review process: There are separate email addresses depending on the nature of your submission. The website notes DO NOT send the same submission to multiple addresses, it is unnecessary as it all goes to the same editor. Please paste the entire document into the email message. Please don’t share Google docs or links to your private blogs. Also, very important: do not send us attachments. 7

General website submissions should be sent to websubmissions@mcsweeneys.net.

Timely submissions should be sent to timelysubmissions@mcsweeneys.net. This inbox is for super topical pieces riffing on big news stories of the last 24-48 hours.

Lists submissions should be sent to lists@mcsweeneys.net.

Open Letters to People or Entities Who Are Unlikely to Respond submissions should be sent to openletters@mcsweeneys.net.

Reviews of New Food submissions should be sent to newfood@mcsweeneys.net.

“We get hundreds of submissions a week and, like we have mentioned, there’s just one editor reading them all. So, it’s only natural that this editor will be drawn to submissions with funny, eye-catching titles that cleverly reveal the premises of pieces.” 8

Editorial tone: Light and comedic/satirical

Style guide used: None Specified. “Please do not format your piece in an unusual way. Do not use colors or fun fonts.” 9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors may have as good a chance as anyone for getting a submission accepted in McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Their whole publication process seems to be highly informal, but the quality is certainly on par with journals that have higher subscription/circulation rates. An exploration of McSweeney’s multiple related websites is a must to see if your writing project is a match for their style. LIS authors might contribute a fiction or nonfiction piece inspired by their experience as library professionals, keeping in mind that the purpose of such pieces should ultimately be to entertain the reader, rather than function as straightforward articles on an LIS-related issue.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Tendency’s biggest hits have gotten millions of pageviews, and many stories do well, reaching tens of thousands.” 10 The website has a social media following of over 180,000 on Facebook, over 274,000 on Twitter, and over 48,000 followers on Instagram.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication first started in San Francisco, CA, but coverage geographically spans the globe. Content is published in English.

Reader characteristics: While no information regarding reader demographics is provided, a review of publication suggests readers are intelligent, open minded, literary, and comfortable thinking outside of the box, especially in a satirical way.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Limited, the same as the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With this publications, LIS authors have an opportunity to engage with readers from a fun, satirical viewpoint, one not typically taken for LIS. While the readership may enjoy high brow humor, there is the potential to address LIS trends, barriers, ethics, and beyond as long as it comes with a comedic edge. The key is to be creative in approach. With shorter word limits, LIS authors can convey concepts in small, precise ways that do not need to meet  academic-level research and review standards.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/about-us
  2. “McSweeney’s,” ndsmcobserver.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://ndsmcobserver.com/2016/11/mcsweeneys-internet-tendency-dont-worry-not-bottomless-pit-procrastinatory-doom/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Submission Guidelines,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/guidelines-for-web-submissions
  5. “Patreon,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.patreon.com/mcsweeneysinternettendency
  6. “Submission Guidelines.”
  7. “Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines.”
  9. “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. “McSweeney’s Meets Internet,” NiemanLab.org, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.niemanlab.org/2016/07/mcsweeneys-meets-internet-a-little-publisher-survives-holding-tight-to-its-eclectic-literary-roots/
Continue Reading

Los Angeles Times

**Please Excuse the Mess, Profile Update in Progress**

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Los Angeles Times (LA Times)

ISSN: 0458-3035 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 138 years.”2

“Bringing truth to power through creative storytelling, original reporting and accountability journalism that impacts lives and pushes change.” 3

Website: http://www.latimes.com/

Target audience: Residents of Southern California and beyond. “Millennials, Gen X, Multicultural Influencers, Affluent Consumers, Families and Parents, Boomers.” 4

Publisher: Los Angeles Times Media Group.5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online. Archives are available online from the founding of the paper in 1881.6

Content: News reports, investigative journalism, editorials, reviews, and various columns. The website’s sections include news at the Local, Nation, World level, as well as Business, Climate & Environment, Entertainment & Arts, Food, Housing & Homeless, Lifestyle, Opinion, Politics, Science, Sports, and Travel. Several more options can be found viewing the Site Map. 7 Of interest to LIS writers, there is a special Books sub-section under Entertainment, including fiction and nonfiction book reviews and features.

Frequency of publication: Daily. 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html

Types of contributions accepted: Op-ed articles are welcome on any subject. Per the website, “Most articles are about 750 words in length, though some are shorter, and on Sundays we can sometimes run pieces as long as 1,200 words 9 For more information on op-ed pieces, see former editor Nicholas Goldberg’s explanation of op-ed processes and goals. 10

Letters to the Editor are another option if you wish to respond to anything already published. They are limited to 150 words. 11

Blowback, is another opportunity to publish within the Times. “Got a beef with the L.A. Times? Read something in the paper that really ticked you off, but haven’t got a place to make your opinion heard? Want to write an article about it and get it into The Times? Blowback is The Times’ forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds. It is the missing link between the 150-word letter to the editor and the Op-Ed piece, and you’re invited to participate. We’re willing to post Blowback items on both news and opinion pieces, but our focus is on opinion. The idea is to present countering opinions, not to provide a forum for pointing out errors or critiquing bias in the Times’ news coverage.12

Submission and review process:  Op-Ed articles: Email op-ed submissions to oped@latimes.com. We make every effort to read manuscripts promptly. If the article is accepted for publication, you will hear from a Times editor within five days. We regret that the volume of submissions we receive means that we cannot respond individually to each article, nor can we provide feedback to proposals or queries. 13

Letters to the Editor: Complete the form located here . “We generally do not publish more than one letter from a single person within any 60-day period. Letters become the property of The Times and may be republished in any format. They typically run 150 words or less and may be edited. You will be contacted if your letter is a candidate for publication.” 14

Blowback: Email Blowback submissions to blowback@latimes.com. 15

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Los Angeles Times is read by a general audience (not necessarily confined to Southern California) who wants to be ahead of the local and world news. Op-ed pieces about new digital collections, expanded library services, or opening of a new library branch would benefit LIS authors. You might also consider submitting a press release or event listing regarding a library event.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Los Angeles Times is “the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country, with a daily readership of 1.3 million and 2 million on Sunday, more than 30 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.6 million.” 16

According to their current media kit, The Times has 46 Million unique visitors, 90 Million page views, 7 Million+ social followers, 332,000 monthly shares on Apple News, 845,000 video views, 4.4 Million weekly print + digital readers in Los Angeles, 2.9 million weekly print readers, 1.8 million Sunday print readers, and 1.2 Million daily print readers. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Los Angeles Times is regional to Southern California, but it’s journalism and reporting covers content on a global scale. While printed in English, Los Angeles Times En Español is also available.

Reader characteristics: “We reach distinct, affluent and diverse audiences of multiple generations, demographics, preferences and interests.” 18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Being a lay publication, Los Angeles Times will require LIS jargon-free contributions. While readers may be familiar with library issues, like Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) and Dewey call numbers, generally authors should avoid writing on heavily specialized library topics such as OpenURL link resolver software technology or collection management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The newspaper’s readers are spread all over the world. They are everyday patrons and potential donors, suggesting they may wish to keep their submissions LIS jargon free and stay away from highly specialized topics. There is potential for publishing on a myriad of topics through the Op-Ed avenue that may be of interest to readers.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Los Angeles Times, WorldCat.org, accessed March 24, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/los-angeles-times/oclc/474112039
  2. “About,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, https://www.latimes.com/about
  3. “Media Kit,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://mediakit.latimes.com/
  4. “Media Kit.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Archives,” LATimes.com, accessed October 23, 2018, https://latimes.newspapers.com/
  7. “Site Map,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-sitemap-htmlstory.html
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html
  10. “Op-Ed, Explained,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/news/la-oe-pages23oct23-story.html
  11. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  12. “About Blowback,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/readersreact/la-op-blowback-about-story.html
  13. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  14. “Submit a letter to the Editor,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/submit-letter-to-the-editor
  15. “About Blowback.”
  16. “About.”
  17. “Media Kit.”
  18. “Media Kit.”
Continue Reading

Mental Floss

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mental Floss

ISSN: Print: 1543-4702 (ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Whether we’re covering history, science, pop culture, language, music, true crime, or entertainment, we help our audience feel smarter. Our New York City-based team of editors and writers—as well as our worldwide network of contributors—answers life’s big questions, uncovers fascinating facts, and finds stories so interesting that our readers absolutely must share them.”2

Mental Floss delivers smart, fun and shareable content in an upbeat and witty environment. An encyclopedia of everything, we answer life’s big questions and uncover stories so interesting our readers absolutely must share them. We take all culture and make it pop culture.” 3

Target audience: “Curious People.” 4

Publisher: Minute Media. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online. Print issues ceased in 2016. 6

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects with a focus on shareability.7

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for new voices to write about the diverse verticals we cover, whether that’s history, science, entertainment, language, pop culture, art, or beyond.” 8

PITCHES WE CAN USE 9
Lists

Lists are an overview of a topic in digestible-nugget form. Each list will cover the who, what, when, and where of the subject, plus its significance, and pay particular attention to quirky or little-known facts about the subject. Pitches may focus on the below topics:

Subjects that have a major anniversary coming up
Historical figures and events
Movies and TV series
Music
Literature and art
Language
Food and drink
Helpful tips and life hacks
Scientific discoveries, phenomena, and figures
Pop culture fads, events, and personalities

Features

Features are reported stories that delve into a topic from a particular angle and with strong characters and storytelling. Features can be short (500 words) or longer (800-1500 words). Areas ripe for features include:

Historical events that put current events into perspective
Exploring and/or answering a big question
Science stories that explain a new field of research or highlight a scientist’s ongoing work
A deep dive into a pop culture event or phenomenon in history
True crime and unsolved mysteries
Features about odd, unique, or little-known historical events and people

PITCHES WE CAN’T USE 10
Short, timely news stories: these pieces are covered by our staff writers
Science articles based on a single study: these are also covered by staff writers
First-person articles or personal essays
Fiction, memoir, or poetry
Current politics or political opinion
Stories based solely on PR pitches

Tips provided by Mental Floss: Keep your pitch short (1-2 paragraphs) and let them know if you have a particular expertise on the subject. Include a link to your portfolio/work samples. Do not pitch or send completed articles.  Take the time to brainstorm a possible headline for your story, and include that as part of the subject line, i.e. Freelance Pitch: 50 Amazing Facts About Animals. Having a headline can help us better understand the angle you plan to use with your story. 11

Submission and review process: “Expect a response to your pitch within two weeks. If you do not receive a response after two weeks, you can assume it’s a pass. Due to the number of pitches we receive each day, we are unfortunately not able to respond to every pitch we receive.” 12

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Since its founding in a Duke University dorm room in 2001, Mental Floss has reached more than 1 billion readers with smart, quirky content presented in a witty, upbeat voice. We reach more than 19 million users per month across our site, social media accounts, and popular YouTube channel.” 13

According to Visitor’s Worth website, Mental Floss has approximately 58,000 daily visitors, with 154,000 daily page views. 14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Visitor’s Worth website, the most traffic for the publication comes from audiences in the United States, but the website also has a following in the UK, Canada, India, and Germany. 15 The website publishes in the English language.

Reader characteristics: In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “About Us,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “Mental Floss,” MinuteMedia.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.minutemedia.com/mentalfloss
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Mental Floss.”
  6. “Life After Print for Mental Floss,” FolioMag.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.foliomag.com/life-after-print-for-mental-floss/
  7. “About Us”
  8. “Pitch,” MentalFloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss
  9. “Pitch.”
  10. “Pitch.”
  11. “Pitch.”
  12. “Pitch.”
  13. “About Us.”
  14. “www.mentalfloss.com,” VisitorsWorth.com, accessed December 5, 2020,  http://visitorsworth.com/www.mentalfloss.com
  15. “www.mentalfloss.com.”
Continue Reading

GOOD

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

ISSN: Print: 1935-1488 (Ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: “We are GOOD & Upworthy—a social impact company with a mass audience. We believe your purpose should be contagious. We work with brands and communities to create participatory campaigns and shareable stories that drive powerful results across business and society. Since 2006, we’ve been on a mission to help people and organizations be a force for good, together. ” 2

Target audience: People who want to make a difference in the world.

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC. 3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and e-Newsletter. GOOD used to print a quarterly magazine but that has ceased, no information on the print publication could be found as of November 27, 2020.

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently, the e-newsletter, The Daily Good, is emailed daily. 5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: As of November 27, 2020, the links to the submission guidelines are no longer active.  Within the website, clicking the “FAQ” and “Newsletter” links sometimes found at the bottom yielded error messages. Performing a website and Google search yielded no results.

Types of contributions accepted: Searching the website could only locate https://goodinc.com/contact which states, “We are not hiring. But we are always on the lookout for new talent, email your resume to jobs@goodinc.com.” and “Say hello. Email us at howdy@goodinc.com” 6

Submission and review process: None could be located. From the main menu clicking “Submit a Tip” and “Contact Us” take the user to the contact page as described above.

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD‘s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and  the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 100 Million Monthly Audience. [ 7. “About.”]

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English. 7

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.8 (*Note: As of December 5, 2020, the link to the 2016 Media Kit is no longer active)

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy, they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. Good, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1607192246377/626469
  2. “About.”, GoodInc.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://goodinc.com/
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Contact.”, GoodInc.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://goodinc.com/contact
  7. “About.”
  8. “GOOD Media Kit 2016.” GoodInc.com, accessed October 17, 2018, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
Continue Reading

Book Riot

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Book Riot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.bookriot.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Book Riot is the largest independent editorial book site in North America, and home to a host of media, from podcasts to newsletters to original content, all designed around diverse readers and across all genres.” 1

“We’re dedicated to the idea that writing about books and reading should be just as diverse as books and readers are. We began with the goal of leading a new discussion around books, readers, and publishing. Individually and collaboratively, we do the work each day to innovate fresh content and services to our readers, amplify marginalized voices, and challenge ourselves and our community to be inclusive.” 2

Target audience: People who love books and reading about books.

Publisher: Riot New Media Group. 3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: “The content is comprised of humor, reviews, commentary, and news as well as editorials on topics related to the reading experience. Book Riot addresses new technology in the literary space and developments in the publishing industry.” 4

Frequency of publication: New content is posted daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot

Types of contributions accepted: “If you can write something smart or funny or interesting or provocative about books in the space of about 600-800 words, we’re interested in hearing from you. Your samples should be things you think could go up on Book Riot just as they are. We recommend that one be an entry for the Our Reading Lives series, and the other on any topic of your choosing.” 5

DO NOT submit “traditional book reviews, interviews, or links to Goodreads, LibraryThing, Amazon, etc. Also, please do not submit image-heavy pieces; we want to get a feel for your voice and writing style.”6

DO NOT send “writing samples unrelated to books and reading. Your samples should show us that you understand how we do things here at the Riot and that you can do it too. Want to learn more about who we are? Poke around the site, and check us out on InstagramTwitterFacebook, and our content on Goodreads.” 7

Submission and review process: “Please note that due to the high volume of applications we receive, we cannot respond to each one. We’re currently accepting applicants on a rolling basis. If you are accepted, you’ll hear back within one month of submitting your application.” 8

Editorial tone: Sometimes serious, sometimes silly, but never stuffy or boring.

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you love books and have blogging experience, this is a great place to submit writing. The pieces are fun, cover a wide range of books, and aren’t limited to just reviews: the site loves top 10 lists of all flavors, introductions to authors you’ve never read, giveaways, and posts about current events like Amazon acquiring Goodreads and how that will affect readers. The site isn’t peer reviewed and might not help you gain tenure, but it’s a wonderful community of book lovers who will most likely appreciate an LIS writer’s perspective on reading.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 3.2m+ global monthly unique visitors, 1.1M+ email subscribers, 1.5m+ Social connections. 9 

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Book Riot states it is the largest independent editorial book site in North America. 10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 50% of readers are between the ages of 18-35, 16% of readers are between the ages of 35-45, 64% are female, 51% have children, 45% attended college with 26% attended grad school. Readers have “above average” household income. Reader industries include education and library, business services and retail. Reader interests include books and literature, comics and animation, cooking, and pets. 11

Audience Bookish Habits: Average 80 books read per year, spend an average of $371 per year on books, 34% are currently in a book club, 46% have subscribed to a book subscription service. 12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will most likely have some knowledge, but this is strictly a civilian publication that doesn’t want to be too stuffy, so keep the LIS jargon out of your submissions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

If you have blogging experience and a good social media presence, this would be an ideal site to pitch ideas. Think beyond mere book reviews; Book Riot is the place for more thoughtful, interesting, or just plain fun commentary around reading or books. Readers will be receptive to a librarian’s perspective and insight, and the field is wide open for LIS-related ideas that can appeal to a lay reader.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/about/
  2. “Join Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/join-us/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Advertise.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/advertise/
  5. “Write for Book Riot.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot
  6. “Write for Book Riot.”
  7. “Write for Book Riot.”
  8. “Write for Book Riot.”
  9. “Media Kit.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fFONL49_WYqrqOhjDjc6oxZechhDbdq-/view
  10. “Media Kit.”
  11. “Media Kit.”
  12. “Media Kit.”
Continue Reading

The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Philanthropy

ISSN: 1040-676X (Print) and 1943-3980 (Online)1

Website: http://www.philanthropy.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “From deeply reported stories on the big ideas that shape the work of charities and foundations to the practical guidance in our online resource center, only the Chronicle of Philanthropy provides nonprofit professionals, foundation executives, board members, and others with the indispensable information and practical advice they need to help them change the world.” 2

“Our news and opinion pages fuel the national conversation about the role nonprofits play in society. The Chronicle’s special reports, benchmarking data, and popular webinars are essential information for nonprofit professionals. 3

Target audience: Nonprofit professionals, foundation executives, board members, etc. 4

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: News stories, opinion pieces, tips and advice, people and awards. 7

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published twelve times a year, while the website is updated daily.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.philanthropy.com/page/contact-us/

Types of contributions accepted: “The Chronicle of Philanthropy welcomes news pitches that pertain to nonprofit organizations and foundations.” 9

What Kinds of News Stories Do We Prefer?

  • We’re writing for a national audience, so if you have a compelling local story, it should also be relevant to nonprofit practitioners across the country.
  • If we’ve just written about a similar development at a different organization, we probably won’t cover it again soon.
  • We like: Stories about best or innovative practices in fundraising and managing organizations. Profiles of interesting (and especially effective but lesser-known) charity leaders, fundraisers, and donors. New trends in giving or fundraising. Anything that our readers can learn from and adapt to make them more effective.
  • We usually don’t cover: Galas. Celebrity events. Groundbreakings and ribbon cuttings. Gifts of less than $1 million unless they are out of the ordinary. 10

Submission and review process: “Send pitches to either one reporter or one editor or, if you’re not sure, copy no more than two staff members on one message. BCC’ing or sending separate emails to multiple people can lead to confusion and will likely delay our response.” 11

“Use your email’s subject line to state your purpose: “Story idea about a successful billion-dollar capital campaign,” for instance. Avoid being cute (“You’ll never guess what WE did!”) or vague (“Press release from Such-and-Such Organization”). We’re eager to hear your news, but we’re pressed for time, and these types of subject lines make it more likely your pitch will be deleted without being opened.” 12

Editorial tone: Official and straightforward.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication provides the potential for publishing to an audience interested in fundraising techniques, strategic planning and budgeting, and community work with nonprofits. Writing to this audience could help promote the LIS field to potential investors and community partners.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Philanthropy.com has 257,000+ unique monthly visitors online, the newsletter has 160,000+ recipients each week, there are 20,000+ paying subscribers representing the most loyal audience in the nonprofit world. 13

Audience location: The Chronicle writes primarily for a national audience though their reach extends across the globe. All articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: “Decision makers at four in five of the largest and most influential charitable organizations in America read the Chronicle to advance their missions.” 14

75% of the top 400 American fundraising charities and 90% of the 50 largest private foundations are premium readers. 51% of individual subscribers at fundraising nonprofits and 84% of individual subscribers at private foundations are executive leaders, 49% of individual subscribers at fundraising nonprofits work in development or fundraising.” 15

“84% of readers consider The Chronicle of Philanthropy essential to their understanding of the nonprofit sector and philanthropic world. 72% use the information in The Chronicle to make a decision.” 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of the subject matter does not deal with LIS information. While it is better that LIS jargon is not used, the information that any LIS writer wished to share with the readers of this publication would be common between both LIS and philanthropy readers.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

It is obvious from recently published articles that all writings presented to the editors of this publication should have a forward spin on them. Articles should focus on the needs or interests of the reader. An article on black men in nonprofit organizationsor lack thereofnot only gives numbers and explains why there are fewer in this demographic working non-profit, but also discusses solutions. Any LIS related article must look at the LIS world from the eyes of that world’s grant writers and fundraisers.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1606532777917/170649
  2. “About”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/about-the-chronicle-of-philanthropy/?cid=cpf_abt
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Subscribe.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/subscribe?cid=CS-COP-H-SUB
  7. “The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 23, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/
  8. “About Us.”, Chronicle.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/about-us/
  9. “Contact Us.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/contact-us/
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “Contact Us.”
  12. “Contact Us.”
  13. “Advertise.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://marketingsolutions.philanthropy.com/
  14. “About.”
  15. “Advertise.”
  16. “Advertise.”
Continue Reading

Family Tree Magazine

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Family Tree Magazine

ISSN: 1529-0298 (Print)1

Website: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A how-to publication for readers interested in family history and genealogy research. “Learn how to build your family tree with beginner research tips, guides to DNA testing, family history storytelling, using genealogy records and more!” 2

Target audience: Genealogists and family history enthusiasts.

Publisher: Yankee Publishing, Inc. 3

Peer reviewed? No. 4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Subscription-based print magazine with online content and research tools. 5

Content: Family Tree Magazine  “covers genealogy, ethnic heritage, personal history, genealogy websites and software, photography and photo preservation, and other ways that families connect with their pasts.” 6

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly. 7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.familytreemagazine.com/frequently-asked-questions-get-involved-family-tree/

Types of contributions accepted: “Family Tree covers genealogy, ethnic heritage, personal history, genealogy websites and software, photography and photo preservation, and other ways that families connect with their pasts. Please query with a specific story idea. In general, we’re looking for articles that are right for our magazine, not for writers to assign articles to. Articles need to be broad enough in scope to appeal to a general audience, yet narrow enough to support specific, useful information.” 8

“We do not publish personal experience stories or the histories of specific families in our magazine. Nor do we publish generic family or parenting articles—keep in mind that our focus is how to do family history.” 9

Submission and review process: “We accept queries by email to FamilyTree@yankeepub.com only. If we’ve never worked with you before, please include writing samples (published clips preferred) with your query. Allow six to eight weeks for a response.” 10

“Both online content and magazine issues are planned well in advance. Though our lead time is technically about six months, we may have a plan for the November/December issue by January of that year.” 11

Editorial tone: “Articles are beginner-friendly but never talk down to the audience. Readers may be experts in one area of our coverage, yet novices in another. We emphasize sidebars, tips and other reader-friendly “packaging,” and each article aims to provide the resources necessary to take the next step in the quest for one’s personal past.” 12

“The ideal Family Tree Magazine writer is both a writer—able to explain complex topics in clear, friendly, easy-to-read articles and sidebars—and an expert (or interested amateur) in one of our coverage areas. Your query should indicate both why you’re right for this topic and why you’re able to write it.” 13

Style guide used: None specified. “Our style is bright, breezy, helpful and encouraging. We’re NOT an academic journal or a genealogy-research journal.” 14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be a good publication for reference librarians, adult services librarians and LIS students who are knowledgeable about genealogy and history resources. The editors specifically mention wanting articles about new reference materials, and past articles have focused on organizing research materials. They are also looking for how-to articles that will help beginners start their family history projects. Librarians have a good understanding of what questions patrons generally ask about family history research; those questions can be turned into simple, informative article ideas for this magazine.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Family Tree serves the fast-growing audience of family history hobbyists, enriching their knowledge and empowering their search with tips and tools that fuel their discoveries. Family Tree Magazine in print reaches over 62,000 readers 6x annually. Each month, an average 170,000 people visit Family Tree’s website. Nearly 62,000 family historians receive Family Tree weekly alerts. Almost 168,000 fans follow us on social media.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This US based publication is distributed nationwide. Family Tree Magazine is printed in English.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, 92% of readers want to learn about their ancestors’ lives, 86% want to record their tree for posterity, and 86% aim to trace their family tree back as many generations as possible.  The average age of readers is 62 years old, average household income is $75,454, and 89% of readers have completed education beyond high school. “Our readers spend an average of $483 annually on genealogy.” 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These readers will most likely have limited knowledge of LIS-related topics, so technical subjects as well as LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication offers endless opportunities for LIS authors with background in research, genealogy, cataloging, preservation, archives, and beyond. This publication offers a whole range of possibilities for articles about researching online or how to evaluate a website. Readers who travel for their hobby will want to know about travel resource materials. The well-educated reader might want an online resource for translating family documents (like a birth certificate) that are in a foreign language. Those who are retired might be interested in historical picture books that they can read to their grandchildren to help them begin to learn about their heritage. The editorial tone of the publication is non-academic and light, opening up the potential for articles on multiple facets of LIS subject matter that help readers apply real world skills and re-affirms the usefulness and relevancy of information organizations and professionals.

Last updated: November 21, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  Family Tree Magazine, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521894414381/310957
  2. “Getting Started.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/family-tree/
  3. “Family Tree Magazine.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/
  4. “FAQ.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/frequently-asked-questions-get-involved-family-tree/
  5. “Family Tree Magazine.”
  6. “FAQ.”
  7. “Subscribe.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://ftm.pcdfusion.com/pcd/Order?iKey=K**A51
  8. “FAQ.”
  9. “FAQ.”
  10. “FAQ.”
  11. “FAQ.”
  12. “FAQ.”
  13. “FAQ.”
  14. “FAQ.”
  15. “Advertise.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/advertise/
  16. “Advertise.”
Continue Reading

Municipal World

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Municipal World

ISSN: 0027-35891

Website: http://www.municipalworld.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Municipal World is a magazine “devoted to promoting effective municipal government.”2. Founded in 1891, it is the oldest continuously published monthly municipal magazine in the world.3

“Each month, Municipal World examines the issues that impact communities: new federal and provincial policies and legislation; new theories about economic development and renewal; new strategies and emerging best practices from communities like yours across the nation.” 4

Target audience: This publication is aimed at elected and appointed officials involved in municipal government interested in providing effective service to their constituents.5

Publisher: Municipal World, Inc., Ontario, Canada.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: Civilian publication for those involved in the municipal sector.

Medium: Print, with current issue TOC, keyword, and article search available online at their website. Digital editions of Municipal World Magazine are also available, but to subscribers only. 8

Content: According to their website, “articles addressing the pressing problems of the municipal sector” and regular features concerning the environment, governance, management, and procurement. Contents also include upcoming events, Canadian Municipal Code, professional directory, job board, and sources for forms and supplies.9

Frequency of publication: Monthly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://municipalworld.com/magazine/editorial-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted:Municipal World welcomes contributed articles from individuals working in the municipal sector or aligned to the field. Submissions may be considered for our online feature articles, print/digital editions, or special themed publications.” 11

“The scope of potential topics for article submissions is very wide; submissions can focus on any subject area that will be of interest to senior municipal administrators and local government elected officials and in Canada. We do have several ‘theme’ issues throughout the year, which may be relevant for something you are contemplating. Contact the Editor for more information.” 12

“Most articles published in Municipal World are in the range of 1,200 to 2,000 words. As a rule of thumb, 1,400-1,800 words is ideal. However, exceptions can be made at the editor’s discretion to accommodate longer or shorter articles. Our best advice: brevity enhances the prospect of publication.” 13

Submission and review process: “The editor ultimately decides upon the content of the publication, including your article, and reserves the right to reject any submission, or to edit your submission for length, content that may have been covered in a previous article, inappropriate information for the interest of our readership, or style.” 14

“As topics for each issue are selected on a ‘what’s hot’ basis, we cannot guarantee a definite date for publication of articles. Periodically, we schedule special feature issues. For example human resources, heritage, technology, environment, or economic development. These factors also determine our selection of articles.” 15

Editorial tone: As noted in style guide entry, publication prefers “streamlined and straightforward” writing.  Authors are encouraged to “present convincing documentation to prove the point” and nothing else. 16

Style guide used: No style guide specified. This guidance provided: “Our preferred style is streamlined and straightforward, to minimize legal and technical jargon, and to spell out all acronyms on the first reference. Use the simplest word that makes the point. For example: “use” instead of “utilize”; “rain” instead of “precipitation event.” Articles should be as specific as possible, and use active voice, rather than passive voice. Articles written in the first person (e.g., using “I” or “we” throughout) are generally inappropriate…Do not include personal opinions and organizational position statements. Rather, present convincing documentation to prove the point.” 17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This magazine, like others of its kind, offers great potential for increasing the visibility of Canadian public libraries with the government administrators who fund and support them (or not). As library leader Ken Haycock pointed out in a blog post, public librarians have much to gain by writing for such publications “to ensure that their celebrations and concerns are front and center with those who make decisions affecting their future.”18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website draws an audience of more than 53,000, the weekly newsletter has more than 18,000 subscribers, and the publication has more than 19,000 social media followers. 19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Canada. Given the geographic location, English speaking authors from outside Canada would be best served respecting the Canadian spelling of English words. While municipal governments throughout the world bear similarities, contributors should have an understanding of issues specific to Canadian municipal government.

Reader characteristics: As appointed and elected officials in Canadian government and others working in municipal government, readers would share a strong sense of service to their community and are likely proud of being a Canadian. Readers will likely possess education beyond high school, often a professional degree in law, accounting, engineering, architecture, planning, or management. Workplace likely a government agency or entity. Interest would likely be broad, any topic that effects their community and constituents including: election process, environmental concerns, provision of social services, and changes in legislation.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS subject matter will vary widely and authors should not assume any LIS background. As professor emeritus and former director at San Jose School of Library and Information Science Ken Haycock often reminded SLIS students, our LIS degree could support a number of job titles and careers beyond “librarian;” librarians, information professionals, and individuals with LIS degrees, due to the economy and the ever changing LIS field, are finding themselves in leadership positions in civil service.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Given that the readership of Municipal World is, by and large, an educated group committed to serving the public, they would likely have an understanding of the needs of other organizations, such as libraries, that serve the public. LIS authors could utilize this common understanding and promote the value of libraries when writing for Municipal World, as long as they also ensure the topic of their article is relevant and their authoritative voice is well grounded in experience. Authors will need to ensure they establish their link to the municipal government world, their authority on the article topic as well as the relevance to the readership of this publication.

Last updated: November 21, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Municipal World, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521936758490/17162
  2. “About Municipal World,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2016, https://municipalworld.com/about_us
  3. “About Municipal World.”
  4. “Municipal World Magazine,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://municipalworld.com/magazine
  5. “About Municipal World.”
  6. “About Municipal World.”
  7. “Editorial Guidelines,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2016,  http://www.municipalworld.com/magazine/editorial-guidelines/
  8. “Municipal World Magazine.”
  9. “Municipal World Magazine.”
  10. “Municipal World Magazine.”
  11.   “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  14. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  15. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  16. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  17. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  18. “One Way to Raise Your Profile,” Ken Haycock Blog, April 16, 2012, http://kenhaycock.com/one-way-to-raise-your-profile/
  19. “Advertise.”, municipalworld.com, accessed on November 21, 2020, https://www.municipalworld.com/advertise/
Continue Reading

Governing

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Governing:  The Future of States and Localities

ISSN:  1930-6954 1

Website: http://www.governing.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Governing: The Future of States and Localities takes on the question of what state and local government looks like in a world of rapidly advancing technology. Governing is a resource for elected and appointed officials and other public leaders who are looking for smart insights and a forum to better understand and manage through this era of change. Governing’s beat is the collision of technology and society and the fallout consequences, intended and unintended, that confront public leaders and increasingly influence their policy, legislation and strategies to govern. ” 2

Target audience: Governing’s audience consists of governors, mayors, county executives, city and county council members, state legislators, state and local agency executives and those holding key professional government positions.3

Publisher: e.Republic, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium:Governing’s information platform includes a robust website, newsletters and custom content. Governing magazine ended its 32 year run as a print publication in August 2019.” 6

Content: “The scope of topics we cover are as broad as the challenges we face: artificial intelligence, privacy, big data, security, the future of work, urban planning, financial systems and more.” 7

Frequency of publication:

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Voices of the Governing Institute 

Types of contributions accepted: Governing content is staff written and the publication does not typically accept unsolicited submissions for publication.  However, submitted material is occasional accepted for the Voices of the Governing Institute section of the website. “Voices is curated by the Governing Institute, which seeks out practitioners and observers whose perspective and insight add to the public conversation about state and local government.”8

Submission and review process: “For more information or to submit an article to be considered for publication, please contact editor John Martin.”9

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers great potential for increasing the visibility of public libraries with the government administrators who fund and support them (or not). Library leader Ken Haycock highly recommends Governing, saying that “We need to read and reflect but also contribute to these important publications.” Haycock points out that public librarians have much to gain by writing for such publications “to ensure that their celebrations and concerns are front and center with those who make decisions affecting their future.”10 (**Note, as of November 8, 2020, this resource link is inactive.**)

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Governing has 4.6million annual online visitors and over 7million annual page views, which means about 500k monthly visitors and 692k average monthly page views. There are 94k newsletter subscribers and 97k social media followers. 11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Audience is American, and the text is written in English.

Reader characteristics:  According to the current media kit, about 80% of Governing’s audience works in the public sector, 55% are elected and senior government officials. Of those involved in government, approximately 70% are at the state and local levels. 12

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of specialized LIS subject matter will be little. LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum. This is a well-educated, intelligent, and influential audience who would be interested in library issues pertaining to policy and government in local or state jurisdictions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal represent all levels of government and hold positions in management, as elected or appointed officials, or staff.  An audience of decision-makers such as these provides an excellent opportunity for an LIS author to not only further his/her/their career, but to possibly influence real change for local or state libraries.

Last updated: November 8, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. Governing.”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1049629903
  2. “About Governing.”, Governing.com, accessed November 8, 2020, http://www.governing.com/about
  3. “About Governing.”
  4. “About Governing.”
  5. “About Governing.”
  6. “About Governing.”
  7. “About Governing.”
  8. “Voices of the Governing Institute,” Governing.com, accessed September 28, 2016, http://www.governing.com/gov-institute/voices
  9. “Voices of the Governing Institute.”
  10. “Governing: Connecting Leaders,” Ken Haycock & Associates Inc Blog, April 4, 2011, http://kenhaycock.com/governing-connecting-leaders/
  11. “Media Kit.”, Governing.com, accessed November 8, 2020, https://media.erepublic.com/document/GOV19_MediaKit_Andrea.pdf
  12. “Media Kit.”
Continue Reading