Wiki Tags Archives: Instruction

Learning Exchange

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LearningExchange : the newsletter of the Learning Round Table of the American Library Association.

ISSN: 0360-06881

Website: http://www.ala.org/learnrt/newsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: LearningExchange is the official publication of the Learning Round Table of the American Library Association (LearnRT). Per their website, LearnRT:

“The Mission of the Learning Round Table….
….promotes quality continuing education and staff development for all library personnel. We help you NETWORK with other staff development and continuing education providers for the exchange of ideas, concerns and solutions.

….serves as your SOURCE for staff development continuing education assistance, publications, materials, training and activities.

….is your ADVOCATE for quality library staff development and continuing education at both the local and national levels.”2

Target audience: Interested parties and members of the American Library Association Learning Round Table.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online

Content: Articles about continuing education initiatives for library staff, reports on education opportunities, guides on best practices.6

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/learnrt/newsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Writing that “promotes quality continuing education and staff development for all library personnel.”7

Submission and review process: To submit content or get more information about the LearningExchange, please email the LearnRT Newsletter Editor, Colleen Hooks editor@alalearning.org8

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines, though content from the most recent newsletter reads professional and informal.9

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors have the opportunity to share resources about continuing education of library personnel.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of 2018, ALA’s Learning Round Table had 382 members.10 All members of LearnRT receive a subscription to Learning Exchange.11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Learning Exchange is written in English for a North American audience.12

Reader characteristics: “Librarians who conduct training and professional development activities.”13

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be knowledgeable about LIS issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, motivated audience. Many readers will be involved in education or supervisory or management positions since LearnRT members either conduct or will conduct training sessions with staff. Authors have a good opportunity to share their knowledge with like-minded professionals in the LIS field.


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1.  Learning Exchange, WorldCat, accessed May 5, 2020,  http://www.worldcat.org/title/learningexchange-the-newsletter-of-the-learning-round-table-of-the-american-library-association/oclc/711850412
  2. American Library Association. (2020). ALA LearnRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/
  3. American Library Association. (2020). Get Involved. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/about
  4. American Library Association. (2020). ALA LearnRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/
  5. American Library Association. (2020). Get Involved. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/about
  6. American Library Association. (2020). Get Involved. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/about
  7. American Library Association. (2020). Get Involved. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/about
  8. American Library Association. (2020). LearnRT Newsletter. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/newsletter
  9. American Library Association. (2020). Get Involved. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/about
  10. American Library Association. (2020). ALA Round Table Membership Statistics 2004-Present. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/rndtblstats#clenert
  11. American Library Association. (2020). Get Involved. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/about
  12. American Library Association. (2020). LearnRT Newsletter. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/newsletter
  13. American Library Association. (2020). Get Involved. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/learnrt/about
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AISL Independent Ideas

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleAISL Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: Independent school librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right-hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians, and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Independent Ideas: Managed by Alexendra Patterson – Mercersburg Academy. 3If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, contact membership coordinator, Renee Chevallier: Rchevallier@ursulinedallas.org .4

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming, and more.

Submission and review process: Contact membership coordinator listed above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.5

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Social Media,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/social-media
  4. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/social-media
  5. “About AISL,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
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Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCataloging & Classification Quarterly

ISSN: 0163-9374 (Print) and 1544-4554 (Online)1

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wccq20/current

Purpose, objective, or missionCataloging & Classification Quarterly is an international journal providing information and discussion on the subject of bibliographic organization. It addresses the theory and practice of cataloging and classification from a historic as well as a contemporary approach. “In a rapidly changing field, it seeks out and fosters new developments in the transition to new forms of bibliographic control and encourages the innovative and the nontraditional.”2

Target audience: “For library school faculty, it provides an outlet for research publication as well as source materials for students.  For the cataloger, the journal provides both theoretical background and potential solutions to current problems. For the public services librarian, there are discussions of bibliographic records in actual use and of the importance of feedback from the user to the creator of cataloging systems. For the administrator, it explores the complex elements in the library organization.”3

Publisher: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6.

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Cataloging & Classification Quarterly features articles that consider “…the full spectrum of creation, content, management, and use and usability of both bibliographic records and catalogs. This includes the principles, functions, and techniques of descriptive cataloging; the wide range of methods of subject analysis and classification; provision of access for all formats of materials; and policies, planning, and issues connected to the effective use of bibliographic records in modern society.”8 Besides introducing innovations in bibliographic control, the journal also discusses theoretical backgrounds and analysis of bibliographic organization.

Frequency of publication: Eight issues per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submitting your Paper

Types of contributions accepted: “Full-length research and review articles; descriptions of new programs and technology relevant to cataloging and classification, considered speculative articles on improved methods of bibliographic control for the future, and solicited book reviews.”10

Submission and review process: Authors should submit via ScholarOne Manuscripts after reviewing the submission instructions11

Editorial tone: Scholarly and professional. 12

Style guide used: Taylor & Francis Chicago US endnote-footnote style found here.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized publication that provides relevant news, information, and analyses of and about recent trends in cataloging and classification as well as historical perspectives of experts in the field. This journal is a very useful resource for LIS professionals who deal with bibliographic organization and technical services in their institutions. Persons who are experts in the field, archivists, or other librarians, as well as students interested in writing classification-oriented research papers may submit their work for publication. Articles involving information organization or collection management are only a small part of the breadth of literature that may be written about cataloging and classification.

This journal is abstracted in De Gruyter Saur; IBZ;  Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Inspec; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; OCLC; ArticleFirst; Ovid; Periodica Islamica; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; FRANCIS; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; VINITI RAN; and Clarivate Analytics’ Emerging Sources Citation Index.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Information for updated publication circulation was not found, but looking at article views from recent issues showed significant exposure with most above 100 or 200 downloads over the past month, and historically high numbers of views from various articles dating from the early to mid 2010s, with some reaching near 8000 views.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerationsCataloging & Classification Quarterly may be purchased online from Taylor & Francis and is available worldwide.16 This is an American English publication and its primary readers reside in the United States. However, as evidenced by the diversity of its editorial board members based in different parts of the world, articles in the journal must also accessible to a international audience.17

Reader characteristics: No individual characteristics of the journal’s readers were available. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, however, describes its audience as, “academic; special adult.”18 Naturally, because Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal, its readers have similar interests in LIS topics and issues, particularly in bibliographic organization. The majority of subscribers are likely cataloging professionals and technical services librarians. As LIS professionals, subscribers of this journal likely support the development of cataloging and classification and have interests in other LIS issues.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this specialized journal are doubtless familiar with cataloging and classification, as well as other LIS issues. 20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal that is geared towards the professional cataloger but is also of interest to LIS professionals or graduate students seeking knowledge of bibliographic organization trends or breakthroughs. Authors must keep in mind that these readers are most likely LIS professionals, graduates or students that are knowledgeable about issues in the field of cataloging and librarianship. They are looking for formal and scholarly articles pertaining to topics such as records description and access or classification systems used in special libraries. Research articles on such subjects are the most appropriate for this audience. The use of subheadings is recommended to focus the reader’s attention and show the author’s intention clearly.

Last updated: April 28, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Journal Information.” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wccq20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020 https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  4. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  5. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  6. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  7. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  8. Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  9. “Journal Information” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wccq20
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wccq20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wccq20
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020  https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020,  https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wccq20#peers
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wccq20
  15. “Current issue,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wccq20/58/2?nav=tocList
  16. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  17. “Editorial board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wccq20#.U9cg5LFiND4
  18. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
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ALAN Review, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The ALAN Review

ISSN: 0882-2840 (Print) and 1547-741X (Online)1

Website: http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The ALAN Review, sponsored by the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents (ALAN), a special-interest group of the National Council of Teachers of English, specializes on articles and reviews of literature for adolescents and those teaching literature to adolescents.2

Target audience: Mostly K-12 teachers who use the Review to research titles appropriate for young adults, and librarians, authors, and publishers focusing in the YA area.3

Publisher: Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council of Teachers of English.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly/professional publication focusing on news and reviews of young adult (YA)/adolescent literature. Not affiliated with a specific LIS resource, other than NCTE – but provides information to librarians on how to instruct adolescents in reading literature, and provides book reviews that librarians will find helpful in the workplace.6

Medium: ALAN members get a print copy of each Review with membership.7 Back issues through 2017 can be found on the DLA website, free of charge.8 (Virginia Tech’s Digital Library and Archives (DLA) project provides many scholarly journals in a digital format to get around the high cost of producing print journals.9)

Content: Reviews of young adult/adolescent literature, and articles on the same, as well as articles on the teaching of literature. This can consist of research papers and studies, literature surveys and critiques, author profiles, comp lit studies, and articles on ways to teach literature to YA/adolescents.10

Frequency of publication: Published three times per year: Fall, Winter, and Spring.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines can be found on ALAN Review’s website. They are also located in the journal itself. You can check the DLA for back issues.12 Calls for manuscripts can be found on the ALAN Review home page.13

Types of contributions accepted: Author reviews and interviews, book reviews, articles on adolescent literature and teaching adolescent literature. The ALAN Review has also begun accepting vignettes from librarians and teachers focusing on their experiences and interactions presenting YA material to other teachers, students, parents, etc.14

From Vol. 38 No. 1 (Fall 2010) online: “€œA manuscript submitted for consideration should deal specifically with literature for adolescents and/or the teaching of that literature.”15

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be emailed to tar@utk.edu, with “ALAN manuscript submission” in the subject line, in MS Word, APA format. Authors should submit a manuscript without reference to the author(s), a title pages with names and biographies, and a brief statement of the originality of the article.16

A blind review is done by the editor and at least three members of the editorial-review board. Authors can expect to hear the results in 8 weeks. Articles are judged on: the contribution to the field of adolescent lit; clarity and cohesiveness; and scholarly rigor.17

Editorial tone: The articles are scholarly, and present a thesis, outline the study or observation methods, and present findings, often with charts and graphs and a lots of references. However, the tone is conversational, open, and friendly. The submission guidelines specifically note that research papers and studies should be treated as articles, not formal reports.18

Style guide used: The ALAN Review prefers the use of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Anyone who has read and enjoyed a YA book will most likely think of something that would be appropriate to publish in The ALAN Review. This is a respected, peer-reviewed publication geared towards the very community that LIS students seek to work with. Authors write to their like-minded peers. They are passionate about sharing their experiences in hopes that others can learn from them. The Review is a wonderful outlet for interesting, involved, scholarly articles, reviews or interviews, or for just sharing a story about getting YA novels out to the public-a library event, book club, new way of teaching an old title, a study on readers of YA novels or focus on the reading patterns of a specific subculture (minority students, girls, boys, rural readers, LGBTQ youth)-this is the place for these types of submissions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Review is distributed to all members of the ALAN group, part of the NCTE.20 Ulrich’s currently lists its circulation at around 2,500.21 In 2015, the online catalog received over 133,652 unique visitors.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Review is part of the National Council of Teachers of English, out of Campbell, OH. English is the primary language; however, ALAN has members in all 50 states and internationally, and covers reviews of all sorts of books for adolescents.23 From the submission guidelines: “Stereotyping on the basis of sex, race, age, etc., should be avoided, as should gender-specific terms such as ‘€œchairman.'”24

Reader characteristics: Members of the ALAN are highly interested in youth and young adult literature. Most people receiving this journal through ALAN or NCTE are classroom English teachers in middle or high school, or librarians, researches, authors, publishers specializing in YA literature.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are not expected to be familiar with LIS terminology, although most likely they will as some subscribers are librarians and most are educators. Subscribers to the journal are primarily part of NCTE, teachers in middle and high school as this is a journal for adolescent literature.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is the place to send your manuscript, article, review or story if you’€™re an LIS student with any interest in the YA world. The Alan Review readers are a highly specialized group of professionals teaching and providing reference services to young adults. Sharing your manuscript could potentially influence classrooms around the country—new books to read, new teaching methods, studies and conclusions – this is the place to publish to get your name and ideas out, and to connect with other teaching and library professionals.

Last updated: February 27, 2020


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  The ALAN Review, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/475341233
  2. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  3. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  4. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  5. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  6. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  7. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). Join ALAN. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/join/
  8. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2018). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  9. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). History of DLA and SCP. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/about/index.html
  10. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  11. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  12. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2018). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  13. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  14. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/alan-review-author-guidelines/
  15. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2018). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  16. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/alan-review-author-guidelines/
  17. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/alan-review-author-guidelines/
  18. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/alan-review-author-guidelines/
  19. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/alan-review-author-guidelines/
  20. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). Join ALAN. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/join/
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2020). ALAN Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401814141318/86397
  22. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2018). The ALAN Review Online Access Data. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/stats/ejournals/ALAN-current.html
  23. SerialsSolutions. (2020). ALAN Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401814141318/86397
  24. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/alan-review-author-guidelines/
  25. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
  26. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2020). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/publications/the-alan-review/
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Academic Exchange Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleAcademic Exchange Quarterly

ISSN: 1096-14531

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Academic Exchange Quarterly states it “is dedicated to the presentation of ideas, research, methods, and pedagogical theories leading to effective instruction and learning regardless of level or subject.”2

Website: http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/

Target audience: Primarily targeting professors, instructors, and students interested in scholarly research associated with practical examples of effective teaching and learning in higher education.3

Publisher: Rapid Intellect Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Academic scholarly6

Medium: Print, with selected articles published open access online7

Content: Academic Exchange Quarterly provides highly effective practical examples of college teaching and learning.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm

Types of contributions accepted: As indicated by their website, Academic Exchange Quarterly “welcomes submissions that contribute to effective instruction and learning regardless of level or subject,” including “papers derived from doctoral study, practicum, or a larger underwritten research.”10 LIS topics of particular interest are information literacy and library instruction at all grade levels.11 Graduate student papers must be coauthored with a professor, and adhere to particular guidelines for scholarly publication.12 Articles should observe a 2,000 to 3,000 word limit. Submissions cannot be previously published and cannot be simultaneously submitted to another publication.13

Submission and review process: Editors use an independent, double-blind peer review process. Authors should strictly adhere to the submission process outlined in the guidelines. Manuscript evaluation is expected to take between one and three months, and may be tracked on the publication’s website.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly15

Style guide used: APA, CBE, MLA, or Chicago, Turabian16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Academic Exchange Quarterly provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to higher education instruction. Graduate students who are conducting research with professors should consider this avenue for peer reviewed publication as Academic Exchange Quarterly seeks to support the work of emerging scholars.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Academic Exchange Quarterly reports that since its inception in 1997, over 3,000 authors from over fifty different countries have subscribed to and written for the journal.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States and forty-four foreign countries.18 Academic Exchange Quarterly is published in English worldwide, with its primary audience in North America.19

Reader characteristics: Readers are primarily professors with an interest in effective instruction in higher education.20 The editors advance this shared interest through an objective peer review process that results in an equal-opportunity publication with a content-neutral bias.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Academic Exchange Quarterly publishes a wide cross section of higher education subjects.22 Because of the reader’s presumed limited knowledge of LIS subjects, authors should avoid technical jargon and basic LIS principles should be explained when included in an article.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Academic Exchange Quarterly has a subscriber base of college professors and instructors interested in effective instruction. As such, LIS authors in pursuing a career in academia might consider Academic Exchange Quarterly as a possible target for publication. This publication might also serve as an avenue to broaden interest in information science topics among higher education professionals.

Last updated: February 27, 2020


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Academic Exchange Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523410831967/259937
  2. “From the Editor,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/welcome-j.htm
  3. “From the Editor,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/welcome-j.htm
  4. Academic Exchange Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399425482781/259937
  5. Academic Exchange Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399425482781/259937
  6. Academic Exchange Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, February 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399425482781/259937
  7. “Is Academic Exchange Quarterly (AEQ) an Open Access Publication?,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://www.rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/redfee.htm
  8. “From the Editor,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/welcome-j.htm
  9. Academic Exchange Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399425482781/259937
  10. “Call for Manuscripts,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm
  11. See especially LIS topics requested under “Calls for Papers.” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/
  12.  “Academic Exchange Quarterly Encourages Graduate Students to Position Themselves as Emerging Scholars,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufengs.htm
  13. “Call for Manuscripts,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm
  14. “Call for Manuscripts,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm
  15. “Call for Manuscripts,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm
  16. “Call for Manuscripts,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm
  17. “Academic Exchange Quarterly (AEQ): A Historical Sketch,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/aeqhis.htm
  18. “From the Editor,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/welcome-j.htm
  19. Academic Exchange Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399425482781/259937
  20. “Who Reads Academic Exchange Quarterly?,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/log100.htm
  21. “Call for Manuscripts,” Rapid Intellect Group, accessed February 27, 2020, http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/rufen1.htm
  22. Academic Exchange Quarterly. (2007). Academic Exchange Quarterly (AEQ): A historical sketch. Retrieved from http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/aeqhis.htm
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School Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Journal (SLJ)

ISSN: 0362-89301

Website: https://www.slj.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “School Library Journal is the premiere publication for librarians and information specialists who work with children and teens. A source of quality journalism and reviews for more than 60 years, SLJ produces award-winning features and news coverage on: literacy, best practices, technology, education policy and other issues of interest to the school library and greater educator community.”2

Target audience: Any librarians and information professionals working with children and teens, including librarians in K-12 schools as well as those in public libraries.3

Publisher: Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Professional.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Claims to be one of the most authoritative reviewers of children’s and young adult materials. It mainly focuses on books, but also includes reviews on audio and video items. The journal also contains columns, news, and feature articles.8

Frequency of publication: Monthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Items of interest to librarians and educators who work with children: feature articles, news articles, and specialty columns.10 Articles from the last few years include topics such as rural public libraries, fundraising, app reviews, bloggers, LGBTQ+ Pride, diversity, and tips for school librarians preparing for the first day of school.11

Submission and review process: Send brief article proposals to the appropriate editor before submitting any complete articles. Feature articles are generally less than 2,500 words, while opinion pieces are around 600-700 words. News articles can vary in length, depending on the topic.12

Editorial tone: Informative, but not academic.13

Style guide used: None indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a successful and popular publication that, while encouraging of submissions, may be difficult to break into as a writer. A thorough study of the publication with attention to the authors published in their pages will give a writer a better idea if this is a good match for them.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: School Library Journal has a circulation of 23,000 in the print edition with an estimated reach of 92,000 readers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: There is no specific breakdown on the nationality of the readers available, but the history of the journal reveals that it is entirely geared toward schools in the United States and Canada.15 Most of the readers of this journal would be those who work with youth in libraries in the United States, so there should not be any problems with cultural references, LIS jargon, or terminology particular to education.16

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal would be those who work with K-12 students, either in schools or public libraries. They have a shared interest in promoting literacy and welcome resources that inspire student achievement.17 Articles openly and positively discuss diversity and inclusivity in library services, with article topics ranging from combating systematic racism in schools to selecting LGBTQ+ books for pre-teen collections. More articles and reviews touching on these topics would be welcome.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this journal would not be limited to those with teaching credentials or MLS degrees. Some may be library media technicians who may not have an advanced degree, but would have enough education or professional training in order to understand the subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of School Library Journal have a common interest in children’€™s literature and issues regarding school libraries. Many of the readers are library technicians, so some articles are geared toward encouraging collaboration with teachers and librarians. Authors should recognize that there is an education gap as well as a wage gap between the professionals and the paraprofessionals and should refrain from using an excess of technical terms in their articles. Readers of SLJ maintain a great interest in information literacy and how this can be integrated into the curriculum, as well as increasing the technology available to the students. Introducing ideas that are on the cutting edge of technology yet are not restricted by financial or time constraints would be a way of effectively reaching the intended audience.

Last updated: June 26, 2019.


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399134773/52981
  2. School Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=About-Us
  3. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  7. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions.
  8. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  11. School Library Journal, “News & Features,” accessed June 29, 2019. https://www.slj.com/?subpage=News%20%26%20Features
  12. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  13. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  14. Library Journals, LLC., “Print,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://media.libraryjournal.com/print/#schoollibraryjournalmag.
  15. School Library Journal, “News & Features.”
  16. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  17. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  18. School Library Journal, “News & Articles.”
  19. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
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Knowledge Quest

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Knowledge Quest

ISSN: 1094-9046 (Print) and 2163-5234 (Online)1

Website: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Knowledge Quest supports the American Association of School Librarians’ mission to empower leaders “to transform teaching and learning.”2 The journal is devoted to offering substantive information to assist building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school libraries and school library services.3

Target audience: “Building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school library programs and services.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: Per their site, “Articles address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.”9 Emerging trends, literacy, co-teaching, leadership, and makerspaces are some encouraged topics.10

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly, September through June.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/ (Scroll down to the link to the PDF Author Guidelines.)

Types of contributions accepted: Knowledge Quest seeks “original, unpublished manuscripts that address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.” The editors are not interested in “basic primers” on the role of school librarians or press releases and vendor news.12 Articles should be 2500 words or less.13

Submission and review process: Articles may be emailed to the editor14 or through an online submission form.15 “Unsolicited manuscripts undergo blind review by the Knowledge Quest editorial advisory board. The process takes approximately 3-4 weeks. When the review is completed, the author will be notified of the outcome.”16

Editorial tone: Professional. Through well-written articles, the journal provides information in a helpful and supportive manner.17

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.).18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although this publication has numerous readers, over half of its readership is comprised of elementary school, middle school, and high school librarians.19 The fact that its content does not apply to all aspects of library science limits the reader base and therefore, the scope of articles covered. Professionals working in school libraries are encouraged to submit their work for review. Knowledge Quest desires to be part of the library community and provide support for members of this community through its articles and reviews. Publishing in this journal represents the authors’ dedication to the school library community.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is distributed to 7,000 members and and additional 150 readers. The online component reports over 1,200 visits per day.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This magazine is a publication of the American Association of School Librarians. The material provided in the magazine is designed to support the curriculum in United States public and private schools. The print version of the magazine can be shipped anywhere, but the typical readers reside and work in the United States. Readers can also access the journal via the online component KQ Web and this website can be accessed world wide over the internet.22 This magazine is presented in English and uses terminology relevant to elementary and secondary school librarians. As a publication of the AASL, the magazine has the same vision statement as the organization. This vision statement highlights the magazine’s and the association’s goal to support and embrace cultural and ethnic diversity.23

Reader characteristics: The readers of the magazine are comprised of professionals and supervisors working in library media centers. Readers can be expected to embrace and be familiar with the ethics and values present in school library programs today. By subscribing to the magazine, readers are demonstrating their stance as advocates of literacy and supporters of intellectual freedom. Media specialists are closely related to teachers as they are active members of the learning community. These individuals are well aware of the resources available to them and are always working towards learning new ways to use these resources in better and more productive ways. Most of the readers work in elementary and secondary school libraries both public and nonpublic schools, and will be interested in issues and programs such as library funding, student achievement, student internet use, literacy, intellectual freedom, and technology that effect or involve the readers. Knowledge Quest is interested in producing a quality publication that presents ideas in a friendly and inclusive manner.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With 87% of readers reporting possession of a Master’s degree, it is probable that many have LIS degrees. Readers can be expected to know about school curriculum and are knowledgeable about the technologies and issues relevant to school media centers today.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since Knowledge Quest is a publication of the AASL, the readers expect that the publication will have the same guidelines and requirements characterized by an AASL publication. The readers expect the magazine to publish works which are balanced, relevant to the field, accurate, and up-to-date on issues pertinent to school libraries. 78% of readers report that Knowledge Quest is “essential professional reading,” so authors should expect to produce content that meets that description. 26

Last updated: June 21, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Knowledge Quest,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 19, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560951075174/52980
  2. American Library Association, “About AASL,” accessed June 19, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/about
  3. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ,” accessed June 19,  2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/about-kq/
  4. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/KQ_mediakit_201920_WEB.pdf
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  10. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  11. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  12. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  13. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines,” accessed June 20, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/Author%20Guidelines%20REVISED.pdf
  14. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  15. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  16. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  17. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  18. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  19. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  20. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  21. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  22. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  23. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  24. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  25. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  26. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
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CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. “Home,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Mailing List Information,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory.”
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
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Community & Junior College Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Community & Junior College Libraries

ISSN: 1545-2522[1 ProQuest, “Community & Junior College Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728955023/484756]

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjcl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Through research and insightful interviews with professionals in the field, Community & Junior College Libraries provides a coherent voice for community college librarians. It addresses the need to define and enhance the leading edge of LRC planning and practice in the United States and abroad. Readers receive information on pertinent topics such as information literacy, collection development, programming initiatives, proven policies, conference reports, and networks and consortia.”1

Target audience: Librarians and educators who deliver information resources to community college students and other lower-division undergraduates.2

Publisher: Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS professional news publication. Although submissions are peer-reviewed, the content is news oriented rather than research oriented, so the publication isn’t considered scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, “news of special relevant legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges” and also “Book reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and ongoing columns with specific focus are also included.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (4 issues per volume).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their Instructions for Authors, “Theoretical research and practical studies dealing with the broad general topic of the delivery of information resources to lower division undergraduate students. This unique publication specifically targets issues concerning community college libraries and learning resource centers. Contributors to this fundamental resource present profiles of learning resource centers (LRCs) around the country and address news of special relevance: €”legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges.”9 Topics for submission include information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming or initiatives which involve the library and the academy at large.10

Submission and review process: The journal provides MS Word templates for authors to properly format their submissions. All submissions and reviews are completed and managed through Editorial Manager, which requires authors to create an account.11

Editorial tone: Academic.12

Style guide used: An in-house style guide based on The Chicago Manual of Style. The guide can be found here.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS authors, especially those who work in two-year colleges. Since both theoretical research and practical studies are welcomed on the many topics covered in the journal, LIS authors in any stage of their careers may publish their works on the topics covered in the journal.14

Topics for possible articles include: information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming and initiatives that involve the library and the academy at large.15

The focus on community and junior college libraries creates varied opportunities for LIS authors, as it encourages dialogue regarding the new challenges in the library science field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication focuses primarily on learning resource centers in two-year colleges throughout the United States. The current editor-in-chief is affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC.16 The publication is aimed at educated, LIS-focused readers involved in the community colleges of the United States, indicating a familiarity with LIS jargon without any special consideration for language other than the courtesy of avoiding regionalism. Readers are most likely familiar with diverse cultures due to the varied population that often makes up urban community and junior colleges.17

Reader characteristics: No specific information was found on gender and ethnicity for this specialized group of librarians. The workplace similarity is the tie that binds together the professional librarians in libraries and learning resource centers within community junior colleges.18 Safely assume readers have a commitment to accessibility of information and to providing it to the public, given the open admissions policies and low tuition of two-year colleges that help to create a rich diversity of people of all ages, cultural backgrounds, and socioeconomic backgrounds.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The professionals would have working knowledge of most LIS subject matter related to academic and school library settings. Use of jargon and acronyms of associations would be familiar to the reader.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Community & Junior College Libraries has a readership that works with a wide variety of patrons. Each type of patron or student has different reasons for being at the community college. The librarians try to fulfill the information needs of many different kinds of patrons including those with low incomes, those who need adult school, a GED or remedial education. Some students are prepared for college and their transition to four-year institutions. Some students are enrolled in high school but are taking accelerated programs at the college. There are also many certificate programs that prepare students for a specific career. The librarian must meet the information needs of all of these groups. Author’s writing for this publication must take all this in to consideration.21

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjcl20#.VChU1xawS3M
  2. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  3. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions#.VChZShawS3M
  10. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  13. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  14. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  16. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group). 2019. Editorial Board. Community & Junior College Libraries. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjcl20
  17. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  18. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  19. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  20. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  21. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
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Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

ISSN:1911-9593

Website: http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Partnership is the journal of The Partnership organization, which is “Canada’s national network of provincial and territorial library associations.” The journal “promotes the exchange of ideas about libraries, librarianship, and information science among practitioners across all library sectors.”1

Target audience: Canadian librarians and library workers and LIS professionals, archivists, scholars, researchers, and students. Although the journal is published by The Partnership, a network of Canadian library associations with more than 7,000 people, it is an open-access journal, so its audience is not limited to members.2

Publisher: The Partnership: The Provincial and Territorial Library Associations of Canada (Ontario, Canada).3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts submitted to the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.5

Content: Regular sections in Partnership include Editor’s Comments, Innovations in Practice, Theory and Research, Features, Book Reviews, and News and Announcements.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Partnership accepts “original, unpublished manuscripts in French or English on a broad range of topics relevant to library and information science practitioners in all library sectors.” The editors “encourage submissions which consider the Canadian context, but this is not a necessary condition for acceptance to the journal.”8 Each section has its own editorial guidelines in terms of topic, word count, tone, and approach.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the journal’s website.10 Manuscripts for the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo a double-blind peer-review process, usually within two months of submission.11

Editorial tone: The tone depends on the section; it is overall scholarly but not overly formal.

Style guide used: APA (6th edition), with a modified style for online articles and documents.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This open-access journal appears to be an excellent opportunity for Canadian LIS authors, as it is written for the Canadian LIS community. LIS authors outside of Canada are not excluded by the guidelines, but they should ensure their work meets the needs of the Canadian readers.13 The many sections–theory, pedagogy, practice, professional development, reviews, and library news–cover a huge variety of content and offer writers many opportunities for submitting work that ranges from scholarly to practical to reflective.14  There are a few must-read articles and editorials for authors submitting to Partnership, especially “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership15 and editorials reflecting on the journal’s past and future.16 Furthermore, the journal “provides a chance for librarians and library workers to be editors and reviewers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to a past announcement, in 2017 the journal received over 45,000 views. They have 1500 readers registered with their website.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  This is a Canadian bilingual publication (English and French) for librarians and information professionals of Canada. Authors would need to ensure their work meets their needs and explains any cultural or language differences.

Reader characteristics: Overall, Partnership has a very broad spectrum of readers in the Canadian library and information professions: librarians, library works, scholars, researchers, practitioners, and students. It can be safely assumed the readers are interested in promoting successful libraries and acquiring knowledge to allow them to succeed in their own work. The authors and content of the publication suggests that the majority of readers are working in all types of libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The journal works to connect members of the Canadian library community,19 and the journal’s sections are variously academic, reflective, and newsy. Readers probably have a range of LIS knowledge, from the practical to the academic.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should first take into consider how their work is broadly or specifically related to libraries and library scholarship in Canada. Furthermore, readers come to this journal to read on a a wide range of current topics in the library profession: research, pedagogy, professional development, and current news and profiles. Readers work at every level of the Canadian library profession and in all types of libraries.

Last updated: April 8, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “What is The Partnership?” ThePartnership.ca, accessed February 19, 2018, http://www.thepartnership.ca/web/PARTNERSHIP/About/PARTNERSHIP/About.aspx?hkey=57981e1d-6cc7-4b09-822e-ebdfd7f2e3b2.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Submissions,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/submissions.
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Information for Authors,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/information/authors#.WouLFRPwZUM.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “Editorial Policies.”
  15. See David Fox, “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership,Partnership 8, no. 1 (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v8i1.2692.
  16. See Robin Bergart, Leanne Olson, and Nathalie Soini, “Editorial: Charting the Course of Partnership,Partnership 12, no. 1 (2017): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v12i1.3976, and Jennifer Richard, “Celebrating 10 Years of Canadian Librarianship through the Partnership Journal,” Partnership 11, no. 1 (2016): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i1.3682.
  17. “Journal History,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/history#.WouedhPwZUM.
  18. “Top Viewed Articles,” Partnership, December 06, 2017, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/announcement/view/128.
  19. “Journal History.”
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