Wiki Tags Archives: Government

DttP: Documents to the People

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: DttP: Documents to the People

ISSN: 2688-125X1

Website: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp

Purpose, objective, or mission: DttP: Documents to the People is the official publication of the Government Documents Round Table (GODORT) of the American Library Association (ALA). This publication disseminates information to ALA and GODORT members about government information and activities on a local, state, national, and international level, and provides information on the professional activities of GODORT.2

Target audience: ALA and GODORT members as well as individuals interested in the global and national environments, and government information and activities.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news magazine.6

Medium: Online 7

Content: From their site, they publish articles on government information and government activities at local, state, national, and international, and intergovernmental levels, and documents the professional activities of GODORT.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp/about/submissions#authorGuidelines10

Types of contributions accepted: Accepts full-length articles (prefer 1,500-3,000 words in length), news items, letters, and other information intended for publication encompassing subjects within DttP‘s scope. Of particular interest for LIS students will be Student Paper Submissions11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted via email to the Co-Lead Editors at dttp.editor@gmail.com, and reviewed for acceptance by editorial staff. Email attachments preferred, in MS Word.12

Editorial tone: The Instructions for Authors ask for articles written in a “grammatically correct, simple, readable style.”13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Within the scope of this publication’s focus, there is considerable potential for LIS authors interested in writing to increase their visibility. While this publication is not peer-reviewed they offer informative works covering a variety of topics. While it may seem that government documents are a narrow field with a limited audience, check out the archived issues for interesting article topics that might be surprising.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Online worldwide

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because DttP covers local, state, national, and international government information, it is safe to assume that a majority of its subscribers are U.S. LIS professionals but since it’s available online, anyone could access the publication. Although most articles deal with issues within the LIS field, they are written in English using language that is comprehensible to the layperson, informal, and straightforward.16

Reader characteristics: GODORT does not have any demographic information specified on their circulation information but, because they stress the subject scope of DttP, we might assume that most subscribers are LIS professionals within a law library or government setting and also include LIS students and laypersons interested in government records. The majority of DttP readers are ALA/GODORT members and are likely to be LIS professionals. According to the ALA website, GODORT works to “provide a nexus for initiating and supporting programs to increase the availability, use and bibliographic control of documents.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers are most likely ALA/GODORT members, the DttP audience will be knowledgeable about general LIS issues and topics. They would be especially familiar with subject matters that involve government information use and dissemination, as well as national efforts to restrict as well as to promote access to these types of information.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A majority of the readers of DttP are GODORT members that are documents librarians or interested in local, state, national, and international government information, however, this publication is also available to non-GODORT or ALA members and, because it is a trade and not a scholarly publication, it is also made accessible to non-LIS professionals. Authors who want to contribute to the journal should opt for an informal yet informative tone and avoid discussing specialized LIS issues that the layperson would not immediately understand, such as bibliographic organization. Although it does pay attention to LIS issues, the primary focus of the journal is on documenting government information and the professional activities of GODORT.19

 


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. DTTP, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 1, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521727649444/60865
  2. American Library Association. (2020). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp
  3. American Library Association. (2020). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp
  4. ProQuest. (2020). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  5. ProQuest. (2020). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  6. ProQuest. (2020). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  7. ProQuest. (2020). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  8. American Library Association. (2020). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp
  9. ProQuest. (2020). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  10. American Library Association. (2020). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. American Library Association. (2020). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. American Library Association. (2020). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. American Library Association. (2020). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. American Library Association. (2020). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. American Library Association. (2020). DttP Full Text. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp/issue/archive
  16. ProQuest. (2020). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  17. American Library Association. (2020). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp
  18. American Library Association. (2020). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp
  19. American Library Association. (2020). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from https://journals.ala.org/index.php/dttp
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base line

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: base line

ISSN: 1943-65481

Website: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: base line is the official publication of the Map and Geospatial Information Round Table (MAGIRT). MAGIRT “leads and inspires information professionals at all levels of expertise in their work with map and geospatial information resources, collections, and technologies in all formats, through community, education, and advocacy.”2 “The purpose of base line is to provide current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”3

Target audience: As per MAGIRT’s site: “People interested or involved in any aspect of map or geospatial librarianship.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Each issue “provide(s) current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”9

Frequency of publication: base line is published electronically six times a year: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. All older issues of base line are now freely available on the MAGIRT website.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: On the first page of each issue: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Types of contributions accepted: base line calls itself “a medium of communication for members of MAGIRT and information of interest is welcome.”11 Articles related to cartography, geography, “related governmental activities, and map librarianship ” would be welcome.12

Submission and review process: Depending on article content, contributions can be sent to one of the editors, check the first page of the latest publication. These are the editors as of April 2020:

Editor: John A. Olson
Government and Geo-Information Librarian
Syracuse University
Tel: 315-443-4818 E-mail: jaolson@syr.edu

Distribution Manager: Mike Smith
Subject Specialist for Maps, California Gov Info, GIS
Coordinator, UCSD
Tel: 858/534-1248 E-mail: mls003@ucsd.edu

Cataloging Editor: Tammy T. Wong
Cartographic Materials Cataloger
Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress
Tel: 202/707-6735 E-mail: twon@loc.gov

Digital Mapping Editor: VACANT

New Maps and Books Editor: Kim Plassche
Sciences Librarian, Liaison to Geography & GIS
University at Buffalo
Tel: 716/645-8168 E-mail: kf43@buffalo.edu13

Editorial tone: Articles tend towards an informal, but professional voice.14

Style guide used: Not specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although there is an informality in tone to this publication, there is still room for a more professional article related to geospatial information. This publication offers a good opportunity for a writer with experience in this field of librarianship to be published.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As a benefit of membership in MAGIRT, base line reaches 313 members on top of being freely available on the web.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in the U.S. and is written in American English.16 As members hail from across North America, authors should avoid using local terminologies or dialects, and should be tailored to a national audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers are mostly members of MAGIRT. As such, one can assume that the majority of readers are “involved in the geospatial librarianship world.”17

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized LIS knowledge can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of base line are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to MAGIRT committee work and topics related to geospatial librarianship. Members of MAGIRT seem eager to “connect with like-minded people, to learn, or to impart…knowledge.”18 Although the pool of readers is relatively small, the LIS author who is interested in geospatial information will find a supportive and interested readership in base line.


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Base Line, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521734545098/483555
  2. American Library Association. (2020). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  3. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  4. American Library Association. (2020). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  5. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  6. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  7. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  8. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  9. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  10. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  11. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  12. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  13. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  14. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  15. American Library Association. (2020). MAGIRT Map & Geospatial Resources: About MAGIRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://magirt.ala.libguides.com/resources
  16. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  17. American Library Association. (2020). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
  18. American Library Association. (2020). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
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Archeota

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of the Society of American Archivists Student Chapter at the San Jose State University School of Information. This open source digital publication provides a platform for student voices, and is written by students for students. Archeota publishes original, substantive content on issues and events connected to the world of archives. Articles include profiles of iSchool students in recognition of outstanding achievements, student experiences working in archives, and think pieces related to archives on current events, controversial issues, pop culture, and other topics in the archival field. 

The mission of the Society of American Archivists Student Chapter at the San Jose State University School of Information (SJSU SAASC) is to promote archival interests in the academic community, provide a platform for discussing archival issues, and to engage students in professional activities in order to enhance career development. The chapter serves its membership by organizing repository site visits, virtual panel discussions and webinars, providing networking opportunities, and inviting professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.1

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.2

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.3 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.4

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.5

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Think pieces on archives-related events and stories in the news; reflections or advice pieces based on first-hand experience, including jobs, internships, or volunteer work; interviews with practicing archivists; reports on SAASC events and site tours; reviews of archives-related media, such as podcast, blog, book, etc.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should be graduate students at San Jose State University School of Information. You can send an email with your proposal idea to sjsusaasc@gmail.com8

Editorial tone: The magazine-style publication is geared toward graduate students in the information profession interested in archives.

Style guide used: APA.9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to publish original content and contribute to discourse in the archival field. The publication serves as a platform for student voices and promotes archival interests in the School of Information community at San Jose State University.10

Information edits provided by Kelli Roisman, SJSU SAASC Chair 2019/2020

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Archeota is an open-source digital publication.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:

The audience of Archeota is primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The SJSU School of Information is a 100% online program, therefore the student body is widely dispersed in the United States and internationally. The physical location of the university is San Jose, California. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in the SJSU School of Information’s  MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital project specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.11 12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records, or those who simply have an interest in the field. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences of what it’s like to work in a particular setting, professional projects and internships, and reflections, observations, and commentary on archival issues.


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  6. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  11. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  12. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCanadian Journal of Information and Library Science / La Revue canadienne des sciences de l’information et de bibliothéconomie

ISSN: 1195-096X (Print) and 1920-7239 (Online)1

Websitehttp://cais-acsi.ca/the-canadian-journal-of-information-and-library-science/

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the vehicle of the Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), the journal seeks to advance the study of information and library science in Canada “by serving as a forum for discussion of theory and research. The journal is concerned with research findings, understanding of issues in the field, information practices of individuals and groups, and understanding of the history, economics, and technology of information or library systems and services.”2

Target audience: Canadian LIS community3

Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Journals Division4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print. It’s available online via Project MUSE7

Content: “The journal publishes research papers, scholarly opinion papers, reviews of research, brief communications, and reviews of books and other media” in both English and French.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts submissions of “research papers, scholarly opinion papers, reviews of research, brief communications, and reviews of books and other media” in both English and French. Reviews of publications by Canadian authors are of particular interest.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted to the online system. A tentative title and an abstract of 50-100 words, preferably in both English and French, should be included. Submissions will be reviewed by at least two independent referees. Additional details about manuscript formatting are available on the journal website.11

Editorial tone: Academic/ Scholarly12

Style guide used: The journal uses an in-house style that is outlined on its website.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science provides an excellent opportunity for LIS authors looking to publish scholarly, career advancing work and establish a presence outside the United States.

This publication is abstracted and indexed in Academic Search Elite/Premier, Canadian Periodical Index, Computer and Control Abstracts, Cultures, Langues, Textes: La revue de sommaires, Current Contents: Social and Behavioural Sciences, ERIC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (IBR), International Bibliography of Periodical Literature on the Humanities and Social Science (IBZ), SCOPUS, Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA), Library Literature, Professional Development Collection, and Social Science Citation Index.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Exact circulation numbers are not available, but the journal is a benefit of membership in Canadian Association for Information Science / L’association canadienne des sciences de l’information (CAIS-ACIS). Membership is automatic for all attendees of the annual conference of the association.15 The journal is also available online through Project MUSE.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal, while covering LIS topics in general, is written and aimed at LIS academics, both English and French speaking, practicing in Canada.17

Reader characteristics: The audience for this journal is a mix of academics and industry and government professionals such as information scientists and archivists, librarians, computer scientists, and educators. Readership also includes those in “media studies and journalism, business, psychology, health sciences, education, law, and many other areas.”18 This indicates a variety of workplaces from universities, large corporations and government organizations.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering their shared interest in the mission of the CAIS-ACIS, it suggests the readers, while not all information science professionals, have considerable knowledge of LIS subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication are interested in furthering their ability to practice in the field, to acquire information on new research that will support their work in support of libraries. The readers are also most likely residents of Canada and, while most of the papers published would easily benefit a librarian or information professional residing anywhere in the world, submissions need to be relevant to librarians practicing in Canada.

Last updated: April 28, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1588090872879/72671
  2. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  3. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  4. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  5. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  6. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  7. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/the-canadian-journal-of-information-and-library-science/
  8. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  9.  Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  10. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28. 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  11. “Guidelines for Submission,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/
  12. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  13. “Guidelines for Submission,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/
  14. “Abstracting and Indexing,” University of Toronto Press, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.utpjournals.com/Canadian-Journal-of-Information-and-Library-Science.html
  15. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  16. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Project MUSE, accessed April 28, 2020, http://muse.jhu.edu/journal/497
  17. “Call for Papers,” Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), accessed November 15, 2016, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  18. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  19. “Call for Papers,” Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
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Library Connect Newsletter

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Connect Newsletter

ISSN: 1549-37331

Website: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Library Connect Newsletter covers library and information science best practices, issues, technology and trends. Library Connect is a global program from Elsevier for academic, medical, corporate and government librarians. .”2

Target audience: Academic, medical, corporate and government librarians. 3

Publisher: Elsevier, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Topics of interest to librarians, including LIS news, current issues in LIS, best practices, Elsevier news, and thoughts from leaders in the LIS field.8

Frequency of publication: 10 times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract

Types of contributions accepted: Interested in your experiences as an academic, corporate, medical or government librarian such as tactical or how-to articles, librarian roles, big ideas or strategies, community news, and how Elsevier products provide solutions.10

Submission and review process: Read the editorial guidelines and if your article fits, then email the editor at libraryconnect@elsevier.com with a short description for review and response.11

Editorial tone: Conversational and professional12

Style guide used: The Library Connect Newsletter evaluates submission based on their content, not form or language, and provides editing support to authors.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Connect Newsletter is a respected professional publication with a global audience. LIS practitioners, educators, and students are encouraged to submit work or story ideas here particularly for their targeted librarian groups. Editing support is available which makes it an ideal site for new writers.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are more than 50,000 subscribers in 175 countries to Library Connect webinars and the newsletter.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Publisher based in United States, publication has international audience and a review of the past issues finds articles written by information professionals from around the world.16

Reader characteristics: Library Connect Newsletter is read around the globe by academic, special and medical librarians “interested in library and information science best practices, issues, trends and events.” Readers are likely to be professionals in the field of library issues as well as Elsevier advocates.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to be familiar with general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors should avoid highly specialized topics and language.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors are advised to submit work of a practical nature, rather than overly scholarly content, as Library Connect Newsletter serves as forum for professional news and discussion.19

Last updated: March 16, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Connect Newsletter, Elsevier, Inc., accessed March 16, 2020, https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/
  2. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  3. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  5. Elsevier Inc. (2020). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  6. Elsevier Inc. (2020). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  8. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  9. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  10. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  11. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  12. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  13. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  14. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  15. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  16. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  17. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  18. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  19. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
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Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information (Title changed from Archives and Museum Informatics in 2001.)1

ISSN: 1389-01662

Purpose, objective, or mission: Promotes the development of archival science as a scientific discipline. Per their website “…this journal is the only independent, international, peer-reviewed journal on archival science, covering all aspects of theory, methodology and practice, with appropriate attention to the non-anglophone world…”3

Websitehttps://www.springer.com/journal/10502

Target audience: The primary audience is researchers and educators in the field of archival science; a secondary audience is other professionals interested in recorded information.4

Publisher: Springer Netherlands5

Peer reviewed? Yes6 However, the journal website provides no information on the review process.

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Print and online, selected articles available open access8

Content: Articles cover all aspects of archival science theory, methodology, and practice; investigations of different cultures; comparisons of perspectives and practices worldwide; and the field of process-related information. The journal especially focuses on the comparison of procedures and techniques throughout the world, especially in non-English-speaking countries.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: See “Submission Guidelines” at https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: The publication focuses on the scientific aspects of the archival field. Articles deal with the creation, preservation and retrieval of archival information; the social, cultural and historical facets of archived information; and the theory and methodology of information generation and use.11

Submission and review process: Entire manuscripts are accepted through an online submission process.12 The site offers detailed information regarding submission guidelines and also provides a series of online tutorials to help an author prepare a manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly14

Style guide used: Publication has an in-house style guide, provided in the “Instructions for Authors” tab.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A review of previously published articles indicates that the majority of authors are from the LIS academic community. Archival Science is an international publication, and the authors are international as well. Faculty at U.S. institutions such as Simmons College, the University of North Carolina, and the University of Pittsburgh were represented with recent articles. There was no indication of graduate students’ work in the publication, suggesting this journal may only be an option for experienced authors from the academic community; however, the journal does offer mentoring through their online course tutorials.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 82,140 Downloads (2018)

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an English-language journal published in the Netherlands. Due to its international audience, prospective authors should avoid regionalisms and ensure that any references, such as cultural and geographic terms, are clear to the reader.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are academics, well-educated within their field, and interested in promoting archival science as an autonomous scientific discipline. Interests span all aspects of archival science theory, methodology, and practice. While readers work in a variety of environments, including universities, governments, and museums, the journal is aimed at academics. Readers would likely not have an interest in LIS issues beyond those related to their work as archivists. Also, writing that focuses on local issues not applicable to another location would hold little interest for the average reader.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Archivists will most likely have a general understanding of how their work is related to the LIS field, but not all archivists will have an LIS degree. For example, archivists working for the United States federal government are not required to have an LIS degree.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in writing for this publication need to be secure in their knowledge and reputation in the archival profession, as the readers expect articles that are thought provoking and will add to their knowledge of the field.

Last updated: February 28, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  2.  Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523412328038/275476
  3. “Archival Science,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  4. “Archival Science,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020,  https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  5. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  6. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  7. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  8. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  9. “Archival Science,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  10. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020 https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/aims-and-scope
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines
  13. “Author and Reviewer Tutorials,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/gp/authors-editors/authorandreviewertutorials
  14. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines
  16. “Submission Guidelines” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines
  17. “Archival Science” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  18. “Archival Science” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
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American Archivist, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The American Archivist

ISSN: 0360-9081 (Print) and 2327-9702 (Online)1

Website: https://americanarchivist.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of The American Archivist states it “seeks to reflect thinking about theoretical and practical developments in the archival profession.”2 It is the journal of the Society of American Archivists, so the focus is on the cultural, social, legal, and technological developments in North America in particular.3

Target audience: Archivists and special collections librarians.4

Publisher: Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS and History, scholarly7

Medium: Print and online open access; last six issues available to SAA members and subscribers only, or to the general public for a fee.8

Content: Includes research articles, case studies, commentaries on issues and practices of interest to the field, essays on international archival practices, annotated professional resource bibliographies, discussions of professional practice and initiatives, and letters to the editor on previously published articles and other topics of interest to the field.9

Frequency of publication: Semi-annual.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy

Types of contributions accepted: Original research articles, case studies, opinion and editorial pieces, articles concerning international practices or perspectives, professional resource bibliographies, and reviews of books, archival literature, finding aids, microfilm editions, exhibits, and computer software.11

Submission and review process: The preferred maximum length is 8,000 words for research articles and surveys, and 3,000 words for case studies and perspectives. These length requirements may be waived for certain articles in consultation with the editor. All articles should be accompanied by a 250-word abstract. Manuscripts are to be submitted electronically through the Submissions Manager in Microsoft Word, double-spaced and pages numbered throughout, with author’s name and address on the title page only.12

The American Archivist is a refereed journal. Each submission will be reviewed by two experts in the subject matter of the submission, and a final decision for publication will be based on their reviews. Final decision normally takes a minimum of three months.13

Acceptance for publication is usually on the condition that specified revisions be made. Once an article is accepted, author will send a short biographical statement and photo. Authors are given the opportunity to approve all editorial changes and to review page proofs for correction of printer’s errors. It usually takes a year for a submission to be seen in print.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition; for professional terminology refer to the definitions outlined in A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology by Richard Pearce-Moses.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If the author is looking for an avenue to enter the conversation of current, scholarly archival practices and the future of conserving information, this may be one of the more prestigious journals through which to pursue publication. Publishing in American Archivist is sure to have weight when interviewing for a position, or to fulfill tenure or promotion requirements for academic libraries or other scholarly institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The American Archivist circulates to around 5,300 members of the Society of American Archivists, while the digital edition receives about 17,000 page views per month17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SAA members live and work all over North America. There is no specified or dominant culture or geographic area. This journal is mainly focused on North American archivists and their practices, and all articles are in English. However, this journal expresses a definite interest in the archival practices of their international colleagues, and specifically looks for articles on this subject.18

Reader characteristics: Highly educated individuals, most of whom have at least two university degrees. Most have history and/or library science graduate degrees. There are further specializations in every area imaginable, so a variety of interests are represented here. There is no information provided on age, gender, or ethnicity of the members. This audience works in a variety of professional settings, including universities and higher education, private corporations, nonprofits, historical societies, public and special libraries, art and history museums, religious organizations, and government agencies. Some specializations include acquisition and appraisal, business archives, religious archives, academic archives, museums, description (cataloging), electronic records, government records, manuscript repositories, oral history, preservation, reference and access, and visual materials to name a few. People may work by themselves with little to no assistance, or work in immense academic or private institutions with a fleet of colleagues and assistants. The most striking characteristic of American Archivist readers is that they love and believe in what they do. They are incredibly interested in their profession, and how to continue and expand it into the future. These readers are interested in practical approaches and ideas, as they are practitioners in the real world who are usually short on money, space, and time. Theoretical discussions with no practical applications would be of little value to them.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With extensive knowledge specific of their branch of LIS, these readers are well versed in the history of archiving and preservation and specific technologies and practices, and are often eager to discuss and debate new technologies and future practices in the field. They are familiar with both LIS and archival terminology, concerns, issues, and theories. Archival studies includes several different models used for appraisal, weeding, preservation, etc., which are also discussed in this publication. Not all readers will possess an LIS degree as some enter the field by way of a history or museum education and background.20

Conclusion: Reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this publication can be extremely intimidating for the new author and archival professional. Many of SAA’s members have been publishing in this journal (and others) for years, and their names are well-known and carry weight at conferences and national conventions. They have highly specialized and technical knowledge ranging over hundreds of topics, localities, and institutional settings. These readers are professional scholars and practitioners who value both theoretical and applied research in archival science. They will be looking for excellent academic writing, new ideas, or suggestive case studies with relevance to their own repositories. This is a high standard to meet. However, if an author feels he or she has something to add to the conversation of archival studies, this is the right forum. This is where the newest, most significant research, case studies, and experimental models in the field are disseminated and discussed.

Last updated: February 28, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-712559018
  2. “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  3.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28. 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  4.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  5. The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  6.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  7.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  8.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  9. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  10.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  11. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  12. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  13. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  14. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  15.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  16. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  17. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  18. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  19. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
  20. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
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Marketing Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Library Services

ISSN: 0896-39081

Website: www.MarketingLibraryServices.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Marketing Library Services (MLS) emerged in 1987 and is the longest-running publication that regularly delivers how-to articles and case studies for marketers in all types of libraries. They’re written by practitioners from around the world and curated by a respected expert who has 25+ years in the field. These detailed, vetted articles deliver more value than the brief ideas and advice offered via social media.2

Target audience: Information professionals in any type of library who need to learn to do better marketing, promotion, and advocacy.3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: MLS covers strategies and tactics for all marketing-related topics: advocacy, outreach, branding, segmentation, social media, funding initiatives, long-term campaigns, assessment, ROI, partnerships, promotional materials, program publicity, communications, PR, advertising, etc. Subscribers will also benefit from interviews with marketing masters, conference coverage, book reviews, and news.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December).9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: The editor of Marketing Library Services, Kathy Dempsey, does not accept blind submissions; instead, it is preferable to email her first (see Editor below) with an article idea, so that she can see if it fits in with upcoming issues, or whether or not something similar has already been published. In a personal correspondence she asserts that if the topic is something useful to Marketing Library Services readership, she will send the author a desired length and deadline. Writers will be sent guidelines, and all graphics (photos, charts, etc.) must be in color and high resolution.10

The site itself says very little about submissions. Editorial communications should be directed to the editor, Kathy Dempsey, at kdempsey@infotoday.com.11

Types of contributions accepted: From a correspondence with the editor: “Marketing Library Services covers a wide range of marketing-related topics, including these: advocacy, outreach, programming, fundraising, event planning, dealing with the media, getting votes for library issues, proving your value, making good promotional materials, community promotion, online promotion, winning related awards, studying demographics for target marketing, innovations, surveys and focus groups, strategic communication, etc. And, of course, true marketing (plans for full campaigns).” Also, “in addition to the case studies, Marketing Library Services carries news, reviews of books and videos, conference coverage, and links to library articles and culture.” 12

Submission and review process: Authors first should send correspondence to Kathy Dempsey stating their idea. Because Marketing Library Services is published often, timely articles are strongly recommended. Also, authors must have been directly involved in the projects they are writing about, and must write in the first person. Ms. Dempsey states that authors’ specific titles do not matter.13

Editorial tone: Marketing Library Services should not be written in third-person or academic tones. The newsletter’s tone is conversational, professional, and should inspire readers. According to the editor, “Articles should be written as if you’€™re sitting down with a colleague and explaining your project over lunch.”14

The editor will correspond with the author about this after the author’s idea has been accepted.15

Style guide used: Associated Press.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Marketing Library Services is a very good resource for LIS authors interested in writing on community outreach and marketing of library services. Many topics can fall under this umbrella, so it is important for potential authors to be creative and open in how they frame their content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Marketing Library Services has 700 subscribers. Most of these are in North America, but some are in Europe and in other English-speaking countries.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the content of the newsletter is in English and about a broad topic (marketing), the geographic location of the newsletter’s readership is assumed to reside across the United States. There are some readers from outside the United States, but because marketing can be culturally specific, those readers are likely already doing the work of cultural translation. English is used entirely throughout Marketing Library Services and, for the most part, readers are American or from Europe.18 Because of this spread, colloquialisms should be avoided (as in most professional writing).

Reader characteristics: According to Kathy Dempsey, the editor, most of the readership is comprised of librarians who market for their organization, while others are managers and directors. She also states that some are professors specializing in marketing. Because Marketing Library Services readership is comprised of professionals directly involved in marketing, it may be safely assumed that jargon specific to marketing is fine. As well, because this is a trade journal, readers will be interested in practical information. Kathy Dempsey states from a personal correspondence that, “MLS is written for a wide horizontal market that covers all types of libraries: public, academic, special (medical, gov’€™t, etc.), corporate, and to a lesser extent, K-12 school. It welcomes article queries from all of these librarians. What they all have in common is the need to promote their services. Many case studies about how one lib accomplished a goal can be used as models to doing similar things in other types of libraries. Articles on projects that have this ability to be widely replicated are especially valuable.”19

Readers of Marketing Library Services work in many types of libraries, so it may be safely assumed that they all value libraries’ continuing prosperity. That said, this does not mean that their values are identical. However, the newsletter’s tone is conversational, not argumentative. Articles written arguing strongly for one thing or another probably will not fit in Marketing Library Services.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Marketing Library Services is a newsletter informing LIS professionals the best practices and valuable ideas regarding LIS marketing. Professionals reading this newsletter are looking for good ideas and solidly practical plans and instances of good marketing. Marketing Library Services is not a dry tome of theoretical research written in an hermetic tone. Nonetheless, most of the readers are deeply engaged with marketing their organization, and are working professionals whose time and attention is valuable. Writers should consider their readers as interested colleagues who are deeply interested in successful programs and campaigns, and how they may learn from writers’ experiences and implement similar strategies in their own organizations.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Proquest, “MLS: Marketing Library Services,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521418800307/153039
  2. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Marketing Library Services,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/
  3. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  8. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  9. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  10. Dempsey, K., 27 June 2019, personal communication.
  11. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Subscription & Editorial Info,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mls-subs.shtml
  12. Dempsey, personal communication.
  13. Dempsey, personal communication.
  14. Dempsey, personal communication.
  15. Dempsey, personal communication.
  16. Dempsey, personal communication.
  17. Dempsey, personal communication.
  18. Dempsey, personal communication.
  19. Dempsey, personal communication.
  20. Dempsey, personal communication.

    Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this newsletter have a high degree of LIS subject matter. Marketing Library Services caters to the LIS profession, so references to library specific trends, ideas, and concepts will be well received and will not require a high degree of explanation. However, because the readership is broadly based across the LIS professional spectrum some terms and knowledge specific to one group may not be appropriate for all readers.[21. Dempsey, personal communication.

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College & Research Libraries News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Research Libraries News

ISSN: 0099-0086 (Print) and 2150-6698 (Online)1

Website: http://crln.acrl.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: C&RL News “provides articles on the latest trends and practices affecting academic and research libraries and serves as the official newsmagazine and publication of record of the Association of College and Research Libraries.”2

Target audience: Members of the ACRL.3

Publisher: Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news magazine.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Per their website, “College & Research Libraries News (C&RL News) publishes articles, reports, and essays written by practitioners addressing philosophy and techniques of day-to-day management of academic library services and collections. C&RL News provides current information relating to issues, activities, and personalities of the higher education and academic and research library field. Information literacy, scholarly communication, technology, professional education, preservation, government actions that affect libraries, acquisitions, grants to libraries, product updates, and the business of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) are covered in C&RL News.”8

Frequency of publication: 11 monthly issues.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, essays, and reports.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted to the editor via email. Only original manuscripts that have not been published will be accepted, however, exception may be given to previous items published in other institutional newsletters. Submission length depends on type: “News notes may be 150-350 words; essays for “The Way I See It” should be 750-1,000 words; feature articles (Scholarly Communication, ACRL Techconnect, and Internet Resources) should be no more than 2,000 words.” Footnotes, charts and tables should be minimal; graphics should be included with submission. The author is responsible for obtaining permission for the use of any graphics. Please provide a brief caption and credit (if needed) for all images.11 Authors should consult past issues and the author guidelines for instructions on writing for specific columns.

Editorial tone: Practical, accurate, informative, and informal. Even humorous essays are welcomed.12

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with C&RL News provides a strong foundation for both an author’s portfolio, in addition to allowing the author to be involved in a LIS association. Authors are not required to become ACRL members to publish with C&RL News; however, ACRL offers a variety of publication tools and resources, including wikis and other forums for information sharing that is important to the professional development of librarians, and LIS authors. C&RL News provides new LIS authors the potential to build their writing portfolio within a supportive, field-specific environment.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The largest division of the ALA, the ACRL claims a membership of over 10,000.15 Since these members receive automatic subscriptions to the C&RL News, this would be a certain count towards the circulation. However, nonmembers can also subscribe to the publication, and the latest circulation total notes the total circulation count at 14,000. Aside from members and nonmember single subscriptions, there may also be subscriptions by other libraries or related groups (educators) that may have an interest in receiving this publication.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, the publication is geared towards academic and research libraries in America. However, the subscription information provides rates specific to subscriptions to Canada, Postal Union of the Americas and Spain (PUAS) countries, and all other countries.17 The publication is printed in English and serves as the official news outlet for a US-based organization, so cultural considerations do not seem to expand beyond the U.S. However, some columns may include international websites and stories on librarianship in other countries18 which demonstrate an awareness of how library trends and practices in other countries can affect U.S. librarianship.

Reader characteristics: The audience of C&RL News is comprised of members of the ACRL, who are professional librarians, staff, administrators, directors, educators in LIS, and students. Nearly all members report affiliation with universities or colleges, with almost half belonging to large research or doctoral-granting universities. The smallest reported group of subscribers is those affiliated with two-year or technical colleges, who comprise 11% of the current membership.19 Readers are used to the publication’s inclusion of more personal insights into individual experiences and humorous anecdotes, and are therefore likely to be open to new perspectives.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the ACRL is a professional association of academic librarians and individuals with interest in academic librarianship, an advanced and specific knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed. Readers will not want definitions and descriptions of issues that they are familiar with; this audience expects to be informed on the current news, trends, and practices in academic and research libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication’s readers are involved in their libraries, their institutions, the academic library community, and the academic community itself. Though not a scholarly publication, informal research exploring best practices and methods for improving services is a sure way to maintain readers’ attention. From archives to community college public services, any essay on a specific topic within the academic library field could offer readers the opportunity to apply the author’s findings to their own institutions. However, authors should keep in mind that readers have diverse experiences. Staff members at technical colleges may be more interested in new resources on serving local communities, whereas administrators at research universities may have a greater interest in international trends. Whatever the chosen topic, authors should be sure to write from experience and with the confidence of expertise.

Last updated: June 29, 2019.


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “College & Research Libraries News,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561866753201/119300
  2. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/pages/view/about
  3. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5.  Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  6. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  7. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0.
  8. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  9. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  10. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
  11. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  12. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  13. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  14. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  15. American Library Association, “About ACRL,” Association of College & Research Libraries, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl.
  16. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/ACRL_MediaKit19.pdf.
  17. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  18. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Past Issues,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/issue/archive.
  19. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide.
  20. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
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CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. “Home,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Mailing List Information,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory.”
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
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