Wiki Tags Archives: Collections

Collection and Curation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection and Curation (renamed in 2018 from Collection Building)

ISSN: 2514-9326 (Print) and 2514-9334 (Online)1

Website: https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/acronym/CC

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection and Curation provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”2

Target audience: Academics and professionals concerned with collection development in libraries, museums, archives, and galleries. 3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.10

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection and Curation is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal. As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development and curation.

Collection and Curation does not list abstracting or indexing data.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.14 This journal reaches a worldwide audience, with an editorial team based in Australia, Greece, the United Kingdom, India, Canada, and the United States, 15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development, curation, and management.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While the focus of this journal is generally on LIS subjects and topics, since broadening its scope in 2018 to include a curation aspect, the journal now includes non-LIS specific content that those in museums and galleries will find helpful. Looking at recent issues shows a broad scope, including traditional LIS subjects such as collection development, but also discussions on European women photographers and Mexican photojournalism. Therefore deep knowledge of LIS subject matter would be helpful, but not required.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: May 11, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/91750902
  2. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  3. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  4. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  5. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11. 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  6. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  7. “Purchase and Trial Options” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/purchase-trial-options?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  8. “Aims and Scope” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#aims-and-scope
  9. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines
  11. “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines
  13. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f

    Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.[14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020,  https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines

  14. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  15. “Editorial Team,” https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#editorial-team
  16. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#aims-and-scope
  17. “Collection and Curation” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/issn/2514-9326
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Collection Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Management

ISSN: 0146-2679 (Print) and 1545-2549 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/aboutThisJournal?journalCode=wcol20

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Collection Management states that the publication “offers library professionals of all types crucial guidance in the fast-changing field of collection management, including the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries.3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Collection Management covers topics on collection management, planning, allocation of resources, selection, and acquisitions, development of virtual collections, consortia, resource sharing, preservation, and other relevant topics8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wcol20

Types of contributions accepted: Per the publication website, “The journal welcomes articles that provide library professionals with crucial guidance about the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”10

Submission and review process: Collection Management does not require initial queries or proposals; it accepts completed manuscripts. Using the ScholarOne Manuscript software, Taylor and Francis offers an extensive website, Authors Services, that provides guidance beyond the submission guidelines for this specific journal and is full of helpful information.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, suitable for practitioners and academics in the LIS field.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition13 See the recommended reference guide here.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Management is an authoritative and credible LIS scholarly publication. This peer-reviewed journal publishes articles on collection development and related topics. With this in mind, potential authors may contribute articles on a broad variety of topics, from electronic resource acquisitions to recreational reading collections to book preservation. Authors need to be certain they submit work that contributes to the body of knowledge on collection management.

The journal is indexed/abstacted in De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; CINAHL; H.W. Wilson; Library, Information science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA); MasterFILE Complete; RILM Abstracts of Music Literature; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; OCLC; ArticleFirst; Education Index; Electronic Collections Online; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; FRANCIS; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX and VINITI RA.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the United States, but has an international audience.15 The issues covered are of interest to librarians whether they are in United States, Taiwan, or Germany, with topics including how to manage collection development in a digital environment, selection versus censorship, and the use of circulation statistics and interlibrary loan data in collection management.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range from associate university librarians to assistant professors to electronic resources librarians. Often the audience will have earned several degrees: BA, MLS or MLIS, MA, and perhaps PhD. Readers often have supervisory functions with purchasing responsibility, either selecting or authorizing resources for purchase. Readers of Collection Management will most likely have several publications of their own in their portfolio and therefore expect to see well-thought-out and well-researched articles.17

The readers of Collection Management have the same professional interests in common, building their library collections in support of the research and teaching agendas of their parent institutions. They meet the challenge of changing technology, providing the latest publications, and staying within limited library budgets. Collection Management has well-researched theoretical and practical articles that help librarians of any rank succeed in their work. It explores “the future and emerging trends in the field and provides reviews of relevant books, technological resources, and software. This useful resource examines technological advances that help librarians manage and assess collections, such as electronic resource management modules, utilities that provide journal coverage data, and developments in the preservation of library materials.”18

Collection Management is geared towards librarians and information professionals who are interested in articles that help them understand how collection assessment tools and methods can help improve their overall resource management and planning for the future, including how to effectively use staff, facilities, and computing resources.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Collection Management is a peer-reviewed publication that focuses on collection development in college, university, and research libraries of all types. The main readers are librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries. These readers have a strong background on LIS topics and issues. Not only will they understand library jargon, but they will expect to find it in articles written for this journal.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors for Collection Management would do best to consider the education level of the audience and the journal’s reputation for addressing the challenges of their profession. Successful submissions will target current issues in collection management.

Last updated: May 11, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589243665332/67186
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  4. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  5. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  6. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  7. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcol20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  9. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wcol20
  15. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  16. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wcol20#.U9GEeLFiND4
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
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Strategic Library

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://libraryworks.com/strategic-library

Purpose, objective, or mission: Strategic Library focuses on innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape. Thought-provoking articles by subject matter experts address, leadership, technology, funding, and more to promote organizational success.1

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.2

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online by subscription only.5

Content: Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.”6

Frequency of publication: Monthly

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf

Note: the subscription paywall hides a lot of information and our guidelines PDF is currently 5 years old in 2020. But you can access the latest issue for free online: https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Here is an Editorial Forecast  from 2015.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.7

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.8

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, Jennifer Newman: jenny@libraryworks.com. According to the writer’s guidelines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”9

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional.

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape read by a paid subscription so readers are heavily invested in the content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2015 documentation, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.

Reader characteristics: “Subscribers to Strategic Library are executive decision-makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty. Our subscribers number around 8,000, although that number is an estimate since many of our subscriptions are institutional. Since our audience is quite broad, we publish a range of articles in each issue, many that have overlapping applications to various types of libraries. Remember, the readers of your article are experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS terms and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using the first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or best practices are other options for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are subscribers and very experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Current. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Current. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
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Children and Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Children and Libraries

ISSN: 1542-9806 (Print) and 2374-7641 (Online)1

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Children and Libraries (CAL) is the official, refereed journal of the Association for Library Service to Children. It primarily serves as a vehicle for continuing education of librarians working with children, and showcases current scholarly research and practice in library service to children and significant activities and initiatives of the Association.”2

Target audience: CAL is “read by librarians who work with children, birth to age fourteen, in public and school libraries.”3

Publisher: Association for Library Services to Children/American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Children and youth; LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Current scholarly research and practice in library service to children with highlights of significant activities and programs of the association8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: CAL publishes full-length scholarly research articles; “best practice” pieces on children’s programming (usually 1,500 words or less); and ends each issue with a brief feature by a children’s librarian, a light essay, humorous story, interview, or interview with a children’s author (up to 300 words). 10

Submission and review process: Submissions via email as Microsoft Word attachments are preferred. Manuscripts will be acknowledged upon receipt and scholarly articles will be evaluated by at least two referees. Authors of scholarly articles can expect the review process to take four to eight months.11

Editorial tone: Academic or informal, depending on the submission type.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are involved and interested in providing library services to children would benefit from submitting an article to this journal. Having an article published in Children and Libraries increases prestige for the author as the publication is distributed nationwide and in some foreign countries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are not available, Children and Libraries is delivered to members of the ALSC at a discounted rate and is a benefit of membership. In addition there are individual subscribers and copies distributed for marketing purposes.14 ALSC has a membership network of more than 4,000.15 Children and Libraries is also available online, with the four most recent issues available only to members but older issues open to all.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the official journal of the ALSC the audience of members extends to every state in the nation and to some foreign countries.17 ALSC is conscious of different cultures and is the national home of El día de los niños – El día de los libros (Children’s Day – Book Day) program. They have also developed the ALSC Every Child Ready to Read project, which aims to promote early literacy skills in children from birth to age five.18 These programs reflect the organization’s support for diversity and dedication to service to all children.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Children and Libraries are made up of children’s librarians, including school librarians, reading teachers, library directors, book reviewers, university professors, library support staff, and retired library professionals. Readers will be familiar with the fundamentals and values of school libraries, public libraries, and community programs that serve children. Readers can be expected to be LIS professionals and to have advanced degrees. Many may work in schools or in public libraries and deal directly with children. Readers have interests in children’s education, literacy programs, continuing education for library professionals, and collection development of children’s materials in schools and libraries.19

ALSC boasts a network of “more than 4,000 children’s and youth librarians, children’s literature experts, publishers, education and library school faculty members, and other adults committed to creating a better future for children through libraries.”20 These readers are dedicated to children around the country and promote practices that improve children’s library services. The ALSC supports equity of access and the continued development of multicultural, multilingual library staff.21 Cultural diversity is a value of the organization, evident in the various articles in CAL that cover service and programs to patrons of different ethnic backgrounds.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers can be expected to be familiar with LIS jargon and issues facing children and libraries. The readers of CAL have experience with current technologies and the latest trends in library services for children.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are professionals who are concerned with issues pertaining to children and libraries. Readers work in school libraries, public libraries, or have contact with children. These professionals seek out literature that is specific to library service for children and this journal meets those needs. Readers wish to be informed of the latest trends, research involving children, literacy, and collection development in order to meet the needs of their young patrons. Writers interested in writing for this publication would be most successful addressing these needs.

Last updated: May 5, 2020


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed  May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/
  2. Children and Libraries: Journal of the ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal
  3. Advertising in CAL,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/advertising
  4. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  5. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  6. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  7. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  9. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  10. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  11. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  12. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  13. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  14.  Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/subscriptions
  15. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  16. “Children and Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Services to Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal
  17. “Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020,  http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/subscriptions
  18. “ALSC Initiatives,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/initiatives
  19. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, Accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  20. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  21. “The Importance of Diversity in Library Programs and Material Collections for Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/ALSCwhitepaper_importance%20of%20diversity_with%20graphics_FINAL.pdf
  22. “Back Issues of Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/back-issues
  23. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
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Computers in Libraries

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

ISSN: 1041-79151

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Computers in Libraries (CIL) Mission Statement: “CIL’s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful articles about the technology that affects them, their institutions, and their patrons. We aim to publish interesting stories, case studies, and opinions that are of professional value to people working with technology in public, academic, special, and corporate libraries, as well as archives and museums. CIL is written by librarians for librarians, and it’s about technology all the time.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.3

Publisher: Information Today Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”8

Frequency of publication: Monthly. 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”10

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.11

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.12

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via the online Query Form.13  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”14

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”15

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author but they are “by librarians and for librarians”. Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well-written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professionals only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”17 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Online magazine with potential for broad readership as the parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Computers in Libraries is published in English. Based in the U.K. but available and accessed worldwide online.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only savvy with technologybut also library managers and system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries do not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. 22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well-informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries do not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead, it devotes itself entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is a month-by-month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand the use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, technical writing should be geared toward a general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

 


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Computers in Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 03, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728654342/91053
  2. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  5. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  6. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  8. Information Today Inc. (2020). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  9. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  10. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  13. Information Today Inc. (2020). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  14. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  19. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
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base line

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: base line

ISSN: 1943-65481

Website: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: base line is the official publication of the Map and Geospatial Information Round Table (MAGIRT). MAGIRT “leads and inspires information professionals at all levels of expertise in their work with map and geospatial information resources, collections, and technologies in all formats, through community, education, and advocacy.”2 “The purpose of base line is to provide current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”3

Target audience: As per MAGIRT’s site: “People interested or involved in any aspect of map or geospatial librarianship.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Each issue “provide(s) current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”9

Frequency of publication: base line is published electronically six times a year: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. All older issues of base line are now freely available on the MAGIRT website.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: On the first page of each issue: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Types of contributions accepted: base line calls itself “a medium of communication for members of MAGIRT and information of interest is welcome.”11 Articles related to cartography, geography, “related governmental activities, and map librarianship ” would be welcome.12

Submission and review process: Depending on article content, contributions can be sent to one of the editors, check the first page of the latest publication. These are the editors as of April 2020:

Editor: John A. Olson
Government and Geo-Information Librarian
Syracuse University
Tel: 315-443-4818 E-mail: jaolson@syr.edu

Distribution Manager: Mike Smith
Subject Specialist for Maps, California Gov Info, GIS
Coordinator, UCSD
Tel: 858/534-1248 E-mail: mls003@ucsd.edu

Cataloging Editor: Tammy T. Wong
Cartographic Materials Cataloger
Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress
Tel: 202/707-6735 E-mail: twon@loc.gov

Digital Mapping Editor: VACANT

New Maps and Books Editor: Kim Plassche
Sciences Librarian, Liaison to Geography & GIS
University at Buffalo
Tel: 716/645-8168 E-mail: kf43@buffalo.edu13

Editorial tone: Articles tend towards an informal, but professional voice.14

Style guide used: Not specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although there is an informality in tone to this publication, there is still room for a more professional article related to geospatial information. This publication offers a good opportunity for a writer with experience in this field of librarianship to be published.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As a benefit of membership in MAGIRT, base line reaches 313 members on top of being freely available on the web.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in the U.S. and is written in American English.16 As members hail from across North America, authors should avoid using local terminologies or dialects, and should be tailored to a national audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers are mostly members of MAGIRT. As such, one can assume that the majority of readers are “involved in the geospatial librarianship world.”17

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized LIS knowledge can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of base line are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to MAGIRT committee work and topics related to geospatial librarianship. Members of MAGIRT seem eager to “connect with like-minded people, to learn, or to impart…knowledge.”18 Although the pool of readers is relatively small, the LIS author who is interested in geospatial information will find a supportive and interested readership in base line.


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Base Line, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521734545098/483555
  2. American Library Association. (2020). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  3. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  4. American Library Association. (2020). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  5. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  6. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  7. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  8. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  9. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  10. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  11. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  12. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  13. American Library Association. (2020). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  14. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  15. American Library Association. (2020). MAGIRT Map & Geospatial Resources: About MAGIRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://magirt.ala.libguides.com/resources
  16. ProQuest. (2020). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  17. American Library Association. (2020). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
  18. American Library Association. (2020). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
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Against the Grain

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

ISSN: 1043-20941

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. Our goal is to link publishers, vendors, and librarians by reporting on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals. ”2

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.3“>https://against-the-grain.com/about/]

Publisher: Against the Grain.4

Peer reviewed? No. All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.5

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.6

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.7 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.8

Content: Articles. The ATG also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.9

Frequency of publication: “Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January; and the ATG NewsChannel website that is updated daily with the latest news, announcements, and online-only content.” 10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews, reviews, legal issues, publishing, bookselling and vending, technology, and standards.11

Submission and review process: Contact Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.12

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,13 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.14

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.16 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.17 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (editorial institutional affiliations).19 Written in American English.20

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.21 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”22 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

 


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “About,” Against the Grain, LLC, accessed April 30, 2020, http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  2. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  3. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  4. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  5. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  6. Against the Grain. (2018). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  7. Purdue University. (2018). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  8. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit Content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from https://against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  9. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  10. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  11. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  12. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  13. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  14. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  15. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  16. Purdue University. (2018). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  17. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  18. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  19. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  20. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  21. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  22. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  23. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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Archeota

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of the Society of American Archivists Student Chapter at the San Jose State University School of Information. This open source digital publication provides a platform for student voices, and is written by students for students. Archeota publishes original, substantive content on issues and events connected to the world of archives. Articles include profiles of iSchool students in recognition of outstanding achievements, student experiences working in archives, and think pieces related to archives on current events, controversial issues, pop culture, and other topics in the archival field. 

The mission of the Society of American Archivists Student Chapter at the San Jose State University School of Information (SJSU SAASC) is to promote archival interests in the academic community, provide a platform for discussing archival issues, and to engage students in professional activities in order to enhance career development. The chapter serves its membership by organizing repository site visits, virtual panel discussions and webinars, providing networking opportunities, and inviting professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.1

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.2

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.3 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.4

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.5

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Think pieces on archives-related events and stories in the news; reflections or advice pieces based on first-hand experience, including jobs, internships, or volunteer work; interviews with practicing archivists; reports on SAASC events and site tours; reviews of archives-related media, such as podcast, blog, book, etc.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should be graduate students at San Jose State University School of Information. You can send an email with your proposal idea to sjsusaasc@gmail.com8

Editorial tone: The magazine-style publication is geared toward graduate students in the information profession interested in archives.

Style guide used: APA.9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to publish original content and contribute to discourse in the archival field. The publication serves as a platform for student voices and promotes archival interests in the School of Information community at San Jose State University.10

Information edits provided by Kelli Roisman, SJSU SAASC Chair 2019/2020

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Archeota is an open-source digital publication.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:

The audience of Archeota is primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The SJSU School of Information is a 100% online program, therefore the student body is widely dispersed in the United States and internationally. The physical location of the university is San Jose, California. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in the SJSU School of Information’s  MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital project specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.11 12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records, or those who simply have an interest in the field. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences of what it’s like to work in a particular setting, professional projects and internships, and reflections, observations, and commentary on archival issues.


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  6. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2020). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  11. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  12. San Jose State University School of Information. (2020). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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BayViews

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayViews

ISSN: unknown

Website: http://www.bayviews.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: BayViews is a publication of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California1, with reviews aimed at evaluating new books to identify titles appropriate for library purchase. BayView‘s goals are “to strengthen and maintain work with youth in the libraries of Northern and Central California according to the highest standards of professional librarianship by:

  • Reviewing and evaluating children’s books and other materials produced for young people
  • Working actively to further the cause of library work with children
  • Discussing various phases and problems of this work
  • Cooperating in the solution of problems of mutual concern
  • Encouraging and stimulating the personal friendships of its members”2

Target audience: Members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, including both public librarians and school librarians.3

Publisher: The Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news. BayViews is published by a professional organization with the prime purpose of educating its own members.6

Medium: BayViews is an electronic and print publication. Additionally, BayViews has a blog on their website which is updated frequently.7

Content: BayViews is a journal of book reviews and opinions aimed at children’s librarians.8 The members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California use its pages to review new books in the field of children’s literature (including books for babies, children, and teens), as well as meeting in person to discuss the reviews. Each copy of BayViews also contains a section called “BayNews,” which keeps a calendar of upcoming events and collects news about goings-on related to children’s services at libraries within the region.9

Frequency of publication: 11 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Online at http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools

Reviews are submitted using an online form on the above page, which also includes sample reviews and a letter from the editors regarding content, voice, and other review considerations.11

Types of contributions accepted: Contributions are accepted by members only, including book reviews of children’s and young adult literature, as well as news about events and services in the Northern California library community.12

Reviewers are now able to choose their own review books at meetings.13

Submission and review process: Contributors must be members of the organization. Reviewers choose their own review books at meetings. Authors wishing to contribute to the BayNews section should contact the editor.14

Editorial tone: Reviews should be concise and critical.15

Style guide used: Not specified but read guidelines on the site16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a great opportunity for writers in Northern California who are interested in reviewing children’s and young adult literature. Since authors must be members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, and reviews are presented at the ACL chapter meetings, they would probably want to reside in the area to get the most out of their membership.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The membership of ACL who receive as a membership benefit both the print (for a fee) and electronic copy (free) of the journal.17

Audience location and language or cultural views: Based in Northern and Central California, the publication is published in English with no special considerations.18

Reader characteristics: Children’s librarians with a desire to learn more about books than reviews in the LIS press offer. Readers are interested specifically in children’s and young adult books, and issues related to working in public and school libraries. Written by, and for, the membership.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: General LIS knowledge and expertise in their area of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication for the education of the membership of ACL, authors should be well versed in the subject of children’s and young adult literature and willing to follow the membership guidelines to participate in the ACL community.20

Last updated: April 26, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission
  2. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission
  3. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission
  4. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  5. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  6. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  7. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  8. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  9. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). BayNews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.baynews
  10. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  11. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  12. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  13. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  14. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  15. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  16. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools
  17. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). Membership. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/membership
  18. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  19. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  20. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2020). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
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Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

ISSN: 1077-66131

Website: http://associates.ucr.edu/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Provides a voice for and promotes the exchange of information within the library support staff community.2

Target audience: The primary audience is support staff at all libraries including public, special, academic, and school. The journal is online and subscriptions are free.3

Publisher: University of California Riverside Library.4

Server and listservs are housed at the University of California, Riverside, and the website is powered through WordPress.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: Professional newsletter.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Topics range from how-to articles, opinion pieces, conference information, resource updates, fiction, conference updates, and research articles.9

Frequency of publication: Published three times per year, in March, July, and November.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88

Types of contributions accepted: The newsletter discusses issues and developments related to the work of library support staff. Topics might include cataloging, collection management, public relations, technology, and personnel issues. Priority consideration will be given to submissions written by library support staff. The submission guidelines provide a list of topics for feature article consideration.11

Submission and review process: Articles of any length are accepted, however, the guidelines are: no longer than 10 double-spaced typed pages for features; four double-spaced typed pages for fiction; and one double-spaced typed page for poetry. Submissions are reviewed by a member of the Editorial Board. “Significantly edited versions will be returned to the authors for discussion or approval. However, most editing is done for punctuation, grammar and for establishing clarity.”12

Items can be submitted any time prior to the publication months and should be submitted to the editor, Kevin Dudeney, at: associates@hotkey.net.au.13

Editorial tone: Items that are written from or focused on a support staff point of view are preferred.14 A review of previous issues indicated that a personal style is common.15

Style guide used: There are no specific style guidelines given, but the editors state that “all submissions must be written in a professional manner, with citations for researched material provided.”16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Since most LIS students have worked or are working in support staff positions, this publication may be a good place to get started writing for the field. While it is not a scholarly journal, it would allow an author to demonstrate their understanding of a staff position other than a librarian.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently 1,700 worldwide subscribers.17 Subscription to Associates is free, and all issues are available free online which suggests they may have an audience beyond their subscribers.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication originates in the United States however they claim to have “1,700 worldwide subscribers”, indicating an international audience.19 It is an English language publication.20 Due to international audience, avoid regionalisms and any references, for example, currency or location, are clear to the reader.

Reader characteristics: Audience, as support staff in all types of libraries, most likely reflects the general public, all ages and backgrounds, with an interest in connecting with other support staff and improving their job skills. Publication values the work of support staff and aims to promote the value of library support staff.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As library support staff, the readers can be expected to have the background and education to understand topics and terminology used in work accepted by this publication.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting work to this publication would benefit from reading the current and past issues to gain a clear understanding of their audience. It seems a cooperative approach, emphasizing the value of all team members in a library, would be useful.

Last updated: April 6, 2020


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal, University of California Riverside Library, accessed April 6, 2020 http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/
  2. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  3. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  5. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  6. ProQuest. (2020). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  8. ProQuest. (2020). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  9. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  10. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  11. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  12. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  13. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  14. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  15. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). Archives and Back Issues. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=4
  16. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  17. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  18. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  19. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  20. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  21. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  22. University of California Riverside Library. (2020). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
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