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Rowman & Littlefield

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: https://rowman.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Rowman & Littlefield is a leading independent publisher, with strengths in: Academic Publishing in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Publishing Government and Official Data, and Educational Publishing.” 1

Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others. 2.

Target audience: Scholars, Instructors, and Professionals

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group. 3 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN). 4  The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, AltaMira Press, Scarecrow Press and Sheed & Ward.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal. 5

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.6

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.7 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.8

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.9 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.10

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).11

In 2020, Under the subject of Library and Information Services, Rowman & Littlefield published approximately 37 titles. 12

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals. They must include a prospectus (book description), Annotated Table of Contents (including a paragraph describing each chapter), Curriculum Vitae/Resume, 1-2 sample chapters, list of 4-7 potential peer reviewers, and marketing platform. For complete proposal details, please see the Submission Guidelines.

Submission and review process: Proposals for publication should be submitted via email to the appropriate acquisitions editor. 13 “The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.” 14

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed., and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., as style and spelling guides.  15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences. Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.  “Our books for librarians, archivists, and other information professionals help them in their professional environment as they work to collect, organize, preserve, and make accessible information in all formats. Our books help practitioners and LIS students preparing to work in many types of organizations, including public, academic, special, and school libraries; archives; database providers; and other information centers.” 16

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A 2021 New Books in LIS catalog listed approximately 77 LIS titles geared toward students, professionals, and academics. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material. However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.18

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: March 24, 2021


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. “About,” Rowman.com, accessed March 24, 2021, https://rowman.com/Page/About
  2. “Subjects,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. “Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, PublishersGlobal.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Submission Guidelines,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  6. “Library Services,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  7. “About.”
  8. “Library Services.”
  9. “About.”
  10. “Library Services.”
  11. “Publisher Details,” NetGalley.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/29645
  12. “LIS Catalog,” Rowman.com, accessed March 24, 2021, https://rowman.com/Subjects?L1=Library-and-Information-Services&L1ID=25
  13. “Editors,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  14. “Submission Guidelines.”
  15. “Manuscript Preparation Guide,” Rowman.com, accessed March 24, 2021, https://rowman.com/WebDocs/R&L%20Manuscript%20Prep%20Guide.pdf
  16. “Library Services.”
  17. “eCatalogs,” Rowman.com, accessed March 24, 2021, https://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  18. “About.”
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Routledge

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Routledge

*Note that Haworth Press was acquired by Taylor & Francis Group in 2007, and former Haworth books are now published by Routledge, a Taylor & Francis Group imprint.

Website: http://www.routledge.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “With reference-led content in specialist subject areas, we are advancing research and enabling knowledge to be discovered and shared.  Together Routledge and CRC Press are the world’s leading academic publisher in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and STEM.”1

“Routledge is a global publisher of academic books, journals and online resources in the humanities and social sciences.” 2

Mission Statement: “We reach around the globe with authoritative coverage of traditional and emerging fields, publishing the pioneering achievements of science and technology to provide professionals and students with the resources they need to make further advances.” 3

Target audience: scholars, instructors, and professional communities worldwide 4

Routledge has a specific Resources for Librarians page detailing catalogs, e-products and online references specifically for libraries, research series, and out of print titles.5

Owner: Taylor & Francis Group.6

Are published books peer reviewed? “All of our books are peer-reviewed at proposal and/or manuscript stage by respected academic specialists who provide independent advice on the content, quality, and potential market for a finished book, and our textbooks are widely researched and reviewed by active teachers in the field.” 7

Types of books published: “Research monographs, textbooks, handbooks/companion books, short form publications.”8

Medium: Print and online.9

“Nearly all our content is published in both print and electronic formats. We generally produce multi-use library books in hardback and books primarily designed for use and purchase by individuals in paperback.” 10

Topics covered: Education, Engineering, Humanities & Media Arts, Medicine, Mental Health, Psychology, Science, and Social Science. 11

Number of titles published per year: “We publish thousands of books and journals each year, serving scholars, instructors, and professional communities worldwide.” 12

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.routledge.com/our-customers/authors/publishing-guidelines

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for Research monographs, textbooks, handbooks/companion books, short form publications

Submission and review process: First, contact by email the appropriate editorial contact. 13. They will then request a proposal with specific information.

Here is a list of common or probable components of a proposal form to help you start
considering your proposal 14:
• Author/Editor names and affiliations
• Suggested book title (see also Making your work discoverable)
• Book description
• Keywords
• Table of contents
• Chapter abstracts and keywords
• Information about contributors (edited collections)
• Length and schedule
• Illustrations
• Advanced features (e.g. equations, special characters, etc.)
• Status of manuscript (e.g. “idea only” or “complete draft”)
• (CRC Press STEM authors only) Intention to use LaTex
• Breadth of market
• International appeal
• Primary audience
• Secondary audience(s)
• Relevant courses/organizations that may use your book
• Competing and related titles (including pros and cons vs your book)
• Third-party material
• Potential reviewers/referees
• Information on current or potential funding (e.g. for Open Access publication)
• Supporting material (e.g. CV)
• Online resources (textbooks for student audiences only)

“Please email your proposal as a Word document or compatible format) to your Commissioning Editor along with any supporting material (such as your CV). Please only submit your proposal to one editor at a time. If, upon receipt, the editor you have contacted feels it would sit better elsewhere, they will pass it on. Note that draft or sample material is only helpful in support of, but not as a substitute to, a comprehensive proposal form.”  15

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly, but readable. The books potentially cover a wide audience including a variety of readers.

Style guide used: None specified. The Publication Guidelines lists a word document entitled “Notes for the Copyeditor”, listed under Essential Forms. Within this word document, the author is asked to specify a number of styling choices made in the manuscript. These include specifying punctuation, spelling, reference style, and use of acronyms.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Routledge is now owned by Taylor & Francis, which has a huge LIS audience and is where you can find a lot of print and online reference materials and publications targeted to students, LIS professionals, and academics. This is a prestigious publishing house that puts writers through a rigorous process just to get to publication; and once you’re there, there is the support of editors and the brand behind your finished book.  This is an excellent group to consider proposing for an LIS specific book idea, as ideas can range from the very scholarly studies to more everyday topics that librarians or information professionals should be aware of.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Routledge is a global publisher of academic books, journals and online resources in the humanities and social sciences. 16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Routledge is operated by Taylor & Francis Group. “As one of the world’s largest publishers, Taylor & Francis maintains offices throughout the world including London, Brighton, and Abingdon in the U.K.; New York, Philadelphia, Florence, Kentucky, and Boca Raton, Florida in the U.S.A.; and Singapore, Australia, China, and India.” 17

“Your book (whether print and/or open access) will be marketed and sold worldwide. We have sales representatives spanning the globe who work with libraries, bookstores, academics, professionals, and third-party retailers to get the word out about your book and a global marketing team who specialise in reaching specific markets.” 18

Reader characteristics: “We are providers of quality information and knowledge that enable our customers to perform their jobs efficiently, enhance their education, and help contribute to the advancement of their chosen market sectors.” 19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varying. Most people seeking out Routledge books will most likely be academics, but whether in the LIS field specifically is not a given. However, Routledge readers are knowledgeable and educated, so assume a degree of understanding, and a quick learning curve, when referencing LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The primary readership of Routledge materials includes academics, librarians, and educators interested in new titles pertaining to LIS. This is a group that eagerly awaits new publications, and is notified through a variety of resources when new topics are published. Routledge is dedicated to the promotion of your publications to a wide, eager audience.

Last updated: March 24, 2021


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “About,” Routledge.com, accessed March 24, 2021, http://www.routledge.com/info/about
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “Librarians,” Routledge.com, accessed January 30, 2018, https://www.routledge.com/our-customers/librarians/resources-and-guides
  6. “About.”
  7. “Authors,” Routledge.com, accessed March 24, 2021,  https://www.routledge.com/our-customers/authors/why-publish-with-us
  8. “Authors.”
  9. “About.”
  10. “Products,” Taylor & Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2021, https://tandfbis.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/rt-files/AUTHOR/Guidelines/Products+customers+and+readers.pdf
  11. “Home,” Routledge.com, accessed March 24, 2021, https://www.routledge.com/
  12. “About.”
  13. “Contacts,” Routledge.com, accessed January 30, 2018, http://www.routledge.com/contacts/editorial
  14. “Proposal Guidelines,” Taylor & Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2021, https://tandfbis.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/rt-files/AUTHOR/Guidelines/Proposal+guidelines.pdf
  15. “Proposal Guidelines.”
  16. “About.”
  17. “About.”
  18. “Promoting Your Book,” Routledge.com, accessed March 24, 2021, https://www.routledge.com/our-customers/authors/promoting-your-book
  19. “About Taylor & Francis,” Taylor & Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2021, https://taylorandfrancis.com/about/
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Library Juice Press

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Library Juice Press

Website: http://libraryjuicepress.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Juice Press is an imprint of Litwin Books, “specializing in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science.” They publish topics such as “library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and in general anything that can be placed under the rubric of ‘critical studies in librarianship.'”1

Target audience: Professional librarians and students of library science. 2

Owner: Litwin Books, LLC. 3

Are published books peer reviewed? “Our book publishing does not currently have a peer review process in place.” 4

Types of books published: LIS-specific books and manuscripts. 

Medium: Print.

Topics covered: Library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and any topics under the rubric of “critical studies in librarianship.” 5

Number of titles published per year: In 2020, Library Juice Press published four titles. 6

Location of submission guidelines: https://litwinbooks.com/authors/

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Types of submissions accepted: The publisher accepts book proposals and full manuscripts on topics that are within its editorial scope.7 

Submission and review process:

If you would like to submit a manuscript, email it as an attached MS Word or RTF file using the appropriate email address below. Please follow the Litwin Books Submission Guidelines in formatting your manuscript. Please also attach 1) your CV, and 2) a separate document stating the intended audience and purpose of the book.

Book proposals should include the following:

  • The title of the proposed book
  • An outline
  • A list of already-published materials that you plan to include
  • Proposed deadline for submission of the final manuscript
  • A description of the book of between 100 and 500 words, stating the book’s subject matter, intended audience, intended purpose, and approach to the topic
  • A description of other works already published on the same topic that yours will be competing with.
  • A list of your prior publications
  • A relevant writing sample
  • Your CV8

Please send general book proposal submissions to inquiries@litwinbooks.com.

For book proposal submissions for the Series on Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies, contact series editor Emily Drabinski, at edrabinski@gc.cuny.edu.

For book proposal submissions for the Series on Critical Book, Publishing, and Literacy Studies, contact series editor Robert Montoya, at montoya@gseis.ucla.edu

For book proposal submissions for the Series on Archives, Archivists and Society, contact series editor Richard J. Cox, at rjcox111@comcast.net.

For book proposal submissions for the Series on Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS, contact series editors Rose L. Chou, at roselovechou@gmail.com or Annie Pho, at anniepho@gmail.com.

For book proposal submissions for the Series on Critical Information Organization in LIS, contact series editors Violet Fox and Kelsey George at CritCat.InclusiveMetadata@gmail.com.

Editorial tone: Academic and professional.

Style guide used: “We do not require the use of a specific style guide. We do require that your chosen style is consistently and correctly applied throughout the work, whether a single authored work or an edited volume.” 9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Library Juice Press titles focus on theoretical investigations into library activism, social justice, feminist pedagogy, as well as practically oriented books like So You Want to Be a Librarian. The publisher produces serious, in-depth works with alternative perspectives. “Our independence from larger institutions gives us the freedom to offer critical perspectives that cut against the grain, as well as occasionally to give a scholar free rein with a work that is outside their usual publishing stream.” 10

A related and worthwhile opportunity to submit writing that is not book-length is Library Juice’s annual paper contest (2,000 to 10,000 words), which is designed “to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.”11 The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others. “Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined. Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of a study.”12

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published): Publishing since 2006, Library Juice Press has approximately 60 published titles. 13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: While the publisher is based in California and books are published in English, recent Library Juice Press titles focus on international perspectives—i.e., academic librarian labor activism in Canada, and librarianship in the context of the Cuban revolution.

Reader characteristics: Readers are interested in content that addresses: social responsibility; information as a public good; intellectual freedom and civil liberties; print culture, web culture, visual culture, and the meaning of literacy; information policy and ethics; and the state of the library profession (issues of identity, work life, and de-professionalization).

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are professional librarians and students of library science who likely have a very strong knowledge of or strong interest in specific LIS subject areas.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Library Juice Press originated as a webzine and blog, covering “topics of interest to passionate librarians from a political left perspective that is linked to the fundamental values of the profession.” LIS authors seeking to publish works that are politically oriented or rooted outside the cultural mainstream may potentially find an audience through Library Juice Press.

Last updated: March 1, 2021


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed March 1, 2021, http://litwinbooks.com/about.php.
  2. “About Us.”
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Policies,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed March 1, 2021,  https://litwinbooks.com/our-policies/
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “Books,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed March 1, 2021, https://litwinbooks.com/publisher/ljp/
  7. “Authors,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed March 1, 2021, https://litwinbooks.com/authors/
  8. “Authors.”
  9. “Submission Guidelines,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed March 1, 2021, https://litwinbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/Litwin-Books-Submission-Guidelines-version-2.0.pdf
  10. “About Us.”
  11. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed September 15, 2015, https://litwinbooks.com/grants-and-awards/paper-contest/
  12. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest.”
  13. “Books.”
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Facet Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Facet Publishing

Website: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Facet Publishing is “Facet Publishing, the commercial publishing and bookselling arm of CILIP: the library and information association, is the leading publisher of books for library, information and heritage professionals worldwide.” 1

Target audience: “We publish a range of titles for practitioners, researchers and students with authorship from some of the leading minds in the field.” 2

Owner: CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. 3

Are published books peer reviewed?  “All new book proposals undergo a full single blind peer review process in order to fully evaluate and develop the content we commission.” 4

Types of books published: LIS professional books, textbooks, series and eBooks.

Medium: Print and electronic, though not all titles are available in both formats.

Topics covered: Over thirty LIS subjects are published by Facet, including subject headings such as Archives, e-Learning, Research Data Management, and Copyright, Information Law, and Ethics. 5

Number of titles published per year: According to Facet Publishing’s 2020-2021 Catalogue, they published almost 20 new products in 2020 and will be publishing another 11 in 2021, along with numerous new editions of older works. 6

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/page/authors/ 

Types of submissions accepted: “We welcome new book proposals for textbooks, professional books and monographs in LIS, knowledge management, data science, archives, cultural heritage and digital humanities.” 7

Submission and review process: Click HERE to go to the Authors Resources page, where you can download “Book Proposal Form”. You will need to complete the form as completely as possible, including details about the book, intended audience, subject areas, and a biography.  Send completed form to: info@facetpublishing.co.uk

Editorial tone: None listed, but consider that Facet publishes for students and professionals already well versed in the LIS field.

Style guide used: Use the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), 16th edition, as your primary style guide. http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/home.html

Click this link to find style guide information: How to Supply your Book to Facet Publishing

Style tips

  • Abbreviations & Acronyms: spell out the full name at first use, followed by the
    acronym/abbreviation in parentheses. Thereafter, the acronym/abbreviation
    will suffice. Do not begin a sentence with an acronym/abbreviation.
    i.e. and e.g. should not be followed by a comma.
  • Apostrophes: Master’s not Masters.
  • Symbols: Ampersands (&) may be used in company names and are correct in
    some journals but should not be used in running text.
  • Percentages: use the % symbol.
  • Bulleted/Numbered lists: bulleted lists are used for short points and do not
    require punctuation at the end of each line. Ensure the list agrees grammatically
    with the preceding sentence. Consider numbered lists for longer points.
  • Capitalisation: use initial capitals for proper nouns only. It is not necessary to
    capitalise ‘library’ and ‘librarian’ unless a particular library or librarian is referred
    to, e.g. Bodley’s Librarian or The London Library.
  • Quotations: use single quotation marks, with double quotation marks for
    quotations within quotations. Quotations of more than 60 words should start
    on a new line and be indented. Do not alter quotations to house style.
    Reference to appear at the end of the quote in brackets: (Smith, 1998).
  • Numbers: use words for numbers one to ten and figures thereafter.
  • Dates: 9 March 2016; tenth century; 21st century; 1981–5 but 1914–18; 1990s.
  • Punctuation: no punctuation at the end of subheadings, figure captions or
    table captions. No oxford comma before final ‘and’ or ‘or’ in lists.
  • UK ‘s’ spellings: ‘ise’

Bibliographic references (for more information see our Guide to Referencing)

  • Chicago ‘Author Date’ style is preferred. We also accept Harvard style. If you
    wish to use any other style please discuss this with your commissioning editor.
  • Footnotes should not be used. Notes should be collated at book-end for
    monographs and chapter-end for contributed volumes.
  • In-text references: the author’s name, date of publication (and page reference
    if necessary) should be given in the text e.g. (Smith, 1998, 34–8).
  • List of references: references should be organised alphabetically by author’s
    surname at the end of a monograph before the index, or at the end of each
    chapter in a contributed volume. 8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Facet publishes across a wide array of LIS topics, making them a publisher to strongly consider no matter what your subject field may be. Potential authors should keep in mind that Facet requests very detailed information from each book proposal, so authors should have a clear idea of their marketability and relevance. Authors should be sure to carefully read the book submission guidelines to ensure that all questions have been addressed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s readers

Publication circulation: Based in the United Kingdom, but Facet has agents and representatives around the world. “Our business has a long-standing global profile. We market and sell books all over the world and the Facet brand is recognised as the home of quality content for the information professions.” 9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Facet is the bookseller for CILIP, a library and science information association in the U.K., though they emphasize that their publications extend into the international LIS world. They have representatives and agents in countries all over the world, making publications available to a world wide audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Facet publications are information professionals. Facet’s bestselling publications include titles such as Managing Records: A handbook of principles and practice and Practical Cataloging, so it can be assumed that their readers have more than a casual knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics and professionals with a strong knowledge or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Facet publishes for an audience in and outside of the United Kingdom. Their works range from LIS textbooks to simple ‘No-nonsense’ guides about topics such as archives and legal issues in Web 2.0, showing that Facet’s readers vary in their knowledge on contemporary LIS topics. This span in readership could make Facet a viable publisher for potential authors across many different subjects.

Last updated: March 1, 2021


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed March 1, 2021, https://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/page/about-us/
  2. “About Us.”
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Home,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed March 1, 2021, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/
  6. “2020-2021 Catalogue,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed March 1, 2021, https://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/resources/pdfs/catalogues/Facet%20Publishing%20catalogue%202021.pdf
  7. “2020-2021 Catalogue.”
  8. “Styling.”, FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed March 1, 2021, https://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/resources/Author%20Resources/How%20to%20Supply%20your%20Book%20to%20Facet%20Publishing.pdf
  9. “About Us.”
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Mental Floss

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mental Floss

ISSN: Print: 1543-4702 (ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Whether we’re covering history, science, pop culture, language, music, true crime, or entertainment, we help our audience feel smarter. Our New York City-based team of editors and writers—as well as our worldwide network of contributors—answers life’s big questions, uncovers fascinating facts, and finds stories so interesting that our readers absolutely must share them.”2

Mental Floss delivers smart, fun and shareable content in an upbeat and witty environment. An encyclopedia of everything, we answer life’s big questions and uncover stories so interesting our readers absolutely must share them. We take all culture and make it pop culture.” 3

Target audience: “Curious People.” 4

Publisher: Minute Media. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online. Print issues ceased in 2016. 6

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects with a focus on shareability.7

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for new voices to write about the diverse verticals we cover, whether that’s history, science, entertainment, language, pop culture, art, or beyond.” 8

PITCHES WE CAN USE 9
Lists

Lists are an overview of a topic in digestible-nugget form. Each list will cover the who, what, when, and where of the subject, plus its significance, and pay particular attention to quirky or little-known facts about the subject. Pitches may focus on the below topics:

Subjects that have a major anniversary coming up
Historical figures and events
Movies and TV series
Music
Literature and art
Language
Food and drink
Helpful tips and life hacks
Scientific discoveries, phenomena, and figures
Pop culture fads, events, and personalities

Features

Features are reported stories that delve into a topic from a particular angle and with strong characters and storytelling. Features can be short (500 words) or longer (800-1500 words). Areas ripe for features include:

Historical events that put current events into perspective
Exploring and/or answering a big question
Science stories that explain a new field of research or highlight a scientist’s ongoing work
A deep dive into a pop culture event or phenomenon in history
True crime and unsolved mysteries
Features about odd, unique, or little-known historical events and people

PITCHES WE CAN’T USE 10
Short, timely news stories: these pieces are covered by our staff writers
Science articles based on a single study: these are also covered by staff writers
First-person articles or personal essays
Fiction, memoir, or poetry
Current politics or political opinion
Stories based solely on PR pitches

Tips provided by Mental Floss: Keep your pitch short (1-2 paragraphs) and let them know if you have a particular expertise on the subject. Include a link to your portfolio/work samples. Do not pitch or send completed articles.  Take the time to brainstorm a possible headline for your story, and include that as part of the subject line, i.e. Freelance Pitch: 50 Amazing Facts About Animals. Having a headline can help us better understand the angle you plan to use with your story. 11

Submission and review process: “Expect a response to your pitch within two weeks. If you do not receive a response after two weeks, you can assume it’s a pass. Due to the number of pitches we receive each day, we are unfortunately not able to respond to every pitch we receive.” 12

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Since its founding in a Duke University dorm room in 2001, Mental Floss has reached more than 1 billion readers with smart, quirky content presented in a witty, upbeat voice. We reach more than 19 million users per month across our site, social media accounts, and popular YouTube channel.” 13

According to Visitor’s Worth website, Mental Floss has approximately 58,000 daily visitors, with 154,000 daily page views. 14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Visitor’s Worth website, the most traffic for the publication comes from audiences in the United States, but the website also has a following in the UK, Canada, India, and Germany. 15 The website publishes in the English language.

Reader characteristics: In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “About Us,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “Mental Floss,” MinuteMedia.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.minutemedia.com/mentalfloss
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Mental Floss.”
  6. “Life After Print for Mental Floss,” FolioMag.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.foliomag.com/life-after-print-for-mental-floss/
  7. “About Us”
  8. “Pitch,” MentalFloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss
  9. “Pitch.”
  10. “Pitch.”
  11. “Pitch.”
  12. “Pitch.”
  13. “About Us.”
  14. “www.mentalfloss.com,” VisitorsWorth.com, accessed December 5, 2020,  http://visitorsworth.com/www.mentalfloss.com
  15. “www.mentalfloss.com.”
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Family Tree Magazine

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Family Tree Magazine

ISSN: 1529-0298 (Print)1

Website: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A how-to publication for readers interested in family history and genealogy research. “Learn how to build your family tree with beginner research tips, guides to DNA testing, family history storytelling, using genealogy records and more!” 2

Target audience: Genealogists and family history enthusiasts.

Publisher: Yankee Publishing, Inc. 3

Peer reviewed? No. 4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Subscription-based print magazine with online content and research tools. 5

Content: Family Tree Magazine  “covers genealogy, ethnic heritage, personal history, genealogy websites and software, photography and photo preservation, and other ways that families connect with their pasts.” 6

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly. 7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.familytreemagazine.com/frequently-asked-questions-get-involved-family-tree/

Types of contributions accepted: “Family Tree covers genealogy, ethnic heritage, personal history, genealogy websites and software, photography and photo preservation, and other ways that families connect with their pasts. Please query with a specific story idea. In general, we’re looking for articles that are right for our magazine, not for writers to assign articles to. Articles need to be broad enough in scope to appeal to a general audience, yet narrow enough to support specific, useful information.” 8

“We do not publish personal experience stories or the histories of specific families in our magazine. Nor do we publish generic family or parenting articles—keep in mind that our focus is how to do family history.” 9

Submission and review process: “We accept queries by email to FamilyTree@yankeepub.com only. If we’ve never worked with you before, please include writing samples (published clips preferred) with your query. Allow six to eight weeks for a response.” 10

“Both online content and magazine issues are planned well in advance. Though our lead time is technically about six months, we may have a plan for the November/December issue by January of that year.” 11

Editorial tone: “Articles are beginner-friendly but never talk down to the audience. Readers may be experts in one area of our coverage, yet novices in another. We emphasize sidebars, tips and other reader-friendly “packaging,” and each article aims to provide the resources necessary to take the next step in the quest for one’s personal past.” 12

“The ideal Family Tree Magazine writer is both a writer—able to explain complex topics in clear, friendly, easy-to-read articles and sidebars—and an expert (or interested amateur) in one of our coverage areas. Your query should indicate both why you’re right for this topic and why you’re able to write it.” 13

Style guide used: None specified. “Our style is bright, breezy, helpful and encouraging. We’re NOT an academic journal or a genealogy-research journal.” 14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be a good publication for reference librarians, adult services librarians and LIS students who are knowledgeable about genealogy and history resources. The editors specifically mention wanting articles about new reference materials, and past articles have focused on organizing research materials. They are also looking for how-to articles that will help beginners start their family history projects. Librarians have a good understanding of what questions patrons generally ask about family history research; those questions can be turned into simple, informative article ideas for this magazine.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Family Tree serves the fast-growing audience of family history hobbyists, enriching their knowledge and empowering their search with tips and tools that fuel their discoveries. Family Tree Magazine in print reaches over 62,000 readers 6x annually. Each month, an average 170,000 people visit Family Tree’s website. Nearly 62,000 family historians receive Family Tree weekly alerts. Almost 168,000 fans follow us on social media.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This US based publication is distributed nationwide. Family Tree Magazine is printed in English.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, 92% of readers want to learn about their ancestors’ lives, 86% want to record their tree for posterity, and 86% aim to trace their family tree back as many generations as possible.  The average age of readers is 62 years old, average household income is $75,454, and 89% of readers have completed education beyond high school. “Our readers spend an average of $483 annually on genealogy.” 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These readers will most likely have limited knowledge of LIS-related topics, so technical subjects as well as LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication offers endless opportunities for LIS authors with background in research, genealogy, cataloging, preservation, archives, and beyond. This publication offers a whole range of possibilities for articles about researching online or how to evaluate a website. Readers who travel for their hobby will want to know about travel resource materials. The well-educated reader might want an online resource for translating family documents (like a birth certificate) that are in a foreign language. Those who are retired might be interested in historical picture books that they can read to their grandchildren to help them begin to learn about their heritage. The editorial tone of the publication is non-academic and light, opening up the potential for articles on multiple facets of LIS subject matter that help readers apply real world skills and re-affirms the usefulness and relevancy of information organizations and professionals.

Last updated: November 21, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  Family Tree Magazine, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521894414381/310957
  2. “Getting Started.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/family-tree/
  3. “Family Tree Magazine.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/
  4. “FAQ.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/frequently-asked-questions-get-involved-family-tree/
  5. “Family Tree Magazine.”
  6. “FAQ.”
  7. “Subscribe.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://ftm.pcdfusion.com/pcd/Order?iKey=K**A51
  8. “FAQ.”
  9. “FAQ.”
  10. “FAQ.”
  11. “FAQ.”
  12. “FAQ.”
  13. “FAQ.”
  14. “FAQ.”
  15. “Advertise.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/advertise/
  16. “Advertise.”
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Computers in Libraries

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

ISSN: 1041-79151

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Computers in Libraries (CIL) Mission Statement: “CIL’s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful articles about the technology that affects them, their institutions, and their patrons. We aim to publish interesting stories, case studies, and opinions that are of professional value to people working with technology in public, academic, special, and corporate libraries, as well as archives and museums. CIL is written by librarians for librarians, and it’s about technology all the time.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.3

Publisher: Information Today Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”8

Frequency of publication: Monthly. 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”10

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.11

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.12

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via the online Query Form.13  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”14

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”15

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author but they are “by librarians and for librarians”. Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well-written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professionals only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”17 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Online magazine with potential for broad readership as the parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Computers in Libraries is published in English. Based in the U.K. but available and accessed worldwide online.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only savvy with technologybut also library managers and system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries do not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. 22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well-informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries do not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead, it devotes itself entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is a month-by-month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand the use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, technical writing should be geared toward a general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

 


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Computers in Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 03, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728654342/91053
  2. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  5. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  6. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  8. Information Today Inc. (2020). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  9. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  10. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  13. Information Today Inc. (2020). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  14. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  19. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
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Community & Junior College Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Community & Junior College Libraries

ISSN: 1545-2522[1 ProQuest, “Community & Junior College Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728955023/484756]

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjcl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Through research and insightful interviews with professionals in the field, Community & Junior College Libraries provides a coherent voice for community college librarians. It addresses the need to define and enhance the leading edge of LRC planning and practice in the United States and abroad. Readers receive information on pertinent topics such as information literacy, collection development, programming initiatives, proven policies, conference reports, and networks and consortia.”1

Target audience: Librarians and educators who deliver information resources to community college students and other lower-division undergraduates.2

Publisher: Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS professional news publication. Although submissions are peer-reviewed, the content is news oriented rather than research oriented, so the publication isn’t considered scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, “news of special relevant legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges” and also “Book reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and ongoing columns with specific focus are also included.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (4 issues per volume).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their Instructions for Authors, “Theoretical research and practical studies dealing with the broad general topic of the delivery of information resources to lower division undergraduate students. This unique publication specifically targets issues concerning community college libraries and learning resource centers. Contributors to this fundamental resource present profiles of learning resource centers (LRCs) around the country and address news of special relevance: €”legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges.”9 Topics for submission include information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming or initiatives which involve the library and the academy at large.10

Submission and review process: The journal provides MS Word templates for authors to properly format their submissions. All submissions and reviews are completed and managed through Editorial Manager, which requires authors to create an account.11

Editorial tone: Academic.12

Style guide used: An in-house style guide based on The Chicago Manual of Style. The guide can be found here.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS authors, especially those who work in two-year colleges. Since both theoretical research and practical studies are welcomed on the many topics covered in the journal, LIS authors in any stage of their careers may publish their works on the topics covered in the journal.14

Topics for possible articles include: information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming and initiatives that involve the library and the academy at large.15

The focus on community and junior college libraries creates varied opportunities for LIS authors, as it encourages dialogue regarding the new challenges in the library science field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication focuses primarily on learning resource centers in two-year colleges throughout the United States. The current editor-in-chief is affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC.16 The publication is aimed at educated, LIS-focused readers involved in the community colleges of the United States, indicating a familiarity with LIS jargon without any special consideration for language other than the courtesy of avoiding regionalism. Readers are most likely familiar with diverse cultures due to the varied population that often makes up urban community and junior colleges.17

Reader characteristics: No specific information was found on gender and ethnicity for this specialized group of librarians. The workplace similarity is the tie that binds together the professional librarians in libraries and learning resource centers within community junior colleges.18 Safely assume readers have a commitment to accessibility of information and to providing it to the public, given the open admissions policies and low tuition of two-year colleges that help to create a rich diversity of people of all ages, cultural backgrounds, and socioeconomic backgrounds.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The professionals would have working knowledge of most LIS subject matter related to academic and school library settings. Use of jargon and acronyms of associations would be familiar to the reader.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Community & Junior College Libraries has a readership that works with a wide variety of patrons. Each type of patron or student has different reasons for being at the community college. The librarians try to fulfill the information needs of many different kinds of patrons including those with low incomes, those who need adult school, a GED or remedial education. Some students are prepared for college and their transition to four-year institutions. Some students are enrolled in high school but are taking accelerated programs at the college. There are also many certificate programs that prepare students for a specific career. The librarian must meet the information needs of all of these groups. Author’s writing for this publication must take all this in to consideration.21

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjcl20#.VChU1xawS3M
  2. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  3. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions#.VChZShawS3M
  10. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  13. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  14. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  16. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group). 2019. Editorial Board. Community & Junior College Libraries. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjcl20
  17. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  18. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  19. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  20. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  21. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
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Technical Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Technical Services Quarterly

ISSN: 0731-7131 (print), 1555-3337 (online)

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wtsq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Technical Services Quarterly is “dedicated to providing a forum for the presentation of current developments and future trends concerning the technical operations of libraries and information centers.” Its purpose is to keep readers informed of developments and research and “practical implementation of systems and applications of traditional and non-traditional technical services and the public operations they influence and sustain.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals, particularly those who are involved with the technical operations of libraries and information centers.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.2

Peer reviewed? Yes.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content: Technical Services Quarterly publishes original articles on research, theory, and implementation of all aspects of technical services in library and information centers. Regular columns include Technical Services Report, Tech Services on the Web, Reviews (of software and books), and Trending Tech Services.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Technical Services Quarterly “accepts original research, theoretical, and implementation articles pertaining to technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies, cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management.”7 The journal advises authors to include a literature review and provides a link to guidelines.8

Submission and review process: Technical Services Quarterly uses Routledge’s Submission Portal to manage manuscripts. Manuscripts “undergo editorial screening and peer review by anonymous reviewers.”9 Taylor & Francis provides an Author Services website that gives a helpful overview of the publishing process.10

Editorial tone: This is a scholarly journal dealing with technical aspects of LIS geared toward professional technical operations of a library. As such, articles are technical and scholarly in tone. LIS-specific terms are used with the underlying assumption that the reader is familiar with them. While the language and tone are technical and scholarly, articles must also be interesting and readable.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Technical Services Quarterly is geared towards LIS professionals, especially those whose interests lie in the technical operations of libraries. For authors and researchers whose manuscripts are geared toward current and future trends in collection methods, technical services, OCLC, metadata, document delivery, among other subjects, this journal is ideal for submission. Articles have addressed interlibrary loan, ebook cataloging and management, low-cost textbooks, and technology-specific studies and reviews; there is a wide variety of librarian roles represented.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a print and online journal published in the United States. Although it does have appeal for international librarians due to its technical nature, Technical Services Quarterly is geared toward American libraries and uses American English. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.12

Reader characteristics: This journal is geared toward LIS professionals in the technical field who are interested in the latest trends.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are most likely to be LIS professionals and, given the technical nature of this journal, will be highly knowledgeable of LIS terminology and practice.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Technical Services Quarterly are LIS professionals who are highly interested in the latest technical information and research. Readers are interested in cutting-edge technology and how it is being implemented in libraries and information centers. Writers who follow trends and understand how the technology of libraries is evolving would be the best bet for this journal.

Last updated: March 21, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Instructions for Authors,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions.
  4. “Journal Information,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wtsq20.
  5. “Aims and Scope.”
  6. “Journal Information.”
  7. “Aims and Scope.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors.”
  10. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 21, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  11. “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. “Editorial Board,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wtsq20.
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Reference Services Review (RSR)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Reference Services Review: Reference and Instructional Services for Libraries in the Digital Age (RSR)

ISSN: 0090-7324

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=RSR

Purpose, objective, or mission: Reference Services Review (RSR) “is a leading journal dedicated to the enrichment and advancement of reference knowledge and the improvement of professional practice.” Further, the journal “raises questions, explores new frameworks for user services, advances fresh analyses and research and proposes solutions to diverse operational issues facing librarians and information professionals.”1

Target audience: Librarians, information professionals, and LIS students, especially those interested in reference, instruction, and public services.

Publisher: Emerald Publishing.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: RSR articles “draw upon traditional areas of inquiry within the fields of information studies and education, as well as from newer interdisciplinary perspectives such as critical pedagogy” and relate to “all aspects of reference and library user services in a digital age.”4 RSR regularly publishes special issues, such as 2017’s two-part Transfer Students and Students in Transition.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted:  RSR publishes research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews. The author guidelines provide a description of each article type in the Article Classification section.6 Topics are wide ranging, including user research, instruction, digital services and software, assessment, management, and any topic relevant to improving and innovating reference services.

Submission and review process: Articles are submitted to RSR using ScholarOne Manuscripts. The editor reviews the manuscripts and sends those that are appropriate for the journal to at least one independent referee for double-blind peer review.7  Reviewers are “distinguished practitioners, managers, administrators, educators, and scholars from library and information studies and higher education, as well as other fields.”8 Additional manuscript requirements and a production cycle with approximate dates and deadlines for the current volume are available on the Author Guidelines page.9

Editorial tone: Professional and academic.

Style guide used: Harvard style in-text citations and reference list. Examples are provided in the Author Guidelines.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

RSR is a strong choice for librarians and information professionals looking to publish scholarship and research on topics relating to reference and readers’ advisory, instruction, information literacy, and public services. It is interdisciplinary in nature, so LIS authors who write from other disciplines or perspectives (for example, critical pedagogy) will find an outlet here. Furthermore, RSR is a leading journal that “provides a quick and efficient service to first-time authors.”11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: RSR “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: RSR is a North American English-language journal. It is widely abstracted and indexed.13 The editorial board consists of LIS professionals from North America, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Canada, so although the articles have an overall North American focus, the reach of the journal is international.

Reader characteristics: Readers include LIS practitioners, managers, administrators, educators, scholars, and students, with a wide range of professional interests in the area of reference services. RSR “is valued reading by the majority of North American library schools with its ‘au courant’ focus.”14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a high familiarity with terminology, trends, and best practices relating to reference services; they will also be LIS graduate students familiar with but learning about these topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A typical reader of this journal will be an LIS professional or graduate student looking for innovative approaches and thoughtful analysis that is written in an accessible style.

Last updated: March 6, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Aims & Scope,” Reference Services Review, accessed March 6, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=RSR.
  2. “Aims & Scope.”
  3.  “Author Guidelines,” Reference Services Review, accessed March 6, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=rsr.
  4. “Aims & Scope.”
  5. See Reference Services Review 45, no. 2 (2017), http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/rsr/45/2,  and 45, no. 3 (2017), http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/rsr/45/3.
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Aims & Scope.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Author Guidelines.”
  11. “Aims & Scope.”
  12. “Aims & Scope.”
  13. “Aims & Scope.”
  14. “Aims & Scope.”
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