Wiki Tags Archives: Blogs

The Librarian Parlor

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Librarian Parlor or LibParlor

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://libparlor.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “. . . a space for conversing, sharing expertise, and asking questions about the process of developing, pursuing, and publishing library research.”1

Target audience: All library, archives, and information workers especially those new to the research community.2

Publisher: The Librarian Parlor. 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional or trade publication. 

Medium: Online.

Content: Any topic relevant to the LIS profession, with an emphasis on material about research in the LIS field. 

Frequency of publication: “LibParlor posts are published to the website on Tuesdays about twice a month at 1 PM EST.”3

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/ 

Types of contributions accepted: The following are the types of contributions accepted for this publication: “informative or reflective blog posts; how-tos (develop research agenda, write proposals, submit IRB, etc); quick tips list; recommended reading; how it started, how it’s going; series; and webinar.”4

Submission and review process: Authors can submit their proposals for articles through this submission form: https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/submit-an-idea/. After submitting, authors will hear back from an editor within one week. 

Editorial tone: “Posts should be written for an audience new to research, not to experts. This is an informal, conversational space, and we like the tone of our blog to reflect that. We encourage you to write in the first-person and avoid passive voice.”5

Style guide used: The Editorial Policies Guidelines can be found at  https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/editorial-guidelines/

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors: LibParlor is an excellent place for LIS professionals new to research to publish their work in and to find a supportive community–professionals can seek connections with other members, find collaborators for projects, or share opportunities for editing works, participating in research, etc.6

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No readership numbers could be gathered for this publication, however, the LibParlor Twitter account (@libparlor) has 2,546 followers.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LibParlor, although not specifically stated, seems to be aimed at a United States readership. The material on the site is written in English. 

Reader characteristics: Regarding their writers and their audience, the publication states “We intentionally work towards providing space for those with a variety of types of work experience such as non-tenure track librarians and library workers without the librarian title, as well as those with different lived experiences, such as people with disabilities, librarians of color, non-binary, and LGBTQ+ folks.”8

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: Due to the targeted LIS readership of this publication, readers will have more knowledge of LIS topics and jargon than the general population. However, the articles should be written so that those new to research can understand it.9

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LibParlor provides LIS professionals, particularly those new to research in the field, with a place to gain experience in publishing as well as a place to build connections with other professionals. 

Last updated: April 6, 2021


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About”, libparlor.com, accessed April 6, 2021, https://libparlor.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Editorial Policies Guidelines”, libparlor.com, accessed December 6, 2020, https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/editorial-guidelines/
  4. “Ways to Contribute”, libparlor.com, accessed December 6, 2020, https://libparlor.com/contribute-to-libparlor/ways-to-contribute/
  5. “Editorial Policies Guidelines.”
  6. “Classifieds”, libparlor.com, accessed April 6, 2021, https://libparlor.com/classifieds/
  7. “The Librarian Parlor”, twitter.com, accessed April 6, 2021, https://twitter.com/libparlor?lang=en
  8. “About.”
  9. “Editorial Policies Guidelines.”
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Book Riot

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Book Riot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.bookriot.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Book Riot is the largest independent editorial book site in North America, and home to a host of media, from podcasts to newsletters to original content, all designed around diverse readers and across all genres.” 1

“We’re dedicated to the idea that writing about books and reading should be just as diverse as books and readers are. We began with the goal of leading a new discussion around books, readers, and publishing. Individually and collaboratively, we do the work each day to innovate fresh content and services to our readers, amplify marginalized voices, and challenge ourselves and our community to be inclusive.” 2

Target audience: People who love books and reading about books.

Publisher: Riot New Media Group. 3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: “The content is comprised of humor, reviews, commentary, and news as well as editorials on topics related to the reading experience. Book Riot addresses new technology in the literary space and developments in the publishing industry.” 4

Frequency of publication: New content is posted daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot

Types of contributions accepted: “If you can write something smart or funny or interesting or provocative about books in the space of about 600-800 words, we’re interested in hearing from you. Your samples should be things you think could go up on Book Riot just as they are. We recommend that one be an entry for the Our Reading Lives series, and the other on any topic of your choosing.” 5

DO NOT submit “traditional book reviews, interviews, or links to Goodreads, LibraryThing, Amazon, etc. Also, please do not submit image-heavy pieces; we want to get a feel for your voice and writing style.”6

DO NOT send “writing samples unrelated to books and reading. Your samples should show us that you understand how we do things here at the Riot and that you can do it too. Want to learn more about who we are? Poke around the site, and check us out on InstagramTwitterFacebook, and our content on Goodreads.” 7

Submission and review process: “Please note that due to the high volume of applications we receive, we cannot respond to each one. We’re currently accepting applicants on a rolling basis. If you are accepted, you’ll hear back within one month of submitting your application.” 8

Editorial tone: Sometimes serious, sometimes silly, but never stuffy or boring.

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you love books and have blogging experience, this is a great place to submit writing. The pieces are fun, cover a wide range of books, and aren’t limited to just reviews: the site loves top 10 lists of all flavors, introductions to authors you’ve never read, giveaways, and posts about current events like Amazon acquiring Goodreads and how that will affect readers. The site isn’t peer reviewed and might not help you gain tenure, but it’s a wonderful community of book lovers who will most likely appreciate an LIS writer’s perspective on reading.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 3.2m+ global monthly unique visitors, 1.1M+ email subscribers, 1.5m+ Social connections. 9 

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Book Riot states it is the largest independent editorial book site in North America. 10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 50% of readers are between the ages of 18-35, 16% of readers are between the ages of 35-45, 64% are female, 51% have children, 45% attended college with 26% attended grad school. Readers have “above average” household income. Reader industries include education and library, business services and retail. Reader interests include books and literature, comics and animation, cooking, and pets. 11

Audience Bookish Habits: Average 80 books read per year, spend an average of $371 per year on books, 34% are currently in a book club, 46% have subscribed to a book subscription service. 12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will most likely have some knowledge, but this is strictly a civilian publication that doesn’t want to be too stuffy, so keep the LIS jargon out of your submissions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

If you have blogging experience and a good social media presence, this would be an ideal site to pitch ideas. Think beyond mere book reviews; Book Riot is the place for more thoughtful, interesting, or just plain fun commentary around reading or books. Readers will be receptive to a librarian’s perspective and insight, and the field is wide open for LIS-related ideas that can appeal to a lay reader.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/about/
  2. “Join Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/join-us/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Advertise.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/advertise/
  5. “Write for Book Riot.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot
  6. “Write for Book Riot.”
  7. “Write for Book Riot.”
  8. “Write for Book Riot.”
  9. “Media Kit.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fFONL49_WYqrqOhjDjc6oxZechhDbdq-/view
  10. “Media Kit.”
  11. “Media Kit.”
  12. “Media Kit.”
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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Higher Education

ISSN: 0009-5982(Print) and 1931-1362 (Online)1

Website: http://chronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Chronicle of Higher Education has the nation’s largest newsroom dedicated to covering colleges and universities. As the unrivaled leader in higher education journalism, we serve our readers with indispensable real-time news and deep insights, plus the essential tools, career opportunities, and knowledge to succeed in a rapidly changing world.” 2

“Higher-ed professionals rely on The Chronicle for unbiased, engaging content to help their students, institutions, and careers.”  3

Target audience: Higher education faculty and administration.4

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No. 6

Type: Civilian; though it does sometimes carry articles of interest to or authored by librarians, it is mainly for the general administration and faculty. 7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: The website contains news, featured stories, opinion pieces, advice columns, job listings, and career-building tools such as online CV management and salary databases. The print magazine includes news, jobs, and The Chronicle Review. 9

The Chronicle Review is a weekly magazine of ideas. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. 10

Frequency of publication: The Chronicle updates its website daily and is available bi-weekly in print. 11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us

Types of contributions accepted: The Chronicle welcomes correspondence, manuscripts, and proposals for articles from our readers. Articles and letters may appear in our print edition, our website, or both. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. We consider unsolicited submissions; however, please read The Review before submitting your work to familiarize yourself with what we publish. 12

Commentary and Views:
“We consider articles or proposals for articles that express an opinion on issues and policies affecting higher education as well as those that explore, through the author’s personal experience, some aspect of the larger academic community. All Commentary and Views submissions should be 1,000 to 1,200 words and should contain URL links to source material for facts and figures mentioned in the essay.” 13

Advice
“We publish first-person and advice columns on topics including the job market and the hiring process in academe; the graduate-school experience, tenure and promotion, the administrative career path, and career options for Ph.D.’s; professional challenges in research, publishing, teaching, and service work; academic culture; and balancing work and family. Essays should be 1,000 to 1,500 words and written in a conversational, journalistic style.” 14

Letters
“Please make your points as concisely as possible. We will not publish letters longer than 350 words, and all letters will be edited to conform to our style.” 15

“The Chronicle welcomes news pitches that pertain to higher education, but note that in a typical week, our reporting staff receives hundreds of them. We’re writing for a national audience, so a successful pitch will not only point out a compelling local story, but will also be relevant to administrators, professors, and higher-education observers across the country.” 16

Submission and review process: The decision to accept or reject a manuscript rarely takes more than a week. All accepted essays and articles are rigorously edited and fact-checked. Authors have the opportunity to review and approve a manuscript before it’s published. The editors of The Review will decide where and when the piece is published, with some articles appearing only online.17

Editorial tone: Journalistic and conversational.

Style guide used: None specified. “While we cover the academy, we are not a scholarly journal. Essays should be written in a clear, informal style free of jargon and accessible to nonspecialists.” 18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because of the publication frequency and the audience that this newspaper serves, this is a good place for the new author to publish. You don’t necessarily have to work in academe, but it helps. Academic librarians, along with information professionals with an interest in education or pedagogy, would be welcomed here. This publication is an informal counterpart to academic journals, a sort of cocktail hour where academics can mull over or vent about relevant issues within and outside of their field. Interested authors will be intelligent, educated and independent thinkers with something interesting to say.

Also, the wide variety of pieces found in the The Chronicle makes it very easy to find something to write about that, if written in a clear prose style, has a decent chance of being published. Book reviews are a natural, but the longer commentary pieces on some topical tempest occurring in the academy are always a good bet. Because so many write under pen names, the odds of a new author being accepted seem high.

Because of its eclectic content, others working in academe will also find something interesting in The Chronicle of Higher Education. While this publication is definitely written for those with careers in higher education, LIS authors with an interest in teaching will find something of interest here as well.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Our award-winning journalism is well-known at colleges and universities: More than 2 million people visit our website every month, and 1,650 organizations across the country make our journalism available to every one of their employees and students.”19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though The Chronicle claims to be the main source of the goings on in higher education, it does tend to concentrate on the English-speaking world of the United States and sometimes Canada and the United Kingdom.20

Reader characteristics: According to The Chronicle’s advertising materials, “86% of readers are decision makers and influencers at their institutions. 54% are in senior leadership positions at their institutions. 92% hold a master’s degree or higher. 60% have a doctorate degree. Readership includes 90% of the buying power in all of U.S. higher education and 90% of the top 300 research institutions in the U.S.” 21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While the readership may garnish accolades in the higher education arena, they may still lack knowledge in LIS jargon, processes, and trends/innovations.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers are well educated and very interested in their profession and the culture of academe as a whole. Writing for The Chronicle would be an excellent way to increase understanding of library issues (such as information literacy) and market the library’s relevance to other professions. Intellectual and academic freedom, new issues in purchasing and providing content such as e-journals, information literacy, and services to disadvantaged groups would be other issues that would resonate with this readership.

An LIS professional writing for this audience would not have much additional work to do, so long as he or she has something interesting and informed to write about. While this is not the place for scholarly work, readers do enjoy learning about new research or reading critiques of articles they’ve read in an entertaining format. They want to read shop talk, stay informed in their field, and feel connected to issues in the larger world.

This would be a good place to write an opinion piece about an LIS issue that touches on education, society or academe, or review a work that touches on these same issues. Todd Gilman, Librarian for Literature in English at Yale University and a Lecturer at San Jose State University, has published articles about distance education, special collections, research skills and information literacy, and other topics that connect libraries and academe in The Chronicle.

Last updated: November 7, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1601911248
  2. “About Us.”, www.chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/about-us/
  3. “Advertising.”, chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://marketingsolutions.chronicle.com/
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “Contact Us.”, Chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us
  7. “About Us.”
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contact Us.”
  13. “Contact Us.”
  14. “Contact Us.”
  15. “Contact Us.”
  16. “Contact Us.”
  17. “Contact Us.”
  18. “Contact Us.”
  19. “About Us.”
  20. “About Us.”
  21. “Advertising.”
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INALJ (I Need a Library Job)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: INALJ (formerly I Need A Library Job)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its tenth year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Types of contributions accepted: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Submission and review process: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: N/A

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.5

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published span a broad range of topics. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. About INALJ
  4. Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ content is updated daily during weekdays. [4. “About INALJ

  5. About INALJ.”
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Bitch Media

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bitch Media

ISSN: 1524-5314 (Print) and 2162-5352 (Online)1

Website: https://bitchmedia.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “Bitch Media’s mission is to provide and encourage an engaged, thoughtful feminist response to mainstream media and popular culture.”2

“Bitch seeks to be a fresh, revitalizing voice in contemporary feminism, one that welcomes complex arguments and refuses to ignore the contradictory and often uncomfortable realities of life in an unequivocally gendered world.”3

“Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.”4

Target audience: Largely women, but meant for anyone who is interested in a modern feminist discussion on media and popular culture. According to the website, Bitch has a diverse audience and is “uniquely situated to draw in young readers who are at a critical moment in their lives—a moment when they are discovering feminism and activism, finding answers to who they are, and questioning the definitions of gender, sexuality, power and agency prescribed by the mainstream media.”5

Publisher: Bitch Media.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: Lay publication, with emphasis on politically and socially minded individuals.8

Medium: Quarterly Magazine, Weekly Podcast, and Daily Online Content. 9

Content: “Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.” Media includes Movies, television, news magazines, fashion magazines, blogs, comics, advertising, music, computer games. 10

Frequency of publication: The print magazine is published quarterly, online content is published five days a week.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “We are looking for discussion-provoking critical essays that are well researched with evidence to back up claims, timely statistics, and connections between one’s personal experience and larger social forces. Interviews with feminist culture-makers are welcome, as are book, film, and music reviews and nuanced analyses of particularly horrifying and/or inspiring examples of pop culture. First-person essays are great, but please read our print magazine and website to get a sense of how our contributors strike a happy balance between the personal “I” and the larger subject matter at hand.”12

Bitch accepts nonfiction pieces only, and does not accept fiction, poetry, “personal essays, experimental lyric essays, or anything that reads like a dissertation.”13 Each issue has a theme, but the themes are meant to serve as jumping-off points rather than rigid guidelines. Be sure to check the website for upcoming topics, but the editors encourage pitches for articles that would suit the magazine but don’t fit an upcoming theme.14

Potential contributors are encouraged to consider which section of the magazine would best fit their idea before submitting a pitch. Features are “2,200 to 3,000 words of meaty critiques, essays, and articles on pop culture from a feminist perspective.” These pieces should be filled with “personal insight and wit,” and may vary in format, such as interviews, reported pieces, critical essays, or even timelines, charts, and comics.15 Dispatches are “1,200 word missives from the front lines of real, imagined, or fictional worlds and places.” 16 “Culture is where Bitch brands its cultural authority through essays about books, music, and screen; profiles of individuals and those who are creating and defining cultural moments; and interviews with those working in publishing, Hollywood, podcasting, and other areas who are helping us imagine new possibilities for representation and inclusion.”17

“Payment varies but is generally $700-$1000 for features, $350 for dispatches, and between $250-$700 for culture stories. All of our writers are paid. Please send all materials through our submission manager. Submit to the section of the magazine that best fits your pitch.” 18

Submission and review process: Both finished work and query letters are accepted. If sending only a query, include clips and/or writing samples. Submissions, query letters, and pitches are accepted through their link to Submittable. Bitch accepts online pitches on a rolling basis. view open calls and submit your pitches through the website found within the writers-guidelines. “Due to the volume of pitches we receive, we are unable to respond to every pitch and will only respond to the pitches that we accept.” 19

Editorial tone: Serious, and seriously tongue-in-cheek. This is not a scholarly publication and sarcasm is rampant, but Bitch remains a very thoughtful and provocative media organization.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and information science is a field that is historically dominated by women, and perhaps due to that, it is a profession filled with preconceived notions and attitudes about women as librarians (think severe, hair-buns, glasses, and sensible shoes). Bitch is an excellent forum to discuss how we as librarians (both male and female) are seen in popular culture, what that image represents, and if that image affects how the populace sees us. It would be a good forum to discuss how gender, sexuality, and feminism play a role in our profession, as well as an outlet to discuss how other LIS issues are affected by or are affecting popular culture and the media. LIS authors with a background or interest in women’s studies or literature might be interested in writing feature articles, though an interdisciplinary perspective is key.

Bitch began as a zine, and has grown into an independent, nonprofit, feminist media organization.20 But that independent spirit, snarky attitude and distrust of the status quo have remained. The magazine endeavors to be a “tool kit” that engages readers in analysis that promotes activism and social change, and LIS authors with an interest in social justice, critiques of mainstream culture, and independent thinking would be at home here. Come with a strong opinion, say it well and say it with wit.21

This organization recognizes the value of libraries as places of critical inquiry, and supports a Bitch Community Lending Library that houses a diverse selection of 2,000 feminist materials to the community in the magazine’s home of Portland, Oregon. “Our library holds over 2,500 books, zines, magazines, and DVDs that explore feminism, media studies, pop culture, queer studies, race studies, sex and sexuality, body image and much more. The library also holds rare issues of ROCKRGRL and Sassy magazines which are available for browsing in our cozy reading room. The books in our catalog are available to search online.” 22

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has 80,000 readers, while the website receives nearly 5 million unique visitors each year.23

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bitch subscribers reside in 46 countries and all 50 states, with 78% of readers living in urban areas or college towns.24 This magazine focuses on popular culture and media images almost exclusively in the United States. Bitch will repeatedly refer to people, places, ads, and events that will only make sense to a person who has an idea of the major figures or subjects in American popular culture.

Reader characteristics: The majority of Bitch’s readers are between the ages of 25 and 34. They are well educated, tech savvy, and have Internet access. Bitch readers are also civic-minded and politically aware, with 85% having voted within the last year, and 51% having contacted their elected officials in the past year. They overwhelmingly identified as politically liberal, progressive, or radical.  They donate to causes and campaigns that are important to them. They read in their spare time, with 63% reading more than 10 hours a week. They are vocally and financially supportive of music, theater, and the arts. They are well-traveled: 48% traveled overseas in the past three years, and 92% traveled domestically in the last year. Bitch readers are conscientious consumers: 82% go out of their way to shop at independent retailers, 84% purchase environmentally friendly products and services, and 44% independently research a company’s mission or labor practices before buying its products.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Little to none. The odds are good that the reader has spent time in libraries of some kind (academic, school, and public), and shares values the library upholds, such as intellectual freedom and equal access to information.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This organization’s readership is large, and while readers are largely unfamiliar with LIS topics, virtually any LIS subject relating to feminism (e.g., gender prejudices within LCSH subject headings) would be welcomed here. This audience wants something that is thought-provoking, well written, and entertaining. They want to discuss thematic figures of women, femininity and gender within pop culture and society as a whole.26

Readers are overwhelmingly well-educated, socially and politically progressive women who live in urban areas. Do not assume there will be a great deal of knowledge or even interest in many library issues or concerns, but there will be an interest in how librarianship as a profession and threats against freedom of information affect the position of women and minorities in American society. Persuasive and thoughtful writing is more important than citations, statistics, or user studies (though referring to any of these will help solidify the author’s argument). Remember that these readers don’t just read about a topic, they do something about it. This is an audience whose members just might write to their legislators about a library issue or volunteer at their local library, if those issues resonate with them. This is a great audience to reach, not only because it shares LIS values but because it has the potential to be an advocate for LIS issues.

Last updated: August 30, 2020


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Bitch, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/93747762
  2. “About Us.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 23, 2018, https://bitchmedia.org/about-us
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “About Us.”
  7. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “About Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  13. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  14. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  15. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  16. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  17. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  18. “Contributor’s Guidelines.”
  19. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  20. “About Us”
  21. “About Us.”
  22. “Bitch Community Lending Library.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/library
  23. “Get that Life: How I Co-founded Bitch Media.”, Cosmopolitan.com, accessed September 7, 2016, http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/a57736/andi-zeisler-bitch-media-get-that-life/
  24. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016,  https://bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/Bitch-Media-Sponsorship-Kit.pdf
  25. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”
  26. “About Us.”
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Hack Library School

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Hack Library School

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://hacklibschool.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Hack Library School is a collaborative project begun in the Fall of 2010. It quickly grew from a Google Doc to a wiki to the rotating group of contributors that it is today. HLS was founded on the principle of students taking the future of librarianship into their own hands.”1 Hack Library School was inspired by a 2010 post by Micah Vandegrift on In the Library with the Lead Pipe, a train of thought brought about by Hacking the Academy, where “a group of academics, librarians and higher ed techies crowdsourced submissions for a born-digital book.”2

Target audience: LIS students.

Publisher: Hack Library School (a WordPress site)

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.

Medium: Online. The primary content is via the blog; information is also shared via Twitter and Facebook.

Content: “Hack Library School is an invitation to participate in the redefinitions of library school using the web as a collaborative space outside of any specific university or organization. Imagine standards and foundations of the profession that we will create, decided upon by us, outside of the institutional framework. Ideas like the democratization of the semantic web, crowdsourcing, and folksonomies allow projects like this to exist and we should be taking advantage of it. What will the information professions be next year if we define it for ourselves today? If we had a voice in the development of curriculum, what would that degree entail? This is our challenge to you; participate or come up with a better idea. How would you hack library school?”3

Frequency of publication: All online media updated as frequently as contributors post. The goal is to post new content regularly.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For guest posts, see the guidelines.5

Types of contributions accepted: Anything related to LIS, from a you-should-know, student perspective. Posts are meant to be conversation starters.6

Submission and review process: Send an email to hacklibschool@gmail.com. If accepted, HLS will get back to you with comments and start working on scheduling your post to the site.7

Editorial tone: Informal.

Style guide used: None. Links to other sites, citations, and references to other points of view are encouraged but not strictly regulated.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

HLS has gained recognition around the LIS blogosphere and already has great social media presence on Twitter and Facebook. This is the place to post your experiences in the LIS world, thoughts on improvements, issues, and ideas for a group who really gets it, and will use the information you provide in the quest of their own LIS degree and pursuits. If you have yet to write articles or blogs, this would be a great place to get started, writing to like-minded peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Open source digital website, blog, and social media.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  Mainly US college & university LIS students, but the site is read available world-wide online.

Reader characteristics: The prevailing concepts are that information should be shared and discussed, and that learning need not only take place within educational institutions. And that we respect each other’s opinions, comments, and posts. From the Guest Post guidelines: “Take responsibility for your own opinion and respect other opinions.”9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but in various stages. HLS is written for, by and about LIS students, but that also means people in their first year in the program, or those just considering getting their degree. Don’t assume readers will understand LIS jargon; explain references so lay readers can easily comprehend.10

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of HLS want to know what you think, what your experiences, thoughts, and issues are with LIS education. The idea is for LIS students to imagine, discuss, and develop the profession the way we want to see it in addition to what is being taught in school. If you know something that’s outside of the books please share it. If you have ideas, concerns, professional advice, career tips, or just a cool LIS subject you’d like to broach, the editors and readers of HLS will be happy to hear from you.11

 


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “About”, Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from https://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  2. Vandegrift, M. (2020). #HackLibSchool. (Weblog post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  3. “About”, Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from https://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  4. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  5. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  6. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  7. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  8. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  9. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  10. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  11. Guest posts,” Hacklibschool.wordpress.com, Accessed May 5, 2020, Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
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BayNet Newsletter

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No. “The editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: “Informal but informative blog posts relevant to the interests of BayNet Members with a focus on interdisciplinary communication. News articles should be factual and inviting, preferably concerning the institution with which the author is affiliated. Opinion pieces should be well researched, and professional with an emphasis on sharing knowledge with fellow professionals of related professions. Links to relevant information is encouraged.”3

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to baynetlibs@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet News Submission” in the subject line.”4

Editorial tone: Informal but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. Articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information, and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed May 01, 2020, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed May 01, 2020, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  3. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed May 01, 2020, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  4. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed May 01, 2020, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
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Against the Grain

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

ISSN: 1043-20941

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. Our goal is to link publishers, vendors, and librarians by reporting on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals. ”2

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.3“>https://against-the-grain.com/about/]

Publisher: Against the Grain.4

Peer reviewed? No. All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.5

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.6

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.7 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.8

Content: Articles. The ATG also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.9

Frequency of publication: “Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January; and the ATG NewsChannel website that is updated daily with the latest news, announcements, and online-only content.” 10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews, reviews, legal issues, publishing, bookselling and vending, technology, and standards.11

Submission and review process: Contact Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.12

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,13 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.14

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.16 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.17 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (editorial institutional affiliations).19 Written in American English.20

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.21 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”22 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

 


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “About,” Against the Grain, LLC, accessed April 30, 2020, http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  2. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  3. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  4. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  5. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  6. Against the Grain. (2018). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  7. Purdue University. (2018). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  8. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit Content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from https://against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  9. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  10. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  11. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  12. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  13. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  14. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  15. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  16. Purdue University. (2018). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  17. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  18. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  19. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  20. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  21. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  22. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  23. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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iSchool Connext

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: iSchool Connext

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “iSchool Connext fosters connections between students and alumni of the SJSU iSchool program through communications, events, and programs open to all students and alumni in order to promote scholarly and professional development and achievement.”1 In 2011, the SJSU School of Information’s alumni association and its student organization were merged into a single organization with a shared blog in order to promote “expanded collaboration and communication between current students and alumni, creating lifelong connections that enrich their scholarly and professional careers.”2

Target audience: All students and alumni of the School of Information at San José State University.3

Publisher: Student and alumni members of the iSchool Connext organization.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Web-based publication.7

Content: “Information on the LIS field, career ideas, job opportunities, or any other topic that may be helpful to others.”8 Recent posts include event announcements, spotlight features of alumni, and recruitment announcements for leadership positions within the organization.9

Frequency of publication: Continuously. As of 2019, the most recent post is from January 2018.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/ (Scroll to the bottom-right corner in the footer of each page.)

Types of contributions accepted: Op ed pieces, as well as announcements and discussions of events, scholarships, and resources related to students and alumni of the School of Information. “Guest posts” from recent years include opinion pieces on the importance of doing research while in school, the use of social media for networking, and interview techniques. Any insight or news relevant to any library profession or education would be welcome here.11

Submission and review process: iSchool Connext members are encouraged to participate by emailing the organization through the website.12 The Blog Correspondent and iSchool WebMaster are responsible for soliciting blog submissions from members and managing online presence,13 and are presumably in charge of reviewing and posting submissions, since “guest posts” are technically posted by the WebMaster.14 The most recent (2017-2018) list of officers indicates open seats for at least the WebMaster position.15

Editorial tone: Informal.16

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The iSchool Connext Blog provides many publication, editorial, and leadership opportunities for iSchool students and alumni at SJSU. Any student or alumni of the school could begin to develop a publication portfolio by contributing opinion or news pieces to the blog. The current lack of activity and leadership indicates a small audience, but any involvement would indicate commitment to improving and participating in communication of the school’s students and alumni. In addition to writing, members of the group could show leadership and further develop their publication skills by seeking out any of the currently open Officer positions and making the blog a more active and widely-read publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation or membership information is available, but blog content makes its way to the organization’s social media pages. As of July 2019, Facebook page has 980 followers and their Twitter account has over 500.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: San José State University is located in San José, California, yet all of its current students complete the program online. Students and alumni may live, study, or work anywhere in the world. Since members have all completed coursework through the program, they will be familiar with English and LIS jargon at least to the extent that it appears in iSchool courses. The School of Information has been around since 1954, so school alumni could have very different cultural and professional experiences than current students.18

Reader characteristics: Since we have no current data on the group’s membership or the blog’s readership, we can only assume that the reader characteristics are the characteristics of the school’s students and alumni. They could possess or be working towards a MLIS or MARA degree with a career pathway in academic libraries, special libraries, public libraries, school libraries, teacher librarianship, archives and preservation, data science, digital curation, information organization, digital services, and more. They could be in their first semesters in the program, or they could be longtime professionals in the field.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: iSchool students and alumni have a command of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the potential membership of this group is so diverse in experience, authors can interest an audience by writing about any topic in the field or by making connections between different topics in the field. Whether reading an observational piece on teacher librarianship or an opinion piece on controversies in digital preservation, most readers will be interested in understanding what their fellow students and alumni are thinking about and experiencing. Members read this blog to keep up on the events and opinions of their classmates and former classmates, not to read the latest best practices and research articles. A focus on connecting life lessons to iSchool experiences would be especially welcome in this blog.

Last updated: July 13, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/?page_id=67
  2. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext,” accessed July 13, 2019, https://ischool.sjsu.edu/node/3204.
  3. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext.”
  4. iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement.”
  5.  iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement.”
  6. iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement.”
  7. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext.”
  8. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/
  9. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  10. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  11. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  12. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  13. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext By-Laws,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/?page_id=1919
  14. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  15. iSchool Connext, “Leadership,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/?page_id=49
  16. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  17. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext.”
  18. SJSU School of Information, “History and Accreditation,” accessed July 13, 2019, https://ischool.sjsu.edu/history-and-accreditation
  19. SJSU School of Information, “MLIS Career Pathways,” accessed July 13, 2019, https://ischool.sjsu.edu/mlis-career-pathways
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SNAP Section Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: SNAP Section Blog [Students & New Archives Professionals]

ISSN: N/A

Website:  https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SNAP Section is a sub-group formed within the Society of American Archivists (SAA) to focus on student and new professional goals and issues.1 The SNAP Blog provides SNAP Section members with a forum sharing information in a more public forum, in conjunction with other social media outlets.2 The blog meets supports SNAP’s goals to “provide a forum to share concerns and learn from each other” and to “facilitate remote participation in the group through social media and other online resources.”3

Target audience: Entry level or student archivists, particularly those involved in the SAA: students, interns, new professionals, early-career archivists, and those still looking for their first professional job. Per the bylaws, any member or nonmember of SAA, including new and more experienced archives professionals, may participate in SNAP in accordance with the most current Guidelines for Roundtables as set forth by the SAA Council.4

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Sharing information relevant to the student and new archive professional community, including archive-relevant blogs, regional meetings or courses, project ideas, general Q&A regarding research, professional and student issues, and the Ask An Archivist Q&A section.9

Frequency of publication: Updated as often as members post online. Recently the rate has been about three times per month.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/

Types of contributions accepted: Blog reviews, accounts of regional meetings or courses, project ideas, and anything of interest to the archival community.11 Special columns offer more structured writing opportunities, and can be found here.12

Submission and review process: Authors who want to contribute to the blog should submit a contact form with information about themselves and about the topic they plan to write about.13 It can be assumed that the blog team will work with authors to develop their idea and get it posted.

Editorial tone: Informal.14

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The SNAP Section Blog is an excellent forum for sharing archival information and concerns among a like-minded group. It should be easy for novice writers to practice publishing their thoughts, ideas, and announcements in this public forum. Posting on this blog promises networking potential, as well as the possibility of becoming a strong voice in the newest generation of archivists, who may bring to light new perspectives on issues not emphasized to more established archivists.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently 218 people follow the blog,15 though the number of views that blog posts receive on the site and on linked-to social media could potentially be much greater.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience is largely North American, as the blog concerns members of the SAA. English is the primary language. Recent blog posts demonstrate comfort with social media and current internet language.16

Reader characteristics:  Since the Section focuses on students and new professionals, members are likely overall to be younger than their other SAA Section counterparts, though new archive professionals may be older individuals in the midst of a career change. Readers may also be more established archivists who want to keep up with what issues their new colleagues find important.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Some LIS terminology and understanding is expected; but this is not a professional-grade publication, just sharing among peers. Contributors writing about their personal experiences in the field are not necessarily expected to walk readers through each step of what their work entails.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The SNAP Blog offers an excellent venue for new and student archivists to share knowledge, insights, and new ideas about their profession.19 This is a very organized, enthusiastic group of students and new professionals who are addressing the needs of those LIS professionals new to archival librarianship. Readers are hoping to learn career tips, gain insight on issues they have different perspectives on, and network with other professionals. Write from personal experience and with passion for maximized readership.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section/snap-mission-statement
  2. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  3. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.”
  4. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  5. Society of American Archivists, “Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Section,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section
  6. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.
  7. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  8. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  9. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  10. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section,” Accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com
  11. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  12. Students & New Professionals Section, “Series,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/series/.
  13. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  14. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  15. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  16. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  17. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  18. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  19. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
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