Wiki Tags Archives: History

Mental Floss

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mental Floss

ISSN: Print: 1543-4702 (ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Whether we’re covering history, science, pop culture, language, music, true crime, or entertainment, we help our audience feel smarter. Our New York City-based team of editors and writers—as well as our worldwide network of contributors—answers life’s big questions, uncovers fascinating facts, and finds stories so interesting that our readers absolutely must share them.”2

Mental Floss delivers smart, fun and shareable content in an upbeat and witty environment. An encyclopedia of everything, we answer life’s big questions and uncover stories so interesting our readers absolutely must share them. We take all culture and make it pop culture.” 3

Target audience: “Curious People.” 4

Publisher: Minute Media. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online. Print issues ceased in 2016. 6

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects with a focus on shareability.7

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for new voices to write about the diverse verticals we cover, whether that’s history, science, entertainment, language, pop culture, art, or beyond.” 8

PITCHES WE CAN USE 9
Lists

Lists are an overview of a topic in digestible-nugget form. Each list will cover the who, what, when, and where of the subject, plus its significance, and pay particular attention to quirky or little-known facts about the subject. Pitches may focus on the below topics:

Subjects that have a major anniversary coming up
Historical figures and events
Movies and TV series
Music
Literature and art
Language
Food and drink
Helpful tips and life hacks
Scientific discoveries, phenomena, and figures
Pop culture fads, events, and personalities

Features

Features are reported stories that delve into a topic from a particular angle and with strong characters and storytelling. Features can be short (500 words) or longer (800-1500 words). Areas ripe for features include:

Historical events that put current events into perspective
Exploring and/or answering a big question
Science stories that explain a new field of research or highlight a scientist’s ongoing work
A deep dive into a pop culture event or phenomenon in history
True crime and unsolved mysteries
Features about odd, unique, or little-known historical events and people

PITCHES WE CAN’T USE 10
Short, timely news stories: these pieces are covered by our staff writers
Science articles based on a single study: these are also covered by staff writers
First-person articles or personal essays
Fiction, memoir, or poetry
Current politics or political opinion
Stories based solely on PR pitches

Tips provided by Mental Floss: Keep your pitch short (1-2 paragraphs) and let them know if you have a particular expertise on the subject. Include a link to your portfolio/work samples. Do not pitch or send completed articles.  Take the time to brainstorm a possible headline for your story, and include that as part of the subject line, i.e. Freelance Pitch: 50 Amazing Facts About Animals. Having a headline can help us better understand the angle you plan to use with your story. 11

Submission and review process: “Expect a response to your pitch within two weeks. If you do not receive a response after two weeks, you can assume it’s a pass. Due to the number of pitches we receive each day, we are unfortunately not able to respond to every pitch we receive.” 12

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Since its founding in a Duke University dorm room in 2001, Mental Floss has reached more than 1 billion readers with smart, quirky content presented in a witty, upbeat voice. We reach more than 19 million users per month across our site, social media accounts, and popular YouTube channel.” 13

According to Visitor’s Worth website, Mental Floss has approximately 58,000 daily visitors, with 154,000 daily page views. 14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Visitor’s Worth website, the most traffic for the publication comes from audiences in the United States, but the website also has a following in the UK, Canada, India, and Germany. 15 The website publishes in the English language.

Reader characteristics: In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “About Us,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “Mental Floss,” MinuteMedia.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.minutemedia.com/mentalfloss
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Mental Floss.”
  6. “Life After Print for Mental Floss,” FolioMag.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.foliomag.com/life-after-print-for-mental-floss/
  7. “About Us”
  8. “Pitch,” MentalFloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss
  9. “Pitch.”
  10. “Pitch.”
  11. “Pitch.”
  12. “Pitch.”
  13. “About Us.”
  14. “www.mentalfloss.com,” VisitorsWorth.com, accessed December 5, 2020,  http://visitorsworth.com/www.mentalfloss.com
  15. “www.mentalfloss.com.”
Continue Reading

Family Tree Magazine

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Family Tree Magazine

ISSN: 1529-0298 (Print)1

Website: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A how-to publication for readers interested in family history and genealogy research. “Learn how to build your family tree with beginner research tips, guides to DNA testing, family history storytelling, using genealogy records and more!” 2

Target audience: Genealogists and family history enthusiasts.

Publisher: Yankee Publishing, Inc. 3

Peer reviewed? No. 4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Subscription-based print magazine with online content and research tools. 5

Content: Family Tree Magazine  “covers genealogy, ethnic heritage, personal history, genealogy websites and software, photography and photo preservation, and other ways that families connect with their pasts.” 6

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly. 7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.familytreemagazine.com/frequently-asked-questions-get-involved-family-tree/

Types of contributions accepted: “Family Tree covers genealogy, ethnic heritage, personal history, genealogy websites and software, photography and photo preservation, and other ways that families connect with their pasts. Please query with a specific story idea. In general, we’re looking for articles that are right for our magazine, not for writers to assign articles to. Articles need to be broad enough in scope to appeal to a general audience, yet narrow enough to support specific, useful information.” 8

“We do not publish personal experience stories or the histories of specific families in our magazine. Nor do we publish generic family or parenting articles—keep in mind that our focus is how to do family history.” 9

Submission and review process: “We accept queries by email to FamilyTree@yankeepub.com only. If we’ve never worked with you before, please include writing samples (published clips preferred) with your query. Allow six to eight weeks for a response.” 10

“Both online content and magazine issues are planned well in advance. Though our lead time is technically about six months, we may have a plan for the November/December issue by January of that year.” 11

Editorial tone: “Articles are beginner-friendly but never talk down to the audience. Readers may be experts in one area of our coverage, yet novices in another. We emphasize sidebars, tips and other reader-friendly “packaging,” and each article aims to provide the resources necessary to take the next step in the quest for one’s personal past.” 12

“The ideal Family Tree Magazine writer is both a writer—able to explain complex topics in clear, friendly, easy-to-read articles and sidebars—and an expert (or interested amateur) in one of our coverage areas. Your query should indicate both why you’re right for this topic and why you’re able to write it.” 13

Style guide used: None specified. “Our style is bright, breezy, helpful and encouraging. We’re NOT an academic journal or a genealogy-research journal.” 14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be a good publication for reference librarians, adult services librarians and LIS students who are knowledgeable about genealogy and history resources. The editors specifically mention wanting articles about new reference materials, and past articles have focused on organizing research materials. They are also looking for how-to articles that will help beginners start their family history projects. Librarians have a good understanding of what questions patrons generally ask about family history research; those questions can be turned into simple, informative article ideas for this magazine.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Family Tree serves the fast-growing audience of family history hobbyists, enriching their knowledge and empowering their search with tips and tools that fuel their discoveries. Family Tree Magazine in print reaches over 62,000 readers 6x annually. Each month, an average 170,000 people visit Family Tree’s website. Nearly 62,000 family historians receive Family Tree weekly alerts. Almost 168,000 fans follow us on social media.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This US based publication is distributed nationwide. Family Tree Magazine is printed in English.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, 92% of readers want to learn about their ancestors’ lives, 86% want to record their tree for posterity, and 86% aim to trace their family tree back as many generations as possible.  The average age of readers is 62 years old, average household income is $75,454, and 89% of readers have completed education beyond high school. “Our readers spend an average of $483 annually on genealogy.” 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These readers will most likely have limited knowledge of LIS-related topics, so technical subjects as well as LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication offers endless opportunities for LIS authors with background in research, genealogy, cataloging, preservation, archives, and beyond. This publication offers a whole range of possibilities for articles about researching online or how to evaluate a website. Readers who travel for their hobby will want to know about travel resource materials. The well-educated reader might want an online resource for translating family documents (like a birth certificate) that are in a foreign language. Those who are retired might be interested in historical picture books that they can read to their grandchildren to help them begin to learn about their heritage. The editorial tone of the publication is non-academic and light, opening up the potential for articles on multiple facets of LIS subject matter that help readers apply real world skills and re-affirms the usefulness and relevancy of information organizations and professionals.

Last updated: November 21, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  Family Tree Magazine, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521894414381/310957
  2. “Getting Started.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/family-tree/
  3. “Family Tree Magazine.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/
  4. “FAQ.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/frequently-asked-questions-get-involved-family-tree/
  5. “Family Tree Magazine.”
  6. “FAQ.”
  7. “Subscribe.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://ftm.pcdfusion.com/pcd/Order?iKey=K**A51
  8. “FAQ.”
  9. “FAQ.”
  10. “FAQ.”
  11. “FAQ.”
  12. “FAQ.”
  13. “FAQ.”
  14. “FAQ.”
  15. “Advertise.”, FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://www.familytreemagazine.com/advertise/
  16. “Advertise.”
Continue Reading

Collaborative Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collaborative Librarianship

ISSN: 1943-75281

Website: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The publication website identifies three mission points: To “promote sharing of ideas, best practices, opportunities, challenges and successes involving collaborative librarianship; sustain an open-access journal where professional librarians can publish articles (peer- and non-peer-reviewed) on a range of subjects relevant to librarianship, but that involve collaboration at their core; to promote sharing of ideas, opportunities, challenges and successes involving new kinds of partnerships, joint projects, and innovative approaches to collaboration that benefit all members within in the information supply chain.2

Target audience: LIS professionals, LIS instructors, and LIS students3

Publisher: Independently published, and sponsored by the Colorado Library Consortium, the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Regis University, and the University of Denver4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The publication’s website indicates that it provides articles relating to a wide range of issues including library-to-library cooperation; sharing resources and expertise; library-to-business partnerships; local, regional, national, and international collaboration; professional, consortium and association partnerships; the history of library collaboration; open access and online availability; better and best practices.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts for submission field reports that focus on innovative collaborations and address best practices. Field reports are usually 2,500 to 5,000 words in length. The journal also accepts scholarly articles on library collaborations at the local, national, or international level that approach their topics historically, quantitatively, qualitatively, analytically, theoretically, philosophically, or practically. Published scholarly articles are usually of at least 5,000 words.10

Submission and review process: The submission may not be under consideration for publication by another publisher nor have been previously published. Submissions should include a short abstract, a title, list of authors and affiliations, an introduction, the body of the paper, conclusions, and references. Submissions should adhere to the style guidelines provided on the website and uploaded as Microsoft Word or RFT files. 11

Editorial tone: Depending on the section, articles may be scholarly or more professionally informal.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors will find Collaborative Librarianship an appealing avenue for publication. Because collaboration is increasing across the LIS community,  professional interest in innovative ideas on this topic is high. Since the publication is a venue for both practical and scholarly articles, authors may expect to reach both professional and academic audiences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication does not provide details on circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is sponsored by library consortiums and universities in Colorado, and part of its mission is to meet goals identified at the June 2008 general meeting of the Colorado Academic Library Consortium, including the promotion of the knowledge infrastructure of Colorado; the maintenance and development of the Colorado library system; and the transmission of lessons learned in the Colorado library community to the rest of the United States.14 The publication is written in English.15

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide information about individual characteristics about the readers. Persons of interest can subscribe via email to receive notification of new issues. The publication is geared toward librarians located in both the education and professional fields. The journal appears to be content neutral, appealing to readers interested in the collaborative aspect of the LIS field.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers work in the LIS field, authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because collaboration exists over practically, if not entirely, all fields in the LIS profession, potential authors can view Collaborative Librarianship as a great source for potential publication. While some readers may not be directly involved in an author’s particular LIS field, collaborative ideas can be shared and valued.

Last updated: May 7, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523415071648/668432
  2. “About this Journal/Mission Points,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  3. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  4.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  5. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  6. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  7. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  8. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  9. “About this Journal/Publication Frequency,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  10. “About this Journal/From-the-Field Reports and Scholarly Articles” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  11. “Policies,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, https://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/policies.html#whatcansubmit
  12.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  13.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  14. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  15. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  16. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  17. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
Continue Reading

Catholic Library World

Image courtesy of Catholic Library World.

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Catholic Library World

ISSN: 0008-820X

Website: http://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Catholic Library Association, an international organization established in 1921, seeks to provide professional development, promote Catholic literature and offer spiritual support. They promote the exchange of ideas and provide an inspirational source of guidance on ethical issues related to librarianship.1

Target audience: The publication is intended for an “audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries,” whether Christian, secular, or from another religion.2

Publisher: Catholic Library Association.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all submissions are subjected to a double-blind review process.3

Type: LIS scholarly.

Medium: Print.

Content: Catholic Library World publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholicism and Catholic Studies. “Topics of interest include: academic libraries, high school and children’s libraries, parish and community libraries, archives, and library education.” The journal also publishes book reviews on the following topics: theology and spirituality, pastoral, professional, children, and young adult.4

Frequency of publication: Journals are published in September, December and March.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Links to PDF files containing author guidelines can be found on CLA’s Publications page.

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews (for both children and adult works) and articles on all aspects of librarianship, particularly those that relate to Catholicism and Catholic Studies.6

For a better idea of what CLW publishes, here are two recent articles:

The Bayou Lafourche Oral History Project: Understanding Environmental Change and Religious Identity in Louisiana

Catholic Academic Libraries and Print Promotional Materials

Articles should contribute new findings to the existing literature in the field. The word count should be between 3000 and 5000 words, but may be longer if an editor gives approval.7

Submission and review process: Send manuscripts via email as an attachment including author’s full name, affiliation and email address. Manuscripts should be neither previously published nor published simultaneously elsewhere. Because of the lengthy peer review process, authors will be notified within ninety days of submission whether or not their work was accepted. 8

If published, authors keep copyrights and publication rights for their work.

Editorial tone: Accessible and well documented.9

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors should keep in mind that the Catholic Library Association does not limit their publications to works about Catholicism or Catholic librarianship. Their Publications page states that “CLW respects diverse Christian traditions as well as non-Christian. While it is a Catholic publication, CLW welcomes relevant articles from a variety of religious traditions.”10

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Catholic Library World features a wide readership within and outside of the Catholic Library Association. The journal is “indexed in Book Review, CPLI, Library Literature and Information Science, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Reference Book Review Index, Current Index to Journals in Education (ERIC), Information Science Abstract, and University des sciences humans de Strasbourg (CERDIC.)”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of Catholic Library World’s readers are likely to be American Catholics.

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be LIS professionals. From their Publications page, “CLW is intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various libraries.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Members of the Catholic Library Association are networkers in the field of library science with a passion for the future of libraries and library trends in the U.S. and abroad.13 Considering that each issue of CLA’s award winning journal features over 100 book and media reviews, readers of Catholic Library World are interested in a wide variety of LIS topics.

Last updated: April 30, 2020


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Cathla.org, accessed April 30, 2020, https://cathla.org/Main/About/About_Us/Main/About/About_Us.aspx?hkey=1d0656f5-9a4c-4436-a435-6074be93e751
  2. “Publications,” Cathla.org, accessed April 30, 2020, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  3. “Author Guidelines,” Cathla.org, accessed April 30, 2020, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  4. “Publications.”
  5. “Author Guidelines.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Publications.”
  11. “Publications.”
  12. “Publications.”
  13. “Become a Member,” Cathla.org, accessed March 13, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member.aspx?hkey=b2bcc799-8b31-4f9e-8629-f408fde31e9d
Continue Reading

Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCanadian Journal of Information and Library Science / La Revue canadienne des sciences de l’information et de bibliothéconomie

ISSN: 1195-096X (Print) and 1920-7239 (Online)1

Websitehttp://cais-acsi.ca/the-canadian-journal-of-information-and-library-science/

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the vehicle of the Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), the journal seeks to advance the study of information and library science in Canada “by serving as a forum for discussion of theory and research. The journal is concerned with research findings, understanding of issues in the field, information practices of individuals and groups, and understanding of the history, economics, and technology of information or library systems and services.”2

Target audience: Canadian LIS community3

Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Journals Division4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print. It’s available online via Project MUSE7

Content: “The journal publishes research papers, scholarly opinion papers, reviews of research, brief communications, and reviews of books and other media” in both English and French.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts submissions of “research papers, scholarly opinion papers, reviews of research, brief communications, and reviews of books and other media” in both English and French. Reviews of publications by Canadian authors are of particular interest.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted to the online system. A tentative title and an abstract of 50-100 words, preferably in both English and French, should be included. Submissions will be reviewed by at least two independent referees. Additional details about manuscript formatting are available on the journal website.11

Editorial tone: Academic/ Scholarly12

Style guide used: The journal uses an in-house style that is outlined on its website.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science provides an excellent opportunity for LIS authors looking to publish scholarly, career advancing work and establish a presence outside the United States.

This publication is abstracted and indexed in Academic Search Elite/Premier, Canadian Periodical Index, Computer and Control Abstracts, Cultures, Langues, Textes: La revue de sommaires, Current Contents: Social and Behavioural Sciences, ERIC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (IBR), International Bibliography of Periodical Literature on the Humanities and Social Science (IBZ), SCOPUS, Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA), Library Literature, Professional Development Collection, and Social Science Citation Index.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Exact circulation numbers are not available, but the journal is a benefit of membership in Canadian Association for Information Science / L’association canadienne des sciences de l’information (CAIS-ACIS). Membership is automatic for all attendees of the annual conference of the association.15 The journal is also available online through Project MUSE.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal, while covering LIS topics in general, is written and aimed at LIS academics, both English and French speaking, practicing in Canada.17

Reader characteristics: The audience for this journal is a mix of academics and industry and government professionals such as information scientists and archivists, librarians, computer scientists, and educators. Readership also includes those in “media studies and journalism, business, psychology, health sciences, education, law, and many other areas.”18 This indicates a variety of workplaces from universities, large corporations and government organizations.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering their shared interest in the mission of the CAIS-ACIS, it suggests the readers, while not all information science professionals, have considerable knowledge of LIS subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication are interested in furthering their ability to practice in the field, to acquire information on new research that will support their work in support of libraries. The readers are also most likely residents of Canada and, while most of the papers published would easily benefit a librarian or information professional residing anywhere in the world, submissions need to be relevant to librarians practicing in Canada.

Last updated: April 28, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1588090872879/72671
  2. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  3. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  4. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  5. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  6. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  7. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/the-canadian-journal-of-information-and-library-science/
  8. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  9.  Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  10. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28. 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  11. “Guidelines for Submission,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/
  12. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  13. “Guidelines for Submission,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/
  14. “Abstracting and Indexing,” University of Toronto Press, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.utpjournals.com/Canadian-Journal-of-Information-and-Library-Science.html
  15. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  16. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Project MUSE, accessed April 28, 2020, http://muse.jhu.edu/journal/497
  17. “Call for Papers,” Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), accessed November 15, 2016, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  18. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  19. “Call for Papers,” Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
Continue Reading

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCataloging & Classification Quarterly

ISSN: 0163-9374 (Print) and 1544-4554 (Online)1

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wccq20/current

Purpose, objective, or missionCataloging & Classification Quarterly is an international journal providing information and discussion on the subject of bibliographic organization. It addresses the theory and practice of cataloging and classification from a historic as well as a contemporary approach. “In a rapidly changing field, it seeks out and fosters new developments in the transition to new forms of bibliographic control and encourages the innovative and the nontraditional.”2

Target audience: “For library school faculty, it provides an outlet for research publication as well as source materials for students.  For the cataloger, the journal provides both theoretical background and potential solutions to current problems. For the public services librarian, there are discussions of bibliographic records in actual use and of the importance of feedback from the user to the creator of cataloging systems. For the administrator, it explores the complex elements in the library organization.”3

Publisher: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6.

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Cataloging & Classification Quarterly features articles that consider “…the full spectrum of creation, content, management, and use and usability of both bibliographic records and catalogs. This includes the principles, functions, and techniques of descriptive cataloging; the wide range of methods of subject analysis and classification; provision of access for all formats of materials; and policies, planning, and issues connected to the effective use of bibliographic records in modern society.”8 Besides introducing innovations in bibliographic control, the journal also discusses theoretical backgrounds and analysis of bibliographic organization.

Frequency of publication: Eight issues per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submitting your Paper

Types of contributions accepted: “Full-length research and review articles; descriptions of new programs and technology relevant to cataloging and classification, considered speculative articles on improved methods of bibliographic control for the future, and solicited book reviews.”10

Submission and review process: Authors should submit via ScholarOne Manuscripts after reviewing the submission instructions11

Editorial tone: Scholarly and professional. 12

Style guide used: Taylor & Francis Chicago US endnote-footnote style found here.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized publication that provides relevant news, information, and analyses of and about recent trends in cataloging and classification as well as historical perspectives of experts in the field. This journal is a very useful resource for LIS professionals who deal with bibliographic organization and technical services in their institutions. Persons who are experts in the field, archivists, or other librarians, as well as students interested in writing classification-oriented research papers may submit their work for publication. Articles involving information organization or collection management are only a small part of the breadth of literature that may be written about cataloging and classification.

This journal is abstracted in De Gruyter Saur; IBZ;  Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Inspec; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; OCLC; ArticleFirst; Ovid; Periodica Islamica; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; FRANCIS; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; VINITI RAN; and Clarivate Analytics’ Emerging Sources Citation Index.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Information for updated publication circulation was not found, but looking at article views from recent issues showed significant exposure with most above 100 or 200 downloads over the past month, and historically high numbers of views from various articles dating from the early to mid 2010s, with some reaching near 8000 views.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerationsCataloging & Classification Quarterly may be purchased online from Taylor & Francis and is available worldwide.16 This is an American English publication and its primary readers reside in the United States. However, as evidenced by the diversity of its editorial board members based in different parts of the world, articles in the journal must also accessible to a international audience.17

Reader characteristics: No individual characteristics of the journal’s readers were available. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, however, describes its audience as, “academic; special adult.”18 Naturally, because Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal, its readers have similar interests in LIS topics and issues, particularly in bibliographic organization. The majority of subscribers are likely cataloging professionals and technical services librarians. As LIS professionals, subscribers of this journal likely support the development of cataloging and classification and have interests in other LIS issues.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this specialized journal are doubtless familiar with cataloging and classification, as well as other LIS issues. 20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal that is geared towards the professional cataloger but is also of interest to LIS professionals or graduate students seeking knowledge of bibliographic organization trends or breakthroughs. Authors must keep in mind that these readers are most likely LIS professionals, graduates or students that are knowledgeable about issues in the field of cataloging and librarianship. They are looking for formal and scholarly articles pertaining to topics such as records description and access or classification systems used in special libraries. Research articles on such subjects are the most appropriate for this audience. The use of subheadings is recommended to focus the reader’s attention and show the author’s intention clearly.

Last updated: April 28, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Journal Information.” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wccq20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020 https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  4. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  5. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  6. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  7. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  8. Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  9. “Journal Information” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wccq20
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wccq20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wccq20
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020  https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020,  https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wccq20#peers
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wccq20
  15. “Current issue,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wccq20/58/2?nav=tocList
  16. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  17. “Editorial board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wccq20#.U9cg5LFiND4
  18. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
Continue Reading

Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America

ISSN: 0730-7187 (Print) and 2161-9417 (Online)1

Website: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/journals/journal/adx.html and https://arlisna.org/publications/art-documentation

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a peer-reviewed journal presenting issues of concern to librarians working within art history, art criticism, the history of architecture, archeology, and similar areas. The journal has established itself as a vital publication for art information professionals, acting as a forum for issues relating to both the documentation of art, and the practice and theory of art librarianship and visual resources curatorship.”2

Target audience: Art, architecture, and design librarians and visual resources curators.3

Publisher: University of Chicago Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Art and LIS, scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Articles and information relevant to art librarianship and visual resources curatorship in academic, special library, and museum settings.8

Frequency of publication: Semiannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelinesArt Libraries Society of North America- Publications. Basic submission guidelines can also be found here: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/instruct

Types of contributions accepted: According to the contributor guidelines, “Feature articles may take the form of theoretical or scholarly submissions, revisions of conference presentations, papers emphasizing library practice, descriptions of specific libraries or collections, interviews, or articles of a historical nature. Articles must relate to art librarianship, visual resources curatorship, or the documentation of art, and the writing style should be formal.” Published articles are typically 2,500 to 5,000 words, with a maximum of 8,000 words.10

Submission and review process: Authors should contact the content editor via email to discuss topic and abstract before submitting a manuscript. Submission deadlines are March 1 for the Fall issue, and September 1 for the Spring issue.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Professionals, academics, and graduate students seeking to establish themselves in the field of art librarianship will find an opportunity in this peer-reviewed publication.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 153 (Total circulation at the end of last published volume Fall 2019)14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an English-language journal published in the United States, with a North American focus.15

Reader characteristics: A subscription to Art Documentation is a benefit to membership in the Art Libraries Society of North America. It is assumed that readers have a shared interest in art, developing LIS skills, and supporting fellow art librarians. Workplaces would include art libraries with an interest in mentoring, networking, and developing best practices. Readers would have a professional interest in promoting access to art and art preservation.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers have an LIS degree. It is likely that many members of the ARLIS/NA also hold additional degrees in history or art.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writers need to consider the education level and very specific interest the readers share when writing for this publication. Authors are encouraged, as with any publication, to read past issues of the publication before querying the editor with a proposal.

Last updated: February 28, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  2. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  3. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  4.  Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  5. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  6. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  7. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  8. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  9. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  10. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed February 28, 2020, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  11. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed February 28, 2020, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  12. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  13. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed February 28, 2020, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  14. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: Advertise in Art Documentation,” University of Chicago Press, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/advertise
  15. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  16.  “Art Documentation,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed February 28, 2020, https://arlisna.org/publications/art-documentation
  17. “What Our Members Are Saying,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.arlisna.org/membership/what-our-members-are-saying
Continue Reading

Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information (Title changed from Archives and Museum Informatics in 2001.)1

ISSN: 1389-01662

Purpose, objective, or mission: Promotes the development of archival science as a scientific discipline. Per their website “…this journal is the only independent, international, peer-reviewed journal on archival science, covering all aspects of theory, methodology and practice, with appropriate attention to the non-anglophone world…”3

Websitehttps://www.springer.com/journal/10502

Target audience: The primary audience is researchers and educators in the field of archival science; a secondary audience is other professionals interested in recorded information.4

Publisher: Springer Netherlands5

Peer reviewed? Yes6 However, the journal website provides no information on the review process.

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Print and online, selected articles available open access8

Content: Articles cover all aspects of archival science theory, methodology, and practice; investigations of different cultures; comparisons of perspectives and practices worldwide; and the field of process-related information. The journal especially focuses on the comparison of procedures and techniques throughout the world, especially in non-English-speaking countries.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: See “Submission Guidelines” at https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: The publication focuses on the scientific aspects of the archival field. Articles deal with the creation, preservation and retrieval of archival information; the social, cultural and historical facets of archived information; and the theory and methodology of information generation and use.11

Submission and review process: Entire manuscripts are accepted through an online submission process.12 The site offers detailed information regarding submission guidelines and also provides a series of online tutorials to help an author prepare a manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly14

Style guide used: Publication has an in-house style guide, provided in the “Instructions for Authors” tab.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A review of previously published articles indicates that the majority of authors are from the LIS academic community. Archival Science is an international publication, and the authors are international as well. Faculty at U.S. institutions such as Simmons College, the University of North Carolina, and the University of Pittsburgh were represented with recent articles. There was no indication of graduate students’ work in the publication, suggesting this journal may only be an option for experienced authors from the academic community; however, the journal does offer mentoring through their online course tutorials.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 82,140 Downloads (2018)

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an English-language journal published in the Netherlands. Due to its international audience, prospective authors should avoid regionalisms and ensure that any references, such as cultural and geographic terms, are clear to the reader.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are academics, well-educated within their field, and interested in promoting archival science as an autonomous scientific discipline. Interests span all aspects of archival science theory, methodology, and practice. While readers work in a variety of environments, including universities, governments, and museums, the journal is aimed at academics. Readers would likely not have an interest in LIS issues beyond those related to their work as archivists. Also, writing that focuses on local issues not applicable to another location would hold little interest for the average reader.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Archivists will most likely have a general understanding of how their work is related to the LIS field, but not all archivists will have an LIS degree. For example, archivists working for the United States federal government are not required to have an LIS degree.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in writing for this publication need to be secure in their knowledge and reputation in the archival profession, as the readers expect articles that are thought provoking and will add to their knowledge of the field.

Last updated: February 28, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  2.  Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523412328038/275476
  3. “Archival Science,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  4. “Archival Science,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020,  https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  5. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  6. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  7. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  8. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  9. “Archival Science,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  10. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020 https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/aims-and-scope
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines
  13. “Author and Reviewer Tutorials,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/gp/authors-editors/authorandreviewertutorials
  14. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines
  16. “Submission Guidelines” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502/submission-guidelines
  17. “Archival Science” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
  18. “Archival Science” Springer, accessed February 28, 2020, https://www.springer.com/journal/10502
Continue Reading

The American Archivist

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The American Archivist

ISSN: 0360-9081 (Print) and 2327-9702 (Online)1

Website: https://americanarchivist.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of The American Archivist states it “seeks to reflect thinking about theoretical and practical developments in the archival profession.”2 It is the journal of the Society of American Archivists, so the focus is on the cultural, social, legal, and technological developments in North America in particular.3

Target audience: Archivists and special collections librarians.4

Publisher: Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS and History, scholarly7

Medium: Print and online open access; last six issues available to SAA members and subscribers only, or to the general public for a fee.8

Content: Includes research articles, case studies, commentaries on issues and practices of interest to the field, essays on international archival practices, annotated professional resource bibliographies, discussions of professional practice and initiatives, and letters to the editor on previously published articles and other topics of interest to the field.9

Frequency of publication: Semi-annual.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy

Types of contributions accepted: Original research articles, case studies, opinion and editorial pieces, articles concerning international practices or perspectives, professional resource bibliographies, and reviews of books, archival literature, finding aids, microfilm editions, exhibits, and computer software.11

Submission and review process: The preferred maximum length is 8,000 words for research articles and surveys, and 3,000 words for case studies and perspectives. These length requirements may be waived for certain articles in consultation with the editor. All articles should be accompanied by a 250-word abstract. Manuscripts are to be submitted electronically through the Submissions Manager in Microsoft Word, double-spaced and pages numbered throughout, with author’s name and address on the title page only.12

The American Archivist is a refereed journal. Each submission will be reviewed by two experts in the subject matter of the submission, and a final decision for publication will be based on their reviews. Final decision normally takes a minimum of three months.13

Acceptance for publication is usually on the condition that specified revisions be made. Once an article is accepted, author will send a short biographical statement and photo. Authors are given the opportunity to approve all editorial changes and to review page proofs for correction of printer’s errors. It usually takes a year for a submission to be seen in print.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition; for professional terminology refer to the definitions outlined in A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology by Richard Pearce-Moses.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If the author is looking for an avenue to enter the conversation of current, scholarly archival practices and the future of conserving information, this may be one of the more prestigious journals through which to pursue publication. Publishing in American Archivist is sure to have weight when interviewing for a position, or to fulfill tenure or promotion requirements for academic libraries or other scholarly institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The American Archivist circulates to around 5,300 members of the Society of American Archivists, while the digital edition receives about 17,000 page views per month17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SAA members live and work all over North America. There is no specified or dominant culture or geographic area. This journal is mainly focused on North American archivists and their practices, and all articles are in English. However, this journal expresses a definite interest in the archival practices of their international colleagues, and specifically looks for articles on this subject.18

Reader characteristics: Highly educated individuals, most of whom have at least two university degrees. Most have history and/or library science graduate degrees. There are further specializations in every area imaginable, so a variety of interests are represented here. There is no information provided on age, gender, or ethnicity of the members. This audience works in a variety of professional settings, including universities and higher education, private corporations, nonprofits, historical societies, public and special libraries, art and history museums, religious organizations, and government agencies. Some specializations include acquisition and appraisal, business archives, religious archives, academic archives, museums, description (cataloging), electronic records, government records, manuscript repositories, oral history, preservation, reference and access, and visual materials to name a few. People may work by themselves with little to no assistance, or work in immense academic or private institutions with a fleet of colleagues and assistants. The most striking characteristic of American Archivist readers is that they love and believe in what they do. They are incredibly interested in their profession, and how to continue and expand it into the future. These readers are interested in practical approaches and ideas, as they are practitioners in the real world who are usually short on money, space, and time. Theoretical discussions with no practical applications would be of little value to them.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With extensive knowledge specific of their branch of LIS, these readers are well versed in the history of archiving and preservation and specific technologies and practices, and are often eager to discuss and debate new technologies and future practices in the field. They are familiar with both LIS and archival terminology, concerns, issues, and theories. Archival studies includes several different models used for appraisal, weeding, preservation, etc., which are also discussed in this publication. Not all readers will possess an LIS degree as some enter the field by way of a history or museum education and background.20

Conclusion: Reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this publication can be extremely intimidating for the new author and archival professional. Many of SAA’s members have been publishing in this journal (and others) for years, and their names are well-known and carry weight at conferences and national conventions. They have highly specialized and technical knowledge ranging over hundreds of topics, localities, and institutional settings. These readers are professional scholars and practitioners who value both theoretical and applied research in archival science. They will be looking for excellent academic writing, new ideas, or suggestive case studies with relevance to their own repositories. This is a high standard to meet. However, if an author feels he or she has something to add to the conversation of archival studies, this is the right forum. This is where the newest, most significant research, case studies, and experimental models in the field are disseminated and discussed.

Last updated: February 28, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-712559018
  2. “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  3.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28. 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  4.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  5. The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  6.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  7.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  8.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  9. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  10.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  11. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  12. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  13. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  14. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  15.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  16. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  17. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  18. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  19. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
  20. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
Continue Reading

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society


About the publication

TitleLibraries: Culture, History, and Society

ISSN: 2473-0343 (Print) and 2473-036X (Online)1

Websitehttp://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Libraries: Culture, History, and Society aims to study libraries within their broader historical, humanistic, and social contexts.”2

Target audience: LHRT members and library historians (both professional historians and hobbyists)3

Publisher: The Pennsylvania State University Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: “In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Sociology, Education, Gender/Women’s Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Political Science, Architecture, Anthropology, Philosophy, Geography, Economics, and other disciplines. The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while promoting innovative cross-disciplinary research on libraries’ relationships with their unique environments.”8

Frequency of publication: Twice a year9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: “Libraries: Culture, History, and Society welcomes submissions of research papers. Manuscripts that offer interdisciplinary perspectives are strongly encouraged, as are authors from outside library science. LCHS also publishes evaluative reviews of books that complement our journal’s mission to situate libraries within their broader historical context.”10

Submission and review process: The Submission Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles that aren’t currently under review elsewhere.11 Authors are asked to create an account through Editorial Manager and submit their manuscripts there.

As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly but very readable13

Style guide usedChicago Manual of Style, notes system14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is an excellent publication for LIS scholars interested in a wide variety of topics pertaining to LIS history. In addition to U.S. history, the journal’s third and fourth issues will cover libraries in the Jewish settlements of Argentina, 100 years of libraries and the library profession in Catalonia, and the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard a library user in Copenhagen.15 Additionally, the journal was just launched in 2017 16, providing LIS authors with a unique opportunity to guide the journal’s formative years.

Additionally, despite the journal’s youth, it’s the official journal of the Library History Round Table, a respected organization that dates back to 1947.17

Thus,  authors can take pride in the knowledge that they’re contributing to the mission of a well-established organization with a storied history.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is written using standard American spelling,18 and the majority of its editorial board members live in the U.S.19 Despite this majority, the editors are eager to receive contributions from authors all over the globe to show the enormous diversity in libraries.20

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be well-versed in LIS history. In keeping with the scholarly nature of this journal, readers will likely have a bachelor’s degree (at minimum). Additionally, they will be fluent in English.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although readers should still be familiar with basic LIS terminology, Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is not as technical as, say, Journal of Library MetadataThis characteristic is largely influenced by the journal’s broad historical focus, meaning that its articles are more concerned with the broader sociological factors (e.g., fiscal crises)21 and how said factors shaped various libraries than the finer technical operations of libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will expect authors to be well-versed in LIS history and ideally, have a background in sociology, history, etc. Furthermore, readers will appreciate readable, yet well-researched articles that define unfamiliar terms where necessary and favor facts over opinion.

Last updated: August 31, 2018


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.   Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  2.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  3.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  4.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  5.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  6.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  7.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  8.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  9.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  10.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  11. “Manuscript Format for Articles,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  12.  “Manuscript Format for Articles,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  13.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  14. “Manuscript Format for Articles,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  15. Eric Novotny and Bernadette Lear, email message to author, August 31, 2018.
  16.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  17. “Library History Round Table (LHRT) The American Library Association Archives,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed August 2, 2018, https://archives.library.illinois.edu/alaarchon/?p=creators/creator&id=3499
  18. Libraries: Culture, History, and Society Submission Guidelines for Authors,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed August 2, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  19.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed August 2, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  20.  Eric Novotny and Bernadette Lear, email message to author, August 31, 2018.
  21.  Jeffrey A. Kroessler, “One Staff, Two Branches: The Queens Borough Public Library and New York City’s Fiscal Crisis of the 1970s,” Libraries: Culture, History, and Society 2, no. 1 (2018): 72, accessed August 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.5325/libraries.2.1.0072
Continue Reading