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Municipal World

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Municipal World

ISSN: 0027-35891

Website: http://www.municipalworld.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Municipal World is a magazine “devoted to promoting effective municipal government.”2. Founded in 1891, it is the oldest continuously published monthly municipal magazine in the world.3

“Each month, Municipal World examines the issues that impact communities: new federal and provincial policies and legislation; new theories about economic development and renewal; new strategies and emerging best practices from communities like yours across the nation.” 4

Target audience: This publication is aimed at elected and appointed officials involved in municipal government interested in providing effective service to their constituents.5

Publisher: Municipal World, Inc., Ontario, Canada.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: Civilian publication for those involved in the municipal sector.

Medium: Print, with current issue TOC, keyword, and article search available online at their website. Digital editions of Municipal World Magazine are also available, but to subscribers only. 8

Content: According to their website, “articles addressing the pressing problems of the municipal sector” and regular features concerning the environment, governance, management, and procurement. Contents also include upcoming events, Canadian Municipal Code, professional directory, job board, and sources for forms and supplies.9

Frequency of publication: Monthly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://municipalworld.com/magazine/editorial-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted:Municipal World welcomes contributed articles from individuals working in the municipal sector or aligned to the field. Submissions may be considered for our online feature articles, print/digital editions, or special themed publications.” 11

“The scope of potential topics for article submissions is very wide; submissions can focus on any subject area that will be of interest to senior municipal administrators and local government elected officials and in Canada. We do have several ‘theme’ issues throughout the year, which may be relevant for something you are contemplating. Contact the Editor for more information.” 12

“Most articles published in Municipal World are in the range of 1,200 to 2,000 words. As a rule of thumb, 1,400-1,800 words is ideal. However, exceptions can be made at the editor’s discretion to accommodate longer or shorter articles. Our best advice: brevity enhances the prospect of publication.” 13

Submission and review process: “The editor ultimately decides upon the content of the publication, including your article, and reserves the right to reject any submission, or to edit your submission for length, content that may have been covered in a previous article, inappropriate information for the interest of our readership, or style.” 14

“As topics for each issue are selected on a ‘what’s hot’ basis, we cannot guarantee a definite date for publication of articles. Periodically, we schedule special feature issues. For example human resources, heritage, technology, environment, or economic development. These factors also determine our selection of articles.” 15

Editorial tone: As noted in style guide entry, publication prefers “streamlined and straightforward” writing.  Authors are encouraged to “present convincing documentation to prove the point” and nothing else. 16

Style guide used: No style guide specified. This guidance provided: “Our preferred style is streamlined and straightforward, to minimize legal and technical jargon, and to spell out all acronyms on the first reference. Use the simplest word that makes the point. For example: “use” instead of “utilize”; “rain” instead of “precipitation event.” Articles should be as specific as possible, and use active voice, rather than passive voice. Articles written in the first person (e.g., using “I” or “we” throughout) are generally inappropriate…Do not include personal opinions and organizational position statements. Rather, present convincing documentation to prove the point.” 17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This magazine, like others of its kind, offers great potential for increasing the visibility of Canadian public libraries with the government administrators who fund and support them (or not). As library leader Ken Haycock pointed out in a blog post, public librarians have much to gain by writing for such publications “to ensure that their celebrations and concerns are front and center with those who make decisions affecting their future.”18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website draws an audience of more than 53,000, the weekly newsletter has more than 18,000 subscribers, and the publication has more than 19,000 social media followers. 19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Canada. Given the geographic location, English speaking authors from outside Canada would be best served respecting the Canadian spelling of English words. While municipal governments throughout the world bear similarities, contributors should have an understanding of issues specific to Canadian municipal government.

Reader characteristics: As appointed and elected officials in Canadian government and others working in municipal government, readers would share a strong sense of service to their community and are likely proud of being a Canadian. Readers will likely possess education beyond high school, often a professional degree in law, accounting, engineering, architecture, planning, or management. Workplace likely a government agency or entity. Interest would likely be broad, any topic that effects their community and constituents including: election process, environmental concerns, provision of social services, and changes in legislation.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS subject matter will vary widely and authors should not assume any LIS background. As professor emeritus and former director at San Jose School of Library and Information Science Ken Haycock often reminded SLIS students, our LIS degree could support a number of job titles and careers beyond “librarian;” librarians, information professionals, and individuals with LIS degrees, due to the economy and the ever changing LIS field, are finding themselves in leadership positions in civil service.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Given that the readership of Municipal World is, by and large, an educated group committed to serving the public, they would likely have an understanding of the needs of other organizations, such as libraries, that serve the public. LIS authors could utilize this common understanding and promote the value of libraries when writing for Municipal World, as long as they also ensure the topic of their article is relevant and their authoritative voice is well grounded in experience. Authors will need to ensure they establish their link to the municipal government world, their authority on the article topic as well as the relevance to the readership of this publication.

Last updated: November 21, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Municipal World, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521936758490/17162
  2. “About Municipal World,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2016, https://municipalworld.com/about_us
  3. “About Municipal World.”
  4. “Municipal World Magazine,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed November 21, 2020, https://municipalworld.com/magazine
  5. “About Municipal World.”
  6. “About Municipal World.”
  7. “Editorial Guidelines,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2016,  http://www.municipalworld.com/magazine/editorial-guidelines/
  8. “Municipal World Magazine.”
  9. “Municipal World Magazine.”
  10. “Municipal World Magazine.”
  11.   “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  14. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  15. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  16. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  17. “Editorial Guidelines.”
  18. “One Way to Raise Your Profile,” Ken Haycock Blog, April 16, 2012, http://kenhaycock.com/one-way-to-raise-your-profile/
  19. “Advertise.”, municipalworld.com, accessed on November 21, 2020, https://www.municipalworld.com/advertise/
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The Washington Post

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Washington Post 

ISSN: 0190-8286 (Print).1

Website: https://www.washingtonpost.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Washington Post engages, informs and entertains the most influential minds. We shape the world through our news coverage and analysis. Our tradition of journalistic excellence and unparalleled access, paired with cutting-edge engineering, make The Washington Post the trusted source for our audience.”2

Target audience: Local Washington D.C. readers, regional readers, national readers, and global readers. 

Publisher: Nash Holdings, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper. 

Medium: Print and online. 

Content: The Washington Post covers a variety of topics from politics, technology, sports, arts and entertainment, and business, to world news and more. 

Frequency of publication: Daily print publication and a website with content that is updated frequently. 

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines for op-eds can be found at https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/submit-an-op-ed/ and submission guidelines for letters to the editor can be found at https://helpcenter.washingtonpost.com/hc/en-us/articles/236004788-Send-a-letter-to-the-editor

Types of contributions accepted: Op-eds and letters to the editor are the accepted submission types. 

Submission and review process

Op-eds should be submitting using the op-ed submission form found on The Washington Post’s website. Information required in the submission form is as follows: author’s name, contact email address, contact phone number, the subject of the op-ed, and the op-ed text. The maximum length of the op-ed is 800 words and should be input in the text box as plain text without brackets.4

Letters to the editor can be sent to The Washington Post via mail, however, The Washington Post mentions that they strongly encourage authors to send their submission via email instead. Email submissions can be sent to letters [at] washpost.com (include the text of the letter in the email’s body; letters sent as email attachments will not be opened) and mailed letters can be addressed to Letters to the Editor, The Washington Post, 1301 K Street NW, Washington DC 20071.5

Letters should be 200 words or less, must include the writer’s name, and cannot have been published elsewhere. Additionally, “for verification purposes, they must include the writer’s home address, email address and telephone numbers, including a daytime telephone number.”6 Letters may be edited for length or clarity if necessary and, time permitting, editors at The Washington Post will confer with the author regarding the changes. For the best chance at getting your letter published, “Letters editor Jamie Riley looks for concise letters that offer a new perspective or add depth to the discussion of an issue.”7 If you haven’t heard back from editors at The Washington Post within 2 weeks, your letter most likely did not get selected for publication. 

Editorial tone: A review of the current articles reflects an informal but informational tone. 

Style guide used: Several articles alluded to a Washington Post style guide existing, however, it could not be located. 

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing a piece in The Washington Post would be an excellent way for authors to present LIS issues and topics to a global audience and a great addition to an author’s resume or CV. Pieces can focus on LIS topics and issues on a national level, global level, or be specific to the Washington D.C. area. Examples of LIS articles published in The Washington Post are “COVID-19 took away our family’s second home: The library” and  “Six ways to get to know D.C.’s beautifully renovated MLK Library — from a distance”. 

For tips on how to get your piece published in The Washington Post, take a look at this guide that The Washington Post released in January of 2020. 

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 1.6 million print readers per week, 104 million unique monthly visitors nationwide and 38 million international unique monthly visitors.8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Washington Post has a national and global readership and is published in English. 

Reader characteristics: The Washington Post divides its readers into four audience groups: Global, Leadership, Local/Washington, D.C. Market and International/Non-US.9  

Global

As stated by The Washington Post Media Kit, their publication is the “fastest growing news site in the world.”10

Leadership:

The Media Kit for the Washington Post asserts that the paper is “. . . the #1 news source for reaching opinion leaders and decision makers in the beltway.”11

Local/Washington, D.C. Market:

1.6 million people in the D.C. market area read the print version of The Washington Post weekly and there are 2 million unique digital visitors from the D.C. market area per month.12

International/Non-US:

The Washington Post sees 38 million unique international visitors per month. “This international coverage unfolds around the clock seven days a week with timely, accessible and original coverage from bureaus on every continent.”13

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: Authors should assume that readers do not have knowledge of, and/or are not familiar with, LIS topics, issues or jargon. 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Washington Post provides authors with the potential to reach a large audience with diverse viewpoints, lifestyles, and cultures. Pieces tailored to one (or more) of the four audience groups will do well, for instance, leadership in the LIS field, how COVID-19 has affected libraries in the US or library accessibility in other countries. 

Last updated: November 15, 2020

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “The Washington Post”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 2, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1604370915478/406763
  2. “About”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 2, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/about/
  3. The Washington Post.
  4. “Submit an Op-Ed”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 07, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/submit-an-op-ed/
  5. “Send a letter to the editor”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://helpcenter.washingtonpost.com/hc/en-us/articles/236004788-Send-a-letter-to-the-editor
  6. Send a letter to the editor.
  7. Send a letter to the editor.
  8. “2020 Media Kit”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/
  9. 2020 Media Kit.
  10. “Global” , WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-global/
  11. “Leadership”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-leadership/
  12. “Local Dominance”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-local/
  13. “International”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-international/
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Chronicle of Higher Education

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Higher Education

ISSN: 0009-5982(Print) and 1931-1362 (Online)1

Website: http://chronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Chronicle of Higher Education has the nation’s largest newsroom dedicated to covering colleges and universities. As the unrivaled leader in higher education journalism, we serve our readers with indispensable real-time news and deep insights, plus the essential tools, career opportunities, and knowledge to succeed in a rapidly changing world.” 2

“Higher-ed professionals rely on The Chronicle for unbiased, engaging content to help their students, institutions, and careers.”  3

Target audience: Higher education faculty and administration.4

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No. 6

Type: Civilian; though it does sometimes carry articles of interest to or authored by librarians, it is mainly for the general administration and faculty. 7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: The website contains news, featured stories, opinion pieces, advice columns, job listings, and career-building tools such as online CV management and salary databases. The print magazine includes news, jobs, and The Chronicle Review. 9

The Chronicle Review is a weekly magazine of ideas. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. 10

Frequency of publication: The Chronicle updates its website daily and is available bi-weekly in print. 11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us

Types of contributions accepted: The Chronicle welcomes correspondence, manuscripts, and proposals for articles from our readers. Articles and letters may appear in our print edition, our website, or both. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. We consider unsolicited submissions; however, please read The Review before submitting your work to familiarize yourself with what we publish. 12

Commentary and Views:
“We consider articles or proposals for articles that express an opinion on issues and policies affecting higher education as well as those that explore, through the author’s personal experience, some aspect of the larger academic community. All Commentary and Views submissions should be 1,000 to 1,200 words and should contain URL links to source material for facts and figures mentioned in the essay.” 13

Advice
“We publish first-person and advice columns on topics including the job market and the hiring process in academe; the graduate-school experience, tenure and promotion, the administrative career path, and career options for Ph.D.’s; professional challenges in research, publishing, teaching, and service work; academic culture; and balancing work and family. Essays should be 1,000 to 1,500 words and written in a conversational, journalistic style.” 14

Letters
“Please make your points as concisely as possible. We will not publish letters longer than 350 words, and all letters will be edited to conform to our style.” 15

“The Chronicle welcomes news pitches that pertain to higher education, but note that in a typical week, our reporting staff receives hundreds of them. We’re writing for a national audience, so a successful pitch will not only point out a compelling local story, but will also be relevant to administrators, professors, and higher-education observers across the country.” 16

Submission and review process: The decision to accept or reject a manuscript rarely takes more than a week. All accepted essays and articles are rigorously edited and fact-checked. Authors have the opportunity to review and approve a manuscript before it’s published. The editors of The Review will decide where and when the piece is published, with some articles appearing only online.17

Editorial tone: Journalistic and conversational.

Style guide used: None specified. “While we cover the academy, we are not a scholarly journal. Essays should be written in a clear, informal style free of jargon and accessible to nonspecialists.” 18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because of the publication frequency and the audience that this newspaper serves, this is a good place for the new author to publish. You don’t necessarily have to work in academe, but it helps. Academic librarians, along with information professionals with an interest in education or pedagogy, would be welcomed here. This publication is an informal counterpart to academic journals, a sort of cocktail hour where academics can mull over or vent about relevant issues within and outside of their field. Interested authors will be intelligent, educated and independent thinkers with something interesting to say.

Also, the wide variety of pieces found in the The Chronicle makes it very easy to find something to write about that, if written in a clear prose style, has a decent chance of being published. Book reviews are a natural, but the longer commentary pieces on some topical tempest occurring in the academy are always a good bet. Because so many write under pen names, the odds of a new author being accepted seem high.

Because of its eclectic content, others working in academe will also find something interesting in The Chronicle of Higher Education. While this publication is definitely written for those with careers in higher education, LIS authors with an interest in teaching will find something of interest here as well.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Our award-winning journalism is well-known at colleges and universities: More than 2 million people visit our website every month, and 1,650 organizations across the country make our journalism available to every one of their employees and students.”19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though The Chronicle claims to be the main source of the goings on in higher education, it does tend to concentrate on the English-speaking world of the United States and sometimes Canada and the United Kingdom.20

Reader characteristics: According to The Chronicle’s advertising materials, “86% of readers are decision makers and influencers at their institutions. 54% are in senior leadership positions at their institutions. 92% hold a master’s degree or higher. 60% have a doctorate degree. Readership includes 90% of the buying power in all of U.S. higher education and 90% of the top 300 research institutions in the U.S.” 21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While the readership may garnish accolades in the higher education arena, they may still lack knowledge in LIS jargon, processes, and trends/innovations.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers are well educated and very interested in their profession and the culture of academe as a whole. Writing for The Chronicle would be an excellent way to increase understanding of library issues (such as information literacy) and market the library’s relevance to other professions. Intellectual and academic freedom, new issues in purchasing and providing content such as e-journals, information literacy, and services to disadvantaged groups would be other issues that would resonate with this readership.

An LIS professional writing for this audience would not have much additional work to do, so long as he or she has something interesting and informed to write about. While this is not the place for scholarly work, readers do enjoy learning about new research or reading critiques of articles they’ve read in an entertaining format. They want to read shop talk, stay informed in their field, and feel connected to issues in the larger world.

This would be a good place to write an opinion piece about an LIS issue that touches on education, society or academe, or review a work that touches on these same issues. Todd Gilman, Librarian for Literature in English at Yale University and a Lecturer at San Jose State University, has published articles about distance education, special collections, research skills and information literacy, and other topics that connect libraries and academe in The Chronicle.

Last updated: November 7, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1601911248
  2. “About Us.”, www.chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/about-us/
  3. “Advertising.”, chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://marketingsolutions.chronicle.com/
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “Contact Us.”, Chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us
  7. “About Us.”
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contact Us.”
  13. “Contact Us.”
  14. “Contact Us.”
  15. “Contact Us.”
  16. “Contact Us.”
  17. “Contact Us.”
  18. “Contact Us.”
  19. “About Us.”
  20. “About Us.”
  21. “Advertising.”
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USA TODAY

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: USA TODAY or USA Today 

ISSN: 0734-7456 (Print).1

Website: https://www.usatoday.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “USA TODAY’s mission is to serve as a forum for better understanding and unity to help make the USA truly one nation.”2

Target audience: Those residing in the US or anyone interested in US News. 

Publisher: Gannett Co., Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication. 

Medium: Print and online. 

Content: USA TODAY covers national and worldwide news as well as sports, entertainment, life, money, and tech.4 USA TODAY also has affiliates that provide local news such as AZCentral and The Coloradoan.5

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/12/04/submit-letters-columns-and-comment-social/2608825001/

Types of contributions accepted: Types of submissions accepted are columns and letters to the editor. 

Submission and review process: Columns are essays, analyses, or arguments on a variety of topics. USA TODAY is specifically looking for columns that have or exhibit one of the following: “. . . timeliness (pegged to news), persuasion pitched to the other side, new information, novel arguments, revelatory insights, passion without partisanship, first-person experience, original reporting that reveals fresh angles and makes news, expert knowledge, and/or a topic that will drive conversation on social media and in the real world.”6 Submissions for columns should be 550 to 750 words and sent to theforum [at] usatoday.com. Headlines and footnotes are not accepted, instead, authors should include URLs to back up quotes or statements made. In conjunction, a short biography (two sentences max) should be included in your submission to be run at the end of the column. If there is any conflict of interest on the author’s side, it should be fully disclosed within the email. Most importantly, “we only accept pieces that are submitted exclusively to USA TODAY. We do not accept material that has been published on blogs, social media or anywhere else.”7

Letters of 200 words or less can be sent to letters [at] usatoday.com. Include the author’s name, address and phone number with the submission. USA Today may edit the submission for accuracy, clarity or length.8

Editorial tone: The USA TODAY Communications Guidelines directs authors to be “clear, factual and get to the point” and to “avoid flowery language and insider jargon.”9

Style guide used: While a style guide could not be located, USA TODAY’s Brand Guide might be useful for potential authors to review. 

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors

As a national publication with worldwide readership, authors who get published in USA TODAY would reach a large audience. Publication in USA TODAY would also look excellent on a resume or CV. 

Additionally, publishing in USA TODAY could help authors introduce readers to LIS issues and topics, thereby bringing more exposure to the LIS field. Examples of published articles in USA TODAY related to the LIS field are, “Libraries are needed more than ever. But many aren’t sure how to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic,” “Reader: Librarians aren’t going anywhere,” and “Banned Books Week: Is your favorite one of the decade’s most censored?”. 

Due to the somewhat extensive submission guidelines, authors may be wary of submitting pieces to USA TODAY. If that is the case, consider checking out these guidelines from the public relations company Cision for tips on pitching a piece to USA TODAY.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Daily paid print circulation averages at 1,424,407 and total print circulation is estimated to be 2,862,229.10 Additionally, “USA TODAY and USATODAY.COM reach a combined seven million readers daily.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although the content in  USA TODAY is primarily focused on news and issues within the US, the publication does cover World and International News which would also appeal to readers outside of the US. USA TODAY also provides an international issue, aimed at “Americans abroad [or] anyone interested in news, investments, sports, and entertainment from the USA.”12 Therefore, authors should assume the majority of the readership resides within the US, but should also take into consideration that readers may be US citizens residing outside of the US, or may be individuals from other countries who are interested in US news. 

Reader characteristics: “USA TODAY  readers are mission-oriented productive people who are trying to advance their lives every day in a time of change and difficulty.”13

In conjunction, “The USA TODAY audience is comprised of everyday Americans and business travelers who are:

  • Busy, on-the-go and connected
  • Responsible, smart and practical
  • Annoyed by biased and noisy argumentation in news
  • Visual learners who like their news ‘straight up’ and are highly suspicious of fluff
  • Driven, social and independent
  • Self-reliant, hardworking and resourceful
  • Quick to see between the lines and spot the agenda behind ‘news’.”14

In regard to reader demographics, a 2018 report compiled by the advertising agency Russell Johns Associates examined both the print and online version of the publication. For the print version, the publication found that 66.8% of the readers are male, the majority of the readers are between the ages of 25-54 (56%), and 66.2% of readers are employed. 63% of readers of the print publication also have a household income of at least $75,000, and 64.4% have at least some college education.15

For the online version, the report by Russell Johns Associates indicates that 58.8% of readers are male, the majority of readers are between ages 25-54 (54.3%), and 66.6% of readers are employed. 61.7% of the readers of the online publication have a household income of at least $75,000, and 65.2% have at least some college education.16

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: Authors should err on the side of caution and assume that most readers of USA TODAY are not familiar with LIS issues, topics, or jargon. 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors will benefit from submitting pieces that will appeal to national readers, if not worldwide readers. Readers will be from diverse backgrounds with varying interests, some of which will have an interest in LIS issues and topics. USA TODAY provides authors with an excellent opportunity to introduce a large audience to LIS issues and topics. 

Last updated: October 18, 2020 


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “USA Today”, Urlichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 6, 2020,http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1602029185264/406783
  2. “About USA TODAY,” USAToday.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://static.usatoday.com/about/#:~:text=Founded%20in%201982%2C%20USA%20TODAY’s,digital%2C%20social%20and%20video%20platforms.
  3. About USA TODAY.
  4. “USA TODAY,” USAToday.com, accessed October 18, 2020, https://www.usatoday.com/
  5. “Brands”, Gannet.com, accessed October 18, 2020, https://www.gannett.com/brands/
  6. “How to submit content,” USAToday.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/12/04/submit-letters-columns-and-comment-social/2608825001//
  7. How to submit content.
  8. How to submit content.”
  9. ”USA Today Corporate Brand Guidelines,” gannett-cdn.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://www.gannett-cdn.com/uxstatic/usatoday/images/marketing/pdfs/USAT_Online_Brand_GL-2-2013.pdf
  10. About USA TODAY.”
  11. About USA TODAY.”
  12. “USA TODAY International Edition, Service.USATODAY.com, accessed October 17, 2020,  https://service.usatoday.com/international/welcomeint.jsp
  13. ”USA Today Corporate Brand Guidelines,” gannett-cdn.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://www.gannett-cdn.com/uxstatic/usatoday/images/marketing/pdfs/USAT_Online_Brand_GL-2-2013.pdf
  14. USA Today Corporate Brand Guidelines.”
  15. “USA TODAY NETWORK TOPLINE METRICS REPORT,” russelljohns.com, accessed October 12, 2020, https://www.russelljohns.com/pdfs/demographics/Topline_Metrics_Report_October_2018.pdf
  16. USA TODAY NETWORK TOPLINE METRICS REPORT.
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New York Times

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The New York Times

ISSN: 0362-4331 (Print) and 1553-8095 (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission:The New York Times is dedicated to helping people understand the world through on-the-ground, expert and deeply reported independent journalism. This mission is rooted in our belief that great journalism has the power to make each reader’s life richer and more fulfilling, and all of society stronger and more just.” 2

“Open-minded inquiry is at the heart of our mission. In all our work, we believe in continually asking questions, seeking out different perspectives and searching for better ways of doing things.”3

“The goal of The New York Times is to cover the news as impartially as possible — “without fear or favor”. 4

Website: http://www.newyorktimes.com

Target audience: Readers interested in high-quality news, information, and entertainment.

Publisher: The New York Times Company. 5

Peer reviewed? No. 6

Type: Civilian daily newspaper for the general public.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: News – local, national, and worldwide; politics, business, opinion, technology, science, health, sports, arts, books, style, food,  and travel. 7

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/site/editorial/op-ed/op-ed.html and http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/site/editorial/letters/letters.html

Types of contributions accepted:The New York Times accepts opinion essays on any topic for both the daily print page and online section as well as the Sunday Review, the International edition (which is edited out of London and Hong Kong), and other themed series. Published pieces typically run from 400 to 1,200 words, but drafts of any length within the bounds of reason will be considered.” 8

“Personal or explanatory essays, commentary on news events, reflections on cultural trends and more are all welcome. We’re interested in anything well-written with a fact-based viewpoint we believe readers will find worthwhile.” 9

The New York Times also accepts Letters to the Editor. “We encourage a diversity of voices and views in our letters. Letters should preferably be 150 to 175 words, should refer to an article that has appeared within the last seven days, and must include the writer’s address and phone number. No attachments, please. Letters should be exclusive to The New York Times or The International New York Times. We do not publish open letters or third-party letters.” 10

Submission and review process:

For Op-Eds: “Due to the large volume of messages we receive, we have to pass on much material of value and interest. If you do not hear from us within three business days, you should feel free to offer it elsewhere.” 11

For Letters to the Editor: “Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified within a week. Letters may be edited and shortened for space. Due to the large volume of submissions we receive, we cannot personally acknowledge each submission. If we decide not to publish your letter you will receive an automated email reply.” 12

Thomas Feyer, the letters editor, gives tips for getting your letter published in his article Editors’ Note; The Letters Editor and the Reader: Our Compact, Updated

Editorial tone: Informational and investigative.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Difficult due to competition, their popularity, and the limited area/type of submissions accepted. If successful, would be a great platform to speak to a large audience that appears would be supportive of LIS issues. Would also look excellent on a resume or CV.

“We seek people with different backgrounds, different skills, different lived experiences. We need experienced journalists and those beginning their careers. We need people in New York and in countries around the world.” 13

Here are some helpful tips for getting published with The New York TimesHow to successfully pitch The New York Times (or, well, anyone else)

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation:  The New York Times has more than 150 Million monthly global readers, with 6.5 million total subscriptions. 14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based in New York, NY, with readers across the U.S. and around the world. The print edition is published in English. Online content can be viewed in English, Spanish, and Chinese languages.

The New York Times also has printing locations around the world to build a global audience. “The New York Times International Edition is an English-language newspaper printed at 38 sites throughout the world and sold in more than 160 countries and territories.” 15

Reader characteristics: According to their media kit, The New York Times is “the #1 Destination for Opinion Leaders, 60% of US audience is made up of Gen Z and Millennial readers, and digital affluent visitors wield over $1 trillion in total buying power.” 16

“In a report released by Pew Research, 32 percent of those who regularly read the New York Times are less than the age of 30. Approximately 56 percent are college graduates and 38 percent are high-income earners.” 17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While is is likely some librarians read The New York Times, the majority of readers will have limited knowledge of LIS issues and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writers need to submit work that will appeal to the worldwide audience. The New York Times is a popular and influential publication with readers from varying backgrounds, some of which will likely have an interest in library related pieces pertaining to current issues and ideas.

Last updated: October 3, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. The New York Times.”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 3, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1601744699857/223674
  2. “Mission and Values.”, nytco.com, accessed October 3, 2020, https://www.nytco.com/company/mission-and-values/
  3. “Mission and Values.”
  4. “Ethical Journalism.”, NYTimes.com, accessed October 3, 2020, https://www.nytimes.com/editorial-standards/ethical-journalism.html
  5. “Copyright Notice.”, NYTimes.com, accessed October 17, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/copyright/copyright-notice.html
  6. “How to Submit an Op-Ed Article.”, NYTimes.com, accessed October 17, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/site/editorial/op-ed/op-ed.html
  7. “New York Times.”, NYTimes.com, accessed October 17, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/
  8. “How to Submit an Op-Ed Article.”
  9. “How to Submit an Op-Ed Article.”
  10. “How to Submit a Letter to the Editor.”, NYTimes.com, accessed October 3, 2020,  https://help.nytimes.com/hc/en-us/articles/115014925288-How-to-submit-a-letter-to-the-editor
  11. “How to Submit an Op-Ed Article.”
  12. “How to Submit a Letter to the Editor.”
  13. “News Room”, NYTimes.com, accessed October 3, 2020, https://www.nytco.com/careers/newsroom/
  14. “Company.”, NYTco.com, accessed October 3, 2020, https://www.nytco.com/company/
  15. “The New York Times International Edition.”, wikipedia.org, accessed October 3, 2020, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_New_York_Times_International_Edition
  16. “NYT Media Kit.”, nytmediakit.com, accessed October 3, 2020, https://nytmediakit.com/
  17. “Who Is the New York Times’ Target Audience?”, reference.com, accessed October 3, 2020, https://www.reference.com/world-view/new-york-times-target-audience-c5e77c29eb68cef4
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Christian Science Monitor

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Christian Science Monitor

ISSN: 2166-32621

Website: http://www.csmonitor.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An independent international news organization, the aim of which is to “embrace the human family, shedding light with the conviction that understanding the world’s problems and possibilities moves us towards solutions.”2 Though owned by the Christian Science church, the Monitor purports to be secular in its reporting save for one “clearly labeled religious article” published each weekday.3

“We want to help you to see news events as starting points for constructive conversations. We seek to cut through the froth of the political spin cycle to underlying truths and values. We want to be so focused on progress that together we can provide a credible and constructive counter-narrative to the hopelessness-, anger-, and fear-inducing brand of discourse that is so pervasive in the news.” 4

“We are not about promoting any specific set of policies, actions or ideologies. The founder of the Monitor was convinced that what reaches and affects thought ultimately shapes experiences and moves our world forward. News, therefore, should be thought-provoking, trustworthy, and engaging.” 5

Target audience: General public. “The Monitor assumes its readers are people who care, who want to care, regardless of their religious or political mindset.”6

Publisher: The First Church of Christ, Scientist.7

Peer reviewed? No.8

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: We deliver global news via our website and mobile site, daily editionweekly print magazine, and free newsletters.”9

Content: Independent national and international news, articles, book reviews, op-eds, essays, and letters to the editor.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: The Monitor accepts articles on national and international news, personal essays, short poems, book reviews,  letters to the Editor, and articles on People Making a Difference. 11

Here are some details about some of the contributions:

International News Contributor Guidelines: Departments include Europe/Baltics/Russia, Asia and Africa, Middle East, and Latin America. 12

“We are interested in a variety of pieces, from 500-word news stories to longer news analysis and news feature pieces for our weekly magazine. We want stories to cover the ‘who, what, when, where, why’ but we expect stories to focus on the ‘why.’ The goal here is to either explain the broader meaning of an event or to explain what’s at stake. We are particularly interested in understanding the ways of thinking or perspectives that are driving your story.” 13

National News Contributor Guidelines: Departments include U.S. Regional News, Justice, and Religion, US Politics, Economy, Education and Culture, and Science/Technology/Environment. 14

“We’re interested in stories of national import from all over the country. We want to stay on top of what is in the news – and in public thought – as much as possible, but there’s also an opportunity for news features with a sense of place. Regardless of the setting or situation, though, we look for history and an eye for detail that show what makes peoples and places the way they are, influencing events.” 15

The Home Forum:

“The Home Forum is looking for upbeat, personal essays from 400 to 800 words. We also welcome short poems. All material must be original and previously unpublished. For seasonal material, be aware that if you submit something that is about a particular month, holiday, event (back to school, graduation), or season, we need to receive it a minimum of six weeks ahead. We accept essays on a wide variety of subjects, and encourage timely, newsy topics. However, we don’t deal with the topics of death, aging and disease.” 16

A Christian Science Perspective:

“This is the column where the theology and practice of Christian Science are discussed in articles that respond to events in the news as well as those that address everyday issues such as companionship, comfort, home, work, relationships, the healing of physical ailments, and dealing with difficult financial times.” 17

People Making a Difference:

“We’re interested in stories about people who are making a positive difference all over the world, working on solutions to problems from hunger and education to the rights of people with disabilities. These profiles, approximately 1,200 words in length, should include an in-depth, in-person interview with the subject. We’ll also want to learn why the individual is so passionate about his or her work as well as gain an understanding of the problem he or she is trying to solve.” 18

Submission and review process: Submissions are welcomed on a continual basis. The Monitor website asks that articles be targeted to their specific departments and guidelines be followed based on the specific section’s editorial teams.  Editors attempt to respond to submissions quickly but are often inundated. If your article is time sensitive please call this to the attention of the editor.  19

Editorial tone: Journalistic to conversational.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Due to the clear contributor guidelines, the volume of freelance work they consume, and the forward approach to covering the world’s news, the Monitor is a promising publication to consider when writing about libraries for the general public. They often cover issues of interest to information professionals and concerning information access. Past articles include a report on a library being created in a small village in Vietnam, the limits being placed on library e-books, Google Books, and membership libraries. The most recent article published in 2020, Pandemic pen pals: How Colombian libraries lift spirits, discusses how libraries are providing services in the wake of COVID-19.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: approximately 50,000 subscribers.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of readership is located in the US, although content covers international news so some international readership is likely.

Reader characteristicsThe Monitor attracts both readers with religious affiliations and those who do not. Their audience includes, “anyone who cares about the progress of the human endeavor around the world and seeks news reported with compassion, intelligence, and an essentially constructive lens.” 21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Range would include professionals, but your audience would most likely be individuals who do not understand LIS subject matter and field jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of the Monitor, in reviewing the articles of the publication, appear to be educated, open-minded and well-read. This is the same audience that often supports and recognizes the value of libraries, making this a potentially place to promote libraries, the work they do, and the challenges they face within communities around the world. Readers of this publication are looking for stories that tie into national and global perspectives, including social, cultural, economical, and environmental issues, all of which have context within the field of LIS.

Last updated: September 20, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Christian Science Monitor Weekly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521861905741/151842
  2. “About.”, CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, https://www.csmonitor.com/About
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Contributor’s guidelines.”, CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines
  9. “About.”
  10. “Contributor’s guidelines.”
  11. “Contributor’s guidelines.”
  12. “International News.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-International-news
  13. “International News.”
  14. “National News.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-National-news
  15. “National News.”
  16. “The Home Forum.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-The-Home-Forum
  17. “Christian Science Perspective.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-A-Christian-Science-Perspective
  18. “People Making a Difference.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-People-Making-a-Difference
  19. “Contributor’s guidelines.”
  20. “The Christian Science Monitor.”, niemanlab.org, accessed September 17, 2018, http://www.niemanlab.org/encyclo/christian-science-monitor/
  21. “About.”
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ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman

Websitehttp://www.alaeditions.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Publishing resources for librarians and LIS professionals worldwide “to improve programs and services, build on best practices, enhance pedagogy, share research, develop leadership, and promote advocacy..”1 ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman is interested in publishing coverage of any library type, including cross-disciplinary topics, and is dedicated to diversity and inclusion. They cater to wide and varied audiences.2

Target audience: “Library and information professionals, faculty and students, researchers and scholars, archivists and other cultural heritage professionals, and library advocates.”3

Owner: American Library Association (ALA)4

Are published books peer reviewed? Proposals and manuscripts undergo an internal review, and, depending on the title, are reviewed by peer advisory boards.

Types of books published: Print and digital.5 Notably, among many types of publications, they publish highly regarded textbooks used in LIS programs.

Medium: Print, digital, and interactive formats.6

Topics covered: Coverage of publications “spans” the types of libraries namely academic, public, school, and special libraries. They are interested in cross disciplinary topics such as copyright, censorship, ethics, law, and sustainability.  Overlapping disciplines are desired as well including information studies, archives, and records and information management. 7

ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman encourages authors to consider how diversity and inclusion impact their topic. “We are dedicated to acquiring and creating content that reflects the unique experiences and backgrounds of librarianship. We want readers, library staff, and patrons to feel empowered by the written word and reflected in the books and content that we publish..”8

Number of titles published per year: In 2019, ALA Editions published 65 new titles and distributed more than 200 titles for its publishing partners, which include Facet Publishing and the Society of American Archivists

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://alaeditions.org/write-with-us/

Also click here to download PDF of proposal guidelines: Download Proposal Guidelines (.docx)

Types of submissions accepted: ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman is interested in proposals that:9

  • Have clear subject, scope, content, and approach.
  • Are distinct and compelling
  • Fit an intended market and audience
  • Stand out from the competition

Types of submissions the publisher is not interested in: This publisher is not interested in proposals that:

  • Have unclear value to intended audience(s)
  • Offer outdated perspectives
  • Do not value diversity and inclusion

Submission and review process: Start by submitting your proposal here. Email your query or proposal to the appropriate member of the editorial team: click here and scroll to bottom of page for editors’ contact info. The three editors specialize in these areas respectively: LIS education, archives, and special libraries; Academic libraries and Library Technology Reports; Public and school librariesThey will consider completed manuscripts but inquire before submitting them.

Allow 6-8 weeks for evaluation.10

For more information, such as details on what happens after your manuscript is submitted during the productions process, please see the Author Guide.11

Editorial tone: Employ appropriate tone that is suitable for your intended audience such as library and information professionals, scholars, students, and educators. 12

Style guide used: Utilize The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), 17th edition, primarily. Also use Merriam-Webster (MW), 11th edition, as your primary dictionary; and Garner’s Modern American Usage for questions not answered in CMS.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

The ALA is a widely recognized and respected LIS resource, consulted by librarians and information professionals worldwide. ALA authors are leaders in their field, and so having a manuscript accepted for ALA Publication would provide authors with a large market for potential readership, amongst LIS professionals and peers. ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman work closely with authors to market their work, both before and after publication. This includes promotion, distribution, exhibits, and many other marketing avenues. ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman has their own catalog, and the ALA has an online store.1415 From the Writer Guidelines: “Your work is in the hands of seasoned professionals. We develop, manufacture, and market your project in a way that draws good reviews and customer interest.”16

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: This is a very large, encompassing publishing house. ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman sends their catalog to over sixty thousand recipients twice per year. Books are listed in the online ALA store, which has over fifty thousand visitors per month.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in Chicago, IL, ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman publishes and reaches librarians and LIS professionals around the world.18 ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman “publications are promoted, translated, and distributed worldwide.”19

Reader characteristics: This is the more professional ALA publishing imprint, focusing on LIS professional development and improving library services. Readers are interested in library and information science, with backgrounds varying from librarian, educator,  LIS administrators and professionals. ALA is the premier Library and Information Science group around, and it would be well worth any author’s time to try to work with them. Their bias is simply pro anything LIS, rather than other publishing houses who have an LIS focus. With ALA, LIS is everything.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as this is the imprint of the American Library Association.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

You’re guaranteed a knowledgeable audience eager for new LIS material when you publish with ALA. Not only are ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman books marketed on the ALA website (including ALA Store), but they’re promoted at ALA conferences and events, emailed to a huge mailing list, and heavily marketed through a partnership with Amazon. Readers of ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman books are seeking LIS material specifically, and will most likely be up to date on your subject matter or, if not, curious to learn from like-minded professionals in the field. This is the first stop publisher and organization for anyone seeking LIS reading material, and is an excellent group to be a part of.

Last updated: September 18, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “Home,” alaeditions.org, accessed September 10, 2020, alaeditions.org
  2. “Write with Us,” alaeditions.org, accessed September 10, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/write-with-us/
  3. “Write with Us.”
  4. “ALA Publishing,” ala.org, accessed September 9, 2020, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/offices/publishing
  5. “Home.”
  6. “Write with Us.”
  7. “Write with Us.”
  8. “Write with Us.”
  9. “Write with Us.”
  10. “Proposal Guidelines,” ALAEditions.org/Proposal-Guidelines, accessed September 15, 2020, http://www.alaeditions.org/proposal-guidelines
  11. “Author Guide.” alaeditions.org, accessed September 15, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/wp-content/uploads/ALA-Author-Guide_2020.pdf
  12. “Home.”
  13. “Author Guide.”
  14. “Marketing.” alaeditions.org, accessed September 15, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/marketing/
  15. “Catalogs.” alaeditions.org, accessed September 15, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/catalogs/
  16. “Write with Us.”
  17. “Marketing.”
  18. “Marketing.”
  19. “Write with Us.”
  20. “Write with Us.”
  21. “Home.”
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Collection Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Management

ISSN: 0146-2679 (Print) and 1545-2549 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/aboutThisJournal?journalCode=wcol20

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Collection Management states that the publication “offers library professionals of all types crucial guidance in the fast-changing field of collection management, including the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries.3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Collection Management covers topics on collection management, planning, allocation of resources, selection, and acquisitions, development of virtual collections, consortia, resource sharing, preservation, and other relevant topics8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wcol20

Types of contributions accepted: Per the publication website, “The journal welcomes articles that provide library professionals with crucial guidance about the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”10

Submission and review process: Collection Management does not require initial queries or proposals; it accepts completed manuscripts. Using the ScholarOne Manuscript software, Taylor and Francis offers an extensive website, Authors Services, that provides guidance beyond the submission guidelines for this specific journal and is full of helpful information.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, suitable for practitioners and academics in the LIS field.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition13 See the recommended reference guide here.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Management is an authoritative and credible LIS scholarly publication. This peer-reviewed journal publishes articles on collection development and related topics. With this in mind, potential authors may contribute articles on a broad variety of topics, from electronic resource acquisitions to recreational reading collections to book preservation. Authors need to be certain they submit work that contributes to the body of knowledge on collection management.

The journal is indexed/abstacted in De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; CINAHL; H.W. Wilson; Library, Information science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA); MasterFILE Complete; RILM Abstracts of Music Literature; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; OCLC; ArticleFirst; Education Index; Electronic Collections Online; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; FRANCIS; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX and VINITI RA.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the United States, but has an international audience.15 The issues covered are of interest to librarians whether they are in United States, Taiwan, or Germany, with topics including how to manage collection development in a digital environment, selection versus censorship, and the use of circulation statistics and interlibrary loan data in collection management.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range from associate university librarians to assistant professors to electronic resources librarians. Often the audience will have earned several degrees: BA, MLS or MLIS, MA, and perhaps PhD. Readers often have supervisory functions with purchasing responsibility, either selecting or authorizing resources for purchase. Readers of Collection Management will most likely have several publications of their own in their portfolio and therefore expect to see well-thought-out and well-researched articles.17

The readers of Collection Management have the same professional interests in common, building their library collections in support of the research and teaching agendas of their parent institutions. They meet the challenge of changing technology, providing the latest publications, and staying within limited library budgets. Collection Management has well-researched theoretical and practical articles that help librarians of any rank succeed in their work. It explores “the future and emerging trends in the field and provides reviews of relevant books, technological resources, and software. This useful resource examines technological advances that help librarians manage and assess collections, such as electronic resource management modules, utilities that provide journal coverage data, and developments in the preservation of library materials.”18

Collection Management is geared towards librarians and information professionals who are interested in articles that help them understand how collection assessment tools and methods can help improve their overall resource management and planning for the future, including how to effectively use staff, facilities, and computing resources.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Collection Management is a peer-reviewed publication that focuses on collection development in college, university, and research libraries of all types. The main readers are librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries. These readers have a strong background on LIS topics and issues. Not only will they understand library jargon, but they will expect to find it in articles written for this journal.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors for Collection Management would do best to consider the education level of the audience and the journal’s reputation for addressing the challenges of their profession. Successful submissions will target current issues in collection management.

Last updated: May 11, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589243665332/67186
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  4. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  5. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  6. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  7. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcol20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  9. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wcol20
  15. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  16. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wcol20#.U9GEeLFiND4
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
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LIBREAS: Library Ideas

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBREAS: Library Ideas

ISSN: 1860-79501

Website: http://libreas.eu/

Note: the site is written mostly in German; if not fluent, use a translator to view content. Google Chrome is the easiest browser to use to translate content.

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBREAS: Library Ideas, is an open access online journal that deals with contemporary issues in LIS.2

The site began as a student project intended in part to bolster the presence of the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany. The staff eventually graduated and entered a professional career and desired “an interface between the young savages and the old hands,” a public place to exchange ideas and information between old and young, academic, and professional. It is a journal that the writers want to read themselves.3

Target audience: LIS new professionals, and the public audience, with particular attention to Germany and Europe.4

Publisher: Published at the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, by LIBREAS-Verein.5

Peer reviewed? No formal peer-review process; content is reviewed by the publication’s editors.6

Type: An LIS professional publication, although some articles are scholarly.7

Medium: Online. You may also follow LIBREAS on TwitterFacebook, and Tumblr.8

Content: Editorials; articles and essays under topics like Theory, Practice, and Projects, about LIS-related news & events, and LIS-content book reviews. Some issues also include podcasts and photo galleries.9

Frequency of publication: Irregularly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libreas.wordpress.com/category/libreas-call-for-papers/ and https://libreas.eu/authorguides/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles and essays related to any aspect of LIS.11

Submission and review process: Send a short sketch of your idea or abstract via email to the editors: redaktion@libreas.eu.12

Editorial tone: Information presented with a fresh, often wry perspective. LIBREAS is open, fresh, and also controversial, in order to leave room for development, to recognize niches in order to unfold trends out of them.13

Style guide used: None specified: but citations should be uniform and formatting should be minimal, as anything beyond structural formatting is lost in the conversion to an online format. Essays should be written in MS Word, LibreOffice or OpenOffice Writer, with a German and English abstract.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a wonderful site that aims to bridge generations and LIS academics and professionals with a touch of humor and humility. The articles are interesting and well-written and apply to LIS practitioners across the globe, not just from Germany. From a 2012 issue’s editorial, LIBREAS editors see themselves as part of a culture of communication in the library and information science and library practice.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. The journal is an open access, online publication.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LIBREAS is published at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany so many contributors and editors are from Germany. Written in German (easily translatable using a Google Chrome browser or add-on on other browsers) and partly in English, the journal references U.S. and world culture frequently, so writers from other countries should not feel intimidated.17

Reader characteristics: Editors and writers consist of scientists and library scholars, LIS professionals and students, academic and otherwise. Anyone with an interest in the information profession.18

LIBREAS aims to continue a discourse and keep LIS relevant in academic and professional circles, but also in the community at large. (Community being initially specific to Berlin, but encompassing the entire online world reading this journal.)19 They also encourage open access journals in the LIS field as a way of promoting more discourse. From LIBREAS 21: It “is important to us that a large number of colleagues bring to the library and information science debate that they also demand accountability and transparency in decisions on libraries and library infrastructure that, if necessary, call for more level of debate. And not just in the LIBREAS, but also in all other publications and forms.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but authors should not assume that readers will have a working knowledge of complicated LIS terminology. As it is an open access journal, the information is easily available to anyone.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIBREAS was created from an idea of forging old and new LIS ideas to create a dialogue amongst LIS professionals and academics. It is passionate, but not overwhelmingly so; and articles are interesting, usually with a philosophical or larger world-view slant that will appeal to LIS and non-LIS readers alike.

 


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  LIBREAS: Library Ideas, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, accessed May 9, 2020, http://libreas.eu/
  2. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  3. B. Kaden, M. Kindling, and M. Schulz, personal communication, 12 April 2013
  4. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2020). Libreas: Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  6. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2020). Libreas. Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  8. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  9. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2020). Libreas. Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  11. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  12. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  13. B. Kaden, M. Kindling, and M. Schulz, personal communication, 12 April 2013
  14. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  15. editorial LIBREAS. (2020). Failure in the writing workshop: From the editors of LIBREAS. Library Ideas. LIBREAS: Library Ideas, 20. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/ausgabe20/texte/04redaktion01.htm
  16. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  17. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  18. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  19. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  20. Vierkant, P. (2012). Visualizing open access. LIBREAS. Library Ideas, 21. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/ausgabe21/texte/05vierkant.htm
  21. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
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Collaborative Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collaborative Librarianship

ISSN: 1943-75281

Website: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The publication website identifies three mission points: To “promote sharing of ideas, best practices, opportunities, challenges and successes involving collaborative librarianship; sustain an open-access journal where professional librarians can publish articles (peer- and non-peer-reviewed) on a range of subjects relevant to librarianship, but that involve collaboration at their core; to promote sharing of ideas, opportunities, challenges and successes involving new kinds of partnerships, joint projects, and innovative approaches to collaboration that benefit all members within in the information supply chain.2

Target audience: LIS professionals, LIS instructors, and LIS students3

Publisher: Independently published, and sponsored by the Colorado Library Consortium, the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Regis University, and the University of Denver4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The publication’s website indicates that it provides articles relating to a wide range of issues including library-to-library cooperation; sharing resources and expertise; library-to-business partnerships; local, regional, national, and international collaboration; professional, consortium and association partnerships; the history of library collaboration; open access and online availability; better and best practices.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts for submission field reports that focus on innovative collaborations and address best practices. Field reports are usually 2,500 to 5,000 words in length. The journal also accepts scholarly articles on library collaborations at the local, national, or international level that approach their topics historically, quantitatively, qualitatively, analytically, theoretically, philosophically, or practically. Published scholarly articles are usually of at least 5,000 words.10

Submission and review process: The submission may not be under consideration for publication by another publisher nor have been previously published. Submissions should include a short abstract, a title, list of authors and affiliations, an introduction, the body of the paper, conclusions, and references. Submissions should adhere to the style guidelines provided on the website and uploaded as Microsoft Word or RFT files. 11

Editorial tone: Depending on the section, articles may be scholarly or more professionally informal.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors will find Collaborative Librarianship an appealing avenue for publication. Because collaboration is increasing across the LIS community,  professional interest in innovative ideas on this topic is high. Since the publication is a venue for both practical and scholarly articles, authors may expect to reach both professional and academic audiences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication does not provide details on circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is sponsored by library consortiums and universities in Colorado, and part of its mission is to meet goals identified at the June 2008 general meeting of the Colorado Academic Library Consortium, including the promotion of the knowledge infrastructure of Colorado; the maintenance and development of the Colorado library system; and the transmission of lessons learned in the Colorado library community to the rest of the United States.14 The publication is written in English.15

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide information about individual characteristics about the readers. Persons of interest can subscribe via email to receive notification of new issues. The publication is geared toward librarians located in both the education and professional fields. The journal appears to be content neutral, appealing to readers interested in the collaborative aspect of the LIS field.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers work in the LIS field, authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because collaboration exists over practically, if not entirely, all fields in the LIS profession, potential authors can view Collaborative Librarianship as a great source for potential publication. While some readers may not be directly involved in an author’s particular LIS field, collaborative ideas can be shared and valued.

Last updated: May 7, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523415071648/668432
  2. “About this Journal/Mission Points,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  3. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  4.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  5. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  6. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  7. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  8. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  9. “About this Journal/Publication Frequency,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  10. “About this Journal/From-the-Field Reports and Scholarly Articles” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  11. “Policies,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, https://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/policies.html#whatcansubmit
  12.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  13.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  14. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  15. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  16. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  17. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed May 7, 2020, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
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