Wiki Tags Archives: Book reviews

Chronicle of Higher Education

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Higher Education

ISSN: 0009-5982(Print) and 1931-1362 (Online)1

Website: http://chronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Chronicle of Higher Education has the nation’s largest newsroom dedicated to covering colleges and universities. As the unrivaled leader in higher education journalism, we serve our readers with indispensable real-time news and deep insights, plus the essential tools, career opportunities, and knowledge to succeed in a rapidly changing world.” 2

“Higher-ed professionals rely on The Chronicle for unbiased, engaging content to help their students, institutions, and careers.”  3

Target audience: Higher education faculty and administration.4

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No. 6

Type: Civilian; though it does sometimes carry articles of interest to or authored by librarians, it is mainly for the general administration and faculty. 7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: The website contains news, featured stories, opinion pieces, advice columns, job listings, and career-building tools such as online CV management and salary databases. The print magazine includes news, jobs, and The Chronicle Review. 9

The Chronicle Review is a weekly magazine of ideas. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. 10

Frequency of publication: The Chronicle updates its website daily and is available bi-weekly in print. 11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us

Types of contributions accepted: The Chronicle welcomes correspondence, manuscripts, and proposals for articles from our readers. Articles and letters may appear in our print edition, our website, or both. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. We consider unsolicited submissions; however, please read The Review before submitting your work to familiarize yourself with what we publish. 12

Commentary and Views:
“We consider articles or proposals for articles that express an opinion on issues and policies affecting higher education as well as those that explore, through the author’s personal experience, some aspect of the larger academic community. All Commentary and Views submissions should be 1,000 to 1,200 words and should contain URL links to source material for facts and figures mentioned in the essay.” 13

Advice
“We publish first-person and advice columns on topics including the job market and the hiring process in academe; the graduate-school experience, tenure and promotion, the administrative career path, and career options for Ph.D.’s; professional challenges in research, publishing, teaching, and service work; academic culture; and balancing work and family. Essays should be 1,000 to 1,500 words and written in a conversational, journalistic style.” 14

Letters
“Please make your points as concisely as possible. We will not publish letters longer than 350 words, and all letters will be edited to conform to our style.” 15

“The Chronicle welcomes news pitches that pertain to higher education, but note that in a typical week, our reporting staff receives hundreds of them. We’re writing for a national audience, so a successful pitch will not only point out a compelling local story, but will also be relevant to administrators, professors, and higher-education observers across the country.” 16

Submission and review process: The decision to accept or reject a manuscript rarely takes more than a week. All accepted essays and articles are rigorously edited and fact-checked. Authors have the opportunity to review and approve a manuscript before it’s published. The editors of The Review will decide where and when the piece is published, with some articles appearing only online.17

Editorial tone: Journalistic and conversational.

Style guide used: None specified. “While we cover the academy, we are not a scholarly journal. Essays should be written in a clear, informal style free of jargon and accessible to nonspecialists.” 18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because of the publication frequency and the audience that this newspaper serves, this is a good place for the new author to publish. You don’t necessarily have to work in academe, but it helps. Academic librarians, along with information professionals with an interest in education or pedagogy, would be welcomed here. This publication is an informal counterpart to academic journals, a sort of cocktail hour where academics can mull over or vent about relevant issues within and outside of their field. Interested authors will be intelligent, educated and independent thinkers with something interesting to say.

Also, the wide variety of pieces found in the The Chronicle makes it very easy to find something to write about that, if written in a clear prose style, has a decent chance of being published. Book reviews are a natural, but the longer commentary pieces on some topical tempest occurring in the academy are always a good bet. Because so many write under pen names, the odds of a new author being accepted seem high.

Because of its eclectic content, others working in academe will also find something interesting in The Chronicle of Higher Education. While this publication is definitely written for those with careers in higher education, LIS authors with an interest in teaching will find something of interest here as well.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Our award-winning journalism is well-known at colleges and universities: More than 2 million people visit our website every month, and 1,650 organizations across the country make our journalism available to every one of their employees and students.”19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though The Chronicle claims to be the main source of the goings on in higher education, it does tend to concentrate on the English-speaking world of the United States and sometimes Canada and the United Kingdom.20

Reader characteristics: According to The Chronicle’s advertising materials, “86% of readers are decision makers and influencers at their institutions. 54% are in senior leadership positions at their institutions. 92% hold a master’s degree or higher. 60% have a doctorate degree. Readership includes 90% of the buying power in all of U.S. higher education and 90% of the top 300 research institutions in the U.S.” 21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While the readership may garnish accolades in the higher education arena, they may still lack knowledge in LIS jargon, processes, and trends/innovations.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers are well educated and very interested in their profession and the culture of academe as a whole. Writing for The Chronicle would be an excellent way to increase understanding of library issues (such as information literacy) and market the library’s relevance to other professions. Intellectual and academic freedom, new issues in purchasing and providing content such as e-journals, information literacy, and services to disadvantaged groups would be other issues that would resonate with this readership.

An LIS professional writing for this audience would not have much additional work to do, so long as he or she has something interesting and informed to write about. While this is not the place for scholarly work, readers do enjoy learning about new research or reading critiques of articles they’ve read in an entertaining format. They want to read shop talk, stay informed in their field, and feel connected to issues in the larger world.

This would be a good place to write an opinion piece about an LIS issue that touches on education, society or academe, or review a work that touches on these same issues. Todd Gilman, Librarian for Literature in English at Yale University and a Lecturer at San Jose State University, has published articles about distance education, special collections, research skills and information literacy, and other topics that connect libraries and academe in The Chronicle.

Last updated: November 7, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1601911248
  2. “About Us.”, www.chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/about-us/
  3. “Advertising.”, chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://marketingsolutions.chronicle.com/
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “Contact Us.”, Chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us
  7. “About Us.”
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contact Us.”
  13. “Contact Us.”
  14. “Contact Us.”
  15. “Contact Us.”
  16. “Contact Us.”
  17. “Contact Us.”
  18. “Contact Us.”
  19. “About Us.”
  20. “About Us.”
  21. “Advertising.”
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Pittsburgh City Paper

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pittsburgh City Paper

ISSN: 1066-00621

Website: http://www.pghcitypaper.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This publication provides weekly information on current local news about entertainment, events, politics, sports, and other local interests. Most readers look to this as a guide for weekly events.2

“As Pittsburgh’s independent voice, we offer a unique prospective on local politics and news, intelligent and fresh cultural reporting, the most comprehensive calendar of events, and stories you will not find anywhere else.” 3

Target audience: Pittsburgh city residents.

Publisher: Eagle Media Corp.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian, alternative newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Information on local music, art, entertainment, sports, news, and politics.6

Frequency of publication: Weekly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/FreelanceInternGuide/Page

Types of contributions accepted: The guidelines state: “We use freelance talent every week, and we value the contributions made by our freelancers. But we don’t just take freelancers from off the street; that’s how we hire editors. When a prospective freelancer wants to write for us, we have two questions: Is this person able to bring us stories we can’t get on our own? and Is this person capable of actually writing the story? To answer the first question, you need to bring us some story pitches. These should be stories you think we’ll want — and stories we don’t already have.”8

“How can you tell what sort of material qualifies? The easiest way is to look at the paper. See what we already publish … and what we don’t. Tailor your ideas accordingly. Here are a few hints to get you started. What we are interested in: Stories about local artists. Stories about local news and politics. Stories about Pittsburgh, in all its love and squalor. What we’re not interested in: Political screeds about how great President Obama is. Political screeds about how awful President Obama is. First-person essays. Your problems.”9

“As to that second question — can this person write the story themselves? — we’re looking for skilled writers and thorough reporters who know the territory. The best proof of these qualities is clips of previously published work. Articles for your college newspaper, freelance stuff you did for community papers, Pulitzer Prize-winning multi-part series from The New York Times … we’ll look at almost anything.”10

Submission and review process: Submission method depends on the type of article. The guidelines provide the editors responsible for each type and their preferred contact method. Review and acceptance of submissions responsibility of editors.11

Editorial tone: Informal and clever.

Style guide used: Not specified in guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication provides a fair opportunity for LIS authors residing in Pittsburgh or familiar with the area. Potential for publication of book reviews, local information services, and content about local programming and events that would interest the younger audience of the newspaper. Authors from the Pittsburgh area, with personal knowledge of the area and population, would find it easier to write for this publication. Because this publication is free both in print and online, it has the potential to meet a wide audience within the city.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 58,000.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Metro Pittsburgh area.

Reader characteristics: Readers are described as “younger and more affluent,” though the age breakdown in the media kit indicates that readership spans a range of age groups, with 25% between 25 and 34 and 20% over 65.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While some readers will certainly be librarians, library administration and staff, and library students who live in the Pittsburgh area, this publication does not specialize in LIS subject matter, nor are any readers expected to have knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers might be interested in technology, local events (possibly library events), interesting stories and news about their local libraries.

Last updated: October 25, 2020


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1.  Pittsburgh City Paper, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522198957662/558709
  2. “Pittsburgh City Paper,” PGHCityPaper.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/
  3. “Advertise.”, PGHCityPaper.com, accessed October 25, 2020, https://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/Advertise/Page
  4. “Pittsburgh City Paper.”, Contact Us, accessed September 15, 2018, https://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/ContactUs/Page
  5. “Freelance/Intern Guide,” PGHCityPater.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/FreelanceInternGuide/Page
  6. “Pittsburgh City Paper.”
  7. “Subscriptions,” PGHCityPaper.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/Subscriptions/Page
  8. “Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  9. “Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  10. “Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  11. “Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  12. “Pittsburgh City Paper Media Kit,” PGHCityPaper.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/general/pdfs/CP-Web-Media-Kit-07-01-16.pdf
  13. “Pittsburgh City Paper Media Kit.”
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Bookmarks

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bookmarks

ISSN: 1546-06571

Purpose, objective, or mission: The magazine offers a guide to the best in books, both new and old, by summarizing book reviews, highlighting the best works by classic authors, and polling experts on non-fiction recommendations. “Bookmarks magazine is a decidedly unstuffy, glossy magazine delivered right to your doorstep every two months. Simply put, we are the best source of ideas for your reading list: we summarize book reviews so you can make an informed decision about what to read next, highlight classic and contemporary authors, uncover readers’ everyday favorites, and much more.” 2

“Bookmarks magazine was the brainchild of Jon Phillips and Alison Nelson, who envisioned a magazine for book lovers: readers who spend countless hours combing bookshelves, clipping book reviews, and studying author biographies and reading lists. Jon and Alison searched high and low for a comprehensive source they could trust for literary advice and pictured a research team hard at work for them: summarizing book reviews, highlighting the best works of classic and contemporary authors, presenting books in different genres and on different topics, and uncovering everyday readers’ favorite books. They looked everywhere, but that team, that one source, that dream magazine, didn’t exist. So they created it, and that editorial team become a reality.” 3

Website: http://www.bookmarksmagazine.com

Target audience:  Adults who are active readers; the “intelligent mainstream.”4

Publisher: Bookmarks Publishing LLC. 5

Peer reviewed? No

Type: General interest, civilian. The content is written in simple but engaging language intended for book lovers and readers with some knowledge of authors current and past. Generally the magazine is free of LIS or scholarly jargon.

Medium: Print magazine6 with some content, such as reading lists and guides, posted online.

Content:

“Our readers enjoy summaries of hundreds of opinions from every major newspaper and magazine for a comprehensive look at 50 new fiction, nonfiction, and children’s books, all designed to give you the information you need to make the best reading choices. We highlight the books that receive a lot of attention, but we always search for that great unsung book that quietly gets just a few enthusiastic reviews.

We also present in-depth profiles on classic as well as contemporary authors, discussing their lives and major (and not so major) works. Bookmarks also covers different topics, from the best American biographies to new fiction in English translation to great mystery, fantasy, and historical fiction series.

Since the best books become known by word-of-mouth, Bookmarks publishes unique lists of our subscribers’ favorites—terrific, little-known gems. Each issue also features a different book club discussing the books its members loved … and the ones that caused the most awkward silences.” 7

Frequency of publication: Every 2 Months. 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.bookmarksmagazine.com/contact-us.html

Types of contributions accepted: “The magazine is structured in its content and will rarely consider pitches that fall outside of that structure. We do not publish original reviews; rather, our mission is to summarize existing reviews from major newspapers and magazines (in our opinion, the last thing the world needs … is another opinion). Within a fairly structured format, we also publish classic and contemporary author profiles as well as specific articles on various topics (Historical Fiction About the Renaissance, Best New Crime Writing, What’s New in Europe, Feminist Fiction, Books of World War II, etc.).” 9

From the website 10:

  • Letters to the Editor
    Please send letters to letters@bookmarksmagazine.com or to our editorial address: Bookmarks Magazine, 2625 Alcatraz Avenue, #362, Berkeley, CA 94705. Please indicate in your letter if you do not wish the contents of your letter to be considered for publication in the “Letters to the Editor” section of the magazine.
  • Book Club Submissions
    Please include the following information for your book group profile: your name and contact information, the name of the book group, the group’s location, and a photo. Email your information to letters@bookmarksmagazine.com or send it to to our editorial address: Bookmarks Magazine, 2625 Alcatraz Avenue, #362, Berkeley, CA 94705​.

Submission and review process: “You may submit a resume and short (fewer than 1,000 words) book- or literary-related writing sample in the text of your email message. We will NOT consider applications without a writing sample. No phone calls or email attachments, please. Address your email to service@bookmarksmagazine.com. 11

Editorial tone: Casual but informed, as if you were talking in a book club, and “decidedly unstuffy.”12

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Anyone who is interested in reviewing books for a book-loving audience would likely have success at Bookmarks. LIS authors would be particularly well-suited for the mining and synthesizing of information required for the consensus-oriented book reviews.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: More than 40,000.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is based in the United States and printed in English. Because Bookmarks is mostly a compilation of other media reviews, there would be little variety in cultural considerations.

Reader characteristics: The magazine’s media kit states, “Active readers are generally better educated and more affluent consumers. It has been proven they are more interested in travel, science, arts and the community.”14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The general reader may be aware of public library terms, but not specific jargon. Many will have an interest in libraries due to the free access to books that have just been reviewed. Some could be aware of the financial struggles that libraries face and the competition from Internet entertainment.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The defining characteristic of the Bookmarks audience is a love of reading. For a librarian who is skilled at readers advisory or collection development, this should be an easy audience to reach and a pleasurable topic to write about. Authors with a special knowledge or interest in certain topics (non-fiction, suspense novels, etc.) could be asked to write on those, but writing brief reviews on any books would be the main desire. Readers expect reviewers to have a confidence about books they recommend (or criticize!). A general magazine about books features classic books in a genre, but also upcoming books, which is one of the main interests of voracious readers. Those who are passionate about a genre or an author want to know what is coming next. Authors and reviewers should be able to excite a reader about a book, while being entertaining but not giving away major plot surprises! Bookmarks has a witty and casual tone, and its habit of compiling reviews from other sources gives the audience “soundbites” for books, instead of in-depth analysis. Potential authors should therefore be clever and concise.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. Bookmarks.”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed September 8, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521860858609/438973
  2. “Home.”, BookmarksMagazine.com, accessed September 8, 2020, https://www.bookmarksmagazine.com/
  3. “About Us.”, BookmarksMagazine.com, accessed September 8, 2020, http://www.bookmarksmagazine.com/about-us
  4. “Bookmarks Media Kit.”, BookmarksMagazine.com, accessed September 8, 2020, https://s3.amazonaws.com/gatherdigitalassets/other/BookmarksMediaKit2015R.pdf
  5. Bookmarks.
  6. “Subscribe.”, BookmarksMagazine.com, accessed September 8, 2020, https://www.bookmarksmagazine.com/subscribe.html
  7. “Home.”
  8. “Home.”
  9. “Contact Us.”, BookmarksMagazine.com, accessed September 8, 2020, https://www.bookmarksmagazine.com/contact-us.html
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “Contact Us.”
  12. “Bookmarks Media Kit.”
  13. “Bookmarks Media Kit.”
  14. “Bookmarks Media Kit.”
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Bitch Media

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bitch Media

ISSN: 1524-5314 (Print) and 2162-5352 (Online)1

Website: https://bitchmedia.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “Bitch Media’s mission is to provide and encourage an engaged, thoughtful feminist response to mainstream media and popular culture.”2

“Bitch seeks to be a fresh, revitalizing voice in contemporary feminism, one that welcomes complex arguments and refuses to ignore the contradictory and often uncomfortable realities of life in an unequivocally gendered world.”3

“Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.”4

Target audience: Largely women, but meant for anyone who is interested in a modern feminist discussion on media and popular culture. According to the website, Bitch has a diverse audience and is “uniquely situated to draw in young readers who are at a critical moment in their lives—a moment when they are discovering feminism and activism, finding answers to who they are, and questioning the definitions of gender, sexuality, power and agency prescribed by the mainstream media.”5

Publisher: Bitch Media.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: Lay publication, with emphasis on politically and socially minded individuals.8

Medium: Quarterly Magazine, Weekly Podcast, and Daily Online Content. 9

Content: “Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.” Media includes Movies, television, news magazines, fashion magazines, blogs, comics, advertising, music, computer games. 10

Frequency of publication: The print magazine is published quarterly, online content is published five days a week.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “We are looking for discussion-provoking critical essays that are well researched with evidence to back up claims, timely statistics, and connections between one’s personal experience and larger social forces. Interviews with feminist culture-makers are welcome, as are book, film, and music reviews and nuanced analyses of particularly horrifying and/or inspiring examples of pop culture. First-person essays are great, but please read our print magazine and website to get a sense of how our contributors strike a happy balance between the personal “I” and the larger subject matter at hand.”12

Bitch accepts nonfiction pieces only, and does not accept fiction, poetry, “personal essays, experimental lyric essays, or anything that reads like a dissertation.”13 Each issue has a theme, but the themes are meant to serve as jumping-off points rather than rigid guidelines. Be sure to check the website for upcoming topics, but the editors encourage pitches for articles that would suit the magazine but don’t fit an upcoming theme.14

Potential contributors are encouraged to consider which section of the magazine would best fit their idea before submitting a pitch. Features are “2,200 to 3,000 words of meaty critiques, essays, and articles on pop culture from a feminist perspective.” These pieces should be filled with “personal insight and wit,” and may vary in format, such as interviews, reported pieces, critical essays, or even timelines, charts, and comics.15 Dispatches are “1,200 word missives from the front lines of real, imagined, or fictional worlds and places.” 16 “Culture is where Bitch brands its cultural authority through essays about books, music, and screen; profiles of individuals and those who are creating and defining cultural moments; and interviews with those working in publishing, Hollywood, podcasting, and other areas who are helping us imagine new possibilities for representation and inclusion.”17

“Payment varies but is generally $700-$1000 for features, $350 for dispatches, and between $250-$700 for culture stories. All of our writers are paid. Please send all materials through our submission manager. Submit to the section of the magazine that best fits your pitch.” 18

Submission and review process: Both finished work and query letters are accepted. If sending only a query, include clips and/or writing samples. Submissions, query letters, and pitches are accepted through their link to Submittable. Bitch accepts online pitches on a rolling basis. view open calls and submit your pitches through the website found within the writers-guidelines. “Due to the volume of pitches we receive, we are unable to respond to every pitch and will only respond to the pitches that we accept.” 19

Editorial tone: Serious, and seriously tongue-in-cheek. This is not a scholarly publication and sarcasm is rampant, but Bitch remains a very thoughtful and provocative media organization.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and information science is a field that is historically dominated by women, and perhaps due to that, it is a profession filled with preconceived notions and attitudes about women as librarians (think severe, hair-buns, glasses, and sensible shoes). Bitch is an excellent forum to discuss how we as librarians (both male and female) are seen in popular culture, what that image represents, and if that image affects how the populace sees us. It would be a good forum to discuss how gender, sexuality, and feminism play a role in our profession, as well as an outlet to discuss how other LIS issues are affected by or are affecting popular culture and the media. LIS authors with a background or interest in women’s studies or literature might be interested in writing feature articles, though an interdisciplinary perspective is key.

Bitch began as a zine, and has grown into an independent, nonprofit, feminist media organization.20 But that independent spirit, snarky attitude and distrust of the status quo have remained. The magazine endeavors to be a “tool kit” that engages readers in analysis that promotes activism and social change, and LIS authors with an interest in social justice, critiques of mainstream culture, and independent thinking would be at home here. Come with a strong opinion, say it well and say it with wit.21

This organization recognizes the value of libraries as places of critical inquiry, and supports a Bitch Community Lending Library that houses a diverse selection of 2,000 feminist materials to the community in the magazine’s home of Portland, Oregon. “Our library holds over 2,500 books, zines, magazines, and DVDs that explore feminism, media studies, pop culture, queer studies, race studies, sex and sexuality, body image and much more. The library also holds rare issues of ROCKRGRL and Sassy magazines which are available for browsing in our cozy reading room. The books in our catalog are available to search online.” 22

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has 80,000 readers, while the website receives nearly 5 million unique visitors each year.23

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bitch subscribers reside in 46 countries and all 50 states, with 78% of readers living in urban areas or college towns.24 This magazine focuses on popular culture and media images almost exclusively in the United States. Bitch will repeatedly refer to people, places, ads, and events that will only make sense to a person who has an idea of the major figures or subjects in American popular culture.

Reader characteristics: The majority of Bitch’s readers are between the ages of 25 and 34. They are well educated, tech savvy, and have Internet access. Bitch readers are also civic-minded and politically aware, with 85% having voted within the last year, and 51% having contacted their elected officials in the past year. They overwhelmingly identified as politically liberal, progressive, or radical.  They donate to causes and campaigns that are important to them. They read in their spare time, with 63% reading more than 10 hours a week. They are vocally and financially supportive of music, theater, and the arts. They are well-traveled: 48% traveled overseas in the past three years, and 92% traveled domestically in the last year. Bitch readers are conscientious consumers: 82% go out of their way to shop at independent retailers, 84% purchase environmentally friendly products and services, and 44% independently research a company’s mission or labor practices before buying its products.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Little to none. The odds are good that the reader has spent time in libraries of some kind (academic, school, and public), and shares values the library upholds, such as intellectual freedom and equal access to information.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This organization’s readership is large, and while readers are largely unfamiliar with LIS topics, virtually any LIS subject relating to feminism (e.g., gender prejudices within LCSH subject headings) would be welcomed here. This audience wants something that is thought-provoking, well written, and entertaining. They want to discuss thematic figures of women, femininity and gender within pop culture and society as a whole.26

Readers are overwhelmingly well-educated, socially and politically progressive women who live in urban areas. Do not assume there will be a great deal of knowledge or even interest in many library issues or concerns, but there will be an interest in how librarianship as a profession and threats against freedom of information affect the position of women and minorities in American society. Persuasive and thoughtful writing is more important than citations, statistics, or user studies (though referring to any of these will help solidify the author’s argument). Remember that these readers don’t just read about a topic, they do something about it. This is an audience whose members just might write to their legislators about a library issue or volunteer at their local library, if those issues resonate with them. This is a great audience to reach, not only because it shares LIS values but because it has the potential to be an advocate for LIS issues.

Last updated: August 30, 2020


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Bitch, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/93747762
  2. “About Us.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 23, 2018, https://bitchmedia.org/about-us
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “About Us.”
  7. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “About Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  13. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  14. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  15. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  16. “Contributors’ Guidelines”
  17. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  18. “Contributor’s Guidelines.”
  19. “Contributors’ Guidelines.”
  20. “About Us”
  21. “About Us.”
  22. “Bitch Community Lending Library.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/library
  23. “Get that Life: How I Co-founded Bitch Media.”, Cosmopolitan.com, accessed September 7, 2016, http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/a57736/andi-zeisler-bitch-media-get-that-life/
  24. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”, BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016,  https://bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/Bitch-Media-Sponsorship-Kit.pdf
  25. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit.”
  26. “About Us.”
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Collection and Curation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection and Curation (renamed in 2018 from Collection Building)

ISSN: 2514-9326 (Print) and 2514-9334 (Online)1

Website: https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/acronym/CC

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection and Curation provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”2

Target audience: Academics and professionals concerned with collection development in libraries, museums, archives, and galleries. 3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.10

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection and Curation is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal. As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development and curation.

Collection and Curation does not list abstracting or indexing data.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.14 This journal reaches a worldwide audience, with an editorial team based in Australia, Greece, the United Kingdom, India, Canada, and the United States, 15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development, curation, and management.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While the focus of this journal is generally on LIS subjects and topics, since broadening its scope in 2018 to include a curation aspect, the journal now includes non-LIS specific content that those in museums and galleries will find helpful. Looking at recent issues shows a broad scope, including traditional LIS subjects such as collection development, but also discussions on European women photographers and Mexican photojournalism. Therefore deep knowledge of LIS subject matter would be helpful, but not required.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: May 11, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/91750902
  2. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  3. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  4. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  5. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11. 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  6. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  7. “Purchase and Trial Options” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/purchase-trial-options?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  8. “Aims and Scope” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#aims-and-scope
  9. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines
  11. “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines
  13. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f

    Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.[14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020,  https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines

  14. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  15. “Editorial Team,” https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#editorial-team
  16. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#aims-and-scope
  17. “Collection and Curation” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/issn/2514-9326
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The Crab

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Crab

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=151

Purpose, objective, or mission: This is the official publication of the Maryland Library Association (MLA). 1

Target audience: The primary target audience is the association’s membership, which includes “library staff and trustees, library school students, libraries, and friends of libraries representing the full spectrum of librarianship in Maryland.”2

Publisher: Maryland Library Association.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online digital publication.

Content: Coverage of the MLA annual conference; program and workshop reports; news about Maryland libraries and library people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials with local or state interest; letters to the editor.3

Frequency of publication: Four times per year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157

Types of contributions accepted: From the submission guidelines, The Crab seeks coverage of the following topics: MLA conference; MLA division, committee or interest group news; reports on programs and workshops of interest to librarians in Maryland; news about Maryland libraries and people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials, based on their local and state interest will be considered for publication; letters to the editor – these must be signed, although names may be withheld from publications upon request.4

Submission and review process: Submissions should be via e-mail to editor Annette Haldeman, Legislative Librarian, Maryland General Assembly Department of Legislative Services, Office of Policy Analysis: Annette.Haldeman@mlis.state.md.us.5

Editorial tone: Informal, friendly.

Style guide used: APA.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication, as indicated by their mission, focuses on local Maryland library organizations, people, and events. An author with local knowledge or connections will find it easier to place a variety of material than an out of the area author. On the other hand, there are examples of articles that address larger LIS sector trends and activities. There are publishing opportunities for an author who can write in an accessible manner with a local connection to the Maryland audience. As with any publication, reviewing the past issues will provide a solid sense of what type of article the editor and readers would find interesting.

Audience analysis


Publication circulation: The print publication is available for a subscription fee from the MLA (membership numbers not available) and is also available online for any visitor to read as well as back issues.6

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Primarily people the State of Maryland, with additional reach to members in the vendor community that is not located in Maryland.

Reader characteristics: Association members include professionals, LIS students, and a large number of non-librarian staff members. Members/readers come from the full variety of library types and the full variety of jobs in those institutions. Some LIS vendors are included. It may be assumed that most readers will be sympathetic to libraries, understand their various missions, and will view themselves as important to their organizations and the achievement of their organizations’ goals.7

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: MLA members are mostly professionals in the LIS field.8“>https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=137]

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the diversity of background, skills, professional duties, missions, and interests of the readers, authors should consider presenting material that is practical, general in scope, accessible in tone and language, and appealing to the interests of readers in the Maryland area.


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=151
  2. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=151
  3. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Submit MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157
  4. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Submit MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157
  5. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Submit MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157
  6. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Join MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/join.asp
  7. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=137
  8. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from Continue Reading

AISL Independent Ideas

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleAISL Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: Independent school librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right-hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians, and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Independent Ideas: Managed by Alexendra Patterson – Mercersburg Academy. 3If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, contact membership coordinator, Renee Chevallier: Rchevallier@ursulinedallas.org .4

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming, and more.

Submission and review process: Contact membership coordinator listed above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.5

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Social Media,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/social-media
  4. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/social-media
  5. “About AISL,” AISL.wildapricot.org, accessed May 3, 2020, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
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Tame the Web

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web 

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From Tame the Web‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Category topics (dropdown menu at bottom of the site) include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture, and many others.2

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

Wholehearted Librarianship: this Stephen Barnes quote gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content, “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”3

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his page here.4

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Home,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  3. “Home,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  4. “About Michael Stephens,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed May 1, 2020, https://tametheweb.com/about-michael-stephens/
Continue Reading

Code4Lib Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Code4Lib Journal 

ISSN: 1940-57581

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, “the Code4Lib Journal exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.”2 It “aims to help engender collective understanding and the necessary support for improving library technology and digital services.”3

Website: http://journal.code4lib.org/

Target audience: The target audience includes anyone who is involved in the “wider library community” who has an interest in libraries and technology.4

PublisherCode4Lib. Publication began in 2007.5

Peer reviewed? Yes. Journal submissions are reviewed by an editorial committee6, and the committee views its process of selecting articles as an open peer review. According to a message from the 2020 coordinating editor, “The author and the designated editor work together to improve a paper before publication. The author knows the name of the editor and other readers on the editorial committee and vice versa. We’ve found that this process works best for us and produces consistently high quality and relevant content for our audience.”7

Type: Open access with Creative Commons license. Although the editorial committee consists mainly of those involved in the academic library community, contents do not necessarily have the format of a traditional scholarly research article, and the journal does not use a traditional blind peer review. Articles can vary in formality and can include case studies and personal opinion pieces. Articles do not generally include extensive literature reviews. For these reasons, the journal is currently classed here as ‘professional news’. Articles tend to be focused on the practical application of the ideas presented.8

Medium: Code4Lib Journal is available online.9

Content: From the Call for Submissions, “the editorial committee is looking for content that is practical, demonstrates how to exploit technology to create digital library collections and services, or offers insight and forethought regarding the use of computers in any type of library setting.”10

The journal publishes articles on a multitude of subjects, as long as they support the mission statement, and is flexible with length (1,500 to 5,000 words is an approximate word count). The types of articles published in the journal include:

  • Case studies of projects (failed or successful), how they were done, and challenges faced.
  • Descriptions of projects in progress, project updates, and new project proposals.
  • Effective processes for project management.
  • Reviews/comparisons of software, frameworks, libraries, etc.
  • Analyses and case studies of using library metadata in technological application: novel applications or solutions, or unsolved challenges,
  • Thought pieces on the big problems associated with library and technology, ideas for new solutions, visions for the future.
  • Findings on user behavior and interaction with systems.
  • Best practices.11

Frequency of publication: It is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The types of articles the journal is looking for include:

  • Book & software reviews
  • Code snippets & algorithms
  • Conference reports
  • Opinion pieces13

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent in the form of either an abstract or a complete draft. Submit articles using the online form, or via email to journal@code4lib.org. Once submitted the article goes through an editorial process, and not a peer review.14

Editorial tone: “Writers should aim for the middle ground between, on the one hand, blog or mailing-list posts, and, on the other hand, articles in traditional journals.”15

Style guide used: From the article guidelines: “While articles in C4LJ should be of high quality, they need not follow any formal structure or guidelines.”16 However, endnotes and references should be cited using the Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a semiformal setting in which to discuss issues of technology in the library and information science world. The information in the journal is concentrated around technology, and its place within the library setting, so it would be a good place for anyone with an interest in this subject to find a home for one of their articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Since the journal is 100% online, there was no information on the exact circulation available.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editorial committee is based throughout the United States, but the writers come from both within and outside the United States.19 The journal is written in English, and although the editorial committee is American, not all of the contributors are. (Article guidelines note that articles should be written in English, and that “American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these.”)20  Also, due to the online nature of the journal, people from anywhere in the world would have the ability to access the articles. Because of this, it would most likely be prudent to explain the use of any language or content that was too culturally specific.

Reader characteristics: Code4Lib is a “volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives, and museums on technology ‘stuff’.” From looking through the author’s information supplies with the articles, it appears that almost all of the contributors work in academic libraries, although their actual job titles vary quite a bit. These job titles range from web designer to information technology coordinator to systems librarian. While this information is about the writers, it goes to show that the journal is of interest to all different types of professionals involved technologies in libraries. Of course, they also all have a professional interest in the intersection of libraries and technology. Code4Lib is of interest to “technology folks in libraries, archives, and museums to informally share approaches, techniques, and code across institutional and project divides.”21 The readers of this journal are likely to have established opinions about the place of technology in libraries. A look at the mission statement shows that the readers are likely to feel that technology holds a key position in the future of libraries.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of Code4Lib Journal would have a good knowledge and understanding of LIS topics and issues. They would also be familiar with library jargon. On top of that, due to the technical nature of the journal, they would also be familiar with most technical jargon.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The common thread running among these readers is an interest in, and a passion for, technology and its use within a library setting. Their level of technical knowledge would be rather high, and this would be an important thing for writers to keep in mind. In fact, it would also be a necessity for the writers of a proposed article for Code4Lib Journal to have significant expertise in technology.


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Code4Lib Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 4, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521729571530/658750
  2. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  3. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  4. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  5. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  6. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Process and Structure. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/process-and-structure
  7. Email from Peter Murray, coordinating editor, Code4Lib Journal, on behalf of the Code4Lib Journal editorial committee (May 21, 2020).
  8. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Issue 25, 2014-07-21. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/issues/issues/issue25
  9. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  10. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  11. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  12. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  13. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  14. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  15. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  16. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  17. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  18. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  19. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Editorial Committee. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/editorial-committee
  20. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  21. Code4Lib. (2020). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
  22. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  23. Code4Lib. (2020). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
Continue Reading

Catholic Library World

Image courtesy of Catholic Library World.

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Catholic Library World

ISSN: 0008-820X

Website: http://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Catholic Library Association, an international organization established in 1921, seeks to provide professional development, promote Catholic literature and offer spiritual support. They promote the exchange of ideas and provide an inspirational source of guidance on ethical issues related to librarianship.1

Target audience: The publication is intended for an “audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries,” whether Christian, secular, or from another religion.2

Publisher: Catholic Library Association.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all submissions are subjected to a double-blind review process.3

Type: LIS scholarly.

Medium: Print.

Content: Catholic Library World publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholicism and Catholic Studies. “Topics of interest include: academic libraries, high school and children’s libraries, parish and community libraries, archives, and library education.” The journal also publishes book reviews on the following topics: theology and spirituality, pastoral, professional, children, and young adult.4

Frequency of publication: Journals are published in September, December and March.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Links to PDF files containing author guidelines can be found on CLA’s Publications page.

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews (for both children and adult works) and articles on all aspects of librarianship, particularly those that relate to Catholicism and Catholic Studies.6

For a better idea of what CLW publishes, here are two recent articles:

The Bayou Lafourche Oral History Project: Understanding Environmental Change and Religious Identity in Louisiana

Catholic Academic Libraries and Print Promotional Materials

Articles should contribute new findings to the existing literature in the field. The word count should be between 3000 and 5000 words, but may be longer if an editor gives approval.7

Submission and review process: Send manuscripts via email as an attachment including author’s full name, affiliation and email address. Manuscripts should be neither previously published nor published simultaneously elsewhere. Because of the lengthy peer review process, authors will be notified within ninety days of submission whether or not their work was accepted. 8

If published, authors keep copyrights and publication rights for their work.

Editorial tone: Accessible and well documented.9

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors should keep in mind that the Catholic Library Association does not limit their publications to works about Catholicism or Catholic librarianship. Their Publications page states that “CLW respects diverse Christian traditions as well as non-Christian. While it is a Catholic publication, CLW welcomes relevant articles from a variety of religious traditions.”10

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Catholic Library World features a wide readership within and outside of the Catholic Library Association. The journal is “indexed in Book Review, CPLI, Library Literature and Information Science, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Reference Book Review Index, Current Index to Journals in Education (ERIC), Information Science Abstract, and University des sciences humans de Strasbourg (CERDIC.)”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of Catholic Library World’s readers are likely to be American Catholics.

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be LIS professionals. From their Publications page, “CLW is intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various libraries.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Members of the Catholic Library Association are networkers in the field of library science with a passion for the future of libraries and library trends in the U.S. and abroad.13 Considering that each issue of CLA’s award winning journal features over 100 book and media reviews, readers of Catholic Library World are interested in a wide variety of LIS topics.

Last updated: April 30, 2020


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Cathla.org, accessed April 30, 2020, https://cathla.org/Main/About/About_Us/Main/About/About_Us.aspx?hkey=1d0656f5-9a4c-4436-a435-6074be93e751
  2. “Publications,” Cathla.org, accessed April 30, 2020, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  3. “Author Guidelines,” Cathla.org, accessed April 30, 2020, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  4. “Publications.”
  5. “Author Guidelines.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Publications.”
  11. “Publications.”
  12. “Publications.”
  13. “Become a Member,” Cathla.org, accessed March 13, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member.aspx?hkey=b2bcc799-8b31-4f9e-8629-f408fde31e9d
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