Wiki Tags Archives: Special libraries

McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A daily humor website, “McSweeney’s exists to champion ambitious and inspired new writing, and to challenge conventional expectations about where it’s found, how it looks, and who participates. We’re here to discover things we love, help them find their most resplendent form, and imagine new ways to bring them to you, Dennis. (If you are not Dennis, kindly ignore the aforementioned.)” 1

“McSweeney’s, however, delivers its humor in a high-brow lit mag sort of way. It’s a place where you can simultaneously experience the comic satisfaction of watching a great sitcom and the glorious smugness of reading a New Yorker think piece.” 2

Target audience: Individuals who enjoy humor/satire  in writing.

Publisher: McSweeney’s Publishing. 3

Peer reviewed? No. 4

Type: Civilian publication

Medium: Website and e-newsletter.

Content: Content is intended to be humorous/satire.  “The thing we are most proud of is that for many of our contributors, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency is the only place they’ve ever published publicly. At some point, something funny or odd occurred to them – a list, a new food review, a short imagined monologue – and they had a place to put that funny and odd thing in order to share it with the world, a private joke made public.” 5

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/guidelines-for-web-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: All types of submissions are allowed. Lists, open letters to people who are unlikely to respond, monologues, food reviews, etc. “Submissions should be shortish. By shortish we mean an absolute maximum of 1,200 words, but in truth we veer toward pieces that are under 1,000 words, and snuggle closest to ones that are even shorter than that. Your subject line should contain some indicator of what is contained in your submission.” 6

Submission and review process: There are separate email addresses depending on the nature of your submission. The website notes DO NOT send the same submission to multiple addresses, it is unnecessary as it all goes to the same editor. Please paste the entire document into the email message. Please don’t share Google docs or links to your private blogs. Also, very important: do not send us attachments. 7

General website submissions should be sent to websubmissions@mcsweeneys.net.

Timely submissions should be sent to timelysubmissions@mcsweeneys.net. This inbox is for super topical pieces riffing on big news stories of the last 24-48 hours.

Lists submissions should be sent to lists@mcsweeneys.net.

Open Letters to People or Entities Who Are Unlikely to Respond submissions should be sent to openletters@mcsweeneys.net.

Reviews of New Food submissions should be sent to newfood@mcsweeneys.net.

“We get hundreds of submissions a week and, like we have mentioned, there’s just one editor reading them all. So, it’s only natural that this editor will be drawn to submissions with funny, eye-catching titles that cleverly reveal the premises of pieces.” 8

Editorial tone: Light and comedic/satirical

Style guide used: None Specified. “Please do not format your piece in an unusual way. Do not use colors or fun fonts.” 9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors may have as good a chance as anyone for getting a submission accepted in McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Their whole publication process seems to be highly informal, but the quality is certainly on par with journals that have higher subscription/circulation rates. An exploration of McSweeney’s multiple related websites is a must to see if your writing project is a match for their style. LIS authors might contribute a fiction or nonfiction piece inspired by their experience as library professionals, keeping in mind that the purpose of such pieces should ultimately be to entertain the reader, rather than function as straightforward articles on an LIS-related issue.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Tendency’s biggest hits have gotten millions of pageviews, and many stories do well, reaching tens of thousands.” 10 The website has a social media following of over 180,000 on Facebook, over 274,000 on Twitter, and over 48,000 followers on Instagram.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication first started in San Francisco, CA, but coverage geographically spans the globe. Content is published in English.

Reader characteristics: While no information regarding reader demographics is provided, a review of publication suggests readers are intelligent, open minded, literary, and comfortable thinking outside of the box, especially in a satirical way.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Limited, the same as the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With this publications, LIS authors have an opportunity to engage with readers from a fun, satirical viewpoint, one not typically taken for LIS. While the readership may enjoy high brow humor, there is the potential to address LIS trends, barriers, ethics, and beyond as long as it comes with a comedic edge. The key is to be creative in approach. With shorter word limits, LIS authors can convey concepts in small, precise ways that do not need to meet  academic-level research and review standards.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/about-us
  2. “McSweeney’s,” ndsmcobserver.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://ndsmcobserver.com/2016/11/mcsweeneys-internet-tendency-dont-worry-not-bottomless-pit-procrastinatory-doom/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Submission Guidelines,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/guidelines-for-web-submissions
  5. “Patreon,” McSweeneys.net, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.patreon.com/mcsweeneysinternettendency
  6. “Submission Guidelines.”
  7. “Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines.”
  9. “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. “McSweeney’s Meets Internet,” NiemanLab.org, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.niemanlab.org/2016/07/mcsweeneys-meets-internet-a-little-publisher-survives-holding-tight-to-its-eclectic-literary-roots/
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Los Angeles Times

**Please Excuse the Mess, Profile Update in Progress**

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Los Angeles Times (LA Times)

ISSN: 0458-3035 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 138 years.”2

“Bringing truth to power through creative storytelling, original reporting and accountability journalism that impacts lives and pushes change.” 3

Website: http://www.latimes.com/

Target audience: Residents of Southern California and beyond. “Millennials, Gen X, Multicultural Influencers, Affluent Consumers, Families and Parents, Boomers.” 4

Publisher: Los Angeles Times Media Group.5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online. Archives are available online from the founding of the paper in 1881.6

Content: News reports, investigative journalism, editorials, reviews, and various columns. The website’s sections include news at the Local, Nation, World level, as well as Business, Climate & Environment, Entertainment & Arts, Food, Housing & Homeless, Lifestyle, Opinion, Politics, Science, Sports, and Travel. Several more options can be found viewing the Site Map. 7 Of interest to LIS writers, there is a special Books sub-section under Entertainment, including fiction and nonfiction book reviews and features.

Frequency of publication: Daily. 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html

Types of contributions accepted: Op-ed articles are welcome on any subject. Per the website, “Most articles are about 750 words in length, though some are shorter, and on Sundays we can sometimes run pieces as long as 1,200 words 9 For more information on op-ed pieces, see former editor Nicholas Goldberg’s explanation of op-ed processes and goals. 10

Letters to the Editor are another option if you wish to respond to anything already published. They are limited to 150 words. 11

Blowback, is another opportunity to publish within the Times. “Got a beef with the L.A. Times? Read something in the paper that really ticked you off, but haven’t got a place to make your opinion heard? Want to write an article about it and get it into The Times? Blowback is The Times’ forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds. It is the missing link between the 150-word letter to the editor and the Op-Ed piece, and you’re invited to participate. We’re willing to post Blowback items on both news and opinion pieces, but our focus is on opinion. The idea is to present countering opinions, not to provide a forum for pointing out errors or critiquing bias in the Times’ news coverage.12

Submission and review process:  Op-Ed articles: Email op-ed submissions to oped@latimes.com. We make every effort to read manuscripts promptly. If the article is accepted for publication, you will hear from a Times editor within five days. We regret that the volume of submissions we receive means that we cannot respond individually to each article, nor can we provide feedback to proposals or queries. 13

Letters to the Editor: Complete the form located here . “We generally do not publish more than one letter from a single person within any 60-day period. Letters become the property of The Times and may be republished in any format. They typically run 150 words or less and may be edited. You will be contacted if your letter is a candidate for publication.” 14

Blowback: Email Blowback submissions to blowback@latimes.com. 15

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Los Angeles Times is read by a general audience (not necessarily confined to Southern California) who wants to be ahead of the local and world news. Op-ed pieces about new digital collections, expanded library services, or opening of a new library branch would benefit LIS authors. You might also consider submitting a press release or event listing regarding a library event.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Los Angeles Times is “the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country, with a daily readership of 1.3 million and 2 million on Sunday, more than 30 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.6 million.” 16

According to their current media kit, The Times has 46 Million unique visitors, 90 Million page views, 7 Million+ social followers, 332,000 monthly shares on Apple News, 845,000 video views, 4.4 Million weekly print + digital readers in Los Angeles, 2.9 million weekly print readers, 1.8 million Sunday print readers, and 1.2 Million daily print readers. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Los Angeles Times is regional to Southern California, but it’s journalism and reporting covers content on a global scale. While printed in English, Los Angeles Times En Español is also available.

Reader characteristics: “We reach distinct, affluent and diverse audiences of multiple generations, demographics, preferences and interests.” 18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Being a lay publication, Los Angeles Times will require LIS jargon-free contributions. While readers may be familiar with library issues, like Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) and Dewey call numbers, generally authors should avoid writing on heavily specialized library topics such as OpenURL link resolver software technology or collection management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The newspaper’s readers are spread all over the world. They are everyday patrons and potential donors, suggesting they may wish to keep their submissions LIS jargon free and stay away from highly specialized topics. There is potential for publishing on a myriad of topics through the Op-Ed avenue that may be of interest to readers.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Los Angeles Times, WorldCat.org, accessed March 24, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/los-angeles-times/oclc/474112039
  2. “About,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, https://www.latimes.com/about
  3. “Media Kit,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://mediakit.latimes.com/
  4. “Media Kit.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Archives,” LATimes.com, accessed October 23, 2018, https://latimes.newspapers.com/
  7. “Site Map,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-sitemap-htmlstory.html
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html
  10. “Op-Ed, Explained,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/news/la-oe-pages23oct23-story.html
  11. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  12. “About Blowback,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/readersreact/la-op-blowback-about-story.html
  13. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  14. “Submit a letter to the Editor,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/submit-letter-to-the-editor
  15. “About Blowback.”
  16. “About.”
  17. “Media Kit.”
  18. “Media Kit.”
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The Washington Post

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Washington Post 

ISSN: 0190-8286 (Print).1

Website: https://www.washingtonpost.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Washington Post engages, informs and entertains the most influential minds. We shape the world through our news coverage and analysis. Our tradition of journalistic excellence and unparalleled access, paired with cutting-edge engineering, make The Washington Post the trusted source for our audience.”2

Target audience: Local Washington D.C. readers, regional readers, national readers, and global readers. 

Publisher: Nash Holdings, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper. 

Medium: Print and online. 

Content: The Washington Post covers a variety of topics from politics, technology, sports, arts and entertainment, and business, to world news and more. 

Frequency of publication: Daily print publication and a website with content that is updated frequently. 

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines for op-eds can be found at https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/submit-an-op-ed/ and submission guidelines for letters to the editor can be found at https://helpcenter.washingtonpost.com/hc/en-us/articles/236004788-Send-a-letter-to-the-editor

Types of contributions accepted: Op-eds and letters to the editor are the accepted submission types. 

Submission and review process

Op-eds should be submitting using the op-ed submission form found on The Washington Post’s website. Information required in the submission form is as follows: author’s name, contact email address, contact phone number, the subject of the op-ed, and the op-ed text. The maximum length of the op-ed is 800 words and should be input in the text box as plain text without brackets.4

Letters to the editor can be sent to The Washington Post via mail, however, The Washington Post mentions that they strongly encourage authors to send their submission via email instead. Email submissions can be sent to letters [at] washpost.com (include the text of the letter in the email’s body; letters sent as email attachments will not be opened) and mailed letters can be addressed to Letters to the Editor, The Washington Post, 1301 K Street NW, Washington DC 20071.5

Letters should be 200 words or less, must include the writer’s name, and cannot have been published elsewhere. Additionally, “for verification purposes, they must include the writer’s home address, email address and telephone numbers, including a daytime telephone number.”6 Letters may be edited for length or clarity if necessary and, time permitting, editors at The Washington Post will confer with the author regarding the changes. For the best chance at getting your letter published, “Letters editor Jamie Riley looks for concise letters that offer a new perspective or add depth to the discussion of an issue.”7 If you haven’t heard back from editors at The Washington Post within 2 weeks, your letter most likely did not get selected for publication. 

Editorial tone: A review of the current articles reflects an informal but informational tone. 

Style guide used: Several articles alluded to a Washington Post style guide existing, however, it could not be located. 

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing a piece in The Washington Post would be an excellent way for authors to present LIS issues and topics to a global audience and a great addition to an author’s resume or CV. Pieces can focus on LIS topics and issues on a national level, global level, or be specific to the Washington D.C. area. Examples of LIS articles published in The Washington Post are “COVID-19 took away our family’s second home: The library” and  “Six ways to get to know D.C.’s beautifully renovated MLK Library — from a distance”. 

For tips on how to get your piece published in The Washington Post, take a look at this guide that The Washington Post released in January of 2020. 

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 1.6 million print readers per week, 104 million unique monthly visitors nationwide and 38 million international unique monthly visitors.8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Washington Post has a national and global readership and is published in English. 

Reader characteristics: The Washington Post divides its readers into four audience groups: Global, Leadership, Local/Washington, D.C. Market and International/Non-US.9  

Global

As stated by The Washington Post Media Kit, their publication is the “fastest growing news site in the world.”10

Leadership:

The Media Kit for the Washington Post asserts that the paper is “. . . the #1 news source for reaching opinion leaders and decision makers in the beltway.”11

Local/Washington, D.C. Market:

1.6 million people in the D.C. market area read the print version of The Washington Post weekly and there are 2 million unique digital visitors from the D.C. market area per month.12

International/Non-US:

The Washington Post sees 38 million unique international visitors per month. “This international coverage unfolds around the clock seven days a week with timely, accessible and original coverage from bureaus on every continent.”13

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: Authors should assume that readers do not have knowledge of, and/or are not familiar with, LIS topics, issues or jargon. 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Washington Post provides authors with the potential to reach a large audience with diverse viewpoints, lifestyles, and cultures. Pieces tailored to one (or more) of the four audience groups will do well, for instance, leadership in the LIS field, how COVID-19 has affected libraries in the US or library accessibility in other countries. 

Last updated: November 15, 2020

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “The Washington Post”, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 2, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1604370915478/406763
  2. “About”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 2, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/about/
  3. The Washington Post.
  4. “Submit an Op-Ed”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 07, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/submit-an-op-ed/
  5. “Send a letter to the editor”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://helpcenter.washingtonpost.com/hc/en-us/articles/236004788-Send-a-letter-to-the-editor
  6. Send a letter to the editor.
  7. Send a letter to the editor.
  8. “2020 Media Kit”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/
  9. 2020 Media Kit.
  10. “Global” , WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-global/
  11. “Leadership”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-leadership/
  12. “Local Dominance”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-local/
  13. “International”, WashingtonPost.com, accessed November 15, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/mediakit/audience-international/
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USA TODAY

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: USA TODAY or USA Today 

ISSN: 0734-7456 (Print).1

Website: https://www.usatoday.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “USA TODAY’s mission is to serve as a forum for better understanding and unity to help make the USA truly one nation.”2

Target audience: Those residing in the US or anyone interested in US News. 

Publisher: Gannett Co., Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication. 

Medium: Print and online. 

Content: USA TODAY covers national and worldwide news as well as sports, entertainment, life, money, and tech.4 USA TODAY also has affiliates that provide local news such as AZCentral and The Coloradoan.5

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/12/04/submit-letters-columns-and-comment-social/2608825001/

Types of contributions accepted: Types of submissions accepted are columns and letters to the editor. 

Submission and review process: Columns are essays, analyses, or arguments on a variety of topics. USA TODAY is specifically looking for columns that have or exhibit one of the following: “. . . timeliness (pegged to news), persuasion pitched to the other side, new information, novel arguments, revelatory insights, passion without partisanship, first-person experience, original reporting that reveals fresh angles and makes news, expert knowledge, and/or a topic that will drive conversation on social media and in the real world.”6 Submissions for columns should be 550 to 750 words and sent to theforum [at] usatoday.com. Headlines and footnotes are not accepted, instead, authors should include URLs to back up quotes or statements made. In conjunction, a short biography (two sentences max) should be included in your submission to be run at the end of the column. If there is any conflict of interest on the author’s side, it should be fully disclosed within the email. Most importantly, “we only accept pieces that are submitted exclusively to USA TODAY. We do not accept material that has been published on blogs, social media or anywhere else.”7

Letters of 200 words or less can be sent to letters [at] usatoday.com. Include the author’s name, address and phone number with the submission. USA Today may edit the submission for accuracy, clarity or length.8

Editorial tone: The USA TODAY Communications Guidelines directs authors to be “clear, factual and get to the point” and to “avoid flowery language and insider jargon.”9

Style guide used: While a style guide could not be located, USA TODAY’s Brand Guide might be useful for potential authors to review. 

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors

As a national publication with worldwide readership, authors who get published in USA TODAY would reach a large audience. Publication in USA TODAY would also look excellent on a resume or CV. 

Additionally, publishing in USA TODAY could help authors introduce readers to LIS issues and topics, thereby bringing more exposure to the LIS field. Examples of published articles in USA TODAY related to the LIS field are, “Libraries are needed more than ever. But many aren’t sure how to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic,” “Reader: Librarians aren’t going anywhere,” and “Banned Books Week: Is your favorite one of the decade’s most censored?”. 

Due to the somewhat extensive submission guidelines, authors may be wary of submitting pieces to USA TODAY. If that is the case, consider checking out these guidelines from the public relations company Cision for tips on pitching a piece to USA TODAY.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Daily paid print circulation averages at 1,424,407 and total print circulation is estimated to be 2,862,229.10 Additionally, “USA TODAY and USATODAY.COM reach a combined seven million readers daily.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although the content in  USA TODAY is primarily focused on news and issues within the US, the publication does cover World and International News which would also appeal to readers outside of the US. USA TODAY also provides an international issue, aimed at “Americans abroad [or] anyone interested in news, investments, sports, and entertainment from the USA.”12 Therefore, authors should assume the majority of the readership resides within the US, but should also take into consideration that readers may be US citizens residing outside of the US, or may be individuals from other countries who are interested in US news. 

Reader characteristics: “USA TODAY  readers are mission-oriented productive people who are trying to advance their lives every day in a time of change and difficulty.”13

In conjunction, “The USA TODAY audience is comprised of everyday Americans and business travelers who are:

  • Busy, on-the-go and connected
  • Responsible, smart and practical
  • Annoyed by biased and noisy argumentation in news
  • Visual learners who like their news ‘straight up’ and are highly suspicious of fluff
  • Driven, social and independent
  • Self-reliant, hardworking and resourceful
  • Quick to see between the lines and spot the agenda behind ‘news’.”14

In regard to reader demographics, a 2018 report compiled by the advertising agency Russell Johns Associates examined both the print and online version of the publication. For the print version, the publication found that 66.8% of the readers are male, the majority of the readers are between the ages of 25-54 (56%), and 66.2% of readers are employed. 63% of readers of the print publication also have a household income of at least $75,000, and 64.4% have at least some college education.15

For the online version, the report by Russell Johns Associates indicates that 58.8% of readers are male, the majority of readers are between ages 25-54 (54.3%), and 66.6% of readers are employed. 61.7% of the readers of the online publication have a household income of at least $75,000, and 65.2% have at least some college education.16

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: Authors should err on the side of caution and assume that most readers of USA TODAY are not familiar with LIS issues, topics, or jargon. 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors will benefit from submitting pieces that will appeal to national readers, if not worldwide readers. Readers will be from diverse backgrounds with varying interests, some of which will have an interest in LIS issues and topics. USA TODAY provides authors with an excellent opportunity to introduce a large audience to LIS issues and topics. 

Last updated: October 18, 2020 


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “USA Today”, Urlichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 6, 2020,http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1602029185264/406783
  2. “About USA TODAY,” USAToday.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://static.usatoday.com/about/#:~:text=Founded%20in%201982%2C%20USA%20TODAY’s,digital%2C%20social%20and%20video%20platforms.
  3. About USA TODAY.
  4. “USA TODAY,” USAToday.com, accessed October 18, 2020, https://www.usatoday.com/
  5. “Brands”, Gannet.com, accessed October 18, 2020, https://www.gannett.com/brands/
  6. “How to submit content,” USAToday.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/12/04/submit-letters-columns-and-comment-social/2608825001//
  7. How to submit content.
  8. How to submit content.”
  9. ”USA Today Corporate Brand Guidelines,” gannett-cdn.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://www.gannett-cdn.com/uxstatic/usatoday/images/marketing/pdfs/USAT_Online_Brand_GL-2-2013.pdf
  10. About USA TODAY.”
  11. About USA TODAY.”
  12. “USA TODAY International Edition, Service.USATODAY.com, accessed October 17, 2020,  https://service.usatoday.com/international/welcomeint.jsp
  13. ”USA Today Corporate Brand Guidelines,” gannett-cdn.com, accessed October 6, 2020, https://www.gannett-cdn.com/uxstatic/usatoday/images/marketing/pdfs/USAT_Online_Brand_GL-2-2013.pdf
  14. USA Today Corporate Brand Guidelines.”
  15. “USA TODAY NETWORK TOPLINE METRICS REPORT,” russelljohns.com, accessed October 12, 2020, https://www.russelljohns.com/pdfs/demographics/Topline_Metrics_Report_October_2018.pdf
  16. USA TODAY NETWORK TOPLINE METRICS REPORT.
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INALJ (I Need a Library Job)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: INALJ ( formerly, I Need A Library Job)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its tenth year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Types of contributions accepted: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Submission and review process: **Update 9/8/2020-INALJ is not accepting guest submissions at this time. the Wiki Core Team will update submission guidelines as they become available**

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: N/A

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.5

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published span a broad range of topics. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed September 6, 2020, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. About INALJ
  4. Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ content is updated daily during weekdays. [4. “About INALJ

  5. About INALJ.”
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Collection and Curation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection and Curation (renamed in 2018 from Collection Building)

ISSN: 2514-9326 (Print) and 2514-9334 (Online)1

Website: https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/acronym/CC

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection and Curation provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”2

Target audience: Academics and professionals concerned with collection development in libraries, museums, archives, and galleries. 3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.10

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection and Curation is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal. As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development and curation.

Collection and Curation does not list abstracting or indexing data.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.14 This journal reaches a worldwide audience, with an editorial team based in Australia, Greece, the United Kingdom, India, Canada, and the United States, 15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development, curation, and management.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While the focus of this journal is generally on LIS subjects and topics, since broadening its scope in 2018 to include a curation aspect, the journal now includes non-LIS specific content that those in museums and galleries will find helpful. Looking at recent issues shows a broad scope, including traditional LIS subjects such as collection development, but also discussions on European women photographers and Mexican photojournalism. Therefore deep knowledge of LIS subject matter would be helpful, but not required.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: May 11, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/91750902
  2. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  3. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  4. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  5. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11. 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  6. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  7. “Purchase and Trial Options” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/purchase-trial-options?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f
  8. “Aims and Scope” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#aims-and-scope
  9. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines
  11. “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines
  13. “Journal Description” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f

    Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.[14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020,  https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#author-guidelines

  14. Collection and Curation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589232919039/84310
  15. “Editorial Team,” https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#editorial-team
  16. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cc?distinct_id=171bc7601323e4-022933398951d1-396d7507-13c680-171bc76013335f#aims-and-scope
  17. “Collection and Curation” Emerald Publishing, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/issn/2514-9326
Continue Reading

Collection Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Management

ISSN: 0146-2679 (Print) and 1545-2549 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/aboutThisJournal?journalCode=wcol20

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Collection Management states that the publication “offers library professionals of all types crucial guidance in the fast-changing field of collection management, including the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries.3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Collection Management covers topics on collection management, planning, allocation of resources, selection, and acquisitions, development of virtual collections, consortia, resource sharing, preservation, and other relevant topics8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wcol20

Types of contributions accepted: Per the publication website, “The journal welcomes articles that provide library professionals with crucial guidance about the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”10

Submission and review process: Collection Management does not require initial queries or proposals; it accepts completed manuscripts. Using the ScholarOne Manuscript software, Taylor and Francis offers an extensive website, Authors Services, that provides guidance beyond the submission guidelines for this specific journal and is full of helpful information.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, suitable for practitioners and academics in the LIS field.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition13 See the recommended reference guide here.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Management is an authoritative and credible LIS scholarly publication. This peer-reviewed journal publishes articles on collection development and related topics. With this in mind, potential authors may contribute articles on a broad variety of topics, from electronic resource acquisitions to recreational reading collections to book preservation. Authors need to be certain they submit work that contributes to the body of knowledge on collection management.

The journal is indexed/abstacted in De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; CINAHL; H.W. Wilson; Library, Information science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA); MasterFILE Complete; RILM Abstracts of Music Literature; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; OCLC; ArticleFirst; Education Index; Electronic Collections Online; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; FRANCIS; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX and VINITI RA.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the United States, but has an international audience.15 The issues covered are of interest to librarians whether they are in United States, Taiwan, or Germany, with topics including how to manage collection development in a digital environment, selection versus censorship, and the use of circulation statistics and interlibrary loan data in collection management.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range from associate university librarians to assistant professors to electronic resources librarians. Often the audience will have earned several degrees: BA, MLS or MLIS, MA, and perhaps PhD. Readers often have supervisory functions with purchasing responsibility, either selecting or authorizing resources for purchase. Readers of Collection Management will most likely have several publications of their own in their portfolio and therefore expect to see well-thought-out and well-researched articles.17

The readers of Collection Management have the same professional interests in common, building their library collections in support of the research and teaching agendas of their parent institutions. They meet the challenge of changing technology, providing the latest publications, and staying within limited library budgets. Collection Management has well-researched theoretical and practical articles that help librarians of any rank succeed in their work. It explores “the future and emerging trends in the field and provides reviews of relevant books, technological resources, and software. This useful resource examines technological advances that help librarians manage and assess collections, such as electronic resource management modules, utilities that provide journal coverage data, and developments in the preservation of library materials.”18

Collection Management is geared towards librarians and information professionals who are interested in articles that help them understand how collection assessment tools and methods can help improve their overall resource management and planning for the future, including how to effectively use staff, facilities, and computing resources.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Collection Management is a peer-reviewed publication that focuses on collection development in college, university, and research libraries of all types. The main readers are librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries. These readers have a strong background on LIS topics and issues. Not only will they understand library jargon, but they will expect to find it in articles written for this journal.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors for Collection Management would do best to consider the education level of the audience and the journal’s reputation for addressing the challenges of their profession. Successful submissions will target current issues in collection management.

Last updated: May 11, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589243665332/67186
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  4. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  5. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  6. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  7. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcol20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  9. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wcol20
  15. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  16. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wcol20#.U9GEeLFiND4
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
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The Crab

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Crab

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=151

Purpose, objective, or mission: This is the official publication of the Maryland Library Association (MLA). 1

Target audience: The primary target audience is the association’s membership, which includes “library staff and trustees, library school students, libraries, and friends of libraries representing the full spectrum of librarianship in Maryland.”2

Publisher: Maryland Library Association.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online digital publication.

Content: Coverage of the MLA annual conference; program and workshop reports; news about Maryland libraries and library people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials with local or state interest; letters to the editor.3

Frequency of publication: Four times per year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157

Types of contributions accepted: From the submission guidelines, The Crab seeks coverage of the following topics: MLA conference; MLA division, committee or interest group news; reports on programs and workshops of interest to librarians in Maryland; news about Maryland libraries and people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials, based on their local and state interest will be considered for publication; letters to the editor – these must be signed, although names may be withheld from publications upon request.4

Submission and review process: Submissions should be via e-mail to editor Annette Haldeman, Legislative Librarian, Maryland General Assembly Department of Legislative Services, Office of Policy Analysis: Annette.Haldeman@mlis.state.md.us.5

Editorial tone: Informal, friendly.

Style guide used: APA.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication, as indicated by their mission, focuses on local Maryland library organizations, people, and events. An author with local knowledge or connections will find it easier to place a variety of material than an out of the area author. On the other hand, there are examples of articles that address larger LIS sector trends and activities. There are publishing opportunities for an author who can write in an accessible manner with a local connection to the Maryland audience. As with any publication, reviewing the past issues will provide a solid sense of what type of article the editor and readers would find interesting.

Audience analysis


Publication circulation: The print publication is available for a subscription fee from the MLA (membership numbers not available) and is also available online for any visitor to read as well as back issues.6

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Primarily people the State of Maryland, with additional reach to members in the vendor community that is not located in Maryland.

Reader characteristics: Association members include professionals, LIS students, and a large number of non-librarian staff members. Members/readers come from the full variety of library types and the full variety of jobs in those institutions. Some LIS vendors are included. It may be assumed that most readers will be sympathetic to libraries, understand their various missions, and will view themselves as important to their organizations and the achievement of their organizations’ goals.7

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: MLA members are mostly professionals in the LIS field.8“>https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=137]

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the diversity of background, skills, professional duties, missions, and interests of the readers, authors should consider presenting material that is practical, general in scope, accessible in tone and language, and appealing to the interests of readers in the Maryland area.


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=151
  2. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=151
  3. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Submit MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157
  4. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Submit MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157
  5. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Submit MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=157
  6. Maryland Library Association. (2020). Join MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/join.asp
  7. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from https://www.mdlib.org/content.asp?contentid=137
  8. Maryland Library Association. (2020). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from Continue Reading

Programming Librarian

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life. ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”1

Target audience: Programming Librarians. “Though the job title can vary, a programming librarian is charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library. Programming librarians can be found in public, academic, special and school libraries, from the largest urban communities to the smallest rural communities, and everywhere in between. Usually, programming librarian is one of many hats that a librarian wears, which makes up-to-date resources like this site even more important.”2

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.4

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian is always looking for new voices, story ideas and program model suggestions.5

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.6

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries, and program models are presented in a standardized format. 7

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.8 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 16,917 members (2020).9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries related to ALA.

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears. Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.10

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities. This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs in their professional settings.11


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  3. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  4. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  5. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, https://programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  6. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  7. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  8. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  9. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 5, 20, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  10. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  11. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
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Computers in Libraries

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

ISSN: 1041-79151

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Computers in Libraries (CIL) Mission Statement: “CIL’s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful articles about the technology that affects them, their institutions, and their patrons. We aim to publish interesting stories, case studies, and opinions that are of professional value to people working with technology in public, academic, special, and corporate libraries, as well as archives and museums. CIL is written by librarians for librarians, and it’s about technology all the time.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.3

Publisher: Information Today Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”8

Frequency of publication: Monthly. 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”10

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.11

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.12

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via the online Query Form.13  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”14

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”15

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author but they are “by librarians and for librarians”. Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well-written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professionals only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”17 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Online magazine with potential for broad readership as the parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Computers in Libraries is published in English. Based in the U.K. but available and accessed worldwide online.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only savvy with technologybut also library managers and system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries do not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. 22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well-informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries do not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead, it devotes itself entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is a month-by-month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand the use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, technical writing should be geared toward a general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

 


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Computers in Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 03, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728654342/91053
  2. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  5. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  6. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  8. Information Today Inc. (2020). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  9. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  10. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  13. Information Today Inc. (2020). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  14. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  19. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
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