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Chronicle of Higher Education

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Higher Education

ISSN: 0009-5982(Print) and 1931-1362 (Online)1

Website: http://chronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Chronicle of Higher Education has the nation’s largest newsroom dedicated to covering colleges and universities. As the unrivaled leader in higher education journalism, we serve our readers with indispensable real-time news and deep insights, plus the essential tools, career opportunities, and knowledge to succeed in a rapidly changing world.” 2

“Higher-ed professionals rely on The Chronicle for unbiased, engaging content to help their students, institutions, and careers.”  3

Target audience: Higher education faculty and administration.4

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No. 6

Type: Civilian; though it does sometimes carry articles of interest to or authored by librarians, it is mainly for the general administration and faculty. 7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: The website contains news, featured stories, opinion pieces, advice columns, job listings, and career-building tools such as online CV management and salary databases. The print magazine includes news, jobs, and The Chronicle Review. 9

The Chronicle Review is a weekly magazine of ideas. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. 10

Frequency of publication: The Chronicle updates its website daily and is available bi-weekly in print. 11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us

Types of contributions accepted: The Chronicle welcomes correspondence, manuscripts, and proposals for articles from our readers. Articles and letters may appear in our print edition, our website, or both. We publish essays, review essays, book reviews, and reporting on academic, intellectual, and cultural affairs. We consider unsolicited submissions; however, please read The Review before submitting your work to familiarize yourself with what we publish. 12

Commentary and Views:
“We consider articles or proposals for articles that express an opinion on issues and policies affecting higher education as well as those that explore, through the author’s personal experience, some aspect of the larger academic community. All Commentary and Views submissions should be 1,000 to 1,200 words and should contain URL links to source material for facts and figures mentioned in the essay.” 13

Advice
“We publish first-person and advice columns on topics including the job market and the hiring process in academe; the graduate-school experience, tenure and promotion, the administrative career path, and career options for Ph.D.’s; professional challenges in research, publishing, teaching, and service work; academic culture; and balancing work and family. Essays should be 1,000 to 1,500 words and written in a conversational, journalistic style.” 14

Letters
“Please make your points as concisely as possible. We will not publish letters longer than 350 words, and all letters will be edited to conform to our style.” 15

“The Chronicle welcomes news pitches that pertain to higher education, but note that in a typical week, our reporting staff receives hundreds of them. We’re writing for a national audience, so a successful pitch will not only point out a compelling local story, but will also be relevant to administrators, professors, and higher-education observers across the country.” 16

Submission and review process: The decision to accept or reject a manuscript rarely takes more than a week. All accepted essays and articles are rigorously edited and fact-checked. Authors have the opportunity to review and approve a manuscript before it’s published. The editors of The Review will decide where and when the piece is published, with some articles appearing only online.17

Editorial tone: Journalistic and conversational.

Style guide used: None specified. “While we cover the academy, we are not a scholarly journal. Essays should be written in a clear, informal style free of jargon and accessible to nonspecialists.” 18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because of the publication frequency and the audience that this newspaper serves, this is a good place for the new author to publish. You don’t necessarily have to work in academe, but it helps. Academic librarians, along with information professionals with an interest in education or pedagogy, would be welcomed here. This publication is an informal counterpart to academic journals, a sort of cocktail hour where academics can mull over or vent about relevant issues within and outside of their field. Interested authors will be intelligent, educated and independent thinkers with something interesting to say.

Also, the wide variety of pieces found in the The Chronicle makes it very easy to find something to write about that, if written in a clear prose style, has a decent chance of being published. Book reviews are a natural, but the longer commentary pieces on some topical tempest occurring in the academy are always a good bet. Because so many write under pen names, the odds of a new author being accepted seem high.

Because of its eclectic content, others working in academe will also find something interesting in The Chronicle of Higher Education. While this publication is definitely written for those with careers in higher education, LIS authors with an interest in teaching will find something of interest here as well.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Our award-winning journalism is well-known at colleges and universities: More than 2 million people visit our website every month, and 1,650 organizations across the country make our journalism available to every one of their employees and students.”19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though The Chronicle claims to be the main source of the goings on in higher education, it does tend to concentrate on the English-speaking world of the United States and sometimes Canada and the United Kingdom.20

Reader characteristics: According to The Chronicle’s advertising materials, “86% of readers are decision makers and influencers at their institutions. 54% are in senior leadership positions at their institutions. 92% hold a master’s degree or higher. 60% have a doctorate degree. Readership includes 90% of the buying power in all of U.S. higher education and 90% of the top 300 research institutions in the U.S.” 21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While the readership may garnish accolades in the higher education arena, they may still lack knowledge in LIS jargon, processes, and trends/innovations.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers are well educated and very interested in their profession and the culture of academe as a whole. Writing for The Chronicle would be an excellent way to increase understanding of library issues (such as information literacy) and market the library’s relevance to other professions. Intellectual and academic freedom, new issues in purchasing and providing content such as e-journals, information literacy, and services to disadvantaged groups would be other issues that would resonate with this readership.

An LIS professional writing for this audience would not have much additional work to do, so long as he or she has something interesting and informed to write about. While this is not the place for scholarly work, readers do enjoy learning about new research or reading critiques of articles they’ve read in an entertaining format. They want to read shop talk, stay informed in their field, and feel connected to issues in the larger world.

This would be a good place to write an opinion piece about an LIS issue that touches on education, society or academe, or review a work that touches on these same issues. Todd Gilman, Librarian for Literature in English at Yale University and a Lecturer at San Jose State University, has published articles about distance education, special collections, research skills and information literacy, and other topics that connect libraries and academe in The Chronicle.

Last updated: November 7, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 7, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1601911248
  2. “About Us.”, www.chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/about-us/
  3. “Advertising.”, chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://marketingsolutions.chronicle.com/
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “About Us.”
  6. “Contact Us.”, Chronicle.com, accessed November 7, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/contact-us
  7. “About Us.”
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “About Us.”
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Contact Us.”
  13. “Contact Us.”
  14. “Contact Us.”
  15. “Contact Us.”
  16. “Contact Us.”
  17. “Contact Us.”
  18. “Contact Us.”
  19. “About Us.”
  20. “About Us.”
  21. “Advertising.”
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Christian Science Monitor

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Christian Science Monitor

ISSN: 2166-32621

Website: http://www.csmonitor.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An independent international news organization, the aim of which is to “embrace the human family, shedding light with the conviction that understanding the world’s problems and possibilities moves us towards solutions.”2 Though owned by the Christian Science church, the Monitor purports to be secular in its reporting save for one “clearly labeled religious article” published each weekday.3

“We want to help you to see news events as starting points for constructive conversations. We seek to cut through the froth of the political spin cycle to underlying truths and values. We want to be so focused on progress that together we can provide a credible and constructive counter-narrative to the hopelessness-, anger-, and fear-inducing brand of discourse that is so pervasive in the news.” 4

“We are not about promoting any specific set of policies, actions or ideologies. The founder of the Monitor was convinced that what reaches and affects thought ultimately shapes experiences and moves our world forward. News, therefore, should be thought-provoking, trustworthy, and engaging.” 5

Target audience: General public. “The Monitor assumes its readers are people who care, who want to care, regardless of their religious or political mindset.”6

Publisher: The First Church of Christ, Scientist.7

Peer reviewed? No.8

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: We deliver global news via our website and mobile site, daily editionweekly print magazine, and free newsletters.”9

Content: Independent national and international news, articles, book reviews, op-eds, essays, and letters to the editor.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: The Monitor accepts articles on national and international news, personal essays, short poems, book reviews,  letters to the Editor, and articles on People Making a Difference. 11

Here are some details about some of the contributions:

International News Contributor Guidelines: Departments include Europe/Baltics/Russia, Asia and Africa, Middle East, and Latin America. 12

“We are interested in a variety of pieces, from 500-word news stories to longer news analysis and news feature pieces for our weekly magazine. We want stories to cover the ‘who, what, when, where, why’ but we expect stories to focus on the ‘why.’ The goal here is to either explain the broader meaning of an event or to explain what’s at stake. We are particularly interested in understanding the ways of thinking or perspectives that are driving your story.” 13

National News Contributor Guidelines: Departments include U.S. Regional News, Justice, and Religion, US Politics, Economy, Education and Culture, and Science/Technology/Environment. 14

“We’re interested in stories of national import from all over the country. We want to stay on top of what is in the news – and in public thought – as much as possible, but there’s also an opportunity for news features with a sense of place. Regardless of the setting or situation, though, we look for history and an eye for detail that show what makes peoples and places the way they are, influencing events.” 15

The Home Forum:

“The Home Forum is looking for upbeat, personal essays from 400 to 800 words. We also welcome short poems. All material must be original and previously unpublished. For seasonal material, be aware that if you submit something that is about a particular month, holiday, event (back to school, graduation), or season, we need to receive it a minimum of six weeks ahead. We accept essays on a wide variety of subjects, and encourage timely, newsy topics. However, we don’t deal with the topics of death, aging and disease.” 16

A Christian Science Perspective:

“This is the column where the theology and practice of Christian Science are discussed in articles that respond to events in the news as well as those that address everyday issues such as companionship, comfort, home, work, relationships, the healing of physical ailments, and dealing with difficult financial times.” 17

People Making a Difference:

“We’re interested in stories about people who are making a positive difference all over the world, working on solutions to problems from hunger and education to the rights of people with disabilities. These profiles, approximately 1,200 words in length, should include an in-depth, in-person interview with the subject. We’ll also want to learn why the individual is so passionate about his or her work as well as gain an understanding of the problem he or she is trying to solve.” 18

Submission and review process: Submissions are welcomed on a continual basis. The Monitor website asks that articles be targeted to their specific departments and guidelines be followed based on the specific section’s editorial teams.  Editors attempt to respond to submissions quickly but are often inundated. If your article is time sensitive please call this to the attention of the editor.  19

Editorial tone: Journalistic to conversational.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Due to the clear contributor guidelines, the volume of freelance work they consume, and the forward approach to covering the world’s news, the Monitor is a promising publication to consider when writing about libraries for the general public. They often cover issues of interest to information professionals and concerning information access. Past articles include a report on a library being created in a small village in Vietnam, the limits being placed on library e-books, Google Books, and membership libraries. The most recent article published in 2020, Pandemic pen pals: How Colombian libraries lift spirits, discusses how libraries are providing services in the wake of COVID-19.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: approximately 50,000 subscribers.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of readership is located in the US, although content covers international news so some international readership is likely.

Reader characteristicsThe Monitor attracts both readers with religious affiliations and those who do not. Their audience includes, “anyone who cares about the progress of the human endeavor around the world and seeks news reported with compassion, intelligence, and an essentially constructive lens.” 21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Range would include professionals, but your audience would most likely be individuals who do not understand LIS subject matter and field jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of the Monitor, in reviewing the articles of the publication, appear to be educated, open-minded and well-read. This is the same audience that often supports and recognizes the value of libraries, making this a potentially place to promote libraries, the work they do, and the challenges they face within communities around the world. Readers of this publication are looking for stories that tie into national and global perspectives, including social, cultural, economical, and environmental issues, all of which have context within the field of LIS.

Last updated: September 20, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Christian Science Monitor Weekly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521861905741/151842
  2. “About.”, CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, https://www.csmonitor.com/About
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Contributor’s guidelines.”, CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines
  9. “About.”
  10. “Contributor’s guidelines.”
  11. “Contributor’s guidelines.”
  12. “International News.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-International-news
  13. “International News.”
  14. “National News.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-National-news
  15. “National News.”
  16. “The Home Forum.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-The-Home-Forum
  17. “Christian Science Perspective.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-A-Christian-Science-Perspective
  18. “People Making a Difference.”, CSMonitor.com, Accessed September 19, 2020, https://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines/Contributor-Guidelines-People-Making-a-Difference
  19. “Contributor’s guidelines.”
  20. “The Christian Science Monitor.”, niemanlab.org, accessed September 17, 2018, http://www.niemanlab.org/encyclo/christian-science-monitor/
  21. “About.”
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Collection Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Management

ISSN: 0146-2679 (Print) and 1545-2549 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/aboutThisJournal?journalCode=wcol20

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Collection Management states that the publication “offers library professionals of all types crucial guidance in the fast-changing field of collection management, including the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries.3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Collection Management covers topics on collection management, planning, allocation of resources, selection, and acquisitions, development of virtual collections, consortia, resource sharing, preservation, and other relevant topics8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wcol20

Types of contributions accepted: Per the publication website, “The journal welcomes articles that provide library professionals with crucial guidance about the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”10

Submission and review process: Collection Management does not require initial queries or proposals; it accepts completed manuscripts. Using the ScholarOne Manuscript software, Taylor and Francis offers an extensive website, Authors Services, that provides guidance beyond the submission guidelines for this specific journal and is full of helpful information.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, suitable for practitioners and academics in the LIS field.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition13 See the recommended reference guide here.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Management is an authoritative and credible LIS scholarly publication. This peer-reviewed journal publishes articles on collection development and related topics. With this in mind, potential authors may contribute articles on a broad variety of topics, from electronic resource acquisitions to recreational reading collections to book preservation. Authors need to be certain they submit work that contributes to the body of knowledge on collection management.

The journal is indexed/abstacted in De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; CINAHL; H.W. Wilson; Library, Information science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA); MasterFILE Complete; RILM Abstracts of Music Literature; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; OCLC; ArticleFirst; Education Index; Electronic Collections Online; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; FRANCIS; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX and VINITI RA.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the United States, but has an international audience.15 The issues covered are of interest to librarians whether they are in United States, Taiwan, or Germany, with topics including how to manage collection development in a digital environment, selection versus censorship, and the use of circulation statistics and interlibrary loan data in collection management.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range from associate university librarians to assistant professors to electronic resources librarians. Often the audience will have earned several degrees: BA, MLS or MLIS, MA, and perhaps PhD. Readers often have supervisory functions with purchasing responsibility, either selecting or authorizing resources for purchase. Readers of Collection Management will most likely have several publications of their own in their portfolio and therefore expect to see well-thought-out and well-researched articles.17

The readers of Collection Management have the same professional interests in common, building their library collections in support of the research and teaching agendas of their parent institutions. They meet the challenge of changing technology, providing the latest publications, and staying within limited library budgets. Collection Management has well-researched theoretical and practical articles that help librarians of any rank succeed in their work. It explores “the future and emerging trends in the field and provides reviews of relevant books, technological resources, and software. This useful resource examines technological advances that help librarians manage and assess collections, such as electronic resource management modules, utilities that provide journal coverage data, and developments in the preservation of library materials.”18

Collection Management is geared towards librarians and information professionals who are interested in articles that help them understand how collection assessment tools and methods can help improve their overall resource management and planning for the future, including how to effectively use staff, facilities, and computing resources.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Collection Management is a peer-reviewed publication that focuses on collection development in college, university, and research libraries of all types. The main readers are librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries. These readers have a strong background on LIS topics and issues. Not only will they understand library jargon, but they will expect to find it in articles written for this journal.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors for Collection Management would do best to consider the education level of the audience and the journal’s reputation for addressing the challenges of their profession. Successful submissions will target current issues in collection management.

Last updated: May 11, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1589243665332/67186
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20
  4. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  5. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  6. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  7. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020,  http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcol20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  9. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wcol20
  15. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 11, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  16. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wcol20#.U9GEeLFiND4
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 11, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
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Library Hi Tech News

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech News

ISSN: 0741-90581

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The journal reports on practical uses of IT in libraries and what’s coming next in terms of technology development for academic and public libraries.”2

Target audience: Library and information science professionals, and anyone with a reason to use LIS services/technologies in their own professional workplace. 3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publications.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles of varying lengths, reporting on LIS conferences, and case studies on how tech is used in the library.6

Regular content includes technology profiles from libraries around the world; feature articles; in-depth conference reviews and reports; new and noteworthy updates for librarians; and a calendar of relevant upcoming events.7

Frequency of publication: 10 issues per year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/lhtn?id=lhtn#author-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Extensive list found under Article Classification9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article. Upload files as a Word document of 1000-3000 words. All submissions are reviewed by the Library Hi Tech News editors, who make the final decision on publication.10

Editorial tone: Informal, but informative. Speaks to readers in a knowledgeable, conversational tone that provides great information on new technologies without making the articles dull or so technical that readers are overwhelmed or tune out.11

Style guide used: Harvard style formatting.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The list of content submissions is vast and touches on a variety of LIS subjects. This is an excellent place to start your LIS publishing.13

Library Hi Tech News‘s editorial objectives note that “publishing your article in LHTN can be a “place to start,” analogous to a “poster session in print,” and does not preclude publishing a more fulsome piece in a peer-reviewed journal at a later date.”14 A peer-reviewed journal related to this newsletter is Library Hi Tech.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International in scope, with the primary editors of the publication based out of U.S. colleges and universities.15 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.16

Reader characteristics: Published in the U.K., readers and writers for this publication are LIS professionals and students interested in new and emerging technologies, and new uses for established technologies. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics  (COPE), “a forum for editors and publishers of peer-reviewed journals to discuss publication ethics.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors 

This is a wonderful publication for LIS new professionals and students, as readers and authors. The authors are seeking submissions covering such a variety of interesting topics, and seem to be open to submissions on anything that is even remotely related to technologies that can be used in libraries and the LIS field. All issues that most students, not just LIS, can speak to, and particularly relevant for those in LIS programs currently using and evaluating these technologies, personally, professionally, and through LIS studies. There are also more technical issues covered, like open source library management systems, global development for libraries, profiles of LIS professionals, and relevant conference updates. A great place to jump in and write for.19

 


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Hi Tech News, Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., accessed May 9, 2020, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  3. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  5. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  6. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/lhtn?id=lhtn#author-guidelines
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  8. ProQuest. (2020). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/lhtn?id=lhtn#author-guidelines
  10. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  11. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  12. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  13. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  14. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  15. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Editorial Team. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lhtn
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  17. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  18. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  19. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
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Children and Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Children and Libraries

ISSN: 1542-9806 (Print) and 2374-7641 (Online)1

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Children and Libraries (CAL) is the official, refereed journal of the Association for Library Service to Children. It primarily serves as a vehicle for continuing education of librarians working with children, and showcases current scholarly research and practice in library service to children and significant activities and initiatives of the Association.”2

Target audience: CAL is “read by librarians who work with children, birth to age fourteen, in public and school libraries.”3

Publisher: Association for Library Services to Children/American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Children and youth; LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Current scholarly research and practice in library service to children with highlights of significant activities and programs of the association8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: CAL publishes full-length scholarly research articles; “best practice” pieces on children’s programming (usually 1,500 words or less); and ends each issue with a brief feature by a children’s librarian, a light essay, humorous story, interview, or interview with a children’s author (up to 300 words). 10

Submission and review process: Submissions via email as Microsoft Word attachments are preferred. Manuscripts will be acknowledged upon receipt and scholarly articles will be evaluated by at least two referees. Authors of scholarly articles can expect the review process to take four to eight months.11

Editorial tone: Academic or informal, depending on the submission type.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are involved and interested in providing library services to children would benefit from submitting an article to this journal. Having an article published in Children and Libraries increases prestige for the author as the publication is distributed nationwide and in some foreign countries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are not available, Children and Libraries is delivered to members of the ALSC at a discounted rate and is a benefit of membership. In addition there are individual subscribers and copies distributed for marketing purposes.14 ALSC has a membership network of more than 4,000.15 Children and Libraries is also available online, with the four most recent issues available only to members but older issues open to all.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the official journal of the ALSC the audience of members extends to every state in the nation and to some foreign countries.17 ALSC is conscious of different cultures and is the national home of El día de los niños – El día de los libros (Children’s Day – Book Day) program. They have also developed the ALSC Every Child Ready to Read project, which aims to promote early literacy skills in children from birth to age five.18 These programs reflect the organization’s support for diversity and dedication to service to all children.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Children and Libraries are made up of children’s librarians, including school librarians, reading teachers, library directors, book reviewers, university professors, library support staff, and retired library professionals. Readers will be familiar with the fundamentals and values of school libraries, public libraries, and community programs that serve children. Readers can be expected to be LIS professionals and to have advanced degrees. Many may work in schools or in public libraries and deal directly with children. Readers have interests in children’s education, literacy programs, continuing education for library professionals, and collection development of children’s materials in schools and libraries.19

ALSC boasts a network of “more than 4,000 children’s and youth librarians, children’s literature experts, publishers, education and library school faculty members, and other adults committed to creating a better future for children through libraries.”20 These readers are dedicated to children around the country and promote practices that improve children’s library services. The ALSC supports equity of access and the continued development of multicultural, multilingual library staff.21 Cultural diversity is a value of the organization, evident in the various articles in CAL that cover service and programs to patrons of different ethnic backgrounds.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers can be expected to be familiar with LIS jargon and issues facing children and libraries. The readers of CAL have experience with current technologies and the latest trends in library services for children.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are professionals who are concerned with issues pertaining to children and libraries. Readers work in school libraries, public libraries, or have contact with children. These professionals seek out literature that is specific to library service for children and this journal meets those needs. Readers wish to be informed of the latest trends, research involving children, literacy, and collection development in order to meet the needs of their young patrons. Writers interested in writing for this publication would be most successful addressing these needs.

Last updated: May 5, 2020


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed  May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/
  2. Children and Libraries: Journal of the ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal
  3. Advertising in CAL,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/advertising
  4. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  5. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  6. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  7. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  9. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  10. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  11. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  12. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  13. Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/author-guidelines
  14.  Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/subscriptions
  15. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  16. “Children and Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Services to Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal
  17. “Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020,  http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/subscriptions
  18. “ALSC Initiatives,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/initiatives
  19. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, Accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  20. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  21. “The Importance of Diversity in Library Programs and Material Collections for Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/ALSCwhitepaper_importance%20of%20diversity_with%20graphics_FINAL.pdf
  22. “Back Issues of Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal/back-issues
  23. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
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Against the Grain

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

ISSN: 1043-20941

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. Our goal is to link publishers, vendors, and librarians by reporting on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals. ”2

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.3“>https://against-the-grain.com/about/]

Publisher: Against the Grain.4

Peer reviewed? No. All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.5

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.6

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.7 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.8

Content: Articles. The ATG also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.9

Frequency of publication: “Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January; and the ATG NewsChannel website that is updated daily with the latest news, announcements, and online-only content.” 10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews, reviews, legal issues, publishing, bookselling and vending, technology, and standards.11

Submission and review process: Contact Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.12

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,13 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.14

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.16 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.17 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (editorial institutional affiliations).19 Written in American English.20

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.21 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”22 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

 


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “About,” Against the Grain, LLC, accessed April 30, 2020, http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  2. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  3. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  4. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  5. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  6. Against the Grain. (2018). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  7. Purdue University. (2018). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  8. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit Content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from https://against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  9. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  10. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  11. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  12. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  13. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  14. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  15. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  16. Purdue University. (2018). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  17. Against the Grain. (2018). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  18. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  19. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  20. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  21. Against the Grain. (2018). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  22. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  23. Against the Grain. (2018). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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American Indian Library Association Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Indian Library Association Newsletter

ISSN: 2152-35251

Website: https://www.ailanet.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Their website states, “An affiliate of the American Library Association, the American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.”2 “The American Indian Libraries Newsletter is an official publication of the American Indian Library Association. It includes information about decisions, goals, activities, and business meetings of AILA, as well as articles on programs, projects, grants, and resources relating to American Indian culture and library and information services. A column by the current president is a regular feature. In addition, you will find books reviews, interviews, and other information that furthers the goals of the association. “3

Target audience: Individuals and institutions interested in working to improve library services to American Indians and Alaska Natives in every type of library.4

Publisher: The American Indian Library Association (AILA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: This is the official publication of the American Indian Library Association. Per their website, it includes “committee and member updates and events; interviews with indigenous authors; scholarly articles; and conference program details.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines are not listed online, but you can contact the newsletter editor, George Gottschalk, for more information about submitting work to the newsletter.11

Types of contributions accepted: Their website states that the newsletter “contains information of professional interest to AILA’s members.” Contributions include updates, events, scholarly articles, author interviews, and conference program details. Book and media reviews are published on the AILA website. 12

Submission and review process: All inquiries should be directed to the current editor.13

Editorial tone: An overview of recent, archived issues suggests that articles should be informative and engaging for library professionals without relying on technical jargon.14

Style guide used: No style guidelines are listed for the newsletter.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are interested in submitting articles should consider contacting the editor, whose information appears on the AILA Publications website. Even though there are no submission guidelines listed, many of the articles are written by members. Interested authors can see the types of articles accepted by looking at previous submissions to the newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: While membership and circulation numbers are unavailable, the newsletter is mailed to all AILA members and digital copies are available to those without memberships.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Members are located throughout the United States and Canada.17 The newsletter is written in English18 and contains library terminology. Readers are aware of the different tribes and expect articles to identify specific tribes and/or bands. Some cultural considerations that authors need to consider may be using the correct term to identify American Indian people. Some readers may object to the term American Indian or Native American. This publication uses the term American Indian in their articles.19

Reader characteristics: “Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve Indian library, cultural, and informational services in school, public, and research libraries on reservations.” Readers are tribal librarians, are associated with tribal libraries or have an interest in issues that affect library and information services for American Indian people. Some readers may be educators in a Native community, or public librarians working with Native people. It is assumed that many readers have LIS degrees. Readers value respect of American Indian communities and their drive to be self sufficient. Factors that aid in independence, such as programs to assist under served American Indian tribal members located on the reservation are important issues and a conduit for receiving that information is the American Indian Library Association Newsletter.20€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with library terminology and the use of LIS jargon is present but does not dominate in the publication. Articles are written for a professional, educated audience.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The American Indian Library Association Newsletter is a respected publication read by librarians and other interested individuals who provide services to American Indian people. Authors writing for this publication will gain recognition within the American Indian LIS community. If published, authors will have a small but concentrated audience of American Indian library professionals. Authors have a good chance of being published if they involve tribal colleges and library-related issues in some way. When writing for this newsletter, it is suggested that authors include tribal affiliation of American Indian people.

Authors that are interested in submitting articles may consider topics such as the future for tribal libraries, improving services for traditionally underserved populations, or articles regarding reading and American Indian children.

Last updated: April 12, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest, “American Indian Library Association Newsletter,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 12, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521736632647/124732
  2. American Indian Library Association, “About,” accessed April 12, 2109, https://ailanet.org/about/about-aila/
  3. American Indian Library Association, “Frequently Asked Questions,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/about/frequently-asked-questions/#q5
  4. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Indian Library Association, “Publications,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  9. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  12. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  13. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  14. American Indian Library Association, “Newsletters,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/newsletter/
  15. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  16. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  17. American Indian Library Association, About.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  20. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  21. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
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Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
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Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

ISSN: 1522-02221

Website: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, this journal “publishes articles exploring the connection between library practice and the philosophy and theory behind it. These include explorations of current, past, and emerging theories of librarianship and library practice, as well as reports of successful, innovative, or experimental library procedures, methods, or projects in all areas of librarianship, set in the context of applied research.”2

Target audience: Library professionals (primarily employees working in academic libraries) interested in exploring the philosophy of librarianship.3

Publisher: University of Nebraska, Lincoln Libraries; University of Idaho Library4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: LPP includes research-based articles covering all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship. Some of the many topics the journal has covered over the years include extended library-hour service, the information-seeking behaviors of journalists, information ethics, the information needs of women in prison, the creativity of public librarians, gaming theory, the role of academic libraries in developing countries as access points to print and electronic resources, and many more.8

Frequency of publication: Annually.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/instructions.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers on all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship.10

Submission and review process: Authors should email their articles (in .doc, .rtf, or html format) to the editors. The editors encourage authors to query them prior to submitting an article.  The journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Lastly, authors should be aware that “all manuscripts are checked using Safe Assignment software before they are sent for peer review.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.12

Style guide used: “Use MLA, APA, or any other style that embeds citations in the article, e.g., (Bolin, 2005), with a list of works cited at the end of the article. Do not use footnote or endnote citations. Please include links to any web resources that are mentioned.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Each issue of LPP covers an extensive variety of topics pertaining to applied research and the theory behind it. The sheer breadth of topics beneath the umbrella of applied LIS research, combined with the journal’s international scope (please see the “Audience analysis” section below) make this publication an excellent choice for new and seasoned LIS authors alike. Additionally, the journal’s flexibility regarding the style used (MLA, APA, etc.) make it an appealing choice for authors in both the humanities and scientific professions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although circulation figures are unavailable, LPP’s papers have been downloaded almost three million times. Nearly 700,000 of these downloads occurred within the past year.14

Audience location: Although LPP is published in the U.S.15, it covers topics pertaining to specific libraries and information organizations all over the world. The map on the journal’s homepage shows that readers live in New Zealand, the U.S., Jamaica, and numerous countries in between.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are educated, have an MLIS, a PhD, or are currently studying in an information and library science program. They may be students yet to work in an information organization, librarians, directors of information organizations, researchers, etc.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: In general, it’s safe to assume that most readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter. However, as mentioned above, the articles vary widely, both in terms of content and complexity. Some articles are written in a less formal style while others are very scholarly, containing advanced language and foreign concepts that even a professional librarian might have trouble deciphering.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Due to the broad scope of this journal, authors should write to a specific group of people, rather than trying to please every reader. Articles tend to address very specific topics (e.g., “Information Seeking Behaviors of Journalists in North India”),19 so readers will expect authors to be experts on their chosen topic. Additionally, authors shouldn’t shy away from technical terms or library jargon, since they can safely assume that at least some of their readers will be familiar with it.

 

Last updated: March 5, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  2.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  3.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  4. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018, http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/~mbolin/lpp.htm
  5. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  6.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  7.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  8. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  9. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  10. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  11. Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  12.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  13.  “Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  14.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  15. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  16.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  17. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  18. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  19.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
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Library Hi Tech (LHT)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech

ISSN: 0737-88311

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Hi Tech (LHT) is concerned with technology-assisted information systems that support libraries & cultural memory, education & the academy, health & medicine, and government & citizenship. LHT covers the IT-enabled creation, curation, representation, communication, storage, retrieval, analysis, and use of records, documents, files, data, and learning objects.” 2

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/lht

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals, LIS researchers and lecturers, library senior management, as well as LIS students and academics.3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online,7 with access available as part of a paid subscription to Emerald Library Studies eJournals.8

Content: From their website, topics covered in the journal include articles about system quality and reliability, integrated library systems, networking, strategic planning, policy implementation, security, automation systems, the role of consortia, resource access initiatives, architecture and technology, electronic publishing, library tech in specific countries, user perspectives on technology, how technology can help disabled library users, and library-related websites.9

Frequency of publication: 14 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht

Types of contributions accepted: Original manuscripts/articles (research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews), 4000-8000 words, submitted in MS Word.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Hi Tech topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

According to a 2013 editorial, a Library Hi Tech manuscript takes up to 30 days to go through peer review, though authors can speed up the process by following the guidelines detailed within the editorial.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly/technical.14

Style guide used: Harvard style guide.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech is a wonderful resource for staying abreast of the latest tech developments in the LIS world (sometimes even before these technologies become mainstream). LHT also has the distinction of being a journal affiliated with the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE),16 a respected organization which promotes “the integrity of the scholarly record through policies and practices that reflect the current best principles of transparency and integrity.”17 Additionally, the journal supports all of its findings with systematic research. For instance, a 2017 article on Apple and non-Apple smartwatches administered an online survey and found that “perceived product attributes” are an important factor in selecting one watch over the other.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Unavailable. Per the Library Hi Tech co-editor, the publication has “a worldwide audience with a strong focus in North America.”19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although written in English,20 the journal is international in scope, with members of the Editorial Board hailing from Germany, Australia, Canada, Ireland, the UK, South Korea, Spain, South Africa, and the USA.21 Submissions need to adhere to Worldwide English language rights.22

Reader characteristics: Subscribers, writers, and editorial staff are primarily LIS professional academics working in universities and are interested in LIS-based technology trends.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will likely be very knowledgeable about LIS subject matter in general, as well as LIS technologies specifically.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are passionate about technology in the LIS workplace. They expect articles to present all findings objectively and methodically, in keeping with the journal’s strong research focus. Readers are likely to welcome articles about emerging technologies from an LIS student point of view, as well as case studies/examples of how technologies are used in classrooms (virtual or not), and in library communities.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  3. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  4.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  5. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  6. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  7. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  10. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  13. Elke Greifeneder, “30 Days to First Decision: Time Span in Library Hi Tech from Submission to First Decision,” Library Hi Tech 31, no. 1 (2013): 5-7, accessed March 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1108/07378831311310338
  14.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  15.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  16.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  17. “Core Practices,” Committee on Publication Ethics, accessed March 2, 2018, https://publicationethics.org/core-practices
  18.  Kuo-Lun Hsiao, “What Drives Smartwatch Adoption Intention? Comparing Apple and Non-Apple Watches,” Library Hi Tech 35, no. 1(2017): 186-206, accessed March 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1108/LHT-09-2016-0105
  19. Elke Greifeneder, email message to author, 2013.
  20. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  21. “Editorial team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lht&
  22. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  23.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  24. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
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