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Los Angeles Times

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Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Los Angeles Times (LA Times)

ISSN: 0458-3035 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 138 years.”2

“Bringing truth to power through creative storytelling, original reporting and accountability journalism that impacts lives and pushes change.” 3

Website: http://www.latimes.com/

Target audience: Residents of Southern California and beyond. “Millennials, Gen X, Multicultural Influencers, Affluent Consumers, Families and Parents, Boomers.” 4

Publisher: Los Angeles Times Media Group.5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online. Archives are available online from the founding of the paper in 1881.6

Content: News reports, investigative journalism, editorials, reviews, and various columns. The website’s sections include news at the Local, Nation, World level, as well as Business, Climate & Environment, Entertainment & Arts, Food, Housing & Homeless, Lifestyle, Opinion, Politics, Science, Sports, and Travel. Several more options can be found viewing the Site Map. 7 Of interest to LIS writers, there is a special Books sub-section under Entertainment, including fiction and nonfiction book reviews and features.

Frequency of publication: Daily. 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html

Types of contributions accepted: Op-ed articles are welcome on any subject. Per the website, “Most articles are about 750 words in length, though some are shorter, and on Sundays we can sometimes run pieces as long as 1,200 words 9 For more information on op-ed pieces, see former editor Nicholas Goldberg’s explanation of op-ed processes and goals. 10

Letters to the Editor are another option if you wish to respond to anything already published. They are limited to 150 words. 11

Blowback, is another opportunity to publish within the Times. “Got a beef with the L.A. Times? Read something in the paper that really ticked you off, but haven’t got a place to make your opinion heard? Want to write an article about it and get it into The Times? Blowback is The Times’ forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds. It is the missing link between the 150-word letter to the editor and the Op-Ed piece, and you’re invited to participate. We’re willing to post Blowback items on both news and opinion pieces, but our focus is on opinion. The idea is to present countering opinions, not to provide a forum for pointing out errors or critiquing bias in the Times’ news coverage.12

Submission and review process:  Op-Ed articles: Email op-ed submissions to oped@latimes.com. We make every effort to read manuscripts promptly. If the article is accepted for publication, you will hear from a Times editor within five days. We regret that the volume of submissions we receive means that we cannot respond individually to each article, nor can we provide feedback to proposals or queries. 13

Letters to the Editor: Complete the form located here . “We generally do not publish more than one letter from a single person within any 60-day period. Letters become the property of The Times and may be republished in any format. They typically run 150 words or less and may be edited. You will be contacted if your letter is a candidate for publication.” 14

Blowback: Email Blowback submissions to blowback@latimes.com. 15

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Los Angeles Times is read by a general audience (not necessarily confined to Southern California) who wants to be ahead of the local and world news. Op-ed pieces about new digital collections, expanded library services, or opening of a new library branch would benefit LIS authors. You might also consider submitting a press release or event listing regarding a library event.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Los Angeles Times is “the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country, with a daily readership of 1.3 million and 2 million on Sunday, more than 30 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.6 million.” 16

According to their current media kit, The Times has 46 Million unique visitors, 90 Million page views, 7 Million+ social followers, 332,000 monthly shares on Apple News, 845,000 video views, 4.4 Million weekly print + digital readers in Los Angeles, 2.9 million weekly print readers, 1.8 million Sunday print readers, and 1.2 Million daily print readers. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Los Angeles Times is regional to Southern California, but it’s journalism and reporting covers content on a global scale. While printed in English, Los Angeles Times En Español is also available.

Reader characteristics: “We reach distinct, affluent and diverse audiences of multiple generations, demographics, preferences and interests.” 18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Being a lay publication, Los Angeles Times will require LIS jargon-free contributions. While readers may be familiar with library issues, like Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) and Dewey call numbers, generally authors should avoid writing on heavily specialized library topics such as OpenURL link resolver software technology or collection management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The newspaper’s readers are spread all over the world. They are everyday patrons and potential donors, suggesting they may wish to keep their submissions LIS jargon free and stay away from highly specialized topics. There is potential for publishing on a myriad of topics through the Op-Ed avenue that may be of interest to readers.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Los Angeles Times, WorldCat.org, accessed March 24, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/los-angeles-times/oclc/474112039
  2. “About,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, https://www.latimes.com/about
  3. “Media Kit,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://mediakit.latimes.com/
  4. “Media Kit.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Archives,” LATimes.com, accessed October 23, 2018, https://latimes.newspapers.com/
  7. “Site Map,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-sitemap-htmlstory.html
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html
  10. “Op-Ed, Explained,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/news/la-oe-pages23oct23-story.html
  11. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  12. “About Blowback,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/readersreact/la-op-blowback-about-story.html
  13. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  14. “Submit a letter to the Editor,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/submit-letter-to-the-editor
  15. “About Blowback.”
  16. “About.”
  17. “Media Kit.”
  18. “Media Kit.”
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Mental Floss

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mental Floss

ISSN: Print: 1543-4702 (ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Whether we’re covering history, science, pop culture, language, music, true crime, or entertainment, we help our audience feel smarter. Our New York City-based team of editors and writers—as well as our worldwide network of contributors—answers life’s big questions, uncovers fascinating facts, and finds stories so interesting that our readers absolutely must share them.”2

Mental Floss delivers smart, fun and shareable content in an upbeat and witty environment. An encyclopedia of everything, we answer life’s big questions and uncover stories so interesting our readers absolutely must share them. We take all culture and make it pop culture.” 3

Target audience: “Curious People.” 4

Publisher: Minute Media. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online. Print issues ceased in 2016. 6

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects with a focus on shareability.7

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for new voices to write about the diverse verticals we cover, whether that’s history, science, entertainment, language, pop culture, art, or beyond.” 8

PITCHES WE CAN USE 9
Lists

Lists are an overview of a topic in digestible-nugget form. Each list will cover the who, what, when, and where of the subject, plus its significance, and pay particular attention to quirky or little-known facts about the subject. Pitches may focus on the below topics:

Subjects that have a major anniversary coming up
Historical figures and events
Movies and TV series
Music
Literature and art
Language
Food and drink
Helpful tips and life hacks
Scientific discoveries, phenomena, and figures
Pop culture fads, events, and personalities

Features

Features are reported stories that delve into a topic from a particular angle and with strong characters and storytelling. Features can be short (500 words) or longer (800-1500 words). Areas ripe for features include:

Historical events that put current events into perspective
Exploring and/or answering a big question
Science stories that explain a new field of research or highlight a scientist’s ongoing work
A deep dive into a pop culture event or phenomenon in history
True crime and unsolved mysteries
Features about odd, unique, or little-known historical events and people

PITCHES WE CAN’T USE 10
Short, timely news stories: these pieces are covered by our staff writers
Science articles based on a single study: these are also covered by staff writers
First-person articles or personal essays
Fiction, memoir, or poetry
Current politics or political opinion
Stories based solely on PR pitches

Tips provided by Mental Floss: Keep your pitch short (1-2 paragraphs) and let them know if you have a particular expertise on the subject. Include a link to your portfolio/work samples. Do not pitch or send completed articles.  Take the time to brainstorm a possible headline for your story, and include that as part of the subject line, i.e. Freelance Pitch: 50 Amazing Facts About Animals. Having a headline can help us better understand the angle you plan to use with your story. 11

Submission and review process: “Expect a response to your pitch within two weeks. If you do not receive a response after two weeks, you can assume it’s a pass. Due to the number of pitches we receive each day, we are unfortunately not able to respond to every pitch we receive.” 12

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Since its founding in a Duke University dorm room in 2001, Mental Floss has reached more than 1 billion readers with smart, quirky content presented in a witty, upbeat voice. We reach more than 19 million users per month across our site, social media accounts, and popular YouTube channel.” 13

According to Visitor’s Worth website, Mental Floss has approximately 58,000 daily visitors, with 154,000 daily page views. 14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Visitor’s Worth website, the most traffic for the publication comes from audiences in the United States, but the website also has a following in the UK, Canada, India, and Germany. 15 The website publishes in the English language.

Reader characteristics: In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “About Us,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “Mental Floss,” MinuteMedia.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.minutemedia.com/mentalfloss
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Mental Floss.”
  6. “Life After Print for Mental Floss,” FolioMag.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.foliomag.com/life-after-print-for-mental-floss/
  7. “About Us”
  8. “Pitch,” MentalFloss.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625670/how-to-pitch-mental-floss
  9. “Pitch.”
  10. “Pitch.”
  11. “Pitch.”
  12. “Pitch.”
  13. “About Us.”
  14. “www.mentalfloss.com,” VisitorsWorth.com, accessed December 5, 2020,  http://visitorsworth.com/www.mentalfloss.com
  15. “www.mentalfloss.com.”
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Book Riot

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Book Riot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.bookriot.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Book Riot is the largest independent editorial book site in North America, and home to a host of media, from podcasts to newsletters to original content, all designed around diverse readers and across all genres.” 1

“We’re dedicated to the idea that writing about books and reading should be just as diverse as books and readers are. We began with the goal of leading a new discussion around books, readers, and publishing. Individually and collaboratively, we do the work each day to innovate fresh content and services to our readers, amplify marginalized voices, and challenge ourselves and our community to be inclusive.” 2

Target audience: People who love books and reading about books.

Publisher: Riot New Media Group. 3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: “The content is comprised of humor, reviews, commentary, and news as well as editorials on topics related to the reading experience. Book Riot addresses new technology in the literary space and developments in the publishing industry.” 4

Frequency of publication: New content is posted daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot

Types of contributions accepted: “If you can write something smart or funny or interesting or provocative about books in the space of about 600-800 words, we’re interested in hearing from you. Your samples should be things you think could go up on Book Riot just as they are. We recommend that one be an entry for the Our Reading Lives series, and the other on any topic of your choosing.” 5

DO NOT submit “traditional book reviews, interviews, or links to Goodreads, LibraryThing, Amazon, etc. Also, please do not submit image-heavy pieces; we want to get a feel for your voice and writing style.”6

DO NOT send “writing samples unrelated to books and reading. Your samples should show us that you understand how we do things here at the Riot and that you can do it too. Want to learn more about who we are? Poke around the site, and check us out on InstagramTwitterFacebook, and our content on Goodreads.” 7

Submission and review process: “Please note that due to the high volume of applications we receive, we cannot respond to each one. We’re currently accepting applicants on a rolling basis. If you are accepted, you’ll hear back within one month of submitting your application.” 8

Editorial tone: Sometimes serious, sometimes silly, but never stuffy or boring.

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you love books and have blogging experience, this is a great place to submit writing. The pieces are fun, cover a wide range of books, and aren’t limited to just reviews: the site loves top 10 lists of all flavors, introductions to authors you’ve never read, giveaways, and posts about current events like Amazon acquiring Goodreads and how that will affect readers. The site isn’t peer reviewed and might not help you gain tenure, but it’s a wonderful community of book lovers who will most likely appreciate an LIS writer’s perspective on reading.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 3.2m+ global monthly unique visitors, 1.1M+ email subscribers, 1.5m+ Social connections. 9 

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Book Riot states it is the largest independent editorial book site in North America. 10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 50% of readers are between the ages of 18-35, 16% of readers are between the ages of 35-45, 64% are female, 51% have children, 45% attended college with 26% attended grad school. Readers have “above average” household income. Reader industries include education and library, business services and retail. Reader interests include books and literature, comics and animation, cooking, and pets. 11

Audience Bookish Habits: Average 80 books read per year, spend an average of $371 per year on books, 34% are currently in a book club, 46% have subscribed to a book subscription service. 12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will most likely have some knowledge, but this is strictly a civilian publication that doesn’t want to be too stuffy, so keep the LIS jargon out of your submissions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

If you have blogging experience and a good social media presence, this would be an ideal site to pitch ideas. Think beyond mere book reviews; Book Riot is the place for more thoughtful, interesting, or just plain fun commentary around reading or books. Readers will be receptive to a librarian’s perspective and insight, and the field is wide open for LIS-related ideas that can appeal to a lay reader.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/about/
  2. “Join Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/join-us/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Advertise.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/advertise/
  5. “Write for Book Riot.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot
  6. “Write for Book Riot.”
  7. “Write for Book Riot.”
  8. “Write for Book Riot.”
  9. “Media Kit.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fFONL49_WYqrqOhjDjc6oxZechhDbdq-/view
  10. “Media Kit.”
  11. “Media Kit.”
  12. “Media Kit.”
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Business Information Review

excuse the mess, update in progress


About the publication

Title: Business Information Review 

ISSN: 0266-3821 (Print) and 1741-64501

Website: http://bir.sagepub.com/

You can also visit the Business Information Review (BIR) BIR blog, (where you can listen to BIR podcasts) or follow the journal on Twitter.

Purpose, objective, or mission: €œ”Business Information Review (BIR) deals with the provision and management of information, content and knowledge in organisations.”€2 It deals with information strategies and operational best practices in order to help businesses get the best value from exploiting information knowledge to their benefit. A primary goal of BIR is to highlight economic, social and technological developments that will affect organizations’€™ information needs.3

It is “€œthe only journal devoted entirely to the practice of business information provision.”4

Target audience: Business information professionals: managers, librarians, knowledge managers, researchers, analysts, consultants, print or electronic publishers.5

Publisher: Sage Publications.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional, with an emphasis on information, content and knowledge in organizations.8

Medium: Print and online access.9

Content: Articles, case studies and industry updates. The website and blog also offer podcasts.10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (March, June, September, December).11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/manuscriptSubmission

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions should cover information and knowledge management within organizations. Articles will ideally be relevant to all sorts of info professionals – librarians, managers, publishers, information managers -€“ and are typically 3000-5000 words. Shorter articles are also accepted, such as interviews, product/service reviews and opinion pieces.12

Submission and review process: Submit a proposal first. Completed articles might be considered, with the understanding that editors may require changes. Editors review all submissions; some are reviewed by the editorial board members. Make sure to read the site’s author guidelines before sending anything for consideration.13

Email your proposal/article to businessinformationreview@gmail.com.14

Co-editors, as of 2016, are Claire Laybats, TFPL, UK, and Luke Tredinnick, London Metropolitan University, UK. To contact the editorial office, email: businessinformationreviewj@gmail.com 15

Editorial tone: Professional, somewhat formal while still engaging and interesting. Readable. BIR wants readers to really delve into topics and think about the relevancy of products/services/devices for their own business needs. LIS authors should note that content is provided by “€œinformation professionals, content, technology and service suppliers, academics and researchers and leading thinkers”€16 from within and outside the information world.17

Style guide usedSAGE Harvard reference style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have an interest in technologies and strategies applicable to the information side of the LIS world, this is a good place to consider submitting. The review attracts readers from a variety of professions, not only LIS practitioners, and would be a good place to present LIS-learned views to a larger audience that might not be aware of the particular information/knowledge management angle.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available for the actual publication; BIR Twitter page has 156 followers 18.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International, with primary editors based out of the U.K./Europe.19 Written in English using British/U.K. spelling.20

Reader characteristics: “€œBIR readers are to be found in the corporate sector, in government agencies and other public institutions, in private consultancy, and in universities and business schools.”€21€œBIR‘s international readership and authorship covers the corporate sector, consultancies and law firms, publishers and information providers, government and other public institutions, academia and the third sector.”22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as librarians and information management/knowledge professionals are a key part of BIR’€™s reading and author group. The publication is also directed towards managers and others in non-LIS professions23, so if you use LIS specific jargon or acronyms, make sure readers still understand what you are talking about.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

BIR readers are interested in knowledge management applications, processes and developments, all areas that LIS practitioners touch on, through study or professionally. BIR readership and authorship includes LIS professionals, making this an ideal publication to share information updates, trends, and applications, as far as they pertain to organizations.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. Business Information Review, Sage Publications Ltd., accessed May 2, 2020, http://journals.sagepub.com/home/bira
  2. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  3. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  4. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  5. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Business Information Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411245980118/146294
  7. Sage Publications Ltd. (2020). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from https://journals.sagepub.com/author-instructions/BIR
  8. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  9. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  10. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Podcasts for Business Information Review. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://bir.sagepub.com/site/Podcast/podcast_dir.xhtml
  11. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  12. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  13. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  14. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  15. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  16. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  17. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  18. BIR Journal. (n.d.). Tweets (Twitter page). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from https://twitter.com/BIRJournal
  19. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  20. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  21. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  22. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  23. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
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Code4Lib Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Code4Lib Journal 

ISSN: 1940-57581

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, “the Code4Lib Journal exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.”2 It “aims to help engender collective understanding and the necessary support for improving library technology and digital services.”3

Website: http://journal.code4lib.org/

Target audience: The target audience includes anyone who is involved in the “wider library community” who has an interest in libraries and technology.4

PublisherCode4Lib. Publication began in 2007.5

Peer reviewed? Yes. Journal submissions are reviewed by an editorial committee6, and the committee views its process of selecting articles as an open peer review. According to a message from the 2020 coordinating editor, “The author and the designated editor work together to improve a paper before publication. The author knows the name of the editor and other readers on the editorial committee and vice versa. We’ve found that this process works best for us and produces consistently high quality and relevant content for our audience.”7

Type: Open access with Creative Commons license. Although the editorial committee consists mainly of those involved in the academic library community, contents do not necessarily have the format of a traditional scholarly research article, and the journal does not use a traditional blind peer review. Articles can vary in formality and can include case studies and personal opinion pieces. Articles do not generally include extensive literature reviews. For these reasons, the journal is currently classed here as ‘professional news’. Articles tend to be focused on the practical application of the ideas presented.8

Medium: Code4Lib Journal is available online.9

Content: From the Call for Submissions, “the editorial committee is looking for content that is practical, demonstrates how to exploit technology to create digital library collections and services, or offers insight and forethought regarding the use of computers in any type of library setting.”10

The journal publishes articles on a multitude of subjects, as long as they support the mission statement, and is flexible with length (1,500 to 5,000 words is an approximate word count). The types of articles published in the journal include:

  • Case studies of projects (failed or successful), how they were done, and challenges faced.
  • Descriptions of projects in progress, project updates, and new project proposals.
  • Effective processes for project management.
  • Reviews/comparisons of software, frameworks, libraries, etc.
  • Analyses and case studies of using library metadata in technological application: novel applications or solutions, or unsolved challenges,
  • Thought pieces on the big problems associated with library and technology, ideas for new solutions, visions for the future.
  • Findings on user behavior and interaction with systems.
  • Best practices.11

Frequency of publication: It is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The types of articles the journal is looking for include:

  • Book & software reviews
  • Code snippets & algorithms
  • Conference reports
  • Opinion pieces13

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent in the form of either an abstract or a complete draft. Submit articles using the online form, or via email to journal@code4lib.org. Once submitted the article goes through an editorial process, and not a peer review.14

Editorial tone: “Writers should aim for the middle ground between, on the one hand, blog or mailing-list posts, and, on the other hand, articles in traditional journals.”15

Style guide used: From the article guidelines: “While articles in C4LJ should be of high quality, they need not follow any formal structure or guidelines.”16 However, endnotes and references should be cited using the Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a semiformal setting in which to discuss issues of technology in the library and information science world. The information in the journal is concentrated around technology, and its place within the library setting, so it would be a good place for anyone with an interest in this subject to find a home for one of their articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Since the journal is 100% online, there was no information on the exact circulation available.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editorial committee is based throughout the United States, but the writers come from both within and outside the United States.19 The journal is written in English, and although the editorial committee is American, not all of the contributors are. (Article guidelines note that articles should be written in English, and that “American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these.”)20  Also, due to the online nature of the journal, people from anywhere in the world would have the ability to access the articles. Because of this, it would most likely be prudent to explain the use of any language or content that was too culturally specific.

Reader characteristics: Code4Lib is a “volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives, and museums on technology ‘stuff’.” From looking through the author’s information supplies with the articles, it appears that almost all of the contributors work in academic libraries, although their actual job titles vary quite a bit. These job titles range from web designer to information technology coordinator to systems librarian. While this information is about the writers, it goes to show that the journal is of interest to all different types of professionals involved technologies in libraries. Of course, they also all have a professional interest in the intersection of libraries and technology. Code4Lib is of interest to “technology folks in libraries, archives, and museums to informally share approaches, techniques, and code across institutional and project divides.”21 The readers of this journal are likely to have established opinions about the place of technology in libraries. A look at the mission statement shows that the readers are likely to feel that technology holds a key position in the future of libraries.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of Code4Lib Journal would have a good knowledge and understanding of LIS topics and issues. They would also be familiar with library jargon. On top of that, due to the technical nature of the journal, they would also be familiar with most technical jargon.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The common thread running among these readers is an interest in, and a passion for, technology and its use within a library setting. Their level of technical knowledge would be rather high, and this would be an important thing for writers to keep in mind. In fact, it would also be a necessity for the writers of a proposed article for Code4Lib Journal to have significant expertise in technology.


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Code4Lib Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 4, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521729571530/658750
  2. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  3. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  4. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  5. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  6. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Process and Structure. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/process-and-structure
  7. Email from Peter Murray, coordinating editor, Code4Lib Journal, on behalf of the Code4Lib Journal editorial committee (May 21, 2020).
  8. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Issue 25, 2014-07-21. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/issues/issues/issue25
  9. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  10. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  11. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  12. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  13. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  14. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  15. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  16. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  17. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  18. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  19. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Editorial Committee. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/editorial-committee
  20. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  21. Code4Lib. (2020). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
  22. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  23. Code4Lib. (2020). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
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Jinfo

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Jinfo (formerly FreePint)

ISSN: 1460-72391

Website: https://www.jinfo.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Jinfo helps “information professionals turn evolution in information sources and technology into practical actions.”2 Through regular free newsletters and updates, and subscription-based articles and reports, Jinfo provides support on a variety of issues important to information professionals and workers.

Target audience: Workers in the information industry including librarians, consultants, freelancers, writers, technology experts, and commercial companies. The site was started in 1997 as a free email newsletter named FreePint and recently changed the name to Jinfo to be more memorable.3

Publisher: Free Pint Limited. Jinfo notes that only the official name has changed, nothing more. ProQuest still lists the publication as FreePint with no update to name.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional newsletter.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Jinfo helps “information professionals turn evolution in information sources and technology into practical actions.” They “provide research on the role of source expertise in data analytics” and offer guidance on contemporary issues in the information profession.8

Frequency of publication: Twice monthly free newsletter, with content uploaded daily to members with a paid subscription.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://web.jinfo.com/go/about/contribute/

Types of contributions accepted: Jinfo articles are based on real-world experience, and writers are encouraged to share their knowledge with peers. 10

Submission and review process: Send a query to catherine.dhanjal@jinfo.com11

Editorial tone: Informative. Jinfo‘s “editorial processes help you state your ideas as clearly and cogently as possible.”12

Style guide used: UK Guardian style and UK spellings.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication has welcomed a variety of submissions and is known for working with authors. Jinfo allows an author to gain visibility within the wider LIS community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of 2012, Jinfo serves more than 80,000 readers across the globe through the newsletter email and the publication’s website and has a global audience of over 100,000 information professionals throughout the entire network.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Jinfo is a UK-based company and reaches English-speaking readers. The newsletter is written in English and uses British spelling, punctuation, and word usage. Because Jinfo is a global publication, regional and cultural references should be kept to a minimum and explained where needed.15

Reader characteristics: Working information professionals with knowledge in their fields.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have extensive knowledge of information issues, but these issues may or may not be related to libraries. Many readers work in information environments but not necessarily library environments and library jargon should be kept to a minimum. General information jargon can be used, but where it denotes cultural or regional references, jargon should be fully explained.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Given the diverse readership, both in career and local, this publication offers an opportunity to inform a global audience of readers interested in information and knowledge management. Even if you just submit one article that gets published to the site, you’ll be added to the list of Jinfo‘s “practicing professionals’ contributors,”18where more people can find out about you and your LIS writing.

Last updated: April 26, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  FreePint, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521688073081/266909
  2. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  3. Jinfo Blog (2020) Jinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/blog/73340
  4. ProQuest. (2020). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  5. ProQuest. (2020). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  6. ProQuest. (2020). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  7. ProQuest. (2020). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  8. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  9. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  10. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  11. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/contribute
  12. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/contribute
  13. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  14. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  15. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  16. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/contribute
  17. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/
  18. Jinfo (2020). About JinfoJinfo. Retrieved from https://web.jinfo.com/go/about/people
Continue Reading

Online Searcher

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine the utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine-style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are:

› 14% Information Professionals
› 27% Academic Librarians
› 24% Special Librarians
› 10% Government Librarians
› 21% Public Librarians
› 4% Other.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed April 10, 2020, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
Continue Reading

Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals

ISSN: 1361-32001

Purpose, objective, or mission: Ariadne is published by Loughborough University Library in the U.K. for Information Professionals to stay abreast of a wide variety of LIS topics. Initially, Ariadne was made available in electronic format by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), in order “to create awareness of Internet developments in the UK higher education LIS community”. 2 Website: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Target audience: The target audience for Ariadne is librarians, museum curators, archivists and associated technical staff & managers. Articles should cover topics that will be of interest to one or more of these audiences. 3

Publisher: Loughborough University Library in the U.K. 4

Peer reviewed? No. The editor makes all decisions regarding manuscript submissions.5

Type: LIS professional news. Although Ariadne does publish some research-oriented content, it is not peer reviewed and it cannot be considered “scholarly.” ISSN is 1361-3200.6

Medium: Entirely online. Ariadne is free and open access, so the full text of all issues (current and archived) is available on the website. 7

Content: Ariadne publishes a variety of articles on current trends and issues in the LIS field. A standard issue contains an editorial, a number of articles including a feature article, news, and events. Prominent topics include emerging technologies and trends, digital libraries and collections, information architecture, search engines, metadata, and conference information. 8

Frequency of publication: Undefined. The magazine was published quarterly up through 2010; as of 2013 there are two issues per year. 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines can be found on the Guidelines page. The publication’s website indicates to submit proposals the editor who will then correspond via email once an article proposal has been accepted. 10

Types of contributions accepted: Ariadne accepts a variety of contributions, including articles (i.e., scholarly papers, position pieces, and case studies), reviews, and reports on events, workshops, meetings, and conferences. The magazine also accepts proposals regarding organizations and work-related projects. There are no stated requirements for length.11

Submission and review process: Ariadne requires an initial proposal for all articles. Authors should submit an abstract, outline, or general description to the editor prior to submission of the completed manuscript. After an agreement is reached, a date for submission is set and the editor then sends out an explanation of the editorial process. No peer-review process is used.12

Proposals can be submitted through an email to the editor: editor@ariadne.ac.uk.13

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for editorial tone. Main articles tend to have a more formal, scholarly tone, while reviews and other articles appear to be relatively informal (i.e., first person is acceptable).14

Style guide used: Ariadne does not use a formal style guide.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Ariadne has remained on the forefront of the open access movement and continues to focus its content on current and emerging LIS trends and technologies. Thus, although it is not peer reviewed, it is a credible and highly accessible source with great publishing potential for LIS practitioners, educators, and students. Contributors might consider writing about LIS conferences or workshops, workplace technologies, online learning, digital collections, social networking, Web 2.0./Library 2.0, or Web-based information seeking behavior.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Ariadne is an open access electronic publication that is available free to anyone with Internet access. As such, there is no formal subscription process and no readily available circulation data. Generally, though, freely accessible online resources do at least have the potential of a large audience base.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although Ariadne maintains an international audience, the majority of readers are located in the U.S. and U.K., and content reflects this. 16

Ariadne is published solely in English, and based on geographic information, it can be assumed that the vast majority of readers are, in fact, native English speakers. However, authors should be aware of the linguistic and cultural differences that exist between the U.S. and British English. For example, submission guidelines indicate that “British English” should be used rather than “US English.” 17

Reader characteristics: Ariadne does not provide any detailed demographic information relating to the gender, age, or ethnicity of its readers. Because this is an international professional publication geared towards practicing information professionals, it is likely that the audience is relatively mature and experienced, but also demographically diverse. Although readers are likely to hold a wide variety of professional specializations, they are also very likely to share professional interests based on Ariadne‘s primary topics, which include digital libraries, technological developments, digital information management, and online learning. As a large portion of Ariadne readers work in libraries and archives, they are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship in an information society. It should be noted that Ariadne also features more opinion-based reader reviews, retrospectives, and reflections.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Ariadne readers are likely to be quite knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and jargon. As practicing information professionals, they would certainly be interested in library topics that are directly applicable to their careers. Read through the archived issues to get a sense of the current topics. 19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Ariadne is a professional publication with a very specific focus on practical articles that discuss sophisticated technological issues and developments in LIS. Overly general library articles, theoretical papers, or pieces that fail to directly address current trends in librarianship with a heavy focus on digital initiatives may not interest Ariadne readers. Submissions should be professional but not necessarily scholarly in tone, and they should focus on relating practical applications for LIS practitioners (see topic suggestions in the Publication Analysis above).

It is important for the author to note that although Ariadne is a British publication with a core following in the UK, the majority of readers actually reside in the U.S., and it is a global magazine. This allows for increased opportunities to effectively reach Ariadne readers.

Last Updated: March 8, 2020


References

 

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals, Loughborough University Library, accessed March 8, 2020, http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/
  2. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about/copyright
  3. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  4. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about/copyright
  5. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  6. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines 
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  8. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  9. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  10. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  11. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  12. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  13. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  14. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  15. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  16. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
  17. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  18. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
  19. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
Continue Reading

American Archivist, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The American Archivist

ISSN: 0360-9081 (Print) and 2327-9702 (Online)1

Website: https://americanarchivist.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of The American Archivist states it “seeks to reflect thinking about theoretical and practical developments in the archival profession.”2 It is the journal of the Society of American Archivists, so the focus is on the cultural, social, legal, and technological developments in North America in particular.3

Target audience: Archivists and special collections librarians.4

Publisher: Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS and History, scholarly7

Medium: Print and online open access; last six issues available to SAA members and subscribers only, or to the general public for a fee.8

Content: Includes research articles, case studies, commentaries on issues and practices of interest to the field, essays on international archival practices, annotated professional resource bibliographies, discussions of professional practice and initiatives, and letters to the editor on previously published articles and other topics of interest to the field.9

Frequency of publication: Semi-annual.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy

Types of contributions accepted: Original research articles, case studies, opinion and editorial pieces, articles concerning international practices or perspectives, professional resource bibliographies, and reviews of books, archival literature, finding aids, microfilm editions, exhibits, and computer software.11

Submission and review process: The preferred maximum length is 8,000 words for research articles and surveys, and 3,000 words for case studies and perspectives. These length requirements may be waived for certain articles in consultation with the editor. All articles should be accompanied by a 250-word abstract. Manuscripts are to be submitted electronically through the Submissions Manager in Microsoft Word, double-spaced and pages numbered throughout, with author’s name and address on the title page only.12

The American Archivist is a refereed journal. Each submission will be reviewed by two experts in the subject matter of the submission, and a final decision for publication will be based on their reviews. Final decision normally takes a minimum of three months.13

Acceptance for publication is usually on the condition that specified revisions be made. Once an article is accepted, author will send a short biographical statement and photo. Authors are given the opportunity to approve all editorial changes and to review page proofs for correction of printer’s errors. It usually takes a year for a submission to be seen in print.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition; for professional terminology refer to the definitions outlined in A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology by Richard Pearce-Moses.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If the author is looking for an avenue to enter the conversation of current, scholarly archival practices and the future of conserving information, this may be one of the more prestigious journals through which to pursue publication. Publishing in American Archivist is sure to have weight when interviewing for a position, or to fulfill tenure or promotion requirements for academic libraries or other scholarly institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The American Archivist circulates to around 5,300 members of the Society of American Archivists, while the digital edition receives about 17,000 page views per month17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SAA members live and work all over North America. There is no specified or dominant culture or geographic area. This journal is mainly focused on North American archivists and their practices, and all articles are in English. However, this journal expresses a definite interest in the archival practices of their international colleagues, and specifically looks for articles on this subject.18

Reader characteristics: Highly educated individuals, most of whom have at least two university degrees. Most have history and/or library science graduate degrees. There are further specializations in every area imaginable, so a variety of interests are represented here. There is no information provided on age, gender, or ethnicity of the members. This audience works in a variety of professional settings, including universities and higher education, private corporations, nonprofits, historical societies, public and special libraries, art and history museums, religious organizations, and government agencies. Some specializations include acquisition and appraisal, business archives, religious archives, academic archives, museums, description (cataloging), electronic records, government records, manuscript repositories, oral history, preservation, reference and access, and visual materials to name a few. People may work by themselves with little to no assistance, or work in immense academic or private institutions with a fleet of colleagues and assistants. The most striking characteristic of American Archivist readers is that they love and believe in what they do. They are incredibly interested in their profession, and how to continue and expand it into the future. These readers are interested in practical approaches and ideas, as they are practitioners in the real world who are usually short on money, space, and time. Theoretical discussions with no practical applications would be of little value to them.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With extensive knowledge specific of their branch of LIS, these readers are well versed in the history of archiving and preservation and specific technologies and practices, and are often eager to discuss and debate new technologies and future practices in the field. They are familiar with both LIS and archival terminology, concerns, issues, and theories. Archival studies includes several different models used for appraisal, weeding, preservation, etc., which are also discussed in this publication. Not all readers will possess an LIS degree as some enter the field by way of a history or museum education and background.20

Conclusion: Reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this publication can be extremely intimidating for the new author and archival professional. Many of SAA’s members have been publishing in this journal (and others) for years, and their names are well-known and carry weight at conferences and national conventions. They have highly specialized and technical knowledge ranging over hundreds of topics, localities, and institutional settings. These readers are professional scholars and practitioners who value both theoretical and applied research in archival science. They will be looking for excellent academic writing, new ideas, or suggestive case studies with relevance to their own repositories. This is a high standard to meet. However, if an author feels he or she has something to add to the conversation of archival studies, this is the right forum. This is where the newest, most significant research, case studies, and experimental models in the field are disseminated and discussed.

Last updated: February 28, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-712559018
  2. “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  3.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28. 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  4.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  5. The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  6.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  7.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  8.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, https://americanarchivist.org/
  9. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  10.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  11. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  12. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  13. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  14. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  15.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  16. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  17. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  18. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  19. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
  20. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed February 28, 2020, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
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School Library Connection

 

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Connection 

ISSN: 2380-98411

Website: https://schoollibraryconnection.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “School Library Connection (SLC) is an extensive learning resource center for school library professionals. As the combined evolution of School Library Monthly and Library Media Connection magazines, SLC maintains their commitment to providing those in the school library field with practical insights and inspiration while also advancing the scope and mission of its predecessors.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in school libraries and educators.3

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Articles on “Organization & Management, Instructional Leadership, and Perspectives & Partners.” Reviews are also featured in a searchable database.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (print); continuously (online.)9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: Queries for proposed articles should be addressed to the appropriate editor found on their submissions page. Articles on day-to-day operations and best practices of school librarianship should be discussed with the Organization & Management editor. Articles on instructional practice should be discussed with the Instructional Leadership editor. Articles on school libraries in the broader context of education should be discussed with the Perspectives & Partners editor. Experienced and new writers are welcomed.10

Reviews are also accepted in the form of “concise descriptions and evaluations of the contents, quality, and curricular applications of books and other media available for school library purchase.”11

Submission and review process: Authors must send a query to the appropriate editor to develop their idea and article before submission. The final article must then be sent to that same editor.12 There is an editorial calendar available to guide author submissions.13 Articles are typically published four months after the article deadlines.14

All book and material reviews should be emailed to the reviews editor.15

Editorial tone: Informative and conversational.16

Style guide used: An in-house guide based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Excellent opportunity for LIS professionals involved with school libraries, with the ability to convey they first hand experiences with an active voice and in a clear, conversational style. Talented first-time authors are welcomed, so this would be a great place to start building a writing portfolio for a respected and widely-read publication. While not a peer-reviewed publication that would support tenure, work in this magazine reaches a very large audience and will increase the visibility of any contributing author.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has over 5,000 readers. The website reports an average of 4,250 visitors.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is based in North America, with a corresponding readership.19 Readers would be familiar with LIS jargon, gained through practice or education, and the issues facing school libraries. Given the practical focus of the publication, readers most likely approach their work with a positive attitude, interested in bettering themselves and the service they provide.20

Reader characteristics: Readers will have experience with libraries, especially school libraries, and the majority work directly with students.21 The 2019 editorial calendar indicates audience interest in OER, collection development, primary resources, collaborating with other school departments, makerspaces, cultural competence, and political literacy, all within the K-12 school library context.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While a reader may have obtained their LIS knowledge through an undergraduate program for media specialists or through a LIS graduate program, depending on their position, it can be assumed all will have a clear understanding of the working of the school library and the responsibilities of the LIS professionals in K-12 libraries. Acronyms and terms common in education and school librarianship would be acceptable to use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication expect articles that support their efforts to improve the LIS services they provide. They want information from colleagues about their successes and efforts they can replicate in their own libraries. To be successful writers will need to meet their collaborating editor’s expectations and submit articles written in an active voice, from personal experience or observation.

Last updated: July 5, 2019


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Connection,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed July 5, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1562358591408/826729
  2. Libraries Unlimited, “About,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About
  3. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com.
  8. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  9. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  10. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About/Write
  11. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/Home/reviews?tab=5
  12. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_FAQ.pdf
  13. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  14. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions.”
  15. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+.”
  16. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  17. Libraries Unlimited, “Article Submission Guidelines,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2o19, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf
  18. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/mediaserver/SLC/1981/1981090.pdf
  19. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019.”
  20. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  21. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  22. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  23. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
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