Wiki Tags Archives: Marketing

Los Angeles Times

**Please Excuse the Mess, Profile Update in Progress**

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Los Angeles Times (LA Times)

ISSN: 0458-3035 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 138 years.”2

“Bringing truth to power through creative storytelling, original reporting and accountability journalism that impacts lives and pushes change.” 3

Website: http://www.latimes.com/

Target audience: Residents of Southern California and beyond. “Millennials, Gen X, Multicultural Influencers, Affluent Consumers, Families and Parents, Boomers.” 4

Publisher: Los Angeles Times Media Group.5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online. Archives are available online from the founding of the paper in 1881.6

Content: News reports, investigative journalism, editorials, reviews, and various columns. The website’s sections include news at the Local, Nation, World level, as well as Business, Climate & Environment, Entertainment & Arts, Food, Housing & Homeless, Lifestyle, Opinion, Politics, Science, Sports, and Travel. Several more options can be found viewing the Site Map. 7 Of interest to LIS writers, there is a special Books sub-section under Entertainment, including fiction and nonfiction book reviews and features.

Frequency of publication: Daily. 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html

Types of contributions accepted: Op-ed articles are welcome on any subject. Per the website, “Most articles are about 750 words in length, though some are shorter, and on Sundays we can sometimes run pieces as long as 1,200 words 9 For more information on op-ed pieces, see former editor Nicholas Goldberg’s explanation of op-ed processes and goals. 10

Letters to the Editor are another option if you wish to respond to anything already published. They are limited to 150 words. 11

Blowback, is another opportunity to publish within the Times. “Got a beef with the L.A. Times? Read something in the paper that really ticked you off, but haven’t got a place to make your opinion heard? Want to write an article about it and get it into The Times? Blowback is The Times’ forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds. It is the missing link between the 150-word letter to the editor and the Op-Ed piece, and you’re invited to participate. We’re willing to post Blowback items on both news and opinion pieces, but our focus is on opinion. The idea is to present countering opinions, not to provide a forum for pointing out errors or critiquing bias in the Times’ news coverage.12

Submission and review process:  Op-Ed articles: Email op-ed submissions to oped@latimes.com. We make every effort to read manuscripts promptly. If the article is accepted for publication, you will hear from a Times editor within five days. We regret that the volume of submissions we receive means that we cannot respond individually to each article, nor can we provide feedback to proposals or queries. 13

Letters to the Editor: Complete the form located here . “We generally do not publish more than one letter from a single person within any 60-day period. Letters become the property of The Times and may be republished in any format. They typically run 150 words or less and may be edited. You will be contacted if your letter is a candidate for publication.” 14

Blowback: Email Blowback submissions to blowback@latimes.com. 15

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Los Angeles Times is read by a general audience (not necessarily confined to Southern California) who wants to be ahead of the local and world news. Op-ed pieces about new digital collections, expanded library services, or opening of a new library branch would benefit LIS authors. You might also consider submitting a press release or event listing regarding a library event.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Los Angeles Times is “the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country, with a daily readership of 1.3 million and 2 million on Sunday, more than 30 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.6 million.” 16

According to their current media kit, The Times has 46 Million unique visitors, 90 Million page views, 7 Million+ social followers, 332,000 monthly shares on Apple News, 845,000 video views, 4.4 Million weekly print + digital readers in Los Angeles, 2.9 million weekly print readers, 1.8 million Sunday print readers, and 1.2 Million daily print readers. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Los Angeles Times is regional to Southern California, but it’s journalism and reporting covers content on a global scale. While printed in English, Los Angeles Times En Español is also available.

Reader characteristics: “We reach distinct, affluent and diverse audiences of multiple generations, demographics, preferences and interests.” 18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Being a lay publication, Los Angeles Times will require LIS jargon-free contributions. While readers may be familiar with library issues, like Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) and Dewey call numbers, generally authors should avoid writing on heavily specialized library topics such as OpenURL link resolver software technology or collection management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The newspaper’s readers are spread all over the world. They are everyday patrons and potential donors, suggesting they may wish to keep their submissions LIS jargon free and stay away from highly specialized topics. There is potential for publishing on a myriad of topics through the Op-Ed avenue that may be of interest to readers.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Los Angeles Times, WorldCat.org, accessed March 24, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/los-angeles-times/oclc/474112039
  2. “About,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, https://www.latimes.com/about
  3. “Media Kit,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://mediakit.latimes.com/
  4. “Media Kit.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Archives,” LATimes.com, accessed October 23, 2018, https://latimes.newspapers.com/
  7. “Site Map,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-sitemap-htmlstory.html
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html
  10. “Op-Ed, Explained,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/news/la-oe-pages23oct23-story.html
  11. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  12. “About Blowback,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/readersreact/la-op-blowback-about-story.html
  13. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  14. “Submit a letter to the Editor,” LATimes.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://www.latimes.com/opinion/submit-letter-to-the-editor
  15. “About Blowback.”
  16. “About.”
  17. “Media Kit.”
  18. “Media Kit.”
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GOOD

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

ISSN: Print: 1935-1488 (Ceased), Online: N/A 1

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: “We are GOOD & Upworthy—a social impact company with a mass audience. We believe your purpose should be contagious. We work with brands and communities to create participatory campaigns and shareable stories that drive powerful results across business and society. Since 2006, we’ve been on a mission to help people and organizations be a force for good, together. ” 2

Target audience: People who want to make a difference in the world.

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC. 3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and e-Newsletter. GOOD used to print a quarterly magazine but that has ceased, no information on the print publication could be found as of November 27, 2020.

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently, the e-newsletter, The Daily Good, is emailed daily. 5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: As of November 27, 2020, the links to the submission guidelines are no longer active.  Within the website, clicking the “FAQ” and “Newsletter” links sometimes found at the bottom yielded error messages. Performing a website and Google search yielded no results.

Types of contributions accepted: Searching the website could only locate https://goodinc.com/contact which states, “We are not hiring. But we are always on the lookout for new talent, email your resume to jobs@goodinc.com.” and “Say hello. Email us at howdy@goodinc.com” 6

Submission and review process: None could be located. From the main menu clicking “Submit a Tip” and “Contact Us” take the user to the contact page as described above.

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD‘s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and  the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 100 Million Monthly Audience. [ 7. “About.”]

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English. 7

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.8 (*Note: As of December 5, 2020, the link to the 2016 Media Kit is no longer active)

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy, they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: December 5, 2020


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. Good, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 5, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1607192246377/626469
  2. “About.”, GoodInc.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://goodinc.com/
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Contact.”, GoodInc.com, accessed December 5, 2020, https://goodinc.com/contact
  7. “About.”
  8. “GOOD Media Kit 2016.” GoodInc.com, accessed October 17, 2018, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
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Book Riot

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Book Riot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.bookriot.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Book Riot is the largest independent editorial book site in North America, and home to a host of media, from podcasts to newsletters to original content, all designed around diverse readers and across all genres.” 1

“We’re dedicated to the idea that writing about books and reading should be just as diverse as books and readers are. We began with the goal of leading a new discussion around books, readers, and publishing. Individually and collaboratively, we do the work each day to innovate fresh content and services to our readers, amplify marginalized voices, and challenge ourselves and our community to be inclusive.” 2

Target audience: People who love books and reading about books.

Publisher: Riot New Media Group. 3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: “The content is comprised of humor, reviews, commentary, and news as well as editorials on topics related to the reading experience. Book Riot addresses new technology in the literary space and developments in the publishing industry.” 4

Frequency of publication: New content is posted daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot

Types of contributions accepted: “If you can write something smart or funny or interesting or provocative about books in the space of about 600-800 words, we’re interested in hearing from you. Your samples should be things you think could go up on Book Riot just as they are. We recommend that one be an entry for the Our Reading Lives series, and the other on any topic of your choosing.” 5

DO NOT submit “traditional book reviews, interviews, or links to Goodreads, LibraryThing, Amazon, etc. Also, please do not submit image-heavy pieces; we want to get a feel for your voice and writing style.”6

DO NOT send “writing samples unrelated to books and reading. Your samples should show us that you understand how we do things here at the Riot and that you can do it too. Want to learn more about who we are? Poke around the site, and check us out on InstagramTwitterFacebook, and our content on Goodreads.” 7

Submission and review process: “Please note that due to the high volume of applications we receive, we cannot respond to each one. We’re currently accepting applicants on a rolling basis. If you are accepted, you’ll hear back within one month of submitting your application.” 8

Editorial tone: Sometimes serious, sometimes silly, but never stuffy or boring.

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you love books and have blogging experience, this is a great place to submit writing. The pieces are fun, cover a wide range of books, and aren’t limited to just reviews: the site loves top 10 lists of all flavors, introductions to authors you’ve never read, giveaways, and posts about current events like Amazon acquiring Goodreads and how that will affect readers. The site isn’t peer reviewed and might not help you gain tenure, but it’s a wonderful community of book lovers who will most likely appreciate an LIS writer’s perspective on reading.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 3.2m+ global monthly unique visitors, 1.1M+ email subscribers, 1.5m+ Social connections. 9 

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Book Riot states it is the largest independent editorial book site in North America. 10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2020 Media Kit, 50% of readers are between the ages of 18-35, 16% of readers are between the ages of 35-45, 64% are female, 51% have children, 45% attended college with 26% attended grad school. Readers have “above average” household income. Reader industries include education and library, business services and retail. Reader interests include books and literature, comics and animation, cooking, and pets. 11

Audience Bookish Habits: Average 80 books read per year, spend an average of $371 per year on books, 34% are currently in a book club, 46% have subscribed to a book subscription service. 12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will most likely have some knowledge, but this is strictly a civilian publication that doesn’t want to be too stuffy, so keep the LIS jargon out of your submissions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

If you have blogging experience and a good social media presence, this would be an ideal site to pitch ideas. Think beyond mere book reviews; Book Riot is the place for more thoughtful, interesting, or just plain fun commentary around reading or books. Readers will be receptive to a librarian’s perspective and insight, and the field is wide open for LIS-related ideas that can appeal to a lay reader.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/about/
  2. “Join Us.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/join-us/
  3. “About Us.”
  4. “Advertise.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/advertise/
  5. “Write for Book Riot.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://bookriot.com/write-for-book-riot
  6. “Write for Book Riot.”
  7. “Write for Book Riot.”
  8. “Write for Book Riot.”
  9. “Media Kit.”, BookRiot.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fFONL49_WYqrqOhjDjc6oxZechhDbdq-/view
  10. “Media Kit.”
  11. “Media Kit.”
  12. “Media Kit.”
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The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Philanthropy

ISSN: 1040-676X (Print) and 1943-3980 (Online)1

Website: http://www.philanthropy.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “From deeply reported stories on the big ideas that shape the work of charities and foundations to the practical guidance in our online resource center, only the Chronicle of Philanthropy provides nonprofit professionals, foundation executives, board members, and others with the indispensable information and practical advice they need to help them change the world.” 2

“Our news and opinion pages fuel the national conversation about the role nonprofits play in society. The Chronicle’s special reports, benchmarking data, and popular webinars are essential information for nonprofit professionals. 3

Target audience: Nonprofit professionals, foundation executives, board members, etc. 4

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc. 5

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: News stories, opinion pieces, tips and advice, people and awards. 7

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published twelve times a year, while the website is updated daily.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.philanthropy.com/page/contact-us/

Types of contributions accepted: “The Chronicle of Philanthropy welcomes news pitches that pertain to nonprofit organizations and foundations.” 9

What Kinds of News Stories Do We Prefer?

  • We’re writing for a national audience, so if you have a compelling local story, it should also be relevant to nonprofit practitioners across the country.
  • If we’ve just written about a similar development at a different organization, we probably won’t cover it again soon.
  • We like: Stories about best or innovative practices in fundraising and managing organizations. Profiles of interesting (and especially effective but lesser-known) charity leaders, fundraisers, and donors. New trends in giving or fundraising. Anything that our readers can learn from and adapt to make them more effective.
  • We usually don’t cover: Galas. Celebrity events. Groundbreakings and ribbon cuttings. Gifts of less than $1 million unless they are out of the ordinary. 10

Submission and review process: “Send pitches to either one reporter or one editor or, if you’re not sure, copy no more than two staff members on one message. BCC’ing or sending separate emails to multiple people can lead to confusion and will likely delay our response.” 11

“Use your email’s subject line to state your purpose: “Story idea about a successful billion-dollar capital campaign,” for instance. Avoid being cute (“You’ll never guess what WE did!”) or vague (“Press release from Such-and-Such Organization”). We’re eager to hear your news, but we’re pressed for time, and these types of subject lines make it more likely your pitch will be deleted without being opened.” 12

Editorial tone: Official and straightforward.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication provides the potential for publishing to an audience interested in fundraising techniques, strategic planning and budgeting, and community work with nonprofits. Writing to this audience could help promote the LIS field to potential investors and community partners.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Philanthropy.com has 257,000+ unique monthly visitors online, the newsletter has 160,000+ recipients each week, there are 20,000+ paying subscribers representing the most loyal audience in the nonprofit world. 13

Audience location: The Chronicle writes primarily for a national audience though their reach extends across the globe. All articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: “Decision makers at four in five of the largest and most influential charitable organizations in America read the Chronicle to advance their missions.” 14

75% of the top 400 American fundraising charities and 90% of the 50 largest private foundations are premium readers. 51% of individual subscribers at fundraising nonprofits and 84% of individual subscribers at private foundations are executive leaders, 49% of individual subscribers at fundraising nonprofits work in development or fundraising.” 15

“84% of readers consider The Chronicle of Philanthropy essential to their understanding of the nonprofit sector and philanthropic world. 72% use the information in The Chronicle to make a decision.” 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of the subject matter does not deal with LIS information. While it is better that LIS jargon is not used, the information that any LIS writer wished to share with the readers of this publication would be common between both LIS and philanthropy readers.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

It is obvious from recently published articles that all writings presented to the editors of this publication should have a forward spin on them. Articles should focus on the needs or interests of the reader. An article on black men in nonprofit organizationsor lack thereofnot only gives numbers and explains why there are fewer in this demographic working non-profit, but also discusses solutions. Any LIS related article must look at the LIS world from the eyes of that world’s grant writers and fundraisers.

Last updated: November 27, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 27, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1606532777917/170649
  2. “About”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/about-the-chronicle-of-philanthropy/?cid=cpf_abt
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Subscribe.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/subscribe?cid=CS-COP-H-SUB
  7. “The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 23, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/
  8. “About Us.”, Chronicle.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.chronicle.com/page/about-us/
  9. “Contact Us.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/contact-us/
  10. “Contact Us.”
  11. “Contact Us.”
  12. “Contact Us.”
  13. “Advertise.”, Philanthropy.com, accessed November 27, 2020, https://marketingsolutions.philanthropy.com/
  14. “About.”
  15. “Advertise.”
  16. “Advertise.”
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Marketingprofs

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: MarketingProfs

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.marketingprofs.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “MarketingProfs is the one source that individual marketers, marketing teams, and some of the world’s largest organizations turn to for modern marketing tools, training, strategies, articles, online seminars, discussion forums, and much more. Our educational materials will give you or your team real-world solutions to common and not-so-common marketing problems. Our experts also provide strategies for various types of marketing, from email to social media and beyond. For upcoming events, professional development, and industry trends, check out our resources below and prepare to take your marketing to a new level of excellence.”1

Target audience: Marketing, business professionals, small business owners, and entrepreneurs.2

Publisher: MarketingProfs LLC. 3

Peer reviewed? No. 4

Type: Civilian website and newsletter for business professionals and others interested in marketing. 5

Medium: Online. 6

Content: Articles and opinion pieces about marketing, as well as summaries of research findings and infographics. 7

Frequency of publication: MarketingProfs Today publishes daily content and MarketingProfs Weekly combines the best articles of the week. 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.marketingprofs.com/write-for-us

Types of contributions accepted: “MarketingProfs focuses on enterprise (i.e., large-company) business-to-business (B2B) marketing-related content (and on some topics that broadly apply to all marketing). The following are the topics MarketingProfs covers. If the subject of your contributed “how to” article or thought-leadership piece does not relate to one of the following, we’re unlikely to consider it for publication. What we don’t publish: case studies and press releases. ” 9

“Do think of these, however, as broad categories rather than narrow topics:

  • Demand Generation & Management
  • Marketing Metrics & Measurement
  • Email Marketing
  • Marketing Operations & Management
  • Account-Based Marketing (ABM)
  • Marketing Automation
  • Social Media/Influencer Marketing
  • Competitive Analysis/Competition
  • Content Marketing
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Types of Content We Publish

Here’s a list of what we publish from guest contributors:

  • Bylined “how-to” articles for our website and thrice-weekly newsletter, MarketingProfs Today
  • Summaries of research findings based on polls, surveys, and research studies conducted by marketers, academia, PR firms, and other researchers
  • Bylined thought-leadership articles (op/ed-type pieces), but we accept only those that offer particularly valuable insights and views that can’t easily be found elsewhere
  • Infographics” 10

Submission and review process: “Our publication queue for contributed articles can be up to 3-4 months long. To ensure our article backlog doesn’t grow, we publish only the most useful articles for our audience; accordingly, we tend to be highly selective. Articles should be at least 800-1,000 words, but not much more than 1,200 or so. Feel free to include images, charts, graphs, and the like—but only if they help convey a point. Include a brief bio of 25 words, including LinkedIn and Twitter contact info, if available, and a recent headshot (make sure the upper half of your torso is also in the picture).” 11

“If your article is accepted for publication, we will inform you; expect to hear from us within a week or two of our having received your email. If we don’t accept your article, you may or may not hear from us, depending on how crowded our inbox is. If you haven’t followed the  guidelines, you likely won’t hear back.” 12

Editorial tone: None Specified.

Style guide used: Be sure to read through all of the instructions on the Write for MarketingProfs web page. Failure to adhere to their guidelines could result in a rejection. “Your article will be edited for clarity and brevity, and to conform to the MarketingProfs house style.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication would have potential for a writer with a background or interest in marketing. Most librarians have experience in marketing, if not formal training, to ensure their libraries survive and thrive. For example, an author could write about their experience and how it can be applied outside the library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 400,000 registered subscribers, with 8,000 new subscribers each month,  and 330,000 unique website visitors a month. MarketingProfs has 600,000+ followers on social media. 14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: MarketingProfs has a global reach, though 67% of users reside in North America. More than 40% are Director-level or above, half come from businesses with over 250 employees, with readership within the top three industries for marketing: technology, manufacturing, and banking/financial. 15 Authors should be aware of the corporate culture, as many readers are employed at businesses and large organizations. Marketing language and jargon might be used and understood among the readers of this publication.

Reader characteristics: Readers are marketing professionals. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, marketing professionals usually have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in business with an emphasis on marketing. Most of these professionals would also have strong computer and technological skills, and people in this field are “creative, highly motivated, resistant to stress, flexible, and decisive.”16 Considering that the site is designed for a very specific audience, it can be assumed that the readers will share similar professional interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will likely not be familiar or have knowledge of library and information science subject matter, unless the reader works in a library.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

An author should write very professional level articles that address new and exciting ideas in marketing. An article on marketing library services may be well received, but only if the article contains marketing approaches that can be applied to other types of organizations and businesses. Another type of article that might be well received is an article on technology in the library, and the use of technology to market the library effectively. Many of the articles published in MarketingProfs are technology oriented.

Last updated: November 8, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “MarketingProfs,” MarketingProfs.com, accessed October 11, 2016,  http://www.marketingprofs.com
  2. “MarketingProfs.”
  3. “MarketingProfs.”
  4. “Write for MarketingProfs,” MarketingProfs.com, accessed October 11, 2016,  http://www.marketingprofs.com/write-for-us
  5. “MarketingProfs.”
  6. “About Us.” MarketingProfs.com, accessed October 11, 2016, https://www.marketingprofs.com/about/
  7. “Write for MarketingProfs.”
  8. “Newsletter.”, MarketingProfs.com, accessed November 8, 2020, https://www.marketingprofs.com/newsletters/marketing/
  9. “Write for MarketingProfs.”
  10. “Write for MarketingProfs”
  11. “Write for MarketingProfs.”
  12. “Write for MarketingProfs.”
  13. “Write for MarketingProfs.”
  14. “Our Audience,” Services.MarketingProfs.com, accessed November 8, 2020, http://services.marketingprofs.com/our-audience/
  15. “Our Audience.”
  16. “Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers,” BLS.gov, accessed October 11, 2016, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm
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Strategic Library

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://libraryworks.com/strategic-library

Purpose, objective, or mission: Strategic Library focuses on innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape. Thought-provoking articles by subject matter experts address, leadership, technology, funding, and more to promote organizational success.1

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.2

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online by subscription only.5

Content: Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.”6

Frequency of publication: Monthly

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf

Note: the subscription paywall hides a lot of information and our guidelines PDF is currently 5 years old in 2020. But you can access the latest issue for free online: https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Here is an Editorial Forecast  from 2015.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.7

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.8

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, Jennifer Newman: jenny@libraryworks.com. According to the writer’s guidelines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”9

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional.

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape read by a paid subscription so readers are heavily invested in the content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2015 documentation, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.

Reader characteristics: “Subscribers to Strategic Library are executive decision-makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty. Our subscribers number around 8,000, although that number is an estimate since many of our subscriptions are institutional. Since our audience is quite broad, we publish a range of articles in each issue, many that have overlapping applications to various types of libraries. Remember, the readers of your article are experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS terms and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using the first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or best practices are other options for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are subscribers and very experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Current. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Current. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
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AIIP Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AIIP Blog (formerly AIIP Connections until March 2019)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://blog.aiip.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Association of Independent Information Professionals created the AIIP blog in order “to showcase our members’ expertise, to highlight AIIP’s generous culture of knowledge-sharing, and to inspire the info-entrepreneurs of tomorrow.”1 The blog serves as a resource for independent business owners who provide information-related services.2

Target audience: Independent (not-employed) information professionals, individuals considering becoming independent information professionals, businesses or individuals seeking the services of independent information professionals, and business or individuals who work in any field of the information profession.3

Publisher: Association of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Blog posts on professional development and business management tend to be the most sought-after pieces. Other common content topics include AIIP news, getting started in the profession, case studies and success stories, tips and strategies on growing IIP businesses, tech trends, and professional development tips.8

Frequency of publication: Continuously.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://blog.aiip.org/contribute/

Types of contributions accepted: Original posts of 500-750 words in length on any specific topic within the subjects of research, information management and technology, marketing and communications, training and consulting, and writing and editing.10

Submission and review process: Content should be submitted in Google Docs or Microsoft Word format via email. The blog editors may make minor revisions without notification before posting.11

Editorial tone: Concise writing free of complex vocabulary is preferred. The use of bullet-points to make content more “scannable” to online readers is encouraged. The submissions guidelines page offers some helpful notes and resources on making online writing appealing and easy to read.12

Style guide used: No particular style is indicated. Read the submissions guidelines thoroughly for notes on preferred style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The AIIP Blog provides an excellent forum for the LIS author who has interest in exploring a career as an independent information professional (or who is already engaged in the practice). This publication could also serve LIS authors who have specialized knowledge in research techniques which would cater to the needs of the independent information professional. While LIS authors may have specialized research knowledge on research techniques, potential works should be written with a focus on how such research techniques may impact on independent information professionals from a practical perspective.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available. However, the blog links to many social media platforms that may increase readership of any particular post.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The subject matter and readership of the blog is international in scope. Simple, clear, and concise English should be used to make material accessible to the wide audience.14

Reader characteristics: Readers consist primarily of independent information professionals engaged as specialized business owners. Readers share a collaborative approach in €œsharing ideas, experiences, and observations as independent information professionals.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter; however,  authors should refrain from using overly technical and elaborate language, and err on the side of simple explanation.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should be aware that the readers are primarily professionals who are engaged as entrepreneurs in the information field. Readers will expect articles specifically tailored to this field. While articles should be professionally written, readers will expect an approach which has practical applications or implications. LIS authors with specific knowledge in emerging techniques in the acquisition/management/distribution of information could use this publication as a forum if specifically tailored to the independent information professional.

Last updated: July 5, 2019


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org/about/.
  2. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Who We Are,” AIIP, accessed July 5, 2019, https://www.aiip.org/Discover/WhoWeAre/
  3. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  4. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  5. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org/contribute/
  6. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  7. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  8. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  9. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “AIIP Blog,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org
  10. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  11. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  12. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  13. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  14. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  15. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  16. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
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Marketing Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Library Services

ISSN: 0896-39081

Website: www.MarketingLibraryServices.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Marketing Library Services (MLS) emerged in 1987 and is the longest-running publication that regularly delivers how-to articles and case studies for marketers in all types of libraries. They’re written by practitioners from around the world and curated by a respected expert who has 25+ years in the field. These detailed, vetted articles deliver more value than the brief ideas and advice offered via social media.2

Target audience: Information professionals in any type of library who need to learn to do better marketing, promotion, and advocacy.3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: MLS covers strategies and tactics for all marketing-related topics: advocacy, outreach, branding, segmentation, social media, funding initiatives, long-term campaigns, assessment, ROI, partnerships, promotional materials, program publicity, communications, PR, advertising, etc. Subscribers will also benefit from interviews with marketing masters, conference coverage, book reviews, and news.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December).9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: The editor of Marketing Library Services, Kathy Dempsey, does not accept blind submissions; instead, it is preferable to email her first (see Editor below) with an article idea, so that she can see if it fits in with upcoming issues, or whether or not something similar has already been published. In a personal correspondence she asserts that if the topic is something useful to Marketing Library Services readership, she will send the author a desired length and deadline. Writers will be sent guidelines, and all graphics (photos, charts, etc.) must be in color and high resolution.10

The site itself says very little about submissions. Editorial communications should be directed to the editor, Kathy Dempsey, at kdempsey@infotoday.com.11

Types of contributions accepted: From a correspondence with the editor: “Marketing Library Services covers a wide range of marketing-related topics, including these: advocacy, outreach, programming, fundraising, event planning, dealing with the media, getting votes for library issues, proving your value, making good promotional materials, community promotion, online promotion, winning related awards, studying demographics for target marketing, innovations, surveys and focus groups, strategic communication, etc. And, of course, true marketing (plans for full campaigns).” Also, “in addition to the case studies, Marketing Library Services carries news, reviews of books and videos, conference coverage, and links to library articles and culture.” 12

Submission and review process: Authors first should send correspondence to Kathy Dempsey stating their idea. Because Marketing Library Services is published often, timely articles are strongly recommended. Also, authors must have been directly involved in the projects they are writing about, and must write in the first person. Ms. Dempsey states that authors’ specific titles do not matter.13

Editorial tone: Marketing Library Services should not be written in third-person or academic tones. The newsletter’s tone is conversational, professional, and should inspire readers. According to the editor, “Articles should be written as if you’€™re sitting down with a colleague and explaining your project over lunch.”14

The editor will correspond with the author about this after the author’s idea has been accepted.15

Style guide used: Associated Press.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Marketing Library Services is a very good resource for LIS authors interested in writing on community outreach and marketing of library services. Many topics can fall under this umbrella, so it is important for potential authors to be creative and open in how they frame their content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Marketing Library Services has 700 subscribers. Most of these are in North America, but some are in Europe and in other English-speaking countries.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the content of the newsletter is in English and about a broad topic (marketing), the geographic location of the newsletter’s readership is assumed to reside across the United States. There are some readers from outside the United States, but because marketing can be culturally specific, those readers are likely already doing the work of cultural translation. English is used entirely throughout Marketing Library Services and, for the most part, readers are American or from Europe.18 Because of this spread, colloquialisms should be avoided (as in most professional writing).

Reader characteristics: According to Kathy Dempsey, the editor, most of the readership is comprised of librarians who market for their organization, while others are managers and directors. She also states that some are professors specializing in marketing. Because Marketing Library Services readership is comprised of professionals directly involved in marketing, it may be safely assumed that jargon specific to marketing is fine. As well, because this is a trade journal, readers will be interested in practical information. Kathy Dempsey states from a personal correspondence that, “MLS is written for a wide horizontal market that covers all types of libraries: public, academic, special (medical, gov’€™t, etc.), corporate, and to a lesser extent, K-12 school. It welcomes article queries from all of these librarians. What they all have in common is the need to promote their services. Many case studies about how one lib accomplished a goal can be used as models to doing similar things in other types of libraries. Articles on projects that have this ability to be widely replicated are especially valuable.”19

Readers of Marketing Library Services work in many types of libraries, so it may be safely assumed that they all value libraries’ continuing prosperity. That said, this does not mean that their values are identical. However, the newsletter’s tone is conversational, not argumentative. Articles written arguing strongly for one thing or another probably will not fit in Marketing Library Services.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Marketing Library Services is a newsletter informing LIS professionals the best practices and valuable ideas regarding LIS marketing. Professionals reading this newsletter are looking for good ideas and solidly practical plans and instances of good marketing. Marketing Library Services is not a dry tome of theoretical research written in an hermetic tone. Nonetheless, most of the readers are deeply engaged with marketing their organization, and are working professionals whose time and attention is valuable. Writers should consider their readers as interested colleagues who are deeply interested in successful programs and campaigns, and how they may learn from writers’ experiences and implement similar strategies in their own organizations.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Proquest, “MLS: Marketing Library Services,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521418800307/153039
  2. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Marketing Library Services,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/
  3. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  8. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  9. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  10. Dempsey, K., 27 June 2019, personal communication.
  11. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Subscription & Editorial Info,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mls-subs.shtml
  12. Dempsey, personal communication.
  13. Dempsey, personal communication.
  14. Dempsey, personal communication.
  15. Dempsey, personal communication.
  16. Dempsey, personal communication.
  17. Dempsey, personal communication.
  18. Dempsey, personal communication.
  19. Dempsey, personal communication.
  20. Dempsey, personal communication.

    Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this newsletter have a high degree of LIS subject matter. Marketing Library Services caters to the LIS profession, so references to library specific trends, ideas, and concepts will be well received and will not require a high degree of explanation. However, because the readership is broadly based across the LIS professional spectrum some terms and knowledge specific to one group may not be appropriate for all readers.[21. Dempsey, personal communication.

Continue Reading

Information Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Outlook

ISSN: 1091-0808 (Print) and 1938-3819 (Online)1

Website: https://www.sla.org/access-membership-3/io/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information Outlook is the official publication of the Special Libraries Association (SLA). The SLA “promotes and strengthens its members through learning, networking, and community building initiatives.”2

Target audience: Information Outlook is targeted towards their membership of information professionals, specifically those working in special libraries.

Publisher: Special Libraries Association (SLA).3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, the publication contains “articles on timely topics such as data curation, digital asset management, bibliometrics, and value co-creation; columns about technology, copyright law, and other issues of perpetual interest; and interviews with SLA members, offering a close-up look at information professionals in different disciplines, work environments, and countries.”7

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/

Types of contributions accepted: From the “Write for IO,” “Although written primarily by SLA members, articles in Information Outlook also are contributed by futurists, attorneys, academicians, technology professionals, human resources specialists, communications experts–anyone with knowledge or ideas about how information professionals can better serve their clients.”9

Submission and review process: Interested authors should send a query email to the current editor with an outline of your topic along with your qualifications. The editor will forward your query to the advisory council for review. The guidelines encourage illustrated article of approximately 2,000 words in length.10

Editorial tone: Written in an active voice following the SLA style guide provided in the submission guidelines.11

Style guide used: Current edition of Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information Outlook is an excellent forum for LIS authors writing on topics of interest to special libraries. Since there is such a wide variety of special library types, there are a number of topics that can be addressed. Despite differences among particular types of special libraries, many experiences and situations can be generalized and made applicable to all of Information Outlook readers.13

Although this is not a scholarly journal, Information Outlook is a highly respected journal, and LIS authors would benefit from having their work published by the SLA.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 4,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Special Libraries Association has 49 regional chapters. The majority are located in the United States, but there are also chapters in Canada, Africa, the Arabian Gulf, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. In addition to the regional chapters, SLA boasts members in 75 countries.15 Information Outlook is published in English, but circulates to members in other countries as well (as listed above). Issues pertaining to special librarians will be of general interest to all readers, but there may be some regional/cultural specifics that might not be applicable to readers in different countries.16

Reader characteristics: The readers of Information Outlook are individuals who typically hold a library degree. Many have master’s degrees in subject specialties as well. There is gender diversity in the audience, and they range in age, typically from late 20s upwards. They may be brand new to the profession or they may be upper management with many years of experience. All readers of Information Outlook are special librarians, and therefore they have a common mission and values, and much in common within the profession. However, they work in settings that are incredibly varied, both in size and type. Readers might work alone or in large organizations, and might specialize in institutions such as government, medical, legal, and academic libraries.17 The readers of Information Outlook care specifically about issues pertaining to special libraries. According to the publication’s website, its readers are interested in articles about “administration, organization, marketing, and operations.” They value information that will help their organizations stay successful and stay informed of the latest developments and technologies.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Information Outlook are extremely knowledgeable about issues relating to library and information science. They will be at different stages of their careers, of course, with some readers having more experience and expertise than others, but writers can assume a basic level of knowledge and can expect readers to understand LIS jargon.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Outlook‘s readers are hungry for the latest information about issues that impact special libraries. They want to read articles that have practical application in their day-to-day lives and careers. As stated on SLA’s website, “readers want to read articles about new techniques, new ideas, new trends…They’re interested in growing their organizations and in planning their careers…They want to know how to confront problems and how to avoid them.” The profession is comprised of individuals who “strategically use information…to advance the mission of the organization…through the development, deployment, and management of information resources and services.”20

Potential authors can reach this audience effectively by providing case studies and real-world examples, and by focusing on what is new and innovative in the field. Most special librarians are technologically savvy and interested in cutting-edge applications that will help them accomplish their professional goals and serve their patrons. They will also likely have limited time to devote to professional reading, and will only devote that time to articles and reviews that are relevant and timely. Therefore, authors will be best served by submitting writing that is direct and to the point.

Last updated: June 9, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Information Outlook,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 9, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  2. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  3. ProQuest. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Special Libraries Association, “Information Outlook,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/
  8. Special Libraries Association, “2019 Editorial and Advertising Calendar,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/editorial-calendar/
  9. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  10. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook.”
  11. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook.”
  12. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook.”
  13. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  14. Special Libraries Association, “Association Finances,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/association-finances/
  15. Special Libraries Association, “Chapters,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/get-involved/chapters/
  16. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  17. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA.”
  18. Special Libraries Association, “Editorial and Advertising Calendar.”
  19. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA.”
  20. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA.”
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AALL Spectrum

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AALL Spectrum

ISSN: 1089-86891

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Spectrum is the professional magazine for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and is included in association membership. This publication “provides informative and engaging articles of interest to AALL members. The magazine informs readers about the ever-changing, multifaceted world of legal information professionals on areas including the transformation of law, career and leadership development, accessibility, education, information technology, and best practices. The magazine also keeps members apprised of Association events and activities.”2

Target audience: Members of AALL are the target audience: members are law librarians in a variety of settings, including academic law school libraries, private firms libraries, judicial and government libraries, and public law libraries for counties and states, as well as other legal information professionals.3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. This is an informal publication of AALL, primarily for association news and short practical pieces that would be of interest to practicing law librarians.6 Though it is not a scholarly journal, it is very well respected and has a high profile in its field.

Medium: Spectrum is a print publication sent free to all AALL members.7 The archives are available online back to mid-1998 at the Spectrum website.8

Content: Spectrum includes articles on subjects of interest to law librarians, especially practical pieces on marketing the library and management tips. The scholarly journal for AALL is titled Law Library Journal;  Spectrum publishes informational pieces more informally written but still of practical use to law librarians.9

Frequency of publication: Spectrum is published six times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/editorial-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Spectrum includes a mix of trend or feature stories, news briefs, regular columns, and opinion pieces about issues that affect legal information and law librarianship as well as Association events and activities.11

Submission and review process: The publishing guidelines indicate that “Spectrum prefers a thorough, detailed proposal letter that fully outlines the article topic.”12

Regarding article length, they note that “Feature articles should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words. News and department articles are typically between 800 and 1,200 words. Shorter or longer articles will be considered. “13

After submitting a query letter, the author should submit the requested article electronically, with any graphics in a separate file. “All submissions will be edited for clarity, grammar, and length.” “Whenever possible, the author will be contacted by either the AALL Spectrum editorial director or AALL publications manager to discuss questions of intention and interpretation.”14

Editorial tone: Reviewing the articles themselves, it appears that Spectrum attempts to include articles that will be of interest to firm, academic, and government librarians rather than focusing on just one type of library. The submission guidelines request “authoritative, well-researched articles about legal information and the profession.  Articles that inform, inspire, provoke, influence, or help improve practices are welcome additions to AALL Spectrum. Each submission should be an original, educational piece.”15

Style guide used: Spectrum follows The Chicago Manual of Style Seventeenth Edition and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition for style and usage, as well as an AALL Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AALL Spectrum is the best place to engage in the informal professional conversation surrounding law librarianship. Though it is not as high profile or scholarly as Law Library Journal, it may be more widely read, and will help any law librarian make a name for him or herself. The quality of writing is very high, as are the editorial standards. However, it is not appropriate for professors seeking tenure to boost publications, as it is not a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Spectrum is sent free to all AALL members. The archives for this publication are available online at the AALL website,17 and Ulrich’s Periodical Directory indicates that they are also searchable on various LIS databases (including EBSCOhost, H.W. Wilson products, and Thomson Gale databases).18 It is possible the articles will reach non-law librarian readers through these sources.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The main circulation of this magazine is within the United States, but AALL does have some international members. Unfortunately, international demographics were not available on the Spectrum site, advertising materials, AALL Salary Survey, or AALL member information.19 Spectrum is written in American English, and is primarily interested in legal librarianship relevant to the United States.20 If international subjects are covered, the legal systems will require more explanation. An example of international coverage is “Beyond the Spectrum,” by Shaikh Mohamed Noordin, available for download.21

Reader characteristics: AALL reports over 4,000 members, roughly half of whom work in an academic or law school setting. The most populated Special Interest Sections of AALL members are Academic Law Libraries and Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals.22  All librarians in AALL are either law librarians or are interested in the organization of legal information.  This publication is run by, written by, and edited by law librarians, and as such tends to reflect the dominant views of the profession. It’s analytical; fairly negative towards vendors, but strives to be fair; focuses primarily on academic and firm librarian concerns (such as training law students or new attorneys) and to a lesser extent of government librarianship.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed. However, specialized information from non-law library disciplines or terms specific to certain jobs (such as cataloging or database administration) require explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in publishing in Spectrum are advised to list their qualifications in their cover letters, as this audience respects degrees and library experience. Though the publication is focused entirely on law librarianship, general subjects of interest to LIS professionals will overlap in this field — for instance, information on Web 2.0 is of great interest to law librarians, and recent articles have dealt with how Second Life can be used in libraries. It is best, even with general topics, to make it evident how the subject could be useful to a law librarian.24

Last updated: March 24, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521387398626/111034
  2. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy,” accessed March 24, 2019, http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/spectrum/policy-spectrum.html
  3. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  6. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  7. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum.”
  8. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/spectrum_issue/
  9. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  10. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  11. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  12. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  13. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  14. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  15. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  16. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  17. American Association of Law Libraries,  “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive.”
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Association of Law Libraries, “Meet Our Members,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/meet-our-members/
  20. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  21. Noordin, Shaikh Mohamed, “Perspective: Beyond the Spectrum,” Spectrum 10, no. 6: 12-13, 17, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/_mediavault/2017/11/pub_sp0604_Persp.pdf
  22. American Association of Law Libraries, “By the Numbers,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/
  23. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  24. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
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