Wiki Tags Archives: Non-English language publications

ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman

Websitehttp://www.alaeditions.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Publishing resources for librarians and LIS professionals worldwide “to improve programs and services, build on best practices, enhance pedagogy, share research, develop leadership, and promote advocacy..”1 ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman is interested in publishing coverage of any library type, including cross-disciplinary topics, and is dedicated to diversity and inclusion. They cater to wide and varied audiences.2

Target audience: “Library and information professionals, faculty and students, researchers and scholars, archivists and other cultural heritage professionals, and library advocates.”3

Owner: American Library Association (ALA)4

Are published books peer reviewed? Proposals and manuscripts undergo an internal review, and, depending on the title, are reviewed by peer advisory boards.

Types of books published: Print and digital.5 Notably, among many types of publications, they publish highly regarded textbooks used in LIS programs.

Medium: Print, digital, and interactive formats.6

Topics covered: Coverage of publications “spans” the types of libraries namely academic, public, school, and special libraries. They are interested in cross disciplinary topics such as copyright, censorship, ethics, law, and sustainability.  Overlapping disciplines are desired as well including information studies, archives, and records and information management. 7

ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman encourages authors to consider how diversity and inclusion impact their topic. “We are dedicated to acquiring and creating content that reflects the unique experiences and backgrounds of librarianship. We want readers, library staff, and patrons to feel empowered by the written word and reflected in the books and content that we publish..”8

Number of titles published per year: In 2019, ALA Editions published 65 new titles and distributed more than 200 titles for its publishing partners, which include Facet Publishing and the Society of American Archivists

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://alaeditions.org/write-with-us/

Also click here to download PDF of proposal guidelines: Download Proposal Guidelines (.docx)

Types of submissions accepted: ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman is interested in proposals that:9

  • Have clear subject, scope, content, and approach.
  • Are distinct and compelling
  • Fit an intended market and audience
  • Stand out from the competition

Types of submissions the publisher is not interested in: This publisher is not interested in proposals that:

  • Have unclear value to intended audience(s)
  • Offer outdated perspectives
  • Do not value diversity and inclusion

Submission and review process: Start by submitting your proposal here. Email your query or proposal to the appropriate member of the editorial team: click here and scroll to bottom of page for editors’ contact info. The three editors specialize in these areas respectively: LIS education, archives, and special libraries; Academic libraries and Library Technology Reports; Public and school librariesThey will consider completed manuscripts but inquire before submitting them.

Allow 6-8 weeks for evaluation.10

For more information, such as details on what happens after your manuscript is submitted during the productions process, please see the Author Guide.11

Editorial tone: Employ appropriate tone that is suitable for your intended audience such as library and information professionals, scholars, students, and educators. 12

Style guide used: Utilize The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), 17th edition, primarily. Also use Merriam-Webster (MW), 11th edition, as your primary dictionary; and Garner’s Modern American Usage for questions not answered in CMS.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

The ALA is a widely recognized and respected LIS resource, consulted by librarians and information professionals worldwide. ALA authors are leaders in their field, and so having a manuscript accepted for ALA Publication would provide authors with a large market for potential readership, amongst LIS professionals and peers. ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman work closely with authors to market their work, both before and after publication. This includes promotion, distribution, exhibits, and many other marketing avenues. ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman has their own catalog, and the ALA has an online store.1415 From the Writer Guidelines: “Your work is in the hands of seasoned professionals. We develop, manufacture, and market your project in a way that draws good reviews and customer interest.”16

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: This is a very large, encompassing publishing house. ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman sends their catalog to over sixty thousand recipients twice per year. Books are listed in the online ALA store, which has over fifty thousand visitors per month.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in Chicago, IL, ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman publishes and reaches librarians and LIS professionals around the world.18 ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman “publications are promoted, translated, and distributed worldwide.”19

Reader characteristics: This is the more professional ALA publishing imprint, focusing on LIS professional development and improving library services. Readers are interested in library and information science, with backgrounds varying from librarian, educator,  LIS administrators and professionals. ALA is the premier Library and Information Science group around, and it would be well worth any author’s time to try to work with them. Their bias is simply pro anything LIS, rather than other publishing houses who have an LIS focus. With ALA, LIS is everything.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as this is the imprint of the American Library Association.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

You’re guaranteed a knowledgeable audience eager for new LIS material when you publish with ALA. Not only are ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman books marketed on the ALA website (including ALA Store), but they’re promoted at ALA conferences and events, emailed to a huge mailing list, and heavily marketed through a partnership with Amazon. Readers of ALA Editions | ALA Neal-Schuman books are seeking LIS material specifically, and will most likely be up to date on your subject matter or, if not, curious to learn from like-minded professionals in the field. This is the first stop publisher and organization for anyone seeking LIS reading material, and is an excellent group to be a part of.

Last updated: September 18, 2020


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “Home,” alaeditions.org, accessed September 10, 2020, alaeditions.org
  2. “Write with Us,” alaeditions.org, accessed September 10, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/write-with-us/
  3. “Write with Us.”
  4. “ALA Publishing,” ala.org, accessed September 9, 2020, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/offices/publishing
  5. “Home.”
  6. “Write with Us.”
  7. “Write with Us.”
  8. “Write with Us.”
  9. “Write with Us.”
  10. “Proposal Guidelines,” ALAEditions.org/Proposal-Guidelines, accessed September 15, 2020, http://www.alaeditions.org/proposal-guidelines
  11. “Author Guide.” alaeditions.org, accessed September 15, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/wp-content/uploads/ALA-Author-Guide_2020.pdf
  12. “Home.”
  13. “Author Guide.”
  14. “Marketing.” alaeditions.org, accessed September 15, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/marketing/
  15. “Catalogs.” alaeditions.org, accessed September 15, 2020, https://alaeditions.org/catalogs/
  16. “Write with Us.”
  17. “Marketing.”
  18. “Marketing.”
  19. “Write with Us.”
  20. “Write with Us.”
  21. “Home.”
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LIBREAS: Library Ideas

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBREAS: Library Ideas

ISSN: 1860-79501

Website: http://libreas.eu/

Note: the site is written mostly in German; if not fluent, use a translator to view content. Google Chrome is the easiest browser to use to translate content.

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBREAS: Library Ideas, is an open access online journal that deals with contemporary issues in LIS.2

The site began as a student project intended in part to bolster the presence of the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany. The staff eventually graduated and entered a professional career and desired “an interface between the young savages and the old hands,” a public place to exchange ideas and information between old and young, academic, and professional. It is a journal that the writers want to read themselves.3

Target audience: LIS new professionals, and the public audience, with particular attention to Germany and Europe.4

Publisher: Published at the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, by LIBREAS-Verein.5

Peer reviewed? No formal peer-review process; content is reviewed by the publication’s editors.6

Type: An LIS professional publication, although some articles are scholarly.7

Medium: Online. You may also follow LIBREAS on TwitterFacebook, and Tumblr.8

Content: Editorials; articles and essays under topics like Theory, Practice, and Projects, about LIS-related news & events, and LIS-content book reviews. Some issues also include podcasts and photo galleries.9

Frequency of publication: Irregularly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libreas.wordpress.com/category/libreas-call-for-papers/ and https://libreas.eu/authorguides/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles and essays related to any aspect of LIS.11

Submission and review process: Send a short sketch of your idea or abstract via email to the editors: redaktion@libreas.eu.12

Editorial tone: Information presented with a fresh, often wry perspective. LIBREAS is open, fresh, and also controversial, in order to leave room for development, to recognize niches in order to unfold trends out of them.13

Style guide used: None specified: but citations should be uniform and formatting should be minimal, as anything beyond structural formatting is lost in the conversion to an online format. Essays should be written in MS Word, LibreOffice or OpenOffice Writer, with a German and English abstract.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a wonderful site that aims to bridge generations and LIS academics and professionals with a touch of humor and humility. The articles are interesting and well-written and apply to LIS practitioners across the globe, not just from Germany. From a 2012 issue’s editorial, LIBREAS editors see themselves as part of a culture of communication in the library and information science and library practice.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. The journal is an open access, online publication.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LIBREAS is published at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany so many contributors and editors are from Germany. Written in German (easily translatable using a Google Chrome browser or add-on on other browsers) and partly in English, the journal references U.S. and world culture frequently, so writers from other countries should not feel intimidated.17

Reader characteristics: Editors and writers consist of scientists and library scholars, LIS professionals and students, academic and otherwise. Anyone with an interest in the information profession.18

LIBREAS aims to continue a discourse and keep LIS relevant in academic and professional circles, but also in the community at large. (Community being initially specific to Berlin, but encompassing the entire online world reading this journal.)19 They also encourage open access journals in the LIS field as a way of promoting more discourse. From LIBREAS 21: It “is important to us that a large number of colleagues bring to the library and information science debate that they also demand accountability and transparency in decisions on libraries and library infrastructure that, if necessary, call for more level of debate. And not just in the LIBREAS, but also in all other publications and forms.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but authors should not assume that readers will have a working knowledge of complicated LIS terminology. As it is an open access journal, the information is easily available to anyone.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIBREAS was created from an idea of forging old and new LIS ideas to create a dialogue amongst LIS professionals and academics. It is passionate, but not overwhelmingly so; and articles are interesting, usually with a philosophical or larger world-view slant that will appeal to LIS and non-LIS readers alike.

 


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  LIBREAS: Library Ideas, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, accessed May 9, 2020, http://libreas.eu/
  2. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  3. B. Kaden, M. Kindling, and M. Schulz, personal communication, 12 April 2013
  4. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2020). Libreas: Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  6. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2020). Libreas. Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  8. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  9. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2020). Libreas. Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  11. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  12. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  13. B. Kaden, M. Kindling, and M. Schulz, personal communication, 12 April 2013
  14. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  15. editorial LIBREAS. (2020). Failure in the writing workshop: From the editors of LIBREAS. Library Ideas. LIBREAS: Library Ideas, 20. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/ausgabe20/texte/04redaktion01.htm
  16. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  17. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  18. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  19. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  20. Vierkant, P. (2012). Visualizing open access. LIBREAS. Library Ideas, 21. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/ausgabe21/texte/05vierkant.htm
  21. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2020). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
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Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCanadian Journal of Information and Library Science / La Revue canadienne des sciences de l’information et de bibliothéconomie

ISSN: 1195-096X (Print) and 1920-7239 (Online)1

Websitehttp://cais-acsi.ca/the-canadian-journal-of-information-and-library-science/

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the vehicle of the Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), the journal seeks to advance the study of information and library science in Canada “by serving as a forum for discussion of theory and research. The journal is concerned with research findings, understanding of issues in the field, information practices of individuals and groups, and understanding of the history, economics, and technology of information or library systems and services.”2

Target audience: Canadian LIS community3

Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Journals Division4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print. It’s available online via Project MUSE7

Content: “The journal publishes research papers, scholarly opinion papers, reviews of research, brief communications, and reviews of books and other media” in both English and French.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts submissions of “research papers, scholarly opinion papers, reviews of research, brief communications, and reviews of books and other media” in both English and French. Reviews of publications by Canadian authors are of particular interest.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted to the online system. A tentative title and an abstract of 50-100 words, preferably in both English and French, should be included. Submissions will be reviewed by at least two independent referees. Additional details about manuscript formatting are available on the journal website.11

Editorial tone: Academic/ Scholarly12

Style guide used: The journal uses an in-house style that is outlined on its website.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science provides an excellent opportunity for LIS authors looking to publish scholarly, career advancing work and establish a presence outside the United States.

This publication is abstracted and indexed in Academic Search Elite/Premier, Canadian Periodical Index, Computer and Control Abstracts, Cultures, Langues, Textes: La revue de sommaires, Current Contents: Social and Behavioural Sciences, ERIC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (IBR), International Bibliography of Periodical Literature on the Humanities and Social Science (IBZ), SCOPUS, Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA), Library Literature, Professional Development Collection, and Social Science Citation Index.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Exact circulation numbers are not available, but the journal is a benefit of membership in Canadian Association for Information Science / L’association canadienne des sciences de l’information (CAIS-ACIS). Membership is automatic for all attendees of the annual conference of the association.15 The journal is also available online through Project MUSE.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal, while covering LIS topics in general, is written and aimed at LIS academics, both English and French speaking, practicing in Canada.17

Reader characteristics: The audience for this journal is a mix of academics and industry and government professionals such as information scientists and archivists, librarians, computer scientists, and educators. Readership also includes those in “media studies and journalism, business, psychology, health sciences, education, law, and many other areas.”18 This indicates a variety of workplaces from universities, large corporations and government organizations.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering their shared interest in the mission of the CAIS-ACIS, it suggests the readers, while not all information science professionals, have considerable knowledge of LIS subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication are interested in furthering their ability to practice in the field, to acquire information on new research that will support their work in support of libraries. The readers are also most likely residents of Canada and, while most of the papers published would easily benefit a librarian or information professional residing anywhere in the world, submissions need to be relevant to librarians practicing in Canada.

Last updated: April 28, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1588090872879/72671
  2. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  3. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  4. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  5. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  6. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  7. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/the-canadian-journal-of-information-and-library-science/
  8. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  9.  Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  10. “Call for Papers,” accessed April 28. 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  11. “Guidelines for Submission,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/
  12. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 28, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406608675219/72671
  13. “Guidelines for Submission,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/guidelines-for-submission/
  14. “Abstracting and Indexing,” University of Toronto Press, accessed April 28, 2020, http://www.utpjournals.com/Canadian-Journal-of-Information-and-Library-Science.html
  15. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  16. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science, Project MUSE, accessed April 28, 2020, http://muse.jhu.edu/journal/497
  17. “Call for Papers,” Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), accessed November 15, 2016, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
  18. “Membership,” accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/membership/
  19. “Call for Papers,” Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS), accessed April 28, 2020, http://cais-acsi.ca/call-for-papers/
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Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

ISSN: 2369-937X

Website: https://cjal.ca/index.php/capal

Purpose, objective, or mission: Published by the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL), the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship seeks to publish articles that are relevant to the profession of academic librarianship and the discipline of library and information science.1

Target audience: Academic librarians, both within and outside of Canada.

Publisher: The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL).2

Peer reviewed? Yes.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles can be traditional research studies, or more theoretical work that may not be suitable for other empirical LIS journals. “Submissions must present substantive analysis of a topic. Why is the article’s topic or finding significant—what is the ‘so what?’ for librarianship?”4

Check the journal’s calls for papers and reviews for the latest information on special issues.

Frequency of publication: “Articles and book reviews are published on a continuous basis and combined into one volume at the end of each calendar year.”5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal welcomes submissions for book reviews and articles and review essays. Book reviews should be about 1,000 words in length, whereas articles should be 3,000 to 6,000 words, and no more than 10,000.6

Submission and review process: First, create a username and password for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. You can register here.

Once you are ready to submit, be sure to read through the Author Guidelines to make sure you have formatted your work properly and included all necessary information.

“Submissions are reviewed first by an editor to confirm that the submission is appropriate for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. This step typically occurs within two weeks of submission. This editorial review considers questions such as:

  • Is the submission within the Aims and Scope?
  • Is the submission readable and within the desired word count?
  • Has the submission been published elsewhere?
  • Has the submission document been anonymized?”

“When the editor has determined that the submission is appropriate to be considered for publication, he/she contacts potential reviewers. Editors do not also serve as reviewers. Each submission is normally reviewed by two reviewers. Reviewers are asked to submit their reviews within four weeks.”

Finally, the editor will consider any recommendations and comments made by the reviewers, and will confer with the author.7

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: The most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Keep in mind that publication submissions are not limited to Canadian librarians, but articles relevant to the country’s LIS field are encouraged and welcomed. Recently published articles are on topics such as using social epistemology to understand information behaviors and Indigenous research and librarianship in Canada.

The CJAL could also be a good outlet for reviews on LIS books written in the last three years. Look at the Book Review Guidelines for more information.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is open access, so anyone can read current and archived issues.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: While the website and parts of the journal are displayed in both English and French, typically the journal articles are published in English only.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians who are members of the Canadian Association of Academic Librarians. Therefore, readers are likely well versed in current LIS topics, especially how they relate to the field of academic librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors who are interested in publishing in this journal should look into CAPAL to learn more about the journal’s readership. The association’s About page states that they differ from other library associations in that CAPAL “is an advocacy group focused on the individual and the profession.”9

Readers are librarians who are well versed in LIS topics, particularly as they relate to academic librarianship. If you have a book review or well researched LIS article that is relevant for academic librarians (particularly in Canada), then this may be a good venue for your writing.

Last updated: April 28, 2020


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” accessed April 28, 2020, https://cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “About the Journal.”
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. “Submissions,” accessed April 28, 2020, https://cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/submissions
  7. “About the Journal.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “About,” CAPALibrarians.org, accessed April 28, 2020, https://capalibrarians.org/about/history/
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Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

ISSN:1911-9593

Website: http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Partnership is the journal of The Partnership organization, which is “Canada’s national network of provincial and territorial library associations.” The journal “promotes the exchange of ideas about libraries, librarianship, and information science among practitioners across all library sectors.”1

Target audience: Canadian librarians and library workers and LIS professionals, archivists, scholars, researchers, and students. Although the journal is published by The Partnership, a network of Canadian library associations with more than 7,000 people, it is an open-access journal, so its audience is not limited to members.2

Publisher: The Partnership: The Provincial and Territorial Library Associations of Canada (Ontario, Canada).3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts submitted to the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.5

Content: Regular sections in Partnership include Editor’s Comments, Innovations in Practice, Theory and Research, Features, Book Reviews, and News and Announcements.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Partnership accepts “original, unpublished manuscripts in French or English on a broad range of topics relevant to library and information science practitioners in all library sectors.” The editors “encourage submissions which consider the Canadian context, but this is not a necessary condition for acceptance to the journal.”8 Each section has its own editorial guidelines in terms of topic, word count, tone, and approach.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the journal’s website.10 Manuscripts for the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo a double-blind peer-review process, usually within two months of submission.11

Editorial tone: The tone depends on the section; it is overall scholarly but not overly formal.

Style guide used: APA (6th edition), with a modified style for online articles and documents.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This open-access journal appears to be an excellent opportunity for Canadian LIS authors, as it is written for the Canadian LIS community. LIS authors outside of Canada are not excluded by the guidelines, but they should ensure their work meets the needs of the Canadian readers.13 The many sections–theory, pedagogy, practice, professional development, reviews, and library news–cover a huge variety of content and offer writers many opportunities for submitting work that ranges from scholarly to practical to reflective.14  There are a few must-read articles and editorials for authors submitting to Partnership, especially “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership15 and editorials reflecting on the journal’s past and future.16 Furthermore, the journal “provides a chance for librarians and library workers to be editors and reviewers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to a past announcement, in 2017 the journal received over 45,000 views. They have 1500 readers registered with their website.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  This is a Canadian bilingual publication (English and French) for librarians and information professionals of Canada. Authors would need to ensure their work meets their needs and explains any cultural or language differences.

Reader characteristics: Overall, Partnership has a very broad spectrum of readers in the Canadian library and information professions: librarians, library works, scholars, researchers, practitioners, and students. It can be safely assumed the readers are interested in promoting successful libraries and acquiring knowledge to allow them to succeed in their own work. The authors and content of the publication suggests that the majority of readers are working in all types of libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The journal works to connect members of the Canadian library community,19 and the journal’s sections are variously academic, reflective, and newsy. Readers probably have a range of LIS knowledge, from the practical to the academic.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should first take into consider how their work is broadly or specifically related to libraries and library scholarship in Canada. Furthermore, readers come to this journal to read on a a wide range of current topics in the library profession: research, pedagogy, professional development, and current news and profiles. Readers work at every level of the Canadian library profession and in all types of libraries.

Last updated: April 8, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “What is The Partnership?” ThePartnership.ca, accessed February 19, 2018, http://www.thepartnership.ca/web/PARTNERSHIP/About/PARTNERSHIP/About.aspx?hkey=57981e1d-6cc7-4b09-822e-ebdfd7f2e3b2.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Submissions,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/submissions.
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Information for Authors,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/information/authors#.WouLFRPwZUM.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “Editorial Policies.”
  15. See David Fox, “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership,Partnership 8, no. 1 (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v8i1.2692.
  16. See Robin Bergart, Leanne Olson, and Nathalie Soini, “Editorial: Charting the Course of Partnership,Partnership 12, no. 1 (2017): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v12i1.3976, and Jennifer Richard, “Celebrating 10 Years of Canadian Librarianship through the Partnership Journal,” Partnership 11, no. 1 (2016): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i1.3682.
  17. “Journal History,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/history#.WouedhPwZUM.
  18. “Top Viewed Articles,” Partnership, December 06, 2017, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/announcement/view/128.
  19. “Journal History.”
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Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

ISSN: 2038-1026

Website: https://www.jlis.it/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information (JLIS.it) is an international academic journal that publishes research and theory in library, archives, and information science.1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, academics, and students from around the world who are interested in research and theory in both LIS and archival science.

Publisher: JLIS.it is published by the Università di Firenze Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo and is hosted by the University of Macerata, CSIA.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: JLIS.it publishes research articles, contributions, and reports on various topics of interest to the library, archives, and information science international communities. Regular sections are Essays, Contributions, and Reports & Reviews.4 The journal also publishes conference proceedings, such as EURIG2017,5 and special issues, such as a 2017 issue on classification.6

Frequency of publication: JLIS.it publishes three issues a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JLIS.it publishes innovative research relevant to the library, archives, and information science fields; brief contributions on a variety of related topics; and conference reports and reviews. The 2015 Manifesto states that the journal aims to “emphasize the integration between LIS and Archival science on the level of projects and profession” nationally and internationally and to consider the theoretical and methodological traditions of each discipline.8 The 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal encourages stepping away from the strictly academic and “mixing knowledge, methods, and different scientific and technical languages.” The journal also encourages writing that theorizes beyond the institutional and traditional.9

Submission and review process: JLIS.it uses OJS, an automated web-based system, for manuscript submission, tracking, and review.10 Authors should check that their manuscripts comply with the Submission Preparation Checklist11 and follow the Section Policies.12 Each manuscript is reviewed by an editor and if appropriate is sent to two reviewers for double-blind peer review; authors are usually contacted within nine weeks of submission.13

Editorial tone: The tone is academic, and articles are in Italian or English.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) citations and references.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JLIS.it is a highly regarded international journal that publishes articles in LIS and archival science and in the intersection of the two disciplines; the journal pushes for new and nontraditional approaches to these disciplines in theory, research, and practice. LIS authors that study the international stage of LIS or archives, or who perform research that resonates internationally and pushes traditional boundaries, may find a good fit here. Further, the 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal is an “ideal place” for contributions from those new to the profession, so student writers may have a chance at publishing in a prestigious journal. The journal is “a sort of lab for studying and researching what is new in LIS; a place for militant librarianship, with strong observations on the changes that the digital culture is bringing to cognitive processes and to professional practices.”15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article displays metrics.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JLIS.it publishes articles in Italian and English. It is written for an international audience, so regional terms or practices should be explained. The editors and editorial board members are mostly from Italian universities and institutions, but the Scientific Committee members are from all over the world.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are professionals, scholars, and students in the fields of LIS and archival science.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a solid knowledge of LIS and archival science; however, readers are from all over the world and from many different types of institutions in LIS and archival science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should consider that readers are LIS and archival science professionals and scholars from all over the world who are interested in the latest developments in both fields as well as how the disciplines relate to each other and how they are shaping and responding to profound changes brought on by the new digital culture. The audience probably expects high-level research and interesting, novel approaches to theory and practice.

Last updated: April 7, 2017


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Journal Sponsorship,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/journalSponsorship.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 9, no. 1 (2018), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/787.
  6.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 8, no. 2 (2017), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/775.
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Manifesto” (2015), Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science no. 1 (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.4403/jlis.it-11080.
  9. “Manifesto” (2010), JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/pages/view/manifesto.
  10. “Submissions,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018 https://www.jlis.it/about/submissions.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Editorial Policies.”
  13. “Editorial Policies.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. “Manifesto,” 2010.
  16. “Editorial Team,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/index.php/jlis/about/editorialTeam.
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
Continue Reading

The Conversation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Conversation

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://theconversation.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Begun as a project in 2014, The Conversation publishes articles written by Ph.D. candidates and university-affiliated researchers. Their aim is to promote access to high-quality information and to strive for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues.1

For more in-depth information, take a look at their charter.

While this wiki profile is for The Conversation‘s U.S.-based website, there are additional sites specific to audiences all around the globe.

Target audience: Members of the general public interested in reading high-quality articles based on academic research. Much of this research may not otherwise be accessible to the general public because it may be published in scholarly journals with limited circulation.

Publisher: The Conversation US, Inc.2

Peer reviewed? No. Authors work with editors, who are professional journalists, to craft their articles.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles based on academic studies of varying topics—arts, culture, science, technology, medicine, and many more.

Frequency of publication: New articles published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://theconversation.com/us/pitches

Types of contributions accepted: The Conversation focuses on three priority areas:

  • “Timely, evidence-based analysis of issues making the news
  • Articles explaining new research and its significance for a non-expert audience
  • Timeless, plain English ‘explainers’ of complex issues”3

Submission and review process: There are three steps to becoming published: verification of institute, educational history/qualifications and the creation of a website account.4. In conjunction, “to be published by The Conversation you must be currently employed as a researcher or academic with a university or research institution. Ph.D. candidates under supervision by an academic can write for us, but we don’t currently publish articles from Masters students.”5

Editorial tone:  “Plain English” (for “a non-expert audience”) and “evidence-based.”6

The writing style must be professional yet accessible to general readers who are not subject matter experts. A scholarly or academic tone could be off-putting for lay readers.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors who are are LIS researchers affiliated with an academic institution (MLIS students should keep in mind that they do not qualify), this could be a great outlet for translating scholarly work research for lay audiences and for providing well-informed content on current issues in libraries, online privacy, intellectual freedom, the digital divide, media literacy, and other LIS-oriented topics that would be significant to a non-expert audience. A four-minute video on the benefits of writing for The Conversation is available here.

Before proposing an article, The Conversation‘s editors ask that you do a keyword search to see what has already been published on your topic.7 (Of course, this is good advice for any publication you might hope to write for!) A list of articles on libraries can be found here.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This profile is geared towards readers of the U.S.-based site, but The Conversation has websites for readers in Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Indonesia, as well as an additional “global perspectives” site.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Conversation has a global audience. Specific editions are geared toward readers in specific geographies, but all editions are accessible worldwide.

Reader characteristics: All published articles feature a comments section with lively debates among readers. Thoughtful, well-developed comments are the norm. Anyone can sign up to comment on articles, but full names are required to help maintain a transparent forum. Click here to read about The Conversation’s community standards for readers and commenters.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. Authors would need to assume that readers would not be part of the LIS world and would not be familiar with LIS jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

From glancing over the reader characteristics mentioned above, you can guarantee that, if published by The Conversation, your article could very well invite a lively debate among commenters from all over the world. Authors will find a higher level of engagement with readers and will be able to see how their audience responds to their work–a feature not usually seen with publication of scholarly articles.

Last updated: September 29, 2020


References

Show 7 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 14, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/who-we-are
  2. ‘Who We Are.”
  3. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  4. “Become an author,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 29, 2018, https://theconversation.com/become-an-author
  5. “Become an author.”
  6. “Pitch an article idea.”
  7. “Pitch an article idea.”
Continue Reading

Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

ISSN: 0363-3640 (Print) and 2224-1574(Online).1

Website: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The purpose of this journal is to contact practitioners and scholars in the field of library science and information science at home and abroad to discuss issues in library science and information science, introduce relevant new technologies, and report on important activities in the field of library science and information science. And to seek the development of library information and information business.”2

Target audience:
• Chinese and Chinese-American information professionals
• Information professionals interested in Chinese library and information services
• Those interested in problems common to librarians and information scientists, especially in the areas of new technologies and concepts.3

Publisher: Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA).4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: “Discusses problems common to Chinese and Chinese-American librarians and information scientists; introduces new concepts, systems, and technologies; announces worldwide symposia and other important professional events; and seeks other ways to promote the development of Chinese library and information services.”8

Frequency of publication: Semiannually in April and October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: 

http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts a variety of submissions, including literature reviews, book reviews, practical research, general discourses, library business and communication pieces, etc. Submissions should be a maximum of 20,000 words in Chinese and a maximum of 15,000 words in English.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be accompanied by a title page with the Chinese and English titles, author name, the institution the author is affiliated with, email address, abstract, and keywords.11 Before submitting to the journal, authors have the option to send their manuscript to meiwu@ntnu.edu or create an account through the site at this link.12

As for the review process, each manuscript is reviewed by a minimum of two anonymous reviewers. To be considered for publication, authors must make the corrections (or provide an explanation for why they’re not accepting the changes) within one month and send the revised manuscript back to the journal.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly/formal.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JLIS is an excellent publishing avenue for practitioners and student authors, especially Chinese and Chinese-American authors. The journal gives authors the opportunity to present information specific to this population, as well as information which affects librarianship as a whole. Additionally, JLIS is indexed by the Taiwan Humanities & Social Sciences Citation Index Database (TCI-HSS), DOAJ, LISA, PAIS, and Ulrich’s, offering authors multiple avenues for visibility.16

 

Audience Analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not provided.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of readers live in the United States and China. 17 Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese.18

Reader characteristics: Readers will have the same characteristics as most librarians but will expect more emphasis on services, technologies, and innovations for Chinese speakers. In other words, readers will expect to find information immediately relevant to Chinese communities.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because the bulk of this publication’s audience members are information professionals,20 authors can expect readers to be very familiar with LIS subject matter, including jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will expect authors to not only be fluent in Chinese, but also be familiar with Chinese culture and how it influences librarianship. Additionally, readers will expect authors to present meticulous yet compelling research which promotes the development of Chinese librarianship.21

Last updated: March 15, 2018


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  2.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  3.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  4.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  5.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  6. Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  7.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  8. Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  9.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  10. “Document Style,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/thesisStyle
  11. “Document Style,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/thesisStyle
  12. “Soliciting Methods,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions
  13. “Soliciting Methods,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions
  14. Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  15. “Document Style,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/thesisStyle
  16. “Index Unit,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  17.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  18. “Soliciting Methods,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions
  19. Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  20. Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  21.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
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Library Management (LM)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

ISSN: 0143-51241

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”2

Target audience:Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”8

Content: “The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright”9

Frequency of publication: Nine times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews, 3000 to 6000 words in Microsoft Word format.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Management topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13 Also, while the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas,” many articles have a practical tone when addressing individual libraries.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Management is a highly informative publication which explores topics pertaining to libraries all over the world. For instance, in volume 39, issue 3/4, the topics covered include the economic crisis as it pertains to public libraries in Greece, agricultural libraries in Northern India, and a SWOT analysis of Jamaican academic libraries.16 The journal should also be of particular interest to Chinese authors, due to its annual Chinese supplement.17

LIS authors, whether professional librarians or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into current issues in library management and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, however, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English and published in the UK but is international in scope.19 The editor lives in Australia, while the editorial board members live in various countries throughout the world, including the UK, Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and South Africa.20

To ensure international voices have an opportunity to be heard, Emerald offers an editing service, Peerwith, which offers help with “language editing and translation.”21

Also, the aforementioned annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”22 with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”23

Reader characteristics: Most readers are senior managers and academics. Due to the journal’s international scope, its audience will have diverse cultural experiences. However, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because of this publication’s primary focus on LIS managers, readers are likely to have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LM’s audience is a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough, and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience. Ideally, authors should hold LIS managerial positions themselves to enhance their credibility in the eyes of their readers.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  4. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  5. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  6. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  7.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  10. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  13.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  14. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Steve O’Connor, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Management 39, no. 3/4 (2018).
  17.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  18. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  19. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  20. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  21. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  22. “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  23.  “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  24.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  25.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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