Wiki Tags Archives: Case studies

Library Hi Tech News

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech News

ISSN: 0741-90581

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The journal reports on practical uses of IT in libraries and what’s coming next in terms of technology development for academic and public libraries.”2

Target audience: Library and information science professionals, and anyone with a reason to use LIS services/technologies in their own professional workplace. 3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publications.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles of varying lengths, reporting on LIS conferences, and case studies on how tech is used in the library.6

Regular content includes technology profiles from libraries around the world; feature articles; in-depth conference reviews and reports; new and noteworthy updates for librarians; and a calendar of relevant upcoming events.7

Frequency of publication: 10 issues per year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/lhtn?id=lhtn#author-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Extensive list found under Article Classification9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article. Upload files as a Word document of 1000-3000 words. All submissions are reviewed by the Library Hi Tech News editors, who make the final decision on publication.10

Editorial tone: Informal, but informative. Speaks to readers in a knowledgeable, conversational tone that provides great information on new technologies without making the articles dull or so technical that readers are overwhelmed or tune out.11

Style guide used: Harvard style formatting.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The list of content submissions is vast and touches on a variety of LIS subjects. This is an excellent place to start your LIS publishing.13

Library Hi Tech News‘s editorial objectives note that “publishing your article in LHTN can be a “place to start,” analogous to a “poster session in print,” and does not preclude publishing a more fulsome piece in a peer-reviewed journal at a later date.”14 A peer-reviewed journal related to this newsletter is Library Hi Tech.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International in scope, with the primary editors of the publication based out of U.S. colleges and universities.15 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.16

Reader characteristics: Published in the U.K., readers and writers for this publication are LIS professionals and students interested in new and emerging technologies, and new uses for established technologies. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics  (COPE), “a forum for editors and publishers of peer-reviewed journals to discuss publication ethics.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors 

This is a wonderful publication for LIS new professionals and students, as readers and authors. The authors are seeking submissions covering such a variety of interesting topics, and seem to be open to submissions on anything that is even remotely related to technologies that can be used in libraries and the LIS field. All issues that most students, not just LIS, can speak to, and particularly relevant for those in LIS programs currently using and evaluating these technologies, personally, professionally, and through LIS studies. There are also more technical issues covered, like open source library management systems, global development for libraries, profiles of LIS professionals, and relevant conference updates. A great place to jump in and write for.19

 


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Hi Tech News, Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., accessed May 9, 2020, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  3. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  5. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  6. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/lhtn?id=lhtn#author-guidelines
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  8. ProQuest. (2020). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/lhtn?id=lhtn#author-guidelines
  10. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  11. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  12. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  13. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  14. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  15. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Editorial Team. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lhtn
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  17. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  18. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  19. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2020). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
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Strategic Library

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://libraryworks.com/strategic-library

Purpose, objective, or mission: Strategic Library focuses on innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape. Thought-provoking articles by subject matter experts address, leadership, technology, funding, and more to promote organizational success.1

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.2

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online by subscription only.5

Content: Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.”6

Frequency of publication: Monthly

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf

Note: the subscription paywall hides a lot of information and our guidelines PDF is currently 5 years old in 2020. But you can access the latest issue for free online: https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Here is an Editorial Forecast  from 2015.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.7

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.8

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, Jennifer Newman: jenny@libraryworks.com. According to the writer’s guidelines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”9

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional.

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape read by a paid subscription so readers are heavily invested in the content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the 2015 documentation, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.

Reader characteristics: “Subscribers to Strategic Library are executive decision-makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty. Our subscribers number around 8,000, although that number is an estimate since many of our subscriptions are institutional. Since our audience is quite broad, we publish a range of articles in each issue, many that have overlapping applications to various types of libraries. Remember, the readers of your article are experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS terms and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using the first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or best practices are other options for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are subscribers and very experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Current. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Current. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library-current-1
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2020). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from https://www.libraryworks.com/strategic-library
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
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Programming Librarian

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life. ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”1

Target audience: Programming Librarians. “Though the job title can vary, a programming librarian is charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library. Programming librarians can be found in public, academic, special and school libraries, from the largest urban communities to the smallest rural communities, and everywhere in between. Usually, programming librarian is one of many hats that a librarian wears, which makes up-to-date resources like this site even more important.”2

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.4

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian is always looking for new voices, story ideas and program model suggestions.5

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.6

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries, and program models are presented in a standardized format. 7

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.8 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 16,917 members (2020).9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries related to ALA.

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears. Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.10

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities. This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs in their professional settings.11


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  3. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  4. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  5. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, https://programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  6. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  7. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  8. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  9. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 5, 20, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  10. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
  11. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 5, 2020, http://programminglibrarian.org/about.
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Computers in Libraries

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

ISSN: 1041-79151

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Computers in Libraries (CIL) Mission Statement: “CIL’s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful articles about the technology that affects them, their institutions, and their patrons. We aim to publish interesting stories, case studies, and opinions that are of professional value to people working with technology in public, academic, special, and corporate libraries, as well as archives and museums. CIL is written by librarians for librarians, and it’s about technology all the time.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.3

Publisher: Information Today Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”8

Frequency of publication: Monthly. 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”10

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.11

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.12

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via the online Query Form.13  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”14

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”15

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author but they are “by librarians and for librarians”. Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well-written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professionals only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”17 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Online magazine with potential for broad readership as the parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Computers in Libraries is published in English. Based in the U.K. but available and accessed worldwide online.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only savvy with technologybut also library managers and system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries do not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. 22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well-informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries do not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead, it devotes itself entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is a month-by-month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand the use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, technical writing should be geared toward a general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

 


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Computers in Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 03, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728654342/91053
  2. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  5. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  6. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  8. Information Today Inc. (2020). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  9. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  10. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  13. Information Today Inc. (2020). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  14. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  19. ProQuest. (2020). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2020). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2020). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2020). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2020). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
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Business Information Review

excuse the mess, update in progress


About the publication

Title: Business Information Review 

ISSN: 0266-3821 (Print) and 1741-64501

Website: http://bir.sagepub.com/

You can also visit the Business Information Review (BIR) BIR blog, (where you can listen to BIR podcasts) or follow the journal on Twitter.

Purpose, objective, or mission: €œ”Business Information Review (BIR) deals with the provision and management of information, content and knowledge in organisations.”€2 It deals with information strategies and operational best practices in order to help businesses get the best value from exploiting information knowledge to their benefit. A primary goal of BIR is to highlight economic, social and technological developments that will affect organizations’€™ information needs.3

It is “€œthe only journal devoted entirely to the practice of business information provision.”4

Target audience: Business information professionals: managers, librarians, knowledge managers, researchers, analysts, consultants, print or electronic publishers.5

Publisher: Sage Publications.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional, with an emphasis on information, content and knowledge in organizations.8

Medium: Print and online access.9

Content: Articles, case studies and industry updates. The website and blog also offer podcasts.10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (March, June, September, December).11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/manuscriptSubmission

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions should cover information and knowledge management within organizations. Articles will ideally be relevant to all sorts of info professionals – librarians, managers, publishers, information managers -€“ and are typically 3000-5000 words. Shorter articles are also accepted, such as interviews, product/service reviews and opinion pieces.12

Submission and review process: Submit a proposal first. Completed articles might be considered, with the understanding that editors may require changes. Editors review all submissions; some are reviewed by the editorial board members. Make sure to read the site’s author guidelines before sending anything for consideration.13

Email your proposal/article to businessinformationreview@gmail.com.14

Co-editors, as of 2016, are Claire Laybats, TFPL, UK, and Luke Tredinnick, London Metropolitan University, UK. To contact the editorial office, email: businessinformationreviewj@gmail.com 15

Editorial tone: Professional, somewhat formal while still engaging and interesting. Readable. BIR wants readers to really delve into topics and think about the relevancy of products/services/devices for their own business needs. LIS authors should note that content is provided by “€œinformation professionals, content, technology and service suppliers, academics and researchers and leading thinkers”€16 from within and outside the information world.17

Style guide usedSAGE Harvard reference style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have an interest in technologies and strategies applicable to the information side of the LIS world, this is a good place to consider submitting. The review attracts readers from a variety of professions, not only LIS practitioners, and would be a good place to present LIS-learned views to a larger audience that might not be aware of the particular information/knowledge management angle.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available for the actual publication; BIR Twitter page has 156 followers 18.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International, with primary editors based out of the U.K./Europe.19 Written in English using British/U.K. spelling.20

Reader characteristics: “€œBIR readers are to be found in the corporate sector, in government agencies and other public institutions, in private consultancy, and in universities and business schools.”€21€œBIR‘s international readership and authorship covers the corporate sector, consultancies and law firms, publishers and information providers, government and other public institutions, academia and the third sector.”22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as librarians and information management/knowledge professionals are a key part of BIR’€™s reading and author group. The publication is also directed towards managers and others in non-LIS professions23, so if you use LIS specific jargon or acronyms, make sure readers still understand what you are talking about.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

BIR readers are interested in knowledge management applications, processes and developments, all areas that LIS practitioners touch on, through study or professionally. BIR readership and authorship includes LIS professionals, making this an ideal publication to share information updates, trends, and applications, as far as they pertain to organizations.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. Business Information Review, Sage Publications Ltd., accessed May 2, 2020, http://journals.sagepub.com/home/bira
  2. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  3. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  4. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  5. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Business Information Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411245980118/146294
  7. Sage Publications Ltd. (2020). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from https://journals.sagepub.com/author-instructions/BIR
  8. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  9. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  10. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Podcasts for Business Information Review. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://bir.sagepub.com/site/Podcast/podcast_dir.xhtml
  11. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  12. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  13. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  14. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  15. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  16. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  17. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  18. BIR Journal. (n.d.). Tweets (Twitter page). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from https://twitter.com/BIRJournal
  19. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  20. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  21. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  22. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  23. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
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Code4Lib Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Code4Lib Journal 

ISSN: 1940-57581

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, “the Code4Lib Journal exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.”2 It “aims to help engender collective understanding and the necessary support for improving library technology and digital services.”3

Website: http://journal.code4lib.org/

Target audience: The target audience includes anyone who is involved in the “wider library community” who has an interest in libraries and technology.4

PublisherCode4Lib. Publication began in 2007.5

Peer reviewed? No. Submissions to the journal are reviewed by an editorial committee.6

Type: Open access with Creative Commons license. Although the editorial committee consists mainly of those involved in the academic library community, contents do not necessarily have the format of a traditional scholarly research article, and the journal does not use a traditional blind peer review. Articles can vary in formality and can include case studies and personal opinion pieces. Articles do not generally include extensive literature reviews. For these reasons, the journal is currently classed here as ‘professional news’. Articles tend to be focused on the practical application of the ideas presented.7

Medium: Code4Lib Journal is available online.8

Content: From the Call for Submissions, “the editorial committee is looking for content that is practical, demonstrates how to exploit technology to create digital library collections and services, or offers insight and forethought regarding the use of computers in any type of library setting.”9

The journal publishes articles on a multitude of subjects, as long as they support the mission statement, and is flexible with length (1,500 to 5,000 words is an approximate word count). The types of articles published in the journal include:

  • Case studies of projects (failed or successful), how they were done, and challenges faced.
  • Descriptions of projects in progress, project updates, and new project proposals.
  • Effective processes for project management.
  • Reviews/comparisons of software, frameworks, libraries, etc.
  • Analyses and case studies of using library metadata in technological application: novel applications or solutions, or unsolved challenges,
  • Thought pieces on the big problems associated with library and technology, ideas for new solutions, visions for the future.
  • Findings on user behavior and interaction with systems.
  • Best practices.10

Frequency of publication: It is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The types of articles the journal is looking for include:

  • Book & software reviews
  • Code snippets & algorithms
  • Conference reports
  • Opinion pieces12

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent in the form of either an abstract or a complete draft. Submit articles using the online form, or via email to journal@code4lib.org. Once submitted the article goes through an editorial process, and not a peer review.13

Editorial tone: “Writers should aim for the middle ground between, on the one hand, blog or mailing-list posts, and, on the other hand, articles in traditional journals.”14

Style guide used: From the article guidelines: “While articles in C4LJ should be of high quality, they need not follow any formal structure or guidelines.”15 However, endnotes and references should be cited using the Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a semiformal setting in which to discuss issues of technology in the library and information science world. The information in the journal is concentrated around technology, and its place within the library setting, so it would be a good place for anyone with an interest in this subject to find a home for one of their articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Since the journal is 100% online, there was no information on the exact circulation available.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editorial committee is based throughout the United States, but the writers come from both within and outside the United States.18 The journal is written in English, and although the editorial committee is American, not all of the contributors are. (Article guidelines note that articles should be written in English, and that “American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these.”)19  Also, due to the online nature of the journal, people from anywhere in the world would have the ability to access the articles. Because of this, it would most likely be prudent to explain the use of any language or content that was too culturally specific.

Reader characteristics: Code4Lib is a “volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives, and museums on technology ‘stuff’.” From looking through the author’s information supplies with the articles, it appears that almost all of the contributors work in academic libraries, although their actual job titles vary quite a bit. These job titles range from web designer to information technology coordinator to systems librarian. While this information is about the writers, it goes to show that the journal is of interest to all different types of professionals involved technologies in libraries. Of course, they also all have a professional interest in the intersection of libraries and technology. Code4Lib is of interest to “technology folks in libraries, archives, and museums to informally share approaches, techniques, and code across institutional and project divides.”20 The readers of this journal are likely to have established opinions about the place of technology in libraries. A look at the mission statement shows that the readers are likely to feel that technology holds a key position in the future of libraries.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of Code4Lib Journal would have a good knowledge and understanding of LIS topics and issues. They would also be familiar with library jargon. On top of that, due to the technical nature of the journal, they would also be familiar with most technical jargon.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The common thread running among these readers is an interest in, and a passion for, technology and its use within a library setting. Their level of technical knowledge would be rather high, and this would be an important thing for writers to keep in mind. In fact, it would also be a necessity for the writers of a proposed article for Code4Lib Journal to have significant expertise in technology.


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Code4Lib Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 4, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521729571530/658750
  2. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  3. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  4. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  5. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  6. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Process and Structure. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/process-and-structure
  7. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Issue 25, 2014-07-21. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/issues/issues/issue25
  8. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  9. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  10. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  11. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  12. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  13. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  14. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  15. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  16. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  17. ProQuest. (2020). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  18. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Editorial Committee. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/editorial-committee
  19. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  20. Code4Lib. (2020). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
  21. Code4Lib Journal. (2020). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  22. Code4Lib. (2020). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
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Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals

ISSN: 1361-32001

Purpose, objective, or mission: Ariadne is published by Loughborough University Library in the U.K. for Information Professionals to stay abreast of a wide variety of LIS topics. Initially, Ariadne was made available in electronic format by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), in order “to create awareness of Internet developments in the UK higher education LIS community”. 2 Website: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Target audience: The target audience for Ariadne is librarians, museum curators, archivists and associated technical staff & managers. Articles should cover topics that will be of interest to one or more of these audiences. 3

Publisher: Loughborough University Library in the U.K. 4

Peer reviewed? No. The editor makes all decisions regarding manuscript submissions.5

Type: LIS professional news. Although Ariadne does publish some research-oriented content, it is not peer reviewed and it cannot be considered “scholarly.” ISSN is 1361-3200.6

Medium: Entirely online. Ariadne is free and open access, so the full text of all issues (current and archived) is available on the website. 7

Content: Ariadne publishes a variety of articles on current trends and issues in the LIS field. A standard issue contains an editorial, a number of articles including a feature article, news, and events. Prominent topics include emerging technologies and trends, digital libraries and collections, information architecture, search engines, metadata, and conference information. 8

Frequency of publication: Undefined. The magazine was published quarterly up through 2010; as of 2013 there are two issues per year. 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines can be found on the Guidelines page. The publication’s website indicates to submit proposals the editor who will then correspond via email once an article proposal has been accepted. 10

Types of contributions accepted: Ariadne accepts a variety of contributions, including articles (i.e., scholarly papers, position pieces, and case studies), reviews, and reports on events, workshops, meetings, and conferences. The magazine also accepts proposals regarding organizations and work-related projects. There are no stated requirements for length.11

Submission and review process: Ariadne requires an initial proposal for all articles. Authors should submit an abstract, outline, or general description to the editor prior to submission of the completed manuscript. After an agreement is reached, a date for submission is set and the editor then sends out an explanation of the editorial process. No peer-review process is used.12

Proposals can be submitted through an email to the editor: editor@ariadne.ac.uk.13

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for editorial tone. Main articles tend to have a more formal, scholarly tone, while reviews and other articles appear to be relatively informal (i.e., first person is acceptable).14

Style guide used: Ariadne does not use a formal style guide.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Ariadne has remained on the forefront of the open access movement and continues to focus its content on current and emerging LIS trends and technologies. Thus, although it is not peer reviewed, it is a credible and highly accessible source with great publishing potential for LIS practitioners, educators, and students. Contributors might consider writing about LIS conferences or workshops, workplace technologies, online learning, digital collections, social networking, Web 2.0./Library 2.0, or Web-based information seeking behavior.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Ariadne is an open access electronic publication that is available free to anyone with Internet access. As such, there is no formal subscription process and no readily available circulation data. Generally, though, freely accessible online resources do at least have the potential of a large audience base.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although Ariadne maintains an international audience, the majority of readers are located in the U.S. and U.K., and content reflects this. 16

Ariadne is published solely in English, and based on geographic information, it can be assumed that the vast majority of readers are, in fact, native English speakers. However, authors should be aware of the linguistic and cultural differences that exist between the U.S. and British English. For example, submission guidelines indicate that “British English” should be used rather than “US English.” 17

Reader characteristics: Ariadne does not provide any detailed demographic information relating to the gender, age, or ethnicity of its readers. Because this is an international professional publication geared towards practicing information professionals, it is likely that the audience is relatively mature and experienced, but also demographically diverse. Although readers are likely to hold a wide variety of professional specializations, they are also very likely to share professional interests based on Ariadne‘s primary topics, which include digital libraries, technological developments, digital information management, and online learning. As a large portion of Ariadne readers work in libraries and archives, they are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship in an information society. It should be noted that Ariadne also features more opinion-based reader reviews, retrospectives, and reflections.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Ariadne readers are likely to be quite knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and jargon. As practicing information professionals, they would certainly be interested in library topics that are directly applicable to their careers. Read through the archived issues to get a sense of the current topics. 19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Ariadne is a professional publication with a very specific focus on practical articles that discuss sophisticated technological issues and developments in LIS. Overly general library articles, theoretical papers, or pieces that fail to directly address current trends in librarianship with a heavy focus on digital initiatives may not interest Ariadne readers. Submissions should be professional but not necessarily scholarly in tone, and they should focus on relating practical applications for LIS practitioners (see topic suggestions in the Publication Analysis above).

It is important for the author to note that although Ariadne is a British publication with a core following in the UK, the majority of readers actually reside in the U.S., and it is a global magazine. This allows for increased opportunities to effectively reach Ariadne readers.

Last Updated: March 8, 2020


References

 

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals, Loughborough University Library, accessed March 8, 2020, http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/
  2. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about/copyright
  3. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  4. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about/copyright
  5. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  6. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines 
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  8. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  9. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  10. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  11. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  12. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  13. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  14. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  15. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  16. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
  17. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  18. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
  19. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
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In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: In the Library with the Lead Pipe

ISSN: 1944-61951

Website: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’s About page: “Lead Pipe believes libraries and library workers can change the world for the better. We improve libraries, professional organizations, and their communities of practice by exploring new ideas, starting conversations, documenting our concerns, and arguing for solutions.”2

Target audience: Educators, administrators, library support staff, technologists, and community members.3

Per co-founder Brett Bonfield: “We do our best to reach beyond librarians, administrators, etc. and also engage people who care about the same things that we care about, such as publishing, reading, knowledge, intellectual freedom . . . all the intersections between librarians and other fields, professions, avocations. We do this by trying to avoid jargon and by telling good stories, and we also do it by interviewing non-librarians and by asking non-librarians to write for us or serve as peer reviewers.”4

Publisher: The editorial staff of In the Library with the Lead Pipe5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 by at least one external and one internal reviewer7

Type: An LIS scholarly publication that crosses over into the professional and trade publication category.8

Medium: Online.9

Content: The goals of Lead Pipe are to start conversations and to propose solutions to LIS problems and concerns. The content includes essays by the editorial board and articles by guest authors, including “educators, administrators, library support staff, technologists, and community members.”10 Articles range from advice to LIS students, to notes from LIS professionals in the workplace, to favorite books and commentary on current LIS-related news items such as retaining LGBTQ staff and library use of social media.11

Frequency of publication: Monthly.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Constructive criticisms and commentary from people experiencing the library from the inside as librarians, administrators, and support staff, as well as community members who interact with libraries. The goal is to provide perspective from all aspects of the library community. The editors encourage article proposals from LIS students and those new to the profession.13

Examples of material published include:

  • Original research with a discussion of its consequences and an argument for action.
  • Articles arguing for a particular approach, strategy or development in librarianship, with practical examples of how it might be achieved.
  • Transformative works with additional explanatory or interpretive content. For example, a transcription of an interview or panel discussion, with a substantial introduction explaining the importance of the subject to librarianship and a discussion of related literature.14

Submission and review process: Prospective authors are asked to submit a 200-word abstract, a link or attachment to writing samples, and a current resume or CV using the email address listed on the submissions page. Authors may also submit a completed article, from 2000-5000 words, with citations as necessary.15

A staff member will respond to submissions within three weeks to indicate whether an article is appropriate to Lead Pipe publication goals in terms of content and style.16

According to Lead Pipe author instructions, “The author does the hard work of actually writing the article. Articles may have multiple authors, but in this case one author must be designated as the primary point of contact for the Editorial Board. Authors are also responsible for identifying an external reviewer. The external reviewer should have some professional connection to or knowledge of the article’s topic, and is expected to provide expert review and constructive feedback. The external reviewer does not necessarily have to be librarian. Authors may work with someone they already know or reach out to the professional community. The Editorial Board is happy to offer guidance in identifying and contacting an appropriate reviewer if needed.”17

Per co-founder Brett Bonfield, “Our goal is to make sure the article is factually accurate, well written, well edited, and interesting.”18

The process from selection to publication takes at least six weeks, with Lead Pipe editors requesting feedback and drafts from the author as necessary. This is a highly collaborative process where editors work closely with writers to produce the most fabulous writing possible for the site. Prospective authors should consult the Guest Author Instructions, Framework for Guest Author Proposals, and Peer Review Guidelines before submitting.19

Editorial tone: Informal and engaging; informative yet relaxed. The articles are peer-reviewed, but speak to the entire community of people who work in and use the library. They are thoughtful, positive articles that pose challenging questions and educate readers on diverse aspects of the LIS world.20

Style guide used:  The Lead Pipe includes an in-house style guide in its submission guidelines. Authors may use any citation style, as long as it is consistently applied within an article. The editors encourage use of the first-person for many articles, and request that authors avoid use of the passive voice.21 See the site’s detailed Style Guide for more information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an extremely LIS-student-friendly publication open to a great variety of topics within the field.22 The site has a registered ISSN number and although it has been awarded titles such as “€œBest General Blog”€ in 2012 from the Salem Press Library Blog Awards, the editors “feel that this rich peer review process sets us apart from scholarly blogs and puts us in the realm of “journal.”23 Many writers have referenced the site through other publications.24

The editors “encourage creative thinking, envelope-pushing, and constructive criticism,”25€œ while “articles indulging in non-constructive criticism will not be accepted.”26

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not specified. According to a survey performed by Arthur Hendricks of 67 university library professionals, 3 of those 67 (4.5%) mentioned In the Library with the Lead Pipe as a blog that they regularly read.27

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Currently all members of the editorial board work in the United States,28 and articles are written in American English.29 However, given that Lead Pipe is an internationally recognized, well-respected, yet informal journal that was previously a popular peer-reviewed blog, a more global readership may be assumed.

The publication style guide requests that authors “. . . incorporate a global perspective in the context and arguments of articles (e.g., by considering what the broad international profession should do, not just what the American Library Association or U.S.-based librarians should do). It is acceptable for an article’s focus to be on one geographic region, but this should be made clear in the article, and avoid phrases like “across the country” without mentioning which country.”30

Reader characteristics: Editors take pride in having diverse skills and interests, and bring all of that knowledge to the website, making it an interesting site to read even by those outside the profession. Lead Pipe is directed towards people involved in libraries in any capacity, from librarians to support staff and community members.31

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.32

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The journal is one of the longer standing open source, peer-edited and -reviewed LIS sites, dating back to 2008. It is read and referenced by librarians internationally, and provides good information and topics of conversation for librarians and those interested in the LIS community. It is an informally written site but still presents scholarly articles along with editorials and opinion pieces, and would be a good platform for LIS students who wish to network and share ideas and concerns through writing articles for a community of peers.

Per editor Brett Bonfield: “We think of ourselves as a journal and we publish “articles,” not posts, and those articles are indexed by EBSCO for its library database products. We’re not aggressive about it or anything–we were delighted by the Salem Press blog award, for instance–but it’s a distinction that has meaning for us. We love a lot of LIS blogs and we love a lot of LIS journals, we just think we have a bit more in common with the journals than the blogs.”33

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 33 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “In the Library with the Lead Pipe,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523475745273/672658
  2. “About,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019 http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/
  3. “About,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/
  4. B. Bonfield, personal communication, March 17, 2013
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  7. “Lead Pipe Publication Process,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/lead-pipe-publication-process/
  8. “About.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. “About.”
  11. “Archives,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/archives/
  12. “Archives.”
  13. “About.”
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/
  16. “Submission Guidelines.”
  17. Lead Pipe Publication Process.”
  18. Bonfield, personal communication.
  19. Lead Pipe Publication Process.”
  20. “About.”
  21. “Style Guide,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed May 3, 2017, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/style-guide/
  22. “Archives.”
  23. Ellie Collier, “And the Survey Says . . .,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, September 5, 2012, accessed May 3, 2017, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2012/survey-says/
  24. “Awards and Good Words,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed May 3, 2017,  http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/awards-good-words/
  25. “About.”
  26. “About.”
  27. Arthur Hendricks, “Bloggership, or is publishing a blog scholarship? A survey of academic librarians,” Library Hi Tech 28, no. 3 (Summer 2010): 470-477, https://doi.org/10.1108/07378831011076701.
  28. “Editorial Board,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019,  http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/editorial-board/
  29. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  30. “Style Guide.”
  31. “Style Guide.”
  32. “About.”
  33. Bonfield, personal communication.
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Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Libraries Journal

ISSN: 2475-8116

Website: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: MLJ is a “peer reviewed, independently published, open access scholarly journal that focuses on innovative marketing activities libraries are engaged in.”1

The journal’s aim is “to publish research and practical examples of library marketing campaigns, library marketing research, public relations campaigns, SWOT analysis, segmentation research, assessment of marketing activities, and tools used for marketing.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals from public, special and academic libraries who work in marketing positions.3

Publisher: MLJ is published independently.

Peer reviewed? Yes. All articles are subjected to a double blind peer review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Two types of articles are published: research-driven work that provides original scholarship, and practical information focusing on best practices and advice.5

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles of 20-25 pages in length and practical articles of 8-10 pages in length. Additionally, practical articles (as columns) under one of the following subjects:

  • Advocacy: articles that focus on developing relationships with stakeholders to help raise awareness and loyalty for library services and resources. This may relate to communicating with government, administration, and the greater community
  • Branding: articles that illustrate how libraries develop their visual identity for their services and resources.
  • From the Trenches: articles that show outcomes of a particular marketing initiative or campaign.
  • Marketing Campaigns: case studies of a marketing campaign and the desired outcomes and objectives sought.
  • Technology: software/apps and web-based technology tools that can be used as part of a marketing campaign.7

Submission and review process: The reviewing process for manuscripts will begin after the call for proposals deadline. Some manuscripts may require substantive revision before they are ready for publication. Once a manuscript has been formally accepted, authors are required to submit a complete electronic copy of the final version, including all figures, charts, tables, appendices, and illustrations.8

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: APA, 6th edition.9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have written about LIS marketing and increasing visibility for libraries, this journal may be a viable publication. Some of the latest articles published are about creating a ‘brand’ for libraries and tips and tricks on video marketing.

Keep in mind that MLJ does not only publish traditional, scholarly articles, but also practical articles on advocacy, branding, case studies of marketing campaigns, technology tools, SWOT analyses and “from the trenches”-type material.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: MLJ is open access, and therefore available for any and all global readers, for free.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Articles are published in English. MLJ states that they are global in scope.10

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely LIS professionals or students who work in or are interested in marketing aspects of librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering the specificity of the journal’s content matter, LIS knowledge may be varied, but strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in a variety of articles, and are seeking out the latest research and information pertaining to LIS marketing. If you have written a scholarly article, a SWOT analysis or have researched a hot topic marketing issue, MLJ readers will be eager to learn about it.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Home,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/
  2. “Home.”
  3. “About,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/about.html
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Home.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 23, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “About.”
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Society of American Archivists (SAA)

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Society of American Archivists

Website: https://saa.archivists.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: SAA is North America’s oldest and largest professional association for archives and archivists. Their mission is to promote “the value and diversity of archives and archivists.” Their core values include “advancing the public standing of archivists,” “fostering a culture of creativity and experimentation across the association” and a commitment to “social responsibility and the public good.”1

Target audience: Students and professional archivists in North America.

Owner: Society of American Archivists.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: Guides and guidelines, reference books, book series, essay collections.

Medium: Print and electronic.

Topics covered: Trends in archiving practices, ethics, case studies, contemporary issues pertaining to archives, archivists, and allied professions.

Number of titles published per year: An exact number is unknown, but SAA has published over 150 books since the 1970s.2

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesforbookproposals

Types of submissions accepted: Book proposals.

Submission and review process: Potential authors should first submit a prospectus to the Publications Editor.

Be sure to address the following:

  • “the theme, purpose and scope of the publication;
  • the estimated format and length of the publication;
  • whether the topic and approach are better suited to print or online format
  • an annotated outline or table of contents;
  • the intended audience and the potential market;
  • the prospective value to the archival profession;
  • the relationship of the proposed publication to the literature in the field;
  • the possibility of co-sponsorship with another organization;
  • the possibility of outside financial support;
  • graphics and illustrations the publication might use;
  • co-authors or contributors in the case of an edited work; and
  • the anticipated schedule for preparation of the publication.”3

The Publications Editor reviews the prospectus and sends it to the Publications Board, Director of Publishing and, if necessary, subject specialists. Depending on the author’s writing experience, two or more sample chapters and a detailed table of contents may be requested.4

Once a prospectus is accepted by the Publications Board, a member of the Board is assigned to the project as a liaison to the author and to oversee the project until the manuscript is finished and submitted.5

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.6

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with SAA focuses primarily on the archiving field, so it may not be a good fit for many LIS authors. However, there is some crossover in resources and initiatives with allied professions (libraries, museums, and historians). For example, SAA publishes a few books that have broader audiences (i.e. Exhibits in Archives and Special Collections Libraries and Archives in Libraries: What Librarians and Archivists Need to Know to Work Together). They occasionally partner with other allied professional associations to develop resources, such as the American Library Association.

Their Guidelines for Book Proposals states that they seek to “nurture new voices,” but keep in mind that the prospectus requires a lot of initial book information to be prepared by the author, including a defined audience and market.7

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: SAA has 6,200 members.8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SAA primarily serves archivists and students within North America.

Reader characteristics: Readers of SAA publications are archivist students or professionals with a working knowledge in the field. Currently featured titles on their online store, including Moving Image and Sound Collections for Archivists and Navigating Legal Issues in Archives, indicate that many newly published SAA releases discuss contemporary issues in the field.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers may have less knowledge on general LIS subject matter than readers of other LIS book publishers in the field, with SAA serving primarily to archives and archivists.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

SAA’s website states that their publications are “largely driven by members. Members write articles, chapters and books which are then vetted by members on the Editorial Board and Publications Board, who strive to maintain SAA’s commitment to furthering best practices in the field.”10 Potential authors can expect their publications to be read by professionals, and experts, in the field.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/aboutsaa
  2. “Book Publishing with SAA,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing
  3. “Guidelines for Book Proposals,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesforbookproposals
  4. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  5. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  6. “Guidelines for Manuscript Submissions,” www.SAA.org, accessed March 2, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesformanuscriptsubmissions
  7. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  8. “Who We Are.”
  9. “SAA Bookstore.”
  10. “Publications,” SAA.org, accessed February 27, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/node/20534
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