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Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

Websitehttp://acrl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the About page: ACRL is a professional association dedicated to enhancing the ability of academic library and information professionals to serve the information needs of the higher education community and to improve learning, teaching and research.”1 From the ACRL Guidelines & Standards, “ACRL is the source that the higher education community looks to for standards, guidelines and frameworks on academic libraries.”2

Target audience: Academic Libraries and the LIS field practitioners.3

Owner: Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the ALA.4

Are published books peer reviewed? ACRL Publications in Librarianship is a peer reviewed series of monographic volumes.5

Types of books published: LIS Professional Development. Monographs of interest to the LIS field and academic libraries: books are research studies, theoretical monographs, or practical tools-based volumes for the practitioner. These are primarily to assist academic librarians in career development, managing their institutions, and keeping abreast of developments in librarianship.6

Medium: Print. There are currently a handful of digital publications available in pdf format, but that is not ACRL’s primary publishing method.7

Topics covered: Information literacy, copyright and scholarly communication, research in academic librarianship, trends in academic libraries, leadership and organizational development, management, collection development, information access, and information literacy.8

Number of titles published per year: 8–169

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals, completed manuscripts, or dissertations, accompanied by a Publication Proposal Form. See the Call for Book Proposals for specifics on suggested topics.10

Submission and review process: From the guidelines: “Ideally authors/editors will send one or more chapters with a proposal. Each proposal is then read by the editorial board and ACRL staff.”11 The review process takes around two months, and reviewers will send comments back to the author if they would like to move forward with the project. “The editor will then work with authors or editors to establish a timetable for development and publication.”12

Editorial tone: Professional and, where warranted, more immediate and casual.13

Style guide usedWebster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 10th edition, for spelling, and The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, for style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors with a proposal for an academic library topic, or a proposal for furthering the professional development of any librarian or information professional would do well to consider ACRL for publication. The group is an outstanding ALA group with a large member base,15 and reaches hundreds of libraries. In addition, the editorial staff is able to provide dedicated support and editing assistance to authors to ensure the most professional product possible.16 ACRL publications are promoted through its catalog,17 and at the ALA store,18 meetings and conferences, with articles and promotional notices appearing in C&RL at the time of publication. ACRL is a trusted organization, excellent to consider for publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Smallish, with 15 new books published in 2016-17, per the Annual Report.19

ACRL has a large automatic audience: “hundreds of libraries have blanket ACRL acquisition orders and many librarians order their own copies, or buy them at conferences.”20

In addition, ACRL is the largest division of the ALA, with more than 11,000 members.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: National and, on occasion, global. ACRL is based, like ALA, in Chicago, IL.22 American English, leaning towards issues in American academic libraries.

Reader characteristics: The association, as an ALA organization and publisher, is interested in continuing the education and providing professional development for academic librarians and information professionals.23 Academic libraries and scholarly research. Strongly dedicated to providing high quality LIS information.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Not only is ACRL devoted to academic libraries, but it is part of the ALA.25 Expect editors and eventual readers to be very knowledgeable about LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Any publishing group that calls the ALA home is a good place to query your LIS proposal, and ACRL is no exception. The largest division of the ALA,  ACRL currently has a membership of more than 11,000 members, accounting for nearly 20% of the total ALA membership.26 Readers will be keen to hear of new titles from this small, discriminating imprint.

Last updated: January 28, 2018


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. “About”, ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  2. “Standards,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “Publications,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  6. “Publications.”
  7. “Digital Publications,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/digital
  8. Publications.”
  9. “Publications.”
  10. “Proposals,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/PILproposals
  11. “Publications”
  12. “Publications”
  13. “Publications”
  14. “Publications”
  15. “About.”
  16. “Publications.”
  17. “Digital Publications”
  18. “ALA Store,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.alastore.ala.org/
  19. “Annual Report,” ACRL.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://crln.acrl.org/content/72/11/659.full.pdf+html
  20. “Book Proposals,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/PILproposals
  21. “About”
  22. “About”
  23. “About.”
  24. “About.”
  25. “About.”
  26. “About.”
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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

ISSN: 2379-95281

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.2 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”3 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”4

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.5

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional news.8

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.9

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Active Librarian, Michael J. Carlozzi, accessed May 5, 2020, http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Australian Library Journal (ALJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Australian Library Journal (ALJ)

ISSN: 0004-9670 (Print) and 2201-4276 (Online)1

Website: http://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Australian Library Journal (ALJ) is the “flagship publication of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), supporting the Association’s Objects by documenting progress in research and professional practice and stimulating discussion on issues relevant to libraries and librarianship.”2 This internationally recognized journal “showcases the best of Australian library and information research and practice.”3

Target audience: Australian LIS community4

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Print and online; open access after four years8

Content: The Australian Library Journal “contains a wide coverage of Australian library issues ranging from ongoing research to day-to-day articles from practitioners in the workplace.”9 The content includes theory- and practice-based writing, as well as book reviews.10 As a supplement to each issue of the journal, the ALIA publishes a series of themed, online-only book reviews.11

Frequency of publication: Quarterly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj20&page=instructions#.VN0EDS4YFZJ

Types of contributions accepted: ALJ welcomes submissions on a variety of library and information topics, ranging from ongoing research to practical articles directly relevant to the workplace.13 The use of Australian English and spelling is preferred. Manuscripts should include a title page with acknowledgements of any funding an abstract of up to 300 words, up to six keywords, implications for best practice, the main text of up to 5,000 words, references, appendices, any tables with captions on separate pages, and a list of any figure captions.14

Of special note is the journal’s “Librarianship-in-Practice” section, for shorter case studies of projects and programs that have already been implemented.15 Articles for this section should observe a 2,000 to 2,500 word limit, and adhere to an organizational structure outlined on the publication website.16

ALJ also features an extensive book review section, in both its print and online versions, and an in an online-only version.17 Those wishing to review books should first consult the online instructions.18

Submission and review process: Detailed submission guidelines can be found on the publisher’s website.19

Editorial tone: Scholarly20

Style guide usedPublication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition21

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Australian Library Journal offers a variety of publishing opportunities for LIS authors. Whether it’s original research, advancements in professional practice, or book reviews, there are many different writing avenues to explore. As this journal focuses on Australian library and information research, potential authors should tailor their writing to this geographical area. For North American authors, the potential for publication seems to be greatest as a book reviewer, as the book review section features publications by the wider global community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not readily available for this journal. However, as the flagship publication for the ALIA, the journal is received by 800 institutional members of the professional organization.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of readers are Australian and the content reflects this. Authors should be aware of the language and cultural differences between the United States and Australia. As per the submission guidelines, “Australian English spelling and punctuation are preferred.”23 Colloquialisms and cultural references unique to the United States should be avoided.

Reader characteristics: ALJ does not provide demographic information of its readers. As it is the flagship publication of the ALIA, however, it is likely that the majority of readers hold memberships in ALIA, which serves 4,200 individual members and 800 institutional members.24 Readers of the ALJ hold a wide variety of professional and research interests within the LIS field.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although some readers may not be information science professionals, the majority work in LIS fields and would therefore be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Australian Library Journal is an internationally recognized publication that holds high standards for its published works. This journal reaches a wide audience of library and information professionals who are interested in current research in the field as well as relevant issues in their workplaces. For current Australian residents, or even North Americans who have lived or travelled in Australia, this journal provides the potential author a large and knowledgeable audience. Although the majority of readers are Australian,25 authors outside of Australia will find a publishing opportunity in the book review section.

Last updated: November 14, 2016


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Australian Library Journal, Routledge, accessed April 10, 2018, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  2. “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016,  https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  3. “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  4. “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  5.  “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  6. Australian Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 10, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1423603424472/355517
  7. Australian Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 10, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1423603424472/355517
  8. “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  9. “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  10. “Instructions for Authors,”Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 10, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj20&page=instructions#.VNqHsy4YFZJ
  11. “Archive of ALJ Online Reviews,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj/alj-online-reviews
  12. Australian Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 10, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1423603424472/355517
  13. “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10 2016,  https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 10, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj20&page=instructions#.VNqHsy4YFZJ
  15.  “Australian Library Journal (ALJ),” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 10, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj20&page=instructions#.VNqHsy4YFZJ
  17. ALJ Online Reviews,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/publications-and-news/australian-library-journal-alj/alj-online-reviews
  18. “Instructions for Reviewers,” Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 10, 2016, http://www.editorialmanager.com/JALIA/default.aspx
  19. “Instructions for Authors,” Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 10, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj20&page=instructions#.VNqHsy4YFZJ
  20. Australian Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 10, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1423603424472/355517
  21. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 10, 2016, http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf
  22. “ALIA Fact Sheet,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/sites/default/files/ALIA-Fact-Sheet.pdf
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 10, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj20&page=instructions#.VNqHsy4YFZJ
  24. “ALIA Fact Sheet,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed November 10, 2016, https://www.alia.org.au/sites/default/files/ALIA-Fact-Sheet.pdf
  25. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Aims and Scope. Taylor & Francis Online. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj20#.VPdI7uFFYm8
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Journal of Creative Library Practice, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Creative Library Practice

ISSN: 2330-42271

Website: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’€™s About page: “The Journal of Creative Library Practice provides an outlet for librarians and information professionals to €œdescribe and encourage greater creativity in library and information center communications, policies, collections, instruction, and other areas of librarianship€.”2

Target audience: “This journal reaches librarians and information professionals of all types, including academic, public, school, special, medical, legal, and others.” The journal is working to broaden its readership to individuals outside the profession, to anyone interested in creative solutions to LIS issues; or anyone who wants to participate in discussions about creative issues and solutions.3

Publisher: Published as an online blog-format journal by Creative Library Practice4

Peer reviewed? Yes,5 though this blog-style journal also publishes non-peer reviewed content. The refereed articles are distinguished from the blog posts on the site.6

Type: LIS scholarly and professional7

Medium: Online,8 peer-reviewed blogposts9

Content: Posts on creative solutions to LIS issues.10

Frequency of publication: This online journal is updated as frequently as the editors write posts and peer-reviewed articles are accepted.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Any article focusing on creative solutions to LIS issues, including communications barriers, technology issues, reviews of relevant books or websites.12

Submission and review process: The website provides a link to email manuscripts in MS-Word .doc, .docx, or RTF format.13

Editorial tone: Editor Joseph Kraus, in a Q&A with Library Journal, stated, “€œWe want to encourage prospective authors to write with less formal rhetoric.”14

Style guide used: References should be provided in a consistent format, whether Chicago, Turabian, MLA, or APA, or author may simply provide links to cited material.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal’s editors consider the publication to be an open source alternative to the stodgy print publications usually favored by the LIS community. They are a creative group open to all sorts of submissions, so this would be a great place to expand on an LIS student paper or thesis, or write about a creative approach tried at a library-related job, and how it helped the organization.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics are not available, but as this journal is also an informal blog there is potential to reach a large audience.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is online and the editors are LIS professionals at colleges and universities around the United States.16 The journal is written in American English.17

Reader characteristics: This journal appeals to forward thinking, creative, multidisciplined, against-the-grain LIS professionals seeking to share information with like-minded peers. The journal is written for and by LIS professionals in all possible settings, including academic, public, school, special, medical, and law libraries. It also aims to reach those readers who are interested in libraries but not necessarily working in them, including teachers, parents, students, and businesses.18

The journal was created by LIS professionals who wish to have a truly open access information sharing site that features creative solutions to common problems in information organizations. This is an open minded, nontraditional group that sees the value in current technologies and is working to take advantage of anything that can help the library community achieve its goals. The journal leans toward the informal, so potential authors should keep this in mind while writing for the publication. The goal is to provide articles from a variety of perspectives.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The knowledge level is probably quite high, but as the editors are attempting to appeal to laypeople as well as LIS students and professionals, potential authors should keep the jargon to a minimum and avoid highly technical terms and unusual acronyms.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Creative Library Practice is part of a new LIS journal standard: using open access for peer-reviewed articles under Creative Commons licensing, and providing relatively loose guidelines in terms of content, and even citations.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523479339830/779051
  2. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  3. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  4. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  5.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  6. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  7.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  8.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  9. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  10. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  12. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  14. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  16. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  17. The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017,
  18. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  19. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  20. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
Continue Reading

Education Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Education Libraries

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Websitehttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Education Libraries is an electronic, refereed journal of the Special Libraries Association’s (SLA) Education Division.  It offers a forum for new and challenging ideas in education, and library and information science. It also explores the effect of new technologies on the library profession and library and information curriculum.”1

Target audience: The target audience is the membership of the Special Libraries Association, which includes those employed at “a variety of venues, including special libraries and information centers, academic libraries, public libraries, and school libraries.”2

Publisher: Special Libraries Association, Education Division3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and Education; scholarly5

Medium: Online, open access since 20156

Content: Education Libraries publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, member profiles, and case studies.7 Recent feature articles include faculty-librarian collaboration, 3-D printing in education libraries, collection development, and school library advocacy.8

Frequency of publication: Biannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Education Libraries accepts “research studies, descriptive narratives, or other thoughtful considerations of topics of interest to the education information professional. Manuscripts focusing on issues relevant to more general concerns either in the field of education or in the field of library and information science are also welcome provided they include a significant component specifically germane to education, libraries and librarianship.”10

Submission and review process: Authors submitting manuscripts are required to register using a link provided on the publication website.11 All submissions will be considered for publication and are subject to the double-blind peer review process. Inquiries about particular manuscripts may be sent via email to the editor. See the publication website for details.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) style manual, most recent edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Education Libraries presents an interesting opportunity for LIS writers from different types of libraries to discuss and share information that is related to education. This journal is well established, which means writers can be assured that they are submitting their work to a credible source and contributing to the scholarly conversation.

The journal is indexed in Education Libraries is indexed in ERIC, EBSCOhost’s Education Collection, and Library Literature.15

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the SLA’s website there are more than 9,000 association members based in more than 75 countries.16 Information about exactly how many are a part of the Education Division is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Just as members of the Special Libraries Association are located around the world, the readers of Education Libraries are also international.17 Because this is an international publication, differences in language and cultural practice should be considered.

Reader characteristics: It is safe to assume the readers of this publication are interested in academic libraries and their role in education. Due to the professional focus of this publication the readership is largely comprised of individuals already working in academic libraries with considerable experience in the field. The readers of this publication are likely to value education and research. They are likely to be interested in learning about new technologies as well as in innovative teaching methods. Recent articles demonstrate a general acceptance of new technologies and changes in librarianship.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is likely that, as library employees, a  majority of readers are very familiar with LIS subject matter. Additionally, we can assume that the readers are familiar with new information technologies issues as well as issues surrounding the growth of digital content in library collections.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of the Education Libraries audience is its interest in education and technology related to instruction and learning. Authors must keep in mind the fact that this journal is scholarly, and the widest audience is those who work in higher education libraries, therefore well researched studies are particularly important. Potential contributors writing book or technology reviews as well as opinion pieces may want to relate their subject back to its value to learning in order to appeal to the audience.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  3.  “Journal Sponsorship,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/journalSponsorship
  4.  “Peer Review Process,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  5. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  7. “Section Policies,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  8.  “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  9. “Publication Frequency,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#publicationFrequency
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Online Submissions,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  14. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  17. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  18. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  19.  “Author Guidelines, Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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Communications in Information Literacy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Communications in Information Literacy

ISSN: 1933-59541

Website: http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php/cil/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Communications in Information Literacy (CIL) is a research-oriented journal that considers knowledge, theory, and practice in the area of information literacy. Its editors seek to advance the “exploration and investigation of the various models of information literacy throughout the world.”2

Target audience: This publication is intended to be read by “professionals in the area of higher education who are committed to advancing information literacy.”3

Publisher: Communications in Information Literacy4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: Primarily research-oriented articles advancing information literacy. The journal also publishes essays and book reviews, but these are not open submission.8

Frequency of publication: Semiannual9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: The editors invite submissions that are  theoretical, research-based, or have a practical focus.10

Submission and review process: Although it is recommended that potential authors send queries before submitting their pieces, this step is not mandatory. Authors submit papers electronically as Word documents after registering on the website. To facilitate the blind review process, the author’s name should be confined to the title page of a submission. The process of review is estimated at 6 to 8 weeks and authors will be informed of decisions. The status of submissions can also be checked after log-on to the website.11 According to the editors of CIL, the manuscript acceptance rate hovers around 35 percent.12

Editorial tone: Academic and formal13

Style guide used: Manual of Style of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CIL offers scholars and those who work in higher education libraries the opportunity to discuss information literacy as well as to share research and knowledge about this growing field. Because this publication is relatively new and is independently published, it is unknown how credible it will prove to be. An indicator of its growth and acceptance is CIL‘s grant from the Digital Humanities Initiative at Buffalo (DHIB) to acquire and assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) to its published works. DOI will be assigned retroactively to articles already published, as well as to articles in future volumes. The DHIB grant is expected to cover the costs of DOI through publication volume nine in the year 2015.15 Due to the fact that it is less established, this journal may present a gateway for those who have not been widely published but who have strong opinions about or knowledge of information literacy.

The journal is indexed in Directory of Open Access Journals, EBSCO, Elsevier Science (SCOPUS), Google Scholar, H.W. Wilson (Library Literature & Information Science Full Text), and Proquest (Library Science). It is also cataloged by OCLC: Worldcat, Public Knowledge Project, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Due to the independent and open access policies of this journal, there are no paid subscribers and no advertising. In 2011 the editors  confirmed over 700 registered users.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the journal is online and open access, readers are located throughout the world.18 As this is an international publication, all potential authors should avoid using certain jargon or cultural references that others may not be able to understand. The CIL editors advise writers, “As we are a journal of information literacy, we assume our readership already has familiarity with the concept of information literacy and its application in library science. Therefore, the manuscript does not need to treat the concept of information literacy as something novel for our readers, particularly in the Introduction or the Literature Review. Unless your institutional definition of information literacy varies significantly from that of the ACRL, there is no need to provide a perfunctory definition of information literacy for our readers.”19

Reader characteristics: Though specific reader demographics are not available, authors may assume that the journal’s readers are international and the majority are employed in libraries at higher education institutions.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The primary readers of this publication are knowledgeable about library and information science issues. As noted above, readers have a clear understanding of information literacy and the issues surrounding the topic. It is likely that most readers have a firm grasp on technology, as this journal is only available online. As individuals interested in information literacy, readers probably work closely with electronic resources. It is clear that the audience of this publication values education and, above all, information literacy. They are interested in ensuring that communities have access to information and the ability to evaluate it adequately.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

It is important to note that because this publication is open access, authors’ work can be viewed for free by anyone searching the Internet, which could be a potential benefit. However, as it has an academic and research emphasis, it is most likely that the audience will be limited to those interested in higher education with a strong background in information literacy. Writers should also keep in mind the growing field of information literacy and recognize the opportunity for new studies in this field, especially those that would be of interest in college libraries and applicable internationally.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523471194802/634315
  2. “Focus and Scope,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  4. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  5. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  6. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  7.  Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  8. “Section Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  10. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017 http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017 http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  13. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  14. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  16. “Editorial Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  18.  “Editorial Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  20. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  21. “Submissions, Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
Continue Reading

Make:

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Make:

ISSN: 1556-23361

Website: http://makezine.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: A hybrid magazine/book (“mook”) specializing in DIY projects, particularly fun, at-home technology in categories like Home & Garden, Art & Design, Computers & Mobile, Craft, and Desktop Manufacturing. Article examples include “Learning to Build a Bot,” “Software for Makers,” and “Code Kids” programming tips.2As the leading voice of the maker movement, Make: publishes tested projects, skill-building tutorials, in-depth reviews and inspirational stories, accessible by all ages and skill ranges”3

Target audience: The target audience is rather diverse and includes anyone who is interested in learning how to build interesting projects, or simply want to see the projects of other people. 4

Publisher: Maker Media, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: Civilian publication and website for hobbyists and professionals.

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Tutorials, projects, reviews, and articles related to education, science, and technology.

Frequency of publication: Print bimonthly, online updated more often.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://makezine.com/submissions.html

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should fit into one of the following categories:

  • Reviews: 50–250 words in length written in the first person. Queries for Reviews can also be emailed to toolbox@makezine.com.
  • Features are either 200-word articles about projects and their makers, or 600-1000 words about groups, companies, or clubs relating to DIY technologies, and can be submitted via the Submission Form.
  • Projects can be either “DIY” or a “Major Project.” As the names imply “DIY” articles are shorter and are also simpler projects, while “Major Projects” are longer and more involved.
  • Everything Else: If it doesn’t fit in one of the above categories, try this.9

Submission and review process: Writers query first using a form on the website to submit their ideas.10

Editorial tone: The style used is informal and instructional. Make: emphasizes that the writer “is the reader’s coach,”11 indicating that writing should be conversational, as if you’re telling a friend something they don’t know.

Style guide used: There is no official style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

While the subject matter of the magazine does not directly relate to any library or information science subjects, libraries are at the forefront of the maker scene. Librarians who run programs utilizing makerspaces, 3-D printers, technology, electronics, and a do-it-yourself spirit might have something to contribute to this magazine, be it a tutorial or a story on a maker program within the library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has a paid circulation of 100,000, while the website receives three million unique visitors per month.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The subscription is only offered in U.S. dollars, which would most likely mean that its readers are all located in the United States.13 Of course, the magazine also has a web element, which could potentially be viewed by anyone with an internet connection. The magazine is written in English, and in a very informal manner. According to the website, the articles are presented with a “highly visual and personal approach.”14 Although there is a possibility that your article will appear on the website and be viewed by someone outside of the United States, it seems safe to use American colloquialisms and slang. Also, since most of the readers will be very tech savvy, it would likely be appropriate to use technical language.

Reader characteristics: The website’s readers are 66% male and 100% college educated, with an average household income of $119,000. The magazine’s readers are 81% male, with an average age of 44, and mostly college educated. The audience is composed of teachers, parents, inventors, and “techy, savvy creatives.”15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader would most likely have little to no knowledge of LIS topics and issues, and probably no knowledge of library jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since these readers would almost certainly be outside of the library world, it would be important to approach LIS subject matter in an approachable way. The use of makerspaces and other DIY, STEM-oriented programs and projects within the library would make great fodder for a contribution to this magazine. It would be important to keep your tone on a more lighthearted tone and avoid jargon as much as possible, or explain the jargon if its use is necessary.

Last updated: October 10, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1.  Make, WorldCat, accessed March 24, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/make-technology-on-your-own-time/oclc/150380631
  2. “Make:,” Makezine.org, accessed October 10, 2016, http://makezine.com/
  3. “Subscribe to Make,” Makezine.com, accessed October 10, 2016, https://readerservices.makezine.com/mk/default.aspx?pc=MK&pk=M6GMKZ
  4. Make:.”
  5. “Leading the Maker Movement,” MakerMedia.com, accessed October 10, 2016, http://makermedia.com/
  6. “Show & Tell,” Makezine.com, accessed October 10, 2016, http://makezine.com/contribute/
  7. Subscribe to Make.”
  8. Subscribe to Make.”
  9. “Make: Submissions Guidelines,” Makezine.com, accessed October 10, 2016, http://makezine.com/submissions/
  10. Make: Submissions Guidelines.”
  11. Make: Submissions Guidelines.”
  12. “2016 Make: Media Kit,” Makermedia.com, accessed October 10, 2016, http://makermedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/2016-Make-Media-Kit-Final.pdf
  13.  “Subscribe to Make.”
  14.  “Make: Submissions Guidelines.”
  15. 2016 Make: Media Kit.”
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Chronicle of Higher Education

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Higher Education

ISSN: 0009-5982(Print) and 1931-1362 (Online)1

Website: http://chronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Chronicle provides information on all facets of higher education in the United States, with international coverage, as well. Along with the general articles, book reviews, and editorials, there are features dealing with the job market as well as extensive classified ads.2

Target audience: Higher education faculty and administration.3

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian; though it does sometimes carry articles of interest to or authored by librarians, it is mainly for the general administration and faculty.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The website contains news, featured stories, opinion pieces, advice columns, job listings, and career-building tools such as online CV management and salary databases. The print magazine features two sections: the first contains news and jobs, while the second is a magazine of the arts.8

Because of its eclectic content, others working in academe will also find something interesting in The Chronicle of Higher Education. While this publication is definitely written for those with careers in higher education, LIS authors with an interest in teaching will find something of interest here as well.

Frequency of publication: The website is updated every weekday, while the print magazine is published weekly during the academic year and less frequently May through August and December, with a total of 43 issues a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Essays; reviews; opinion pieces; reporting; advice columns; and contributions to the “What I’m Reading” feature that answer the question: what have you read lately that is insightful and useful to you as you think about higher education?10 The Chronicle also accepts news pitches, the guidelines of which can be found here.11

Submission and review process: Unsolicited submissions are considered. The decision to accept or reject a manuscript rarely takes more than a week. All accepted essays and articles are rigorously edited and fact-checked. Authors have the opportunity to review and approve a manuscript before it’s published. The editors of The Review will decide where and when the piece is published, with some articles appearing only online.12 Review the submission guide carefully, as different sections have different guidelines.

Editorial tone: Journalistic and conversational.13

Style guide used: None specified. Articles should be written in a clear, informal style free of jargon. Do not use footnotes or citations.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because of the publication frequency and the audience that this newspaper serves, this is a good place for the new author to publish. You don’t necessarily have to work in academe, but it helps. Academic librarians, along with information professionals with an interest in education or pedagogy, would be welcomed here. This publication is an informal counterpart to academic journals, a sort of cocktail hour where academics can mull over or vent about relevant issues within and outside of their field. Interested authors will be intelligent, educated and independent thinkers with something interesting to say.

Also, the wide variety of pieces found in the The Chronicle makes it very easy to find something to write about that, if written in a clear prose style, has a decent chance of being published. Book reviews are a natural, but the longer commentary pieces on some topical tempest occurring in the academy are always a good bet. Because so many write under pen names, the odds of a new author being accepted seem high.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: From the website: The Chronicle‘s is seen by more than 2 million unique visitors a month. “650 organizations across the country make our journalism available to every one of their employees and students.”15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though The Chronicle claims to be the main source of the goings on in higher education, it does tend to concentrate on the English-speaking world of the United States and sometimes Canada and the United Kingdom.16

The audience is well educated and mostly well informed about current events within and outside of academia, but the normal caution of defining extremely specialized or locally used jargon is applicable.17

Other than that, everything seems to go as long as it relates to academe in some way or another. The cosmopolitan affectations of the majority of the readers would allow a more eclectic use of language than would be found in a more mainstream newspaper.

Reader characteristics: As this is a lay publication, the makeup of its readership is somewhat important, but because it is a specialized publication the readership still has many common traits. The average reader tends to be either administration or faculty at a college or university, they can either be relatively new in their profession or at the midpoint, and though once predominately male the percentage of females is on the increase and will probably overtake the male percentage in the next few years. The readers are well educated and very interested in their profession and the culture of academe as a whole.18 Writing for The Chronicle would be an excellent way to increase understanding of library issues (such as information literacy) and market the library’s relevance to other professions. Intellectual and academic freedom, new issues in purchasing and providing content such as e-journals, information literacy, and services to disadvantaged groups would be other issues that would resonate with this readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Over all, the readership is oblivious of the complexities of the LIS profession and is most concerned with those processes that touch them in their own professions such as collection development. Of course, the readership would more than likely not fully understand the meaning of “collection development,” so such technical phrases would have to be defined.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

An LIS professional writing for this audience would not have much additional work to do, so long as he or she has something interesting and informed to write about. This is a publication for opinion pieces and reviews, and readers pick up The Chronicle to be entertained and informed. While this is not the place for scholarly work, readers do enjoy learning about new research or reading critiques of articles they’ve read in an entertaining format. They want to read shop talk, stay informed in their field, and feel connected to issues in the larger world.

This would be a good place to write an opinion piece about an LIS issue that touches on education, society or academe, or review a work that touches on these same issues. Todd Gilman, Librarian for Literature in English at Yale University and a Lecturer at San Jose State University, has published articles about distance education, special collections, research skills and information literacy, and other topics that connect libraries and academe in The Chronicle.

Last updated: September 25, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1601911248
  2. “The Chronicle of Higher Education,” www.chronicle.com, accessed September 18, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/the-chronicle-of-higher/609?cid=cheftr
  3. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  4. “The Chronicle of Higher Education,” Wikipedia, accessed September 20, 2016, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicle_of_Higher_Education
  5. “Submissions,” Chronicle.com, accessed September 19, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/Submissions/638
  6. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  7. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  8. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  9. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  10. Submissions.”
  11. “How to Pitch Us,” Chronicle.com, accessed September 20, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/How-to-Pitch-Us/633/
  12. Submissions.”
  13. Submissions.”
  14. Submissions.”
  15. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  16. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  17. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  18. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
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Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

ISSN: 0748-5786 (Print) and 2328-2967 (Online)1

Website: http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445

Purpose, objective, or mission: “JELIS supports scholarly inquiry in library and information science (LIS) education by serving as the primary venue for the publication of research articles, reviews, and brief communications about issues of interest to LIS educators.”2

Target audience: LIS faculty and educators, and more specifically, ALISE members3

Publisher: Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS and education scholarly6 JELIS is a peer-reviewed journal that features scholarly papers, original research, reports, and studies. Although the journal does also publish brief communications, reader comments, and guest editorials, its primary purpose is the presentation of scholarly research.7

Medium: Online8

Content: JELIS publishes peer-reviewed research articles that contribute to scholarship in the field of education in library and information science and brief communications on topics important to the field. The later is not subject to peer review, but editorial approval only.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458

Types of contributions accepted: JELIS accepts submission of major articles of up to 7,000 words and more reflective, brief communications of up to 1,500 words.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted via the online submission widget. The publication acknowledges the receipt of all submissions. Major articles go through a double-blind review process.12

Editorial tone: Formal and academic.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Additional information on style and formatting guidelines is included in the guidelines.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal in the field of LIS education, JELIS would be a suitable publication venue for those involved in academic librarianship or graduate-level teaching. Although its readership may be relatively small, publication in JELIS would definitely help in the process of building tenure and establishing professional credibility. Ulrichsweb notes that “(JELIS) Authors are most often professors in schools of library and information science.”15 However, information professionals, LIS faculty, and even LIS students with relevant experience and strong academic writing skills should consider submitting work to JELIS.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Actual numbers are not available, but JELIS is made available to all ALISE members, both individual and institutional, as a benefit of membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although detailed geographic information is not available, the ALISE mission specifically mentions serving faculty in North America.17 JELIS is published solely in English, 18 and its North American base would suggest that most readers are comfortable communicating in English. Due to the prominent Canadian reader contingent, authors would definitely want to avoid colloquialisms and cultural references that are specific to the United States.19

Reader characteristics: Though demographic information on readership is not available, ALISE does note that its members are generally faculty in library and information science graduate programs.20 It is difficult to make blanket characterizations in terms of age, gender, and ethnicity, as readers range from LIS students to deans. No detailed breakdown of reader workplaces is provided by JELIS or ALISE. The ALISE membership brochure notes that its members include “All levels of faculty, administration, students, librarians, researchers, educational institutions, and others interested in library and information science education.”21 Readers likely share a high level of education and a professional interest in LIS education and graduate-level teaching.

JELIS readers, particularly LIS faculty members, are likely to have established opinions based on their area of expertise.22 They are also likely to share the core values of librarianship and view the profession as highly important and relevant in both the academic and professional spheres. Yet JELIS does also feature divergent viewpoints and constructive criticism in its reader comments and guest editorials.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JELIS readers are extremely knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and well-versed in library jargon, particularly that which relates to education.24 Authors will want to focus their submissions on the most relevant topics for LIS educators, as this publication is quite specialized and readers might not be interested in more general or overarching library concepts.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a scholarly publication that features specialized content geared towards a relatively small audience of LIS educators and students. Successful submissions will exhibit a professional and academic tone, and should specifically address emerging issues and trends in LIS education in the United States and Canada, or internationally. Appropriate topics might include technological advances in distance learning, course management systems such as Blackboard or WebCT, the use of Web 2.0 applications (i.e., blogs, wikis, podcasts) in teaching, or a comparative analysis of international LIS education. Additionally, authors might consider including original research to more effectively connect with JELIS readers.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/738510419
  2. Journal for Library and Information Science Education, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  3. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  4. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  5.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  6.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  7.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  8.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  9.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  10.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  11. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  12.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  13.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  14.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  15.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  16. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  17. “ALISE Strategic Plan 2017-2020,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/alise-strategic-plan-2017-2020
  18.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  19. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  20. Association for Library and Information Science Education. (2013). About ALISE. Retrieved from http://www.alise.org/about-alise
  21. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  22. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  23. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  24. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  25. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
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Information and Learning Science

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information and Learning Science (previously published as Library World and then New Library World and incorporating Asian Libraries)1

ISSN: 2398-5348 (Print) and 1758-6909 (Online)2

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Information and Learning Science advances inter-disciplinary research that explores scholarly intersections shared within 2 key fields: information science and the learning sciences / education sciences. The journal provides a publication venue for work that strengthens our scholarly understanding of human inquiry and learning phenomena, especially as they relate to design and uses of information and e-learning systems innovations.”3

Target audience: The target audience is international in scope, including academics, information professionals, and librarians, along with researchers and teachers involved in the library and information community.

Publisher: Emerald Publishing.

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and Online.

Content: “We invite research that builds upon and advances theories, methods, results, innovation designs, evidence bases and frameworks for action present across both information science, and the learning/education sciences scholarly domains. We especially welcome the submission of papers that directly address, explicate and discuss the inter-disciplinary boundaries and intersections present across these two fields, and that offer new conceptual, empirical and technological syntheses. Such investigations may include but are not limited to:

  • E-learning perspectives on searching, information-seeking, and information uses and practices engaged by a full diversity of youth, adults, elders and specialized populations, in varied contexts including leisure time activities; e-learning at work, in libraries, at school, home, during playtime, in health/wellness settings, etc.
  • Design and use of systems such as MOOCs, social media, learning management systems, search systems, information systems, and other technology design innovations that contribute to human inquiry, formal and informal learning, searching, information-seeking, information uses, knowledge building and sharing, and instruction;
  • HCI, socio-technical systems research, and materiality research perspectives on information and learning systems design; social learning ecologies; and creation and use of physical objects and settings that elicit human inquiry and learning;
  • Ethnographic; emancipatory; social justice-based; feminist; critical race theory; and post-structuralist research involving information, learning, equity, design;
  • Information, communication, and technology (ICT) considerations in computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) contexts;
  • Innovations and e-learning solutions that address digital / information / media / data literacy and/or address the digital divide;
  • Innovations involving problem-, project-, and inquiry-based learning contexts and goods;
  • Learning analytics and/or data science perspectives on measurement and analysis of learning in information / search / e-learning systems;
  • Social and ethical issues in e-learning contexts such as design, measurement, and evaluation — such as privacy and security concerns around student confidentiality, data ownership and ethical data uses by researchers, teachers, institutions, etc.”5

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (six times a year).

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Information and Learning Science accepts articles in the following categories: research paper, viewpoint, technical paper, conceptual paper, case study, literature review, and general review (between 2,500 and 6,000 words). Structured abstracts must be submitted with all articles. The journal also publishes conference reports and book reviews.6

Submission and review process: Authors submit and track manuscripts on ScholarOne Manuscripts. The editor reviews submissions and sends appropriate manuscripts to two referees for double-blind review. Conference reports and book reviews are not peer reviewed.7

Editorial tone: The editorial tone is scholarly and academic.

Style guide used: Information and Learning Science uses Harvard Style and provides examples of references and citations.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information and Learning Science is multidisciplinary and international in scope. It publishes many different types of high-quality articles on a broad range of LIS topics. Further, the journal takes account of “social, cultural, economic, ergonomic, ethical and sectoral issues,” which appeals to LIS authors worldwide.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information and Learning Science is published in English in the United Kingdom; however, its audience is international. Editorial Advisory Board members are from all over the world, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Nigeria, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Hungary,  Greece, and the United Arab Emirates.10

Reader characteristics: Due to the journal’s international reach, Information and Learning Science attracts readers from the LIS professional spectrum, including teachers, librarians, researchers, and students, from a variety of library types and information settings, who are interested in understanding LIS practices from around the world.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader of Information and Learning Science has a broad understanding of LIS subject matters and issues and an understanding of library jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the readership is international, published articles should have a broad level of interest and be applicable to LIS professionals and academics from all over the world. Information and Learning Science is a scholarly journal with a large number of academics in its audience; the articles they would be most interested in would be those based on original and novel scholarship and research.

Last updated: April 14, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Journal History,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  2.  Information and Learning Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/901530879
  3. “Aims & Scope,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ils.
  5. “Aims & Scope.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Aims & Scope.
  10. “Editorial Team,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=ils.
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