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Public Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Public Services Quarterly

ISSN: 1522-8959 (print), 1522-9114 (online)

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wpsq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Public Services Quarterly “covers a broad spectrum of public service issues in academic libraries, presenting practical strategies for implementing new initiatives and research-based insights into effective practices.”1 The journal was formerly known as Public & Access Services Quarterly (1995-2001).2

Target audience: Academic librarians, professors, and LIS graduate students.3

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Public Services Quarterly publishes research- and practice-based articles, theoretical articles, and case studies.6 Further, the journal publishes regular columns that keep academic librarians up to date in the field of public service with reviews, essays, reports, and commentaries: Internet Resources, Professional Reading, Best of the Literature, Technology, Marketing, Future Voices in Public Services, and Special Libraries, Special Challenges.7

Frequency of publication: 4 issues per year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Public Services Quarterly accepts “research-based and theoretical articles as well as case studies that advance the understanding of public services, including reference and research assistance, information literacy instruction, access and delivery services, and other services to patrons,” as well as those that “examine creative ways to use technology to assist students and faculty.” The journal also accepts practice-based articles, which “should be thoroughly grounded in the literature and should situate the work done in one library into the larger context of the situation.”9

Submission and review process: Public Services Quarterly uses ScholarOne Manuscripts for the submission, revision, and peer-review process. All published articles go though an anonymous double-blind peer review; thematic issues are reviewed at the discretion of the special issue editor.10 Taylor & Francis provides a guide for authors that covers the entire publication process,11 including directions for using ScholarOne Manuscripts12 and an American Psychological Association (APA) reference guide.13

Editorial tone: Published articles are scholarly in tone; the columns are academic but less formal, depending on the content.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Public Services Quarterly has an established reputation for quality, scholarly writing about public service issues in academic libraries. The journal values scholarship and research that is practical and applicable in academic libraries, so LIS writers should highlight these aspects in their manuscripts. Aside from scholarly research articles, LIS students could contribute to columns specifically seeking the viewpoint of LIS students or provide updates on the latest professional books, websites, and themes in the field.

The Future Voices in Public Services column provides a forum for students in graduate LIS programs “to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to tell us of their visions for the profession, or to tell us of research that is going on in library schools.”15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Public Services Quarterly is a North American English-language journal for an international audience. The editorial board includes librarians from from U.S. and Canadian colleges,16 but the publication aims to cover worldwide issues confronting academic librarians.

Reader characteristics: Public Services Quarterly primarily serves academic librarians, professors, and graduate students.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter is strong, especially as it relates to academic public services. However, the journal is also read by students who may still be developing their LIS knowledge. Further, there is a column written by LIS graduate students that offers fresh perspectives and insights to the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers expect high-level research and scholarship that advances the theory and practice of public service librarianship in the academic setting. They also expect to read regular columns that keep them up to date in a field that is perpetually advancing. Writers need to remember that readers are established academic librarians and graduate students from North America and around the world. The Future Voices in Public Services column is a great way for LIS graduate students to experience the publication process of a highly esteemed journal.

Last updated: March 4, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wpsq20.
  2. “Journal Information,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wpsq20.
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Aims and Scope.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. See, for example, Public Services Quarterly 14, 1(2017), https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wpsq20/14/1?nav=tocList.
  8. “Journal Information.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wpsq20&page=instructions.
  10. “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 4, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Making Your Submission,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 4, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/category/making-your-submission/.
  13. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” tandf.co.uk, accessed March 4, 2018, http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. Nancy Dewald, “2015-16 LIS Student Publishing Opportunity,” ALA ILI-L Discussion List, September 22, 2015, http://lists.ala.org/sympa/arc/ili-l/2015-09/msg00123.html.
  16. “Editorial Board,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wpsq20.
  17. “Aims and Scope.”
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Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

ISSN: 1750-59681

Website: https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Information Literacy (JIL) is the professional journal of the CILIP Information Literacy Group. The journal “publishes innovative and challenging research articles and project reports which push the boundaries of information literacy thinking in theory, practice and method, and which aim to develop deep and critical understandings of the role, contribution and impact of information literacies in everyday contexts, education and the workplace.”2

Target audience: The target audience includes members of the UK-based CILIP Information Literacy Group and LIS professionals, scholars, students, and teachers, and those working in any field related to information literacy instruction and scholarship.

Publisher: JIL is published by the CILIP Information Literacy Group and hosted by Loughborough University Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: JIL “aims to investigate information literacy in all its forms to address the interests of diverse IL communities of practice.”5 Regular sections include Peer-Reviewed Articles, Articles from LILAC (Librarians’ Information Literacy Annual Conference), Book Reviews, Conference Updates, Project Reports, and Students’ View of IL.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JIL accepts research articles that are “informed and evidence based, designed around an arguable research question, contextualised with reference to previous and current advances in IL thinking, [and] methodologically robust with a demonstrable research design.8 For the Students’ View of IL section, submissions should be “papers drawn from research (theoretical or applied) undertaken by students as part of a postgraduate course in LIS or other cognate disciplines, such as education or media.”9 Authors may also submit reviews of books, media, websites, and software relevant to information literacy practices; conference updates; and project reports “related to information, digital and learning literacies.10

Submission and review process: JIL‘s Submission page includes a section titled The Route to Publication that provides a helpful overview of the submission, review, and acceptance process. Authors need to format manuscripts according to the journal’s article template and verify that manuscripts conform to each item on the Submission Preparation Checklist. After manuscripts are submitted online, they are peer reviewed with comments on suitability and suggestions for revision; authors receive feedback and may resubmit for review if substantial changes are made.11

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly, and writers should use UK spelling. The journal’s Submission page provides helpful guidelines and templates for expected style, structure, and argument.12

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).13 

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JIL “publishes articles from both established and new authors” in the field of information literacy. Furthermore, JIL “welcomes contributions that push the boundaries of IL beyond the educational setting and examine this phenomenon as a continuum between those involved in its development and delivery and those benefiting from its provision.”14 This journal is a good fit for LIS authors who conduct original research and novel scholarship in any area of information literacy. LIS graduate students and recent graduates have a great opportunity to publish in the journal’s Students’ View of IL section. JIL accepts 44% of articles submitted for publication.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JIL is published by CILIP Information Literacy Group, which “works across the UK and represents a UK workforce of 87,000 information professionals working across the private, public and third sectors to unlock the value of information.”16 Authors should keep in mind that readers are information professionals throughout the UK, but as an open-access journal for a large organization, it can have an international reach.

Reader characteristics: Readers are information professionals throughout the UK. CILIP explains that information professional “is an umbrella term for librarians, information managers, knowledge managers and data professionals.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Based on membership in CILIP, readers are UK information professionals in a wide range of libraries and institutions. Members are interested in staying up-to-date on the most current developments in information literacy and in advancing scholarship of and practice in the field. Authors should keep in mind the journal’s focus on innovative research, scholarship, and practice in the field of information literacy.

Last updated: April 10, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523821255563/626763
  2. Homepage, Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/.
  3. “About the Journal,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about.
  4. “Submissions,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about/submissions.
  5. “About the journal.”
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About the Journal.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “About the Journal.”
  15. “About the Journal.”
  16. “Who We Represent,” cilip.org.uk, accessed April 10, 2018, http://www.cilip.org.uk/page/who_we_represent.
  17. “Who We Represent.”
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Facet Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Facet Publishing

Website: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Facet Publishing is “the commercial and publishing and bookselling arm of CILIP: the Library and Information Association,” with a focus on global business and attention to detail.1

Target audience: LIS professionals.

Owner: CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: LIS professional books, textbooks, series and ebooks.

Medium: Print and electronic, though not all titles are available in both formats.

Topics covered: Over thirty LIS subjects are published by Facet, ranging from academic libraries to website & intranet management.2

Number of titles published per year: Exact number unknown, though Facet’s ‘Recently published’ page lists thirty books published between April 2017 and January 2018.3

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php

Types of submissions accepted: Facets asks potential authors to “think carefully about the intended market, the competition and the unique selling points”4 before sending in a proposal. They are looking for “a mixture of content: practice oriented books for working professionals, textbooks that particularly dovetail with the iSchools curriculum and emerging developments and thinking in research for a scholarly audience.”5 Book proposals should contain sections regarding the book’s content, market, and competition, as well as information about yourself.

The content:

  • “A synopsis of the book, including a detailed outline of the work with intended chapter headings, together with a description of each chapter and its estimated length
  • An estimate of the total length of the book
  • A rationale describing why the book is needed, what it hopes to achieve and how, and any new ideas and developments you intend to cover, or new approaches that you intend to use. Notes on additional features such as case studies, checklists, diagrams, photographs, software, etc.
  • Sample material (one or two chapters), if possible
  • An estimated date of manuscript completion”6

The market:

  • “Who is the intended reader?
  • How large do you estimate the potential readership to be?
  • A description of the potential readers (e.g., students, practising library and information professionals/managers, policy makers) with specific details about why they need this book:
    • what sectors/organizations they are working in
    • the required level of professional expertise
    • courses
  • Are there any potential secondary audiences and markets? (e.g., museums, archives, publishers, record managers)
  • Is there international potential? Where? Why?”7

The competition: “Does this book fill a gap in the market? What evidence is there for this gap? Provide a list of any competing books with price, publisher, year of publication, and any other useful information, together with a comment as to how your book differs, what makes it superior and how it will compete.”8

Yourself: “Details of yourself, your experience, related activities, and any other previous publications (whether articles, reports or books).”9

Submission and review process: All proposals should be submitted to the Commissioning Editor. If a proposal is accepted, the author and commissioning editors will work together on a realistic schedule for the book’s publication.10 Facet prides themselves on timeliness and detail, and are quick to market new publications.11

Editorial tone: None listed, but consider that Facet publishes for students and professionals already well versed in the LIS field.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Facet publishes across a wide array of LIS topics, making them a publisher to strongly consider no matter what your subject field may be. Potential authors should keep in mind that Facet requests very detailed information from each book proposal, so authors should have a clear idea of their marketability and relevance. Authors should be sure to carefully read the book submission guidelines to ensure that all questions have been addressed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s readers

Publication circulation: Based in the United Kingdom, but Facet has agents and representatives around the world.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Facet is the bookseller for CILIP, a library and science information association in the U.K., though they emphasize that their publications extend into the international LIS world. They have representatives and agents in countries all over the world, making publications available to a world wide audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Facet publications are information professionals, though there may be a secondary audience in fields such as archives and museums. Facet’s bestselling publications include titles such as Managing Records: A handbook of principles and practice and Practical Cataloging, so it can be assumed that their readers have more than a casual knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics and professionals with a strong knowledge or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Facet publishes for an audience in and outside of the United Kingdom. Their works range from LIS textbooks to simple ‘No-nonsense’ guides about topics such as archives and legal issues in Web 2.0, showing that Facet’s readers vary in their knowledge on contemporary LIS topics. This span in readership could make Facet a viable publisher for potential authors across many different subjects.

Last updated: February 26, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/
  2. “Home,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/index.php/a>
  3. “Recently published,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/category.php?category_code=38
  4. “Book proposal guidelines,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php
  5. “Write for us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/write_for_us.php
  6. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  7. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  8. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  9. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  10. “The publishing process,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February, 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/Guidance_for_Existing_Authors/04%20The%20publishing%20process%20Jan%202012.pdf
  11. “About us.”
  12. “About Us.”
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Law Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Law Library Journal

ISSN: 0023-92831

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Since 1908, LLJ has provided up-to-date information on law, legal materials, and law librarianship.2

Target audience: “Law librarians and others who work with legal materials.”3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries (AALL)4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Sample article topics “include law library collections and their acquisition and organization; services to patrons and instruction in legal research; law library administration; the effects of developing technology on law libraries; law library design and construction; substantive law as it applies to libraries; and the history of law libraries and legal materials.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Information appropriate to law librarianship, case studies, descriptive or historical narratives, commentaries, reports on research projects, articles memorializing deceased members of the association.10

Submission and review process: As is standard practice for scholarly journals, LLJ only accepts unpublished manuscripts which are not being considered for publication elsewhere. The editor works closely with authors throughout the review process and keeps the latter informed of the expected production schedule. Additionally, the journal encourages potential authors to submit queries before submitting articles for consideration.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, although many articles have adapted an engaging narrative style, which is as readable as it is informative.12

Style guide used: The Bluebook, which illustrates how to format footnotes and references is used in conjunction with The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Law Library Journal is an excellent choice for students working in law libraries, lawyers, judges, paralegals, law students, as well as anyone interested in law libraries in general, including the history of these valuable institutions. Although the subject matter of this publication is relatively specialized, authors who combine research with engaging narrative to frame in-depth articles on law libraries will feel right at home with LLJ.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Circulates to nearly 4500 members and subscribers.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because Law Library Journal is published by the American Association of Law Libraries, the bulk of its audience is comprised of English-speakers, particularly those who live in the U.S. and/or are interested in U.S. law libraries.16 However, the journal also publishes research which describes the role of law in other countries, particularly European countries which have influenced the U.S.17

Reader characteristics: LLJ readers are primarily law librarians or others who work with legal materials and resources. They may work in law firms, law libraries, law schools, public libraries with law sections, etc.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with both LIS and legal jargon.

Additionally, since the bulk of LLJ’s readers are AALL members, it’s worth examining the general knowledge base of the AALL. AALL members belong to a variety of committees, including the Citation Formats Committee,18 Fair Business Practices Implementation Task Force,19 and Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Law Library Journal‘s readers are very familiar with legal procedure, courts, and librarianship. While the articles in this journal are written in an easy-to-understand style, readers expect authors to accurately portray the nuances of U.S. law, the history of libraries in general, etc. Thus, although the topics portrayed within the journal are broader than the title suggests, thorough knowledge of U.S. law and its history is suggested before submitting to this publication.

Last updated: February 23, 2018


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  2.  Law Library Journal, American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/
  3.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  4. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  5. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  6. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  7.  Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  8.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  9. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  10. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  11. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  12. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  13. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  14.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  15. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries
    Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  16. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  17.  James E. Duggan, ed. “Introduction,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  18. “Citations Formats Committee,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/citation-formats-committee/
  19.  “Fair Business Practices Implementation Task Force,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/fair-business-practices-implementation-task-force/
  20. “Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February, 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/recruitment-to-law-librarianship-committee/
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portal: Libraries and the Academy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: portal: Libraries and the Academy

ISSN:  1531-2542 (print), 1530-7131 (online)

Website: https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy

Purpose, objective, or mission: portal is an award-winning journal that focuses “on important research about the role of academic libraries and librarianship” and “features commentary on issues in technology and publishing.” 1 The journal “publishes articles that focus on all aspects of librarianship, knowledge management, and information services and studies within higher education.”2

Target audience: portal is “intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of libraries within the academy.”3

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Each issue of portal “includes peer-reviewed articles on subjects such as library administration, information technology, new forms of support for research and teaching, and information policy. Other articles address technological issues, research, standards, and policy and strategic planning.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: portal accepts research and scholarship on libraries in the academy, especially work that explores the effects of technology on librarianship, the roles of libraries in meeting institutional missions, how the information revolution is challenging and changing library and information practices, and how libraries and librarians address the changing needs of the academy and academics. portal “welcomes submission of inquiries and proposals for topics that authors have under development and will provide guidance on the suitability for publication in portal.” The journal maintains a rigorous review policy, which requires scholarship to be unique in advancing knowledge in the field; needed and in demand, with intrinsic value and use; and used locally and of value to the field. For Features, authors may direct proposals to the appropriate editor.9

Submission and review process: The preferred method for submitting manuscripts to portal is via email with a Microsoft Word attachment. “All submissions to portal are subjected to the double-blind review process, and referees are explicitly asked to indicate when a manuscript is worthy but needs more detailed guidance to be fully acceptable for publication in portal.”10 Authors will usually receive the editor’s decision and the referees’ comments within four to eight weeks after submission.

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

portal is a well-established, respected, award-winning journal.12 LIS authors who want to publish in it should read the 2004 article “Research and Scholarship Defined for portal: Libraries and the Academy.13 The editors of portal encourage authors, especially new authors, to find experienced mentors to guide them through the research and publishing process. For manuscripts deemed “worthy” but in need of revision, authors are encouraged to work with an experienced mentor to incorporate the referees’ comments and to do further revision; revised manuscripts will be subject to double-blind review with different referees. Overall, portal maintains high standards of scholarship; however, the journal also values collaborative work between novice and experienced LIS writers in order to bring well-written, innovative articles to its pages.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available; the journal is available through Project MUSE.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: portal is a U.S.-based journal that is published in English for an international LIS audience.16

Reader characteristics: The readers of this journal are interested in the role and impact of libraries within an academic environment. The journal’s readers are aware of the importance of a librarian’s work and of the need for careful and scholarly research in the LIS field. Readers work in academic libraries around the world and are researchers and scholars of librarianship in the academy.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are engaged academic librarians who will have considerable knowledge of LIS terms and subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The main audience for portal is academic librarians, faculty, library science students, information professionals, and anyone interested working in a library environment in higher education. Readers expected consistently high-quality, novel research and scholarship that helps librarians improve and innovate their practices and approaches in the academic library environment.

Last updated: February 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Overview,” portal: Libraries and the Academy, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy.
  2. “Author Guidelines,” portal: Libraries and the Academy, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy/author-guidelines.
  3. “Author Guidelines.”
  4. “Overview.”
  5. “Author Guidelines.”
  6. “Overview.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Available Issues,” Project MUSE, accessed February 23, 2018, https://muse.jhu.edu/journal/159.
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Author Guidelines.”
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Awards,” portal: Libraries and the Academy, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy/awards.
  13. Charles B. Lowry, “Research and Scholarship Defined for portal: Libraries and the Academy,” portal: Libraries and the Academy 4, no. 4 (October 2004): 449-453, https://doi.org/10.1353/pla.2004.0068.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Available Issues.”
  16. “Author Guidelines.”
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Chandos Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Chandos Publishing

Website: https://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals/chandos-publishing

Purpose, objective, or mission: Chandos is “an international leading publisher in contemporary library and information science, and social science”1 with a global perspective. They are an imprint of the publishing house Elsevier, founded in 1880.

Target audience: LIS professionals and those in the social sciences fields.

Owner: Elsevier

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Elsevier’s book proposal form asks potential authors to list three experts in the field who could provide input as part of the book’s review panel. All proposals are read by Elsevier editorial staff and selected external reviewers.2

Check out Elsevier’s How to get published guide for more information on the publishing process.

Types of books published: Reference, textbooks, research books.

Medium: Print and digital.

Topics covered: Contemporary issues within the library and information sciences, including legal aspects, library acquisitions, bibliometrics and digital libraries.3

Number of titles published per year: In 2017, Chandos published twenty three books in the LIS field.4

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.elsevier.com/authors/book-authors

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for both books and journals.

Information that needs to be included in your proposal:

  • Title
  • Author(s) and/or editors(s)
  • Aims and scope/Background and purpose
  • Your intended audience and its needs
  • Competing resources
  • Table of contents
  • Sample chapter
  • Qualified reviewers
  • Clarity and discoverability
  • Optional: multimedia content

For more information, consult the Authors and Book Editors page.

Submission and review process: After sending a proposal to the proposal mailbox (linked on this page), further questions about the process can be answered by sending an email to an acquisitions editor at the same proposal mailbox. Be sure the subject line of the email reads: “Question for [subject area] acquisitions editor.” All proposals are considered by Elsevier editorial staff and selected external reviewers.5

Editorial tone: Professional. The home page for Chandos Publishing states that they produce books for researchers, academics and practitioners.6

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Though Elsevier is a large publishing house that is heavy on journals, LIS book authors could possibly find a good fit with Chandos. In 2017, some of their published book titles included Emerging Library Technologies, Social Justice and Library Work and Taking Your Library Career to the Next Level. Elsevier is especially supportive of less experienced researchers and authors. Their website Researcher Academy offers in depth teaching modules to help authors learn about getting their works published and promoted.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Chandos is a sizable LIS publisher. Their online catalog shows 384 books currently in print within the library and information science subject area.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though Elsevier’s headquarters is in the Netherlands, Chandos states that they are an international publisher for the global LIS community. They feature a book series entitled the Asian Studies series, producing titles such as China’s Publishing Industry and Scholarly Communication in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. Chandos also publishes international titles such as Succession Planning in Canadian Academic Libraries and Australian Library Supervision and Management.

Reader characteristics: Readers of works published by Chandos will likely be LIS academics and professionals seeking out books on specific subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The home page for Chandos publishing states that they publish for “researchers, academics and practitioners,” so authors can assume that readers could potentially have an expert knowledge in the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of works published by Chandos are LIS professionals located all over the world. With works such as Disaster Planning for Special Libraries and The Impact of Print-On-Demand on Academic Books, it’s clear that readers come to Chandos with well defined information needs that pertain to specific areas within the LIS field.

Last updated: February 22, 2018


References

Show 6 footnotes

  1. “About,” Elsevier.com, accessed February 20, 2018, https://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals/chandos-publishing
  2. “Book Authors,” Elsevier.com, accessed February 22, 2018, https://www.elsevier.com/authors/book-authors
  3. “About.”
  4. “Catalog,” Elsevier.com, accessed February 20, 2018, https://www.elsevier.com/catalog?producttype=book&cat0=27390&cat1=28072&cat2=&imprintname=Chandos+Publishing&categoryrestriction=&author=&publicationyear=2017&q=&sort=datedesc
  5. “Book Authors.”
  6. “About.”
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New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship

ISSN1361-4541 (print), 1740-7885 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcll20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship “is multidisciplinary in nature, providing opportunities for the ‘€˜pure’ discussion of children’s literature, and of issues relating to one of the key places in which to find such literature — €”libraries for young people.”1

Target audience: Those working in the field of children’s and adolescent literature around the world, including public and school librarians, scholars, critics, and teachers.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship is international in scope and publishes articles on a broad range of topics in the field of children’s and adolescent literature and library services, including “the management of library services to children and adolescents; education issues affecting library services; user education and the promotion of services; staff education and training; collection development and management; critical assessments of children’s and adolescent literature; book and media selection; and research in literature and library services for children and adolescents”6

Frequency of publication: Two issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship accepts “original papers of both an experimental and theoretical nature,” as well as those grounded in practical issues in children’s and adolescent literature and library services. The journal publishes original research and scholarship on a broad range of professional issues in children’s and adolescent library services as well as theoretical analyses and discussions of children’s and adolescent literature.8

Submission and review process: Manuscripts and all editorial inquiries should be directed to the editor9 for editorial screening and peer review.10 Taylor & Francis provides a general overview of the publication process.11

Editorial tone: The tone is academic and appropriate for an international audience.

Style guide used: MLA Handbook (8th ed.).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship is an appropriate outlet for LIS scholars, practitioners, and researchers from around the world who are writing about children’s and adolescent literature and library services. The journal publishes high-level research and analyses, as well as theoretical articles and those with practical application.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The New Review of Children’s Literature is international in scope and is published in English. The journal’s editor is based in the United Kingdom, as are many members of the editorial board. In addition, there are editorial board members from Ireland, France, the United States, Canada, Hong Kong, and Thailand.13

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely public and school librarians, as well as researchers in children’s library services and teachers and critics of children’s literature.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As an academic journal, it can be assumed that most readers have a solid professional knowledge of LIS subject matters.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship have a high level of knowledge of the topic and expect to read articles that further their knowledge with well-reasoned analysis and research presented in a straightforward writing style. Readers are also practicing librarians who look to the journal for “informed comment and advice.”15 The journal’s readership is international, and so authors should provide some context for regional practices.

Last updated: February 14, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=rcll20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Journal Information,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rcll20.
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Journal Information.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. “Journal Information.”
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rcll20&page=instructions.
  10. “Aims and Scope.”
  11. “Author Services,” TaylorandFrancis.com, accessed February 14, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Instructions for Authors.”
  13. “Editorial Board,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rcll20.
  14. “Aims and Scope.”
  15. “Aims and Scope.”
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Medical Reference Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Medical Reference Services Quarterly

ISSN0276-3869 (print), 1540-9597 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wmrs20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Medical Reference Services Quarterly “covers topics of current interest and practical value in the areas of reference in medicine and related specialties, the biomedical sciences, nursing, and allied health.” The journal publishes practice-oriented and research articles on medical reference services, with a focus on “user education, database searching, and electronic information.”1

Target audience: Medical Reference Services Quarterly is an “essential working tool for medical and health sciences librarians” aimed at “professionals who provide reference and public services to health sciences personnel in clinical, educational, or research settings” in the fields of medicine, biomedical science, nursing, allied health.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Medical Reference Services Quarterly publishes original practical and research articles on health sciences librarianship. Regular columns include Online Updates, Emerging Technologies, Hospital Information Services, Informatics Education, From the Literature, and Book Reviews.6 Recent topics include using the Internet for providing medical information, using biomedical databases, managing medical reference services, continuing education, marketing, user education, document delivery, patient education, ready reference, and collection management, all within the context of medical reference services.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted:Medical Reference Services Quarterly covers topics of current interest and practical value in public services librarianship in the areas of medicine and related specialties, including the biomedical sciences, nursing, and allied health. MRSQ has expanded its scope to cover most aspects of health sciences librarianship, including health informatics, information literacy, collection development, and management of health sciences libraries”9

Submission and review process: Submissions are submitted via email to the editor as Word file attachments. Manuscripts are screened for originality.10 Manuscripts are “are peer reviewed using a rigorous, double-blind process” by two reviewers assigned based on subject expertise.11

Editorial tone: Formal and scholarly.

Style guide used: Chicago Publication Manual, 16th ed.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Medical Reference Services Quarterly is a journal for LIS professionals who specialize in medical and health science information services in clinical, educational, or research settings, and who produce articles of practical application and original research. Authors should be aware that this is a high-level, “highly acclaimed,” professional and research journal, with an emphasis on articles that analyze and evaluate practical application in all types of medical and health science library and information settings.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not provided.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Medical Reference Services Quarterly is written in English for a U.S.-based audience. The editors and editorial board members are from U.S. institutions.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be well educated (often having a science or medical degree and an LIS degree) and to expect articles they can apply to improve the services they provide to their users. Readers have a shared interest in reference services, medical information, and technology. Subscribers to this journal seem to value well-researched and well-written articles that will help them in their work.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers, given the specific nature and focus of this journal, will probably have a general knowledge of LIS subject matter with extensive, in-depth knowledge of medical reference services and research.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers and authors will likely be professionals and researchers already in the field of medical reference services. Furthermore, faculty and librarians involved with developing programs on information literacy, embedded librarianship, and library instruction directed to medical and clinical students, for example, will find practical, in-depth articles to read and a high-profile journal in which to publish.

Last updated: February 7, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Medical Reference Services Quarterly, accessed February 5, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wmrs20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Journal Information,” Medical Reference Services Quarterly, accessed February 5, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wmrs20.
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Journal Information.”
  6. Table of Contents, Medical Reference Services Quarterly 37, no. 1 (January 2018), http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wmrs20.
  7. “Aims and Scope.”
  8. “Journal Information.”
  9. “Instructions for authors,” Medical Reference Services Quarterly, accessed February 5, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wmrs20.
  10. “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. “Aims and Scope.”
  12. “Instructions for Authors.”
  13. “Aims and Scope.”
  14. “Editorial Board,” Medical Reference Services Quarterly, accessed February 5, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wmrs20.
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Rowman & Littlefield

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: http://rowman.com/RLPublishers

Purpose, objective, or mission: Rowman & Littlefield “publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.”1 Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others.2

Target audience: Rowman & Littlefield offers “serious works of scholarship, core textbooks for introductory courses, supplemental, affordable paperbacks for alternative approaches to teaching, and general interest and trade books for the curious reader.”3 LIS books are targeted toward practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars.

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group4 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN).5 The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, AltaMira Press, Scarecrow Press and Sheed & Ward.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal.6

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.7

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.8 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.9

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.10 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.11

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).12 The number of LIS titles published per year is unknown.

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes13

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for publication should be submitted to the appropriate acquisitions editor,14 and include a prospectus, outline (annotated table of contents), author’s CV or resume, one to two brief writing samples, and a list of potential peer reviewers.15 Full book manuscripts are not accepted unless requested by the acquisitions editor. See the publisher’s website for detailed submission guidelines.

Submission and review process: The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.16

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. Formal book proposals require a detailed description, author qualifications, previously published works, writing samples, competitive analysis, and potential markets for a book.17 The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences and conventions.18 Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A Spring 2017 catalog listed approximately 150 LIS books geared toward students, professionals, and academics.19 Print runs for titles are not publicly available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material.20 However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: February 2, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Home,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  2. “Subjects,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, PublishersGlobal.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  5. “About,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/Page/About
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  7. “Library Services,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  8. “About.”
  9. “Library Services.”
  10. “About.”
  11. “Library Services.”
  12. “Publisher Details,” NetGalley.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/29645
  13. “Submission Guidelines.”
  14. “Editors,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  15. “Submission Guidelines.”
  16. “Submission Guidelines.”
  17. “Submission Guidelines.”
  18. “Convenions Schedule,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018,https://rowman.com/Page/ConventionsSchedule
  19. “Digital Catalogs, Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  20. “Digital Catalogs.”
  21. “About.”
  22. “Digital Catalogs.”
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Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

ISSN: 1533-290X (Print) and 1533-2918 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/WLIS

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning €addresses the issues and concerns of librarians and information specialists in the rapidly growing field of distance education.”2

Target audience: The journal primarily targets scholars, librarians, and library students.3

Publisher: Routledge.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The journal reports that it “€addresses a wide variety of subjects that are vital to the field, including but not limited to: collection development strategies, faculty/librarian partnerships or collaborations, cutting edge instruction and reference techniques, document delivery, remote access, evaluation, etc.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.UxCmcYVUPpw

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning is comprised of “€original research, theoretical papers, substantive articles, essays, book and literature reviews, and research reports that cover programs and innovations throughout the international community.”10€ Submissions should include an abstract with a maximum of 100 words, while the main text should be between 3,000 and 5,000 words. Additionally, submissions cannot be previously published and cannot be simultaneously submitted to another publication. Authors should provide 3-10 keywords for indexing purposes.11

Submission and review process: Both editorial screening and peer review are conducted anonymously.12Authors should submit manuscripts electronically via ScholarOne Manuscripts at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/wlis.13

Editorial tone: While the journal is scholarly in nature, many of the articles cover practical subjects, such as reference techniques.14

Style guide used: APA Publication Manual.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles in the specific and emerging field of distance learning. In particular, library instructors with experience using Web 2.0, virtual reference, LibGuides, etc. in conjunction with distance learning will feel right at home with this journal’s subject matter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation figures not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The primary audience for this publication is the United States, and–to a slightly lesser degree–other English-speaking countries such as Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.16

Reader characteristics: Although the journal does not provide information about its readers, its website reports that it covers “€programs and innovations throughout the international community.”17€ The journal’s focus on distance learning contributes to its international reach. Readers consist mainly of librarians, LIS instructors, and LIS students who value education, specifically programs and innovations in distance learning relating to LIS education. Workplaces for these readers primarily include academic libraries and institutions.18€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning addresses a wide variety of subjects relating to distance learning within the field of LIS. Because most readers will have familiarly with the LIS field, LIS authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.19€

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that that the readers of this journal have extensive knowledge of distance learning specifically within the LIS field. As long as they are aware of the specialized nature of this journal, potential authors can use this forum to make valuable connections and establish professional rapport.

Last updated: January 29, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wlis20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  3.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  4.  Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  5. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  6. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  7. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  9. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  14. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  16. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
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