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Law Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Law Library Journal

ISSN: 0023-92831

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Since 1908, LLJ has provided up-to-date information on law, legal materials, and law librarianship.2

Target audience: “Law librarians and others who work with legal materials.”3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries (AALL)4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Sample article topics “include law library collections and their acquisition and organization; services to patrons and instruction in legal research; law library administration; the effects of developing technology on law libraries; law library design and construction; substantive law as it applies to libraries; and the history of law libraries and legal materials.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Information appropriate to law librarianship, case studies, descriptive or historical narratives, commentaries, reports on research projects, articles memorializing deceased members of the association.10

Submission and review process: As is standard practice for scholarly journals, LLJ only accepts unpublished manuscripts which are not being considered for publication elsewhere. The editor works closely with authors throughout the review process and keeps the latter informed of the expected production schedule. Additionally, the journal encourages potential authors to submit queries before submitting articles for consideration.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, although many articles have adapted an engaging narrative style, which is as readable as it is informative.12

Style guide used: The Bluebook, which illustrates how to format footnotes and references is used in conjunction with The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Law Library Journal is an excellent choice for students working in law libraries, lawyers, judges, paralegals, law students, as well as anyone interested in law libraries in general, including the history of these valuable institutions. Although the subject matter of this publication is relatively specialized, authors who combine research with engaging narrative to frame in-depth articles on law libraries will feel right at home with LLJ.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Circulates to nearly 4500 members and subscribers.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because Law Library Journal is published by the American Association of Law Libraries, the bulk of its audience is comprised of English-speakers, particularly those who live in the U.S. and/or are interested in U.S. law libraries.16 However, the journal also publishes research which describes the role of law in other countries, particularly European countries which have influenced the U.S.17

Reader characteristics: LLJ readers are primarily law librarians or others who work with legal materials and resources. They may work in law firms, law libraries, law schools, public libraries with law sections, etc.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with both LIS and legal jargon.

Additionally, since the bulk of LLJ’s readers are AALL members, it’s worth examining the general knowledge base of the AALL. AALL members belong to a variety of committees, including the Citation Formats Committee,18 Fair Business Practices Implementation Task Force,19 and Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Law Library Journal‘s readers are very familiar with legal procedure, courts, and librarianship. While the articles in this journal are written in an easy-to-understand style, readers expect authors to accurately portray the nuances of U.S. law, the history of libraries in general, etc. Thus, although the topics portrayed within the journal are broader than the title suggests, thorough knowledge of U.S. law and its history is suggested before submitting to this publication.

Last updated: February 23, 2018


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  2.  Law Library Journal, American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/
  3.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  4. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  5. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  6. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  7.  Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  8.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  9. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  10. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  11. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  12. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  13. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  14.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  15. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries
    Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  16. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  17.  James E. Duggan, ed. “Introduction,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  18. “Citations Formats Committee,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/citation-formats-committee/
  19.  “Fair Business Practices Implementation Task Force,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/fair-business-practices-implementation-task-force/
  20. “Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February, 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/recruitment-to-law-librarianship-committee/
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Oral History Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Oral History Review

ISSN: 0094-0798 (print), 1533-8592 (online)

Website: https://academic.oup.com/ohr and http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The mission of The Oral History Review “is to explore the nature and significance of oral history and advance understanding of the field among scholars, educators, practitioners, and the general public.” The journal reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the field of oral history. It is considered “the U.S. journal of record for the theory and practice of oral history and related fields.”1

Target audience: The Oral History Review is a publication of the Oral History Association, which has an international membership and “serves a broad and diverse audience including teachers, students, community historians, archivists, librarians, and filmmakers.” The journal is  international and cross-disciplinary, reaching “people committed to the value of oral history.”2

Publisher: Oxford University Press.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Available in print and online.5

Content: The Oral History Review “publishes narrative and analytical articles and reviews…that present and use oral history in unique and significant ways and that contribute to the understanding of the nature of oral history and memory.”6 A typical issue includes an editor’s introduction; original articles on research, method, practice, and theory; articles on pedagogy; and media and book reviews. Occasionally, the journal will publish a guest-edited special section, such as Looking Back, Looking Forward: Fifty Years of Oral History.7

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines appear on the Oral History Association website (http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/) and on the Oxford University Press website (https://academic.oup.com/ohr/pages/Instructions_To_Authors).

Types of contributions accepted:  The Oral History Review “publishes narrative and analytical articles and reviews, in print and multimedia formats, that present and use oral history in unique and significant ways and that contribute to the understanding of the nature of oral history and memory. It seeks previously unpublished works that demonstrate high-quality research and that offer new insight into oral history practice, methodology, theory, and pedagogy.”8

Submission and review process: Manuscripts for articles are submitted through ScholarOne Manuscripts for blinded peer review. Review manuscripts are submitted via email attachment to the appropriate editor.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition).10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS professionals to contribute to this publication. Guidance can be provided about cataloging and preservation methodologies for oral history collections. LIS professionals can also weigh in on the ethics of information, including collection, copyright, distribution, and access. LIS professionals should also be aware that the Oral History Association has published goals, guidelines, and standards for oral history interviews.11 Prospective authors should also explore the journal’s blog.12

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Oral History Association members receive a free subscription and online access to current and back issues. Other circulation data are not available.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Oral History Association is located in the United States but has an international membership. The Oral History Review is published in English but “reflects the international scope of the field and encourages work from international authors and about international topics.”14

Reader characteristics: Readers have a high knowledge of and interest in oral history, from both a local and an international perspective. Readers will expect articles that are well-written and original and that exemplify the best practices and principals in oral history research and practice, as established by the Oral History Association.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is not strictly an LIS publication, although librarians do read it and contribute to its content. Articles should avoid LIS jargon and be directed toward a broad, international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Oral History Review is written for an academic and international audience, so writers who contribute should be sure that their articles exhibit the knowledge and novelty that the experienced readership has come to expect. This could make it a difficult journal for oral history novices to write for. LIS professionals and students who have expert knowledge of the field of oral history and its preservation and archival techniques would find a good outlet in this journal.

Last updated: February 16, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  The Oral History Review, Oral History Association, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/.
  2. “About OHA,” Oral History Association, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.oralhistory.org/about/.
  3. The Oral History Review, Oxford Academic, accessed February 16, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/ohr.
  4. “Information for Authors,” The Oral History Review, Oxford Academic, accessed February 16, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/ohr/pages/Instructions_To_Authors.
  5.  The Oral History Review, Oral History Association.
  6. “About the Journal,” The Oral History Review, Oxford Academic, accessed February 16, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/ohr/pages/About.
  7. Teresa Barnett, “Guest Editor’s Introduction,” The Oral History Review 43, no. 2 (Summer/Fall 2016): 315-317, https://doi.org/10.1093/ohr/ohw079.
  8. “Information for Authors.”
  9. “Information for Authors.”
  10. “Information for Authors.”
  11. “Principles for Oral History and Best Practices for Oral History,” Oral History Association, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.oralhistory.org/about/principles-and-practices/.
  12. “About the Blog,” oralhistoryreview.org, accessed February 16, 2018, http://oralhistoryreview.org/about/.
  13.  The Oral History Review, Oral History Association.
  14. “Information for Authors.”
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Notes: The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Notes: The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association

ISSN: 0027-4380

Website: http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/page/Notes

Purpose, objective, or mission: Notes is the journal of the Music Library Association. Since 1934, the journal has offered “its readers interesting, informative, and well-written articles in the areas of music librarianship, music bibliography and discography, the music trade, and on certain aspects of music history.”1

Target audience: Notes is the journal of the Music Library Association, whose members are “librarians, musicians, scholars, educators, and members of the book and music trades.”2 Members of the Music Library Association receive the journal in print and can access it online.

Publisher: Music Library Association, Middleton, Wisconsin.

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Notes issue typically contains an editorial section; general articles on music and music librarianship; reviews of books, scores, periodicals, and new media; and newly cataloged books and recently issued music scores.4 Articles and reviews published in Notes are international in scope.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Information for Contributors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Notes welcomes submissions of interesting, informative, and well-written articles on music librarianship, music bibliography, the music trade, and discography, and on certain aspects of music history.”5 The editor welcomes preliminary ideas and manuscript proposals.6 Unsolicited reviews are not accepted, but those who would like to become reviewers “are invited to send a curriculum vitae and a statement delineating their special areas of interest and competence to the appropriate editors.”7

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted as an email attachment to the editor, Deborah Campana (deborah.campana@oberlin.edu). Manuscripts are first read by the editor for “general suitability” and then are subjected to a double-blind peer-review process. Once a submission is accepted, the author is informed of the conditions governing that acceptance.8

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition).9 Journal-specific style requirements are delineated in the “Notes Style Sheet,” which is helpful, extensive, and “in continuous revision.” Furthermore, authors should consult the “Information for Contributors” in the most recent issue of Notes.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As the quarterly journal of the Music Library Association, Notes clearly belongs to the library and information science literature. Music librarianship, however, is still largely the domain of librarians who are also scholars in the field of musicology–they have advanced degrees, teach, and publish in both disciplines. As such, publishing in Notes is only an option for LIS authors with a great deal of expertise in both librarianship and some area of musicology, such as music history, music theory, or the music trade. Being published in Notes would be a huge boost to the career of any LIS author, and it would be sure to impress almost any tenure committee.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Each quarter, 1,150 print issues are mailed.11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Notes is the quarterly journal of the Music Library Association, which is the U.S. branch of the International Association of Music Libraries, Archives, and Documentation Centres; as such, the journal reaches an international audience. Based on the Music Library Association membership, the audience includes “librarians, musicians, scholars, educators, and members of the book and music trades.”12 The journal is published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are professional music librarians and archivists, as well as LIS professionals with an interest in music, from around the world. Further, the readership of Notes likely includes scholars and students in music, musicology, and related fields from outside the LIS professions.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this journal will have a professional knowledge of LIS, especially in terms of music librarianship and archival work.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Notes readers are a very educated group of people who typically have advanced degrees in both library science and musicology. It’s reasonable to assume that they expect a comparable expertise from the publication’s authors, so Notes is probably a venue that should be left for authors with that kind of background. Writers who do publish in Notes can assume that their readers are familiar with the terminology of both the music/musicology and LIS fields.

Last updated: February 14, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1.  Notes, Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/page/Notes.
  2. “About MLA,” Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=AboutMLA.
  3. “Information for Contributors,” Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors.
  4. “Where to Send Materials for Review,” Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/page/Notesmaterials.
  5. “Information for Contributors.”
  6. “Call for Proposals,” Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/page/Notesproposals.
  7. “Information for Contributors.”
  8. “Information for Contributors.”
  9. “Information for  Contributors.”
  10. Notes Style Sheet,” Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/mpage/notes_style.
  11. “Advertise with Us,” Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, https://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=advertisers.
  12. “Welcome,” Music Library Association, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/.
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The University of Chicago Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: The University of Chicago Press Books

Website: http://press.uchicago.edu

Purpose, objective, or mission: Founded in 1890, the mission of the Press is “the obligation to disseminate scholarship of the highest standard and to publish serious works that promote education, foster public understanding, and enrich cultural life.”1

Target audience: Both scholars and casual audiences, in the United States and abroad. 2

Owner: The University of Chicago Press.

Are published books peer reviewed? Unknown, but all book proposals are to be sent to appropriate editors for a lengthy review process. Prospective authors are encouraged to consult William Germano’s book Getting It Published for more information on the publication process.

Types of books published: The Press leans toward being a civilian publication, and their Book Submissions page states that they generally do not publish work outside of their stated subject fields.3

Medium: Print and electronic, released simultaneously.4

Topics covered: Mostly liberal arts and social sciences, though they are well known for The Chicago Manual of Style and writing guides. Consult the list of acquisitions editors for a complete list of accepted book topics.

Number of titles published per year: Unknown, but the Press is a rather large publishing house, with more than 5,000 books currently in print.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/books_submissions.html

Types of submissions accepted: Book proposals only on accepted subjects. The Press has a separate division for journals.

Types of submissions the publisher is not interested in:

  • Unrevised dissertations
  • Festschriften
  • Works of original fiction

Submission and review process: After determining the appropriate editor, send a letter of introduction, curriculum vitae, table of contents and a prospectus.6 Do not send a complete manuscript unless you are asked to do so. After your submission has been received, it may take up to a month to hear back from an editor.7

Editorial tone: Unknown.

Style guide used: Unknown, though keep in mind that the Press publishes The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

The Press publishes across a wide array of subjects, including books about both library science and publishing. Glance over the list of currently published LIS books on their website to get a better sense of what the Press is looking for. Prospective authors penning writing guides, or writing about literary, media, cultural studies or education are encouraged to contact an appropriate editor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: This is a relatively large publishing house, having published more than 11,000 works since its foundation in 1890.8 It’s editors have worked to “build a broad but coherent publishing program engaged with authors and readers around the world.”9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Press publishes books that appeal to a vast, international audience: books about Chicago and surrounding areas, translations of foreign language texts and significant non scholarly works are just a sampling of their publications.10 If published by the Press, their marketing department ensures that publicity and promotions will be conducted in the United States as well as from satellite offices in the United Kingdom, Australia and Japan.11

Reader characteristics: Scholars and casual readers with specific interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A majority of the LIS books published by the Press are historical in nature, including a world history of libraries and account of medieval books of early modern England.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of books published by the Press can generally be considered knowledgeable and, potentially, subject experts. The Press also distributes dozens of other publications from the likes of the American Meteorological Society, Association of University Presses, Amsterdam University Press and many others from all over the world.12 Considering that many of these, like the Press, are affiliated with a university, potential authors may want to keep in mind that the general readership leans in a scholarly direction.

Last updated: February 14, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About,” Press.UChicago.edu, Accessed February 8, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/press/about.html
  2. “About.”
  3. “Book Submissions,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 9, 2019, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoservices/book_submissions.html
  4. “Marketing Information,” Press.UChicago.edu/InfoServices/Auth_Resources, accessed February 9, 2019, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/auth_resources.html
  5. “About.”
  6. “Book Submissions.”
  7. “Submissions FAQ,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 9, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/submissions-faq.html
  8. “About.”
  9. “About.”
  10. “About.”
  11. “Marketing Information for Authors,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 11, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/auth_resources.html
  12. “Major publishers marketed & distributed by the University of Chicago Press,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 14, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/books/publishers.html
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

ISSN: 1052-5726 (print), 1052-5722 (online)

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian “is a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive “discourse and action on library issues.” Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG) members receive a subscription, or individuals can subscribe without joining the guild.2

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, by the editorial board.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online. Full text of complete issues and individual articles are available online.5

Content: Progressive Librarian publishes “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”6 Articles cover topics such as sexual violence, social justice, sustainability, youth empowerment, intellectual freedom, international activism, and a wide variety of progressive critiques and analyses of national and international LIS issues.

Frequency of publication:  Two times a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: A Call for Papers for future issues of Progressive Librarian asks for “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, documents, artwork and poetry that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”8

Submission and review process: All manuscripts submitted to Progressive Librarian are reviewed by each member of the editorial board. Manuscripts outside the expertise of board members are sent to outside reviewers for comment and evaluation. The journal also welcomes prints and digital images. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions before publication. For book reviews, please contact the book review editor.9

Editorial tone: The articles are innovative and present alternative views to those of other LIS publications. The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.

Style guide used: Authors may use their preferred citation style “for in-text (parenthetical) citations, footnotes, and endnotes, as well as a bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian), works cited (MLA), and references (APA & Harvard) sections.” The citation style has to be used consistently throughout the manuscript.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Progressive Librarian is a innovative and welcoming journal for LIS authors who write about any issue related to progressive librarianship or the relationship of library and information science to issues of social justice and responsibility. Articles are international in scope and are often focused on current events and actions. LIS professionals and students may submit artwork and poetry, as well as documents, reports, and bibliographies, on progressive issues.

Prospective authors should read the editorial in issue 45 for an understanding of the journal’s philosophy and perspective,11 as well as the Progressive Librarians Guild Statement of Purpose.12

For LIS graduate students, each year the PLG awards the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize “for the best paper about some aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.” The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian, and the winner receives a $500 stipend toward travel costs to the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, where the award is presented.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal as an international readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, although there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.14 As with any scholarly writing, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.15 The readership is made up of librarians, librarian graduate students, and library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and in how politics informs LIS practices.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals, or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have an understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about news and events in the LIS world, and about national and international politics and current events, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues, or events others may not be familiar with.

 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Broadly speaking, the readers of Progressive Librarian are LIS professionals, scholars, and students who consider themselves socially and politically progressive and who bring their passion for social justice and action to their work in various library and information settings. PLG works against the current idea that “the library is merely a neutral institutional mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society of atomized information consumers.” Rather,  a “progressive librarianship demands the recognition of the idea that libraries for the people has been one of the principal anchors of an extended free public sphere which makes an independent democratic civil society possible, something which must be defended and extended.”16

 

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml.
  2. “Subscription,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_subscribe.shtml.
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml.
  5. “Archive,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml.
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Call for Papers,” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017): verso, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45.pdf.
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. Elaine Harger, “Editorial: Why PLG? Why Paper? Why Bridge Generations?” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017),  http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45/003.pdf.
  12. “Statement of Purpose,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml.
  13. “The Braverman Award,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml.
  14. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  15. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  16. “PLG’s History,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/history.shtml.
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LIBRI: International Journal of Libraries and Information Studies

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBRI: International Journal of Libraries and Information Studies

ISSN: 0024-2667 (print), 1865-8423 (online)

Website: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/libr

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBRI is a long-standing, leading international scholarly journal that “investigates the functions of libraries and information services from both a historical and present-day perspective and analyses the role of information in cultural, organizational, national and international developments.” LIBRI “reports on current trends in librarianship worldwide and describes their resulting transformation from the introduction of new information technologies, multidisciplinary approaches, changing practices, and evolving methods.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) academics, practitioners, students, and the broader public.2

Publisher: De Gruyter Saur3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: LIBRI publishes full-length, original scholarly articles. LIBRI is international in scope, and has a particular, but not exclusive, focus on LIS in the developing world; another area of interest is digital libraries and digital library technology. Its objectives are to examine the functions of information services past and present, evaluate the role of information in various contexts, analyze trends in the LIS profession, review the impact of new technologies on information services, and share original research.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors

Types of contributions accepted: LIBRI accepts scholarly papers (generally 5,000 to 7,000 words, with exceptions) that critically analyze current topics in LIS and that present original research. Submissions should include a literature review, critical analysis, appropriate research methods, balanced discussion of the evidence, a clear argument and structure, and contextual information.9

Submission and review process: Papers are submitted through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an electronic editorial management system where authors are able to monitor the editorial and publication process. Authors should make sure their papers adhere to the journal’s guidelines before submitting.10

Editorial tone: LIBRI has a scholarly and academic tone; if necessary, papers will be edited to meet the journal’s “traditional high standards of academic writing.”11

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIBRI publishes on a broad range of topics in LIS, including original research and critical analyses of current trends and technology. It has an international scope and a particular interest in studies conducted in the developing world. Authors submitting manuscripts should be aware that this is a well-established scholarly journal that maintains high academic standards.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Information not provided.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LIBRI is published in English for an international audience of LIS academics and professionals.13 The advisory board is made up of scholars from all over the world.14 The editors advise that, because of the international scope of the journal and its readership, authors “should provide sufficient background information about the activity or country to enable to context to be easily understood by readers not familiar with it.”15

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, scholars, and students with an interest in international LIS scholarship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is likely the audience has a high level of understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are well educated and interested in strengthening their understanding of issues facing information professionals from all over the world. They expect to find high-level LIS research and scholarship, as well as historical analyses, from professionals in both developing and developed regions. Writers are best served by reading issues of the journal to determine if their work fits audience expectations.

 Last updated: February 3, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Overview,” LIBRI, accessed February 3, 2018, https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/libr.
  2. “Overview.”
  3. “Details,” LIBRI, accessed February 3, 2018, https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/libr.
  4. “Instructions for Authors,” LIBRI, accessed February 3, 2018, https://www.degruyter.com/view/supplement/s18658423_Instructions_for_Authors_en.pdf.
  5. “Overview.”
  6. “LIBRI,” accessed February 3, 2018, https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/libr.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8.  “LIBRI.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors.”
  10. “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. “Instructions for Authors.”
  13. “Overview.”
  14. “Editorial Information,” LIBRI, accessed February 3, 2018, https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/libr.
  15. “Instructions for Authors.”
Continue Reading

Journal of Library Administration (JLA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library Administration (JLA)

ISSN: 0193-0826 (Print) and 1540-3564 (Online)1.

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjla20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, JLA “informs readers on research, current developments, and trends related to the leadership and management of libraries.”2. It keeps managers in the information profession informed of the latest trends in management, technology, and budgeting solutions.3.

Target audience: Individuals holding management positions within the library profession.4.

Publisher: Routledge.5.

Peer reviewed? Yes.6.

Type: JLA can be classified as a hybrid publication because articles deal with both the latest trends in technology and management as well as research on historical perspectives and future projections. However, it is primarily a scholarly journal7, since it is peer-reviewed and all articles have abstracts and detailed notes.8.

Medium: Print and online.9.

Content: Includes articles discussing the trends in management and the developments in digital technology, as well as research papers on diverse subjects relating to leadership in various areas of the library profession, such as project management and strategic planning.10.

Frequency of publication: 8 issues per year.11.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on “leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, and more to promote organizational success.”12.

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the editor for the peer-review process. No simultaneous submissions or previously published work is accepted.13.

Editorial tone: Scholarly but readable.14.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).15.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Library Administration contains a lot of useful information for current leaders in the Library and Information Science profession. Not only does it disseminate practical information that promotes efficient management practices, it also publishes articles that range from discussions of theoretical perspectives about technological trends and their effect on the profession to historically fundamental issues of library management. Malcolm Getz’s article “Open-Access Scholarly Publishing in Economic Perspective,” for example, discusses digital versus paper publication and the consequences for financial management.16. LIS professionals who can contribute insightful new outlooks on management issues should be encouraged as well. JLA sometimes publishes special issues that cover a specific theme, so queries—while not required—should be sent first.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A review of the publication shows that while the issues presented within its pages may be considered globally appropriate, most of the research done for these articles is U.S. based. In Volume 46, issue 2, for example, Joseph J. Branin’s “Shaping Our Space: Envisioning the New Research Library” uses Ohio State University’s central research library as the model for its findings,17 while in volume 45, issue 3/4, Lesley Mutinta Moyo and Ellysa Stern Cahoy’s “Library Use in the E-learning Environment: A Profile of Penn State’s World Campus Faculty and Students” uses findings from research conducted at Penn State University in Pennsylvania.18.

The journal is an English publication geared towards LIS professionals in the United States19, but the issues discussed are relevant to librarians in other parts of the world. The authors use scholarly language that is free of cultural predilections to make it accessible to LIS professionals worldwide.20.Although most of the research is U.S. based, the challenges explored are applicable to most libraries across the globe, such as the use of web-based library resources.

Reader characteristics: Although no specific characteristics are available, we may safely assume that readers of the publication are more than likely educated, LIS professionals or MLIS students and graduates. It is likely that a majority of the subscribers of the Journal of Library Administration are LIS professionals since almost all articles cover library or archival type issues. Judging from the title, it is safe to surmise that a percentage of its library and information science audience holds managerial positions. Readers of the Journal of Library Administration are presumably enthusiastic supporters library advancement and champions of library issues, as a majority are professionals in the field. The publication is patently progressive, with articles that promote the aggressive use of technologies in libraries which advocate change. Readers of the journal, as well as the authors of these articles, also encourage using management practices in other fields.21.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS topics and issues is critical to understanding this publication. Readers are most likely familiar with LIS jargon because if they are not already working in the field, they are probably MLIS students or, at the very least, have great interest in the subject matter.22.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the Journal of Library Administration is a specialized publication, the majority of its readers are likely LIS professionals in leading positions within their institutions. Authors should remember that the journal’s subscribers are familiar with LIS jargon, topics, and issues. This audience is not interested in technical services but is partial to articles about management problems and solutions. Authors must submit formal or scholarly pieces and should consider using headings and subheadings to focus readers’ attention on topics and resolutions.

Last updated: January 27, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Journal information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjla20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  3.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  4. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  5.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  6.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  7. Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  8. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjla20#.U77vALGdROg
  9.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  11.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  13.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  15.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  16. Malcolm Getz, “Open-Access Scholarly Publishing in Economic Perspective,” Journal of Library Administration 42, no. 1 (2005): 1-39, accessed January 27, 2018, doi: 10.1300/J111v42n01-01
  17. Joseph J. Branin, “Shaping our Space: Envisioning the New Research Library,” Journal of Library Administration 46, no. 2 (2007): 27-53, accessed January 27, 2018, doi: 10.1300/J111v46n02_04
  18. Lesley Mutinta Moyo and Ellysa Stern Cahoy, “Library Use in the E-Learning Environment: A Profile of Penn State’s World Campus Faculty and Students,” Journal of Library Administration 46, no. 3/4 (2006): 339-359, accessed January 27, 2018, doi: 10.1300/J111v45n03_01
  19.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  20. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  21. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
Continue Reading

Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

ISSN: 2157-0396 (Print) and 2161-3540 (Online)1

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”2

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,3 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.4

Publisher: Georgia Library Association5

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.6 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.7

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.8 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,9 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online10

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.11

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”12

Frequency of publication: Quarterly13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.14

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”15

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”16

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.17

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.18

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,20 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.22 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,23 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,24 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia25 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.26 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,27 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1.  Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/465320178
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  4. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  7. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  8. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  10. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  11. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  12. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  13. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  14. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  15. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  16. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  17. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  18. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  19. (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  20. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  21. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  22. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  27. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

ISSN: 1931-54731

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Society of California Archivists Newsletter is the official voice of SCA. It carries professional news, reports the Board’s actions, announces SCA seminars, and workshops, and informs members of other archival issues and events of interest.2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.6

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.7

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archive, and museum communities.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from managers and directors to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists Newsletter is distributed to members and is open access with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses on archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and non-academic.


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1.  SCA Newsletter, Society of California Archivists (SCA), accessed May 9, 2020, http://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from https://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter/
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2020). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4. ProQuest. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  6. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9. Society of California Archivists. (2020). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
Continue Reading

mental_floss

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: mental_floss

ISSN: 1543-4702 (Print)1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Mental Floss delivers smart, fun and shareable content in an upbeat and witty environment. An encyclopedia of everything, we answer life’s big questions and uncover stories so interesting our readers absolutely must share them.”2

Target audience: Millennials.3

Publisher: Minute Media.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects with a focus on shareability.6

Frequency of publication: New stories posted daily.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for lists and Big Questions to fill out those two sections of the site, but if you know a great story from history, a strange science phenomenon, or anything else fascinating that we need to cover, we’d love to hear it.”8

Submission and review process: Send pitches to webpitches [at] mentalfloss.com.9

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website receives 11.9 million unique visitors per month.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information about audience location is not provided, but content is written in English. Readers have a high degree of knowledge in pop culture, trivia, and current events.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, readers are “brainy millennials.”11 In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: October 17, 2018


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1.  Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “About Us,” mentalfloss.com, accessed October 17, 2018, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “About Us,”  minutemedia.com, accessed October 17, 2018, https://www.minutemedia.com/about-us
  4. “About Us,”  minutemedia.com, accessed October 17, 2018, https://www.minutemedia.com/about-us
  5. “This is Our Last Print Issue!,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, https://service.mentalfloss.com/servlet/Show?WESPAGE=csp-dp/login.jsp&MSRSMAG=LF
  6. About Us
  7. This is Our Last Print Issue!
  8. “Freelance Help Wanted,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted
  9. Freelance Help Wanted.”
  10. About Us
  11. What is mental_floss?
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