Wiki Tags Archives: History

Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

ISSN: 1931-54731

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Society of California Archivists Newsletter is the official voice of SCA. It carries professional news, reports the Board’s actions, announces SCA seminars, and workshops, and informs members of other archival issues and events of interest.2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.6

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.7

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archive, and museum communities.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from managers and directors to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists Newsletter is distributed to members and is open access with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses on archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and non-academic.


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1.  SCA Newsletter, Society of California Archivists (SCA), accessed May 9, 2020, http://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from https://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter/
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2020). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4. ProQuest. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  6. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9. Society of California Archivists. (2020). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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Faculty of Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Faculty of Information Quarterly (*Publication currently on hiatus.*)

ISSN: 1925-91071

Website: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Faculty of Information Quarterly (FIQ) is a student-led, peer reviewed journal and provides immediate open access to its content by publishing online, on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Edited by graduate students at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information, the journal seeks to provide an environment for the voices of emerging and established scholars and practitioners in diverse Information fields, including but not limited to the following: archival science, accessibility studies, book history and print culture, communication theory, critical theory, cultural informatics, health informatics, information studies, information systems and technology, knowledge theory, library science, management science, media theory, museum studies, semiotics, and technology studies.”2

Target audience: University of Toronto LIS students, faculty and global LIS community3

Publisher: University of Toronto, Faculty of Information4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: Research articles covering any topic relevant to LIS community. Recent article titles include Research as a Social Process: Considerations for Academic Libraries, Applying Concepts of Bug-Tracking Software to e-Resource Management in Academic Libraries, and The Rare e-Vent: Concepts of Rarity and Scarcity in e-Books.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9 *The last edition published was Volume 3, Number 4, in 2011.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles from the LIS and related academic communities. Per the publication website, “While there is an emphasis on encouraging student work in FIQ we certainly support submissions from all members of the Information community. Masters and PhD students and faculty of all disciplines, practitioners and Information professionals with an interest in scholarly work, and interested members of the Information community in its broadest sense are all welcome to submit works to this publication.”11 “We encourage students to submit articles they think are of an academic calibre, which can include conference papers, reworked course papers, personal research projects, reflections on the scholarly and practical elements of Information, or other communications of excellent quality.”12

Submission and review process: All work is submitted online through the publication  website. Detailed instructions provided for authors including a checklist to ensure all requirements are met. FIQ is peer-reviewed and publication is subject to approval and review by the Editorial Staff.13

Editorial tone: Formal14

Style guide used: For Canadian English spelling, authors should consult the latest edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary; for citations and references authors should use the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although FIQ was founded in part to promote publication of student research and writing, all members of the information community are invited to submit manuscripts.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. As an open access, online publication of a leading information school, FIQ is freely accessible to academic and professional members of the information community the world over.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Toronto, Canada.18 While its target audience is the global information community, the publication requires its authors to use Canadian spellings and to ensure the relevance of articles to Canadian culture.19

Reader characteristics: Though FIQ is an open-access publication with an international reach, it is likely, given its editorial bias,20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers would have an LIS background or education; however, since FIQ strives for a global reach and LIS education varies around the global, writers should consider this when writing.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication run by graduate students and primarily for graduate students and academics in the the LIS community, fellow graduate student authors would seem to have a better chance of publication in FIQ.

Last updated: April 24, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523472560543/717394
  2. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  5. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  6. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  7. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  8. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  9. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  10. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  11. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  15. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  18. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  19. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  20.  “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines that the majority of its readers are Canadian or North American. Readers of this student-run journal will have a keen interest in the latest developments in the LIS field. The journal does state a preference for publishing the student work, so this is an ideal venue for a first publication.[21. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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Education Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Education Libraries

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Websitehttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Education Libraries is an electronic, refereed journal of the Special Libraries Association’s (SLA) Education Division.  It offers a forum for new and challenging ideas in education, and library and information science. It also explores the effect of new technologies on the library profession and library and information curriculum.”1

Target audience: The target audience is the membership of the Special Libraries Association, which includes those employed at “a variety of venues, including special libraries and information centers, academic libraries, public libraries, and school libraries.”2

Publisher: Special Libraries Association, Education Division3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and Education; scholarly5

Medium: Online, open access since 20156

Content: Education Libraries publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, member profiles, and case studies.7 Recent feature articles include faculty-librarian collaboration, 3-D printing in education libraries, collection development, and school library advocacy.8

Frequency of publication: Biannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Education Libraries accepts “research studies, descriptive narratives, or other thoughtful considerations of topics of interest to the education information professional. Manuscripts focusing on issues relevant to more general concerns either in the field of education or in the field of library and information science are also welcome provided they include a significant component specifically germane to education, libraries and librarianship.”10

Submission and review process: Authors submitting manuscripts are required to register using a link provided on the publication website.11 All submissions will be considered for publication and are subject to the double-blind peer review process. Inquiries about particular manuscripts may be sent via email to the editor. See the publication website for details.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) style manual, most recent edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Education Libraries presents an interesting opportunity for LIS writers from different types of libraries to discuss and share information that is related to education. This journal is well established, which means writers can be assured that they are submitting their work to a credible source and contributing to the scholarly conversation.

The journal is indexed in Education Libraries is indexed in ERIC, EBSCOhost’s Education Collection, and Library Literature.15

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the SLA’s website there are more than 9,000 association members based in more than 75 countries.16 Information about exactly how many are a part of the Education Division is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Just as members of the Special Libraries Association are located around the world, the readers of Education Libraries are also international.17 Because this is an international publication, differences in language and cultural practice should be considered.

Reader characteristics: It is safe to assume the readers of this publication are interested in academic libraries and their role in education. Due to the professional focus of this publication the readership is largely comprised of individuals already working in academic libraries with considerable experience in the field. The readers of this publication are likely to value education and research. They are likely to be interested in learning about new technologies as well as in innovative teaching methods. Recent articles demonstrate a general acceptance of new technologies and changes in librarianship.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is likely that, as library employees, a  majority of readers are very familiar with LIS subject matter. Additionally, we can assume that the readers are familiar with new information technologies issues as well as issues surrounding the growth of digital content in library collections.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of the Education Libraries audience is its interest in education and technology related to instruction and learning. Authors must keep in mind the fact that this journal is scholarly, and the widest audience is those who work in higher education libraries, therefore well researched studies are particularly important. Potential contributors writing book or technology reviews as well as opinion pieces may want to relate their subject back to its value to learning in order to appeal to the audience.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  3.  “Journal Sponsorship,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/journalSponsorship
  4.  “Peer Review Process,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  5. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  7. “Section Policies,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  8.  “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  9. “Publication Frequency,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#publicationFrequency
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Online Submissions,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  14. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  17. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  18. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  19.  “Author Guidelines, Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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Information & Culture: A Journal of History (formerly Libraries and the Cultural Record)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information & Culture: A Journal of History

The journal has gone through a number of name changes:
1966-1972, Journal of Library History
 1972-1973, Journal of Library History, Philosophy, and Comparative Librarianship
1973-1987, Journal of Library History
1987-2006, Libraries and Culture
2006-2012, Libraries and the Cultural Record.1

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.infoculturejournal.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per journal website, Information & Culture “. . . publishes high-quality, peer reviewed articles on topics related to the history of information. The journal’s scope has broadened significantly in recent years to encompass the historical study of any topic that would fall under the purview of the modern interdisciplinary schools of information . . . However, the journal honors its (50+ year) heritage by continuing to publish in the areas of library, archival, museum, conservation, and information science history.”2

Target audience: Library historians and other scholars whose interests might relate to the history of information, such as historians of computing, labor, gender, economics, business, and politics; critical theorists, and scholars of cultural studies, science, and technology3

Publisher: University of Texas Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS and history, scholarly6

Medium: Print, with online subscriptions available.7

Content: The journal website states, “In keeping with the spirit of information studies, the work is human centered and explores the interactions of people, organizations, and societies with information and technologies. Social and cultural context of information and information technology, viewed from a historical perspective, is at the heart of the journal’s interests.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles10 and book reviews11 and book reviews

Among the content requirements are that an article be primarily historical in nature, take an interpretative, not merely descriptive approach, and have a clearly stated thesis supported by appropriately cited evidence.12

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email, accompanied by a cover sheet and abstract, in MS Word format. Authors are asked to provide the names of at least two potential reviewers.13 Submission includes an initial review by the editor, and, if accepted, a double blind process by at least two outside reviewers.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors may find that it is a bit more difficult to get articles published in this journal as the acceptance rate is less than half. However, the journal is very prestigious. The editors state that “we do not yet have enough data to make an accurate forecast of acceptance rates. For the period April 2011-March 2012 our acceptance rate was 20.5%. We anticipate that the acceptance rate will stabilize at well below 50 percent of submitted manuscripts.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Exact submission numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is worldwide. However, based on the content of the articles, most readers most likely reside in North America, South America, and Europe. In past issues, there were articles about Mexico, France, and the United States as well as a review of a book in German. This indicates the editorial board expects reader interest to be broader than merely North America.18 The journal publishes articles in English,19 but the topics are wide ranging and are not necessarily limited to the English-speaking world.20

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are generally scholars and professionals in a variety of fields, but especially history and library science. This publication has a broad base of support in a variety of disciplines. Articles could easily fit under history, literature, art, and political science as well as library science.21 The professional interests of the readers of this publication would be generally academic and scholarly. It might fit those working in all manners of libraries, museums, and archives as well as both faculty and students at academic institutions. The journal strongly follows a particular historiography, that of social and cultural history. In this sense, it is far less likely that one would find an article that is based in political history or in reconstructing grand narratives.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS subject matter is very high when it comes to the historical aspects of the profession. Because other academics in other disciplines are actively participating in the creation and use of this journal,  knowledge of current information profession issues might not be as high as it is with other LIS-specific journals.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication are generally highly educated, scholarly, and professional. Potential authors need to be exact and precise and have expertise in the field. The journal, while overwhelmingly about library science topics, is also very rooted in historical study. The editorial staff and the readers are exacting in their quest for solid scholarship.

Last updated: May 6, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  2. “Information & Culture,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org
  3. “Information & Culture,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  4. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  5. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  6. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  7. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  8. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  9. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  10. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  11. “Book Reviews,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/book_reviews
  12.  “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  13. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017,  http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  14. “Peer Review Process,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  15. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  16. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  17.  “Peer Review Process,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  18. “Archive,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/archive
  19. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  20. “Archive,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/archive
  21. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  22. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  23. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
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Yosemite Highway Herald

Excuse the mess! Profile update in progress.

Per contact with the editor: both the Yosemite Highway Herald and Foothill Express were purchased by the editor and are currently being merged under the name The Yosemite Express. The creation of a website for The Yosemite Express is in progress. This wiki will continue to be updated as we receive information from the editor.

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Yosemite Highway Herald

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.yosemitehwyherald.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Yosemite Highway Herald is a free monthly newspaper featuring local news and events for Southern Tuolumne County and Northern Mariposa County in California.1

Target audience: The community residents of the greater Yosemite area, including parts of Tuolumne and Mariposa counties.2

Publisher: Yosemite Highway Herald, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content: Local community news, stories, historical news, and current events news of the greater Yosemite area to the local communities.5

Frequency of publication: Monthly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: None provided.

Types of contributions accepted: Articles and letters to the editor.

Submission and review process: Email submissions to info [at] yosemitehwyherald.com.

Editorial tone: Informal and folksy.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newspaper would be of interest to LIS authors who are local to the area and want to promote library services and events or discuss issues facing the library. Past issues have featured library-related articles, including one in support of the Groveland library.7

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “We reach 4,000 households plus 500 extra copies are distributed in local businesses throughout the area.”8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Yosemite Highway Herald is published for the local residents of the communities of Big Oak Flat, Buck Meadows, Coulterville, Greeley Hill, Groveland, La Grange, Lake Don Pedro, Moccasin, Pine Mountain Lake, and surrounding area. This publication is printed in English.9

Reader characteristics: The population served by the Yosemite Highway Herald include young people, families, older adults, and retired persons. Professional interests and workplaces would vary widely given the nature of the audience. This diverse audience shares an interest in the local community and an appreciation of natural beauty of the area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this publication would not have an expert knowledge of library and information science jargon. An author would be expected to provide an introductory background to terms about information services. Also, the author would be expected to write in a manner that would encourage to show the value of library services to the local community.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Past issues of the Yosemite Highway Herald have featured articles on topics such as: the local blood drive, free classes and workshops, the Laverini Sawmill dedication, information on how and where to get burn permits, and local events, festivals, and concerts.. Writers would need to be very familiar with the area and contribute information directly relevant to community members.

Last updated: September 28, 2018


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “Yosemite Highway Herald,” YosemiteHwyHerald.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://www.yosemitehwyherald.com/
  2. Yosemite Highway Herald.”
  3. Yosemite Highway Herald.”
  4. Yosemite Highway Herald.”
  5. Yosemite Highway Herald.”
  6. Yosemite Highway Herald.”
  7. Nadine Pedron, “The Book Nook,” Yosemite Highway Herald, February 2014, http://www.yosemitehwyherald.com/images/february14.pdf
  8. Yosemite Highway Herald.”
  9. Yosemite Highway Herald.”
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The Northern Light

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Northern Light

ISSN: 1088-4416 (Print)1

Website: http://www.scottishritenmj.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Published since 1970, The Northern Light is the premier magazine of Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction (NMJ).”2

Target audience: Members of the Scottish Rite and laypeople interested in Freemasonry.

Publisher: Supreme Council Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite * Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: News and articles on the history, social, and humanitarian aspects of Freemasonry.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are none available online as well as no general contact form. However, the editor of the magazine can be contacted at (781) 465-3324.

Types of contributions accepted: All types of articles, editorials, reviews, letters to the editor as well as cartoons that deal with Freemasonry in a generally positive way. A past issue contained an article by an archivist about a historical aspect of freemasonry. A preference for articles that stress the humanitarian and social aspects of the Craft as well as historical articles is shown.

Submission and review process: No process is provided; it is safe to assume that the final word lies with the editor.

Editorial tone: Very informal, clearly written prose aimed at a generally mature audience.

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

At first, it would seem that this magazine would not be a fertile place for the new writer to publish, but if you are an academic librarian and/or an archivist with an interest in esoteric Americana or US history, or you are, in fact, a Freemason, then this magazine is a natural fit for you. Freemasons generally have a keen interest in their history and the history of the country, and so these types of pieces are heavily sought, especially if photographs of Masonic ephemera accompany the piece.

There have been several pieces in past issues that have been written by archivists and librarians. Some have been Masonic librarians because the Craft owned a few special libraries, but most are non-Masons who work in a facility with some Masonic artifacts or a complete collection.

Don’t ignore these specialty magazines, they are usually hungry for material and their editorial process is also usually very informal and forgiving. You might not want to put one of these publications on a C.V., but it does allow you to get your feet wet and stretch your horizons a bit.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, “The magazine is delivered quarterly to every member of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction and distributed worldwide to other Supreme Councils and subscribers.” 5 Membership numbers are not provided, however, according to Business Insider, there are over 6 million Freemasons worldwide.6 It is, therefore, safe to assume that the publication reaches a large portion of the population.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is in English and geared toward readers in the United States.

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers will be members of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will not likely have much knowledge of LIS subject matter but will have a keen interest in matters pertaining to archives, history, and artifacts.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Northern Light are a large, diverse group of people, likely older adults. To join the Freemasons one must believe in a supreme being. Philanthropy is important to them as is American history. Because of these traits, readers will likely be advocates of libraries. Articles discussing library collections that involve American history, Freemasons, or artifacts directly related to their culture would be successful.

Last updated: September 27, 2020


References

Show 6 footnotes

  1.  The Northern Light, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed September 26, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522205701262/170818
  2. The Northern Light,” ScottishRiteNMJ.org, accessed September 17, 2020, https://scottishritenmj.org/members-center/the-northern-light
  3. The Northern Light.”
  4. The Northern Light.”
  5. The Northern Light.”
  6. “The Most Powerful Freemasons Ever,” BusinessInsider.com, accessed September 27, 2020, https://www.businessinsider.com/powerful-masons-2011-9#:~:text=wikipedia%20commons%20Freemasons%20have%20over,time%20part%20of%20the%20club.
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Journal of Documentation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Documentation

ISSN: 0022-0418 (Print) and 1758-7379 (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of Documentation (JDoc) is one of the longest established academic journals in library and information science, providing a unique focus on theories, concepts, models, frameworks and philosophies.”2

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jd

Target audience: Primary readership includes educators, scholars, researchers, and advanced scholars in information science fields.3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly,6 as indicated by the target audience, a “rigorous peer review process,” and the focal areas of the content: “theories, concepts, models, frameworks, and philosophies in the information sciences.”7 Many of the articles are highly research oriented and follow a typical format, including sections for literature review, methods, results, discussion, and conclusion. Journal of Documentation is an ISI ranked journal.8

Medium: Print and online9

Content: The journal publishes research papers, critical and scholarly reviews, and short speculative articles.10

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jd

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers, critical and scholarly reviews, short speculative articles12

Submission and review process: Article length is restricted to 4,000 – 10,000 words. Title must be 16 words or less, and the submission must include a structured abstract following their “How to . . . Write an Abstract” guide. All articles are subject to a double blind peer review.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly14

Style guide used: Harvard style references15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Documentation is a highly regarded journal of research, review, and evidence-based practice. It claims a rigorous peer-review process and would be a credit to an LIS writer seeking to publish for tenure and career advancement. Potential works may take the forms of research reports, scholarly reviews, articles on research methodology, historical articles, and “€œreviews of the evidence base for professional practice.”16€

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation not listed.

Audience location and language or cultural: Journal of Documentation is published in English in the United Kingdom.17 A good amount of professional jargon will be familiar to most readers, depending more upon their professional discipline than upon their native tongue.

Reader characteristics: Given the content of the journal, it is likely that its readers work in a variety of library settings. This readership expects thoughtful, well-articulated conceptual work alongside evidence-driven research and practical approaches to problem-solving.18€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Indications are that LIS subject matter knowledge among this readership is very high, and often specific to a particular area of practice or research. Readers may be experts in some other domain but interested in its relationship to LIS disciplines and have a high degree of comfort dealing with that material.19€

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

These readers will be knowledgeable about most LIS concepts and experts in specific areas. They will be critical readers and will want thoughtfulness in presentation along with evidence and sound reasoning in discussions and conclusions.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1229268474
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jd
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jd
  4. Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405366141613/38244
  5.  Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405366141613/38244
  6. Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405366141613/38244
  7. Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405366141613/38244
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jd
  9. Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405366141613/38244
  10.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jd
  11. Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405366141613/38244
  12.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jd
  13. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jd
  14.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jd
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jd
  16.  “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jd
  17.  Journal of Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405366141613/38244
  18.  “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jd
  19.  “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=jd
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Perspectives on History

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Perspectives on History

ISSN: 1940-80481

Website: http://www.historians.org/perspectives/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Perspectives on History is the newsmagazine of the American Historical Association (AHA); it serves as the, “…principal source for news and information about the discipline of history.”2

Publication Tagline: “Perspectives cultivates the community of historians and promotes our work.” 3

“We strive to be a place for historians across the discipline’s broad spectrum to share their ideas and enthusiasm.” 4

Target audience: Members of the AHA; College and university professors, and K–12 teachers of history; historical administrators; editors; museum professionals; publishers; librarians; and students of history. 5

Publisher: American Historical Association.6

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian. While some members of the AHA might also be information professionals (and many other members will have a strong understanding of the library profession), most members will not be intimately familiar with the LIS profession.

Medium: Print. Online content is also published under Perspectives Daily.

Content: “We offer articles and commentary on research and archives, teaching, digital projects, new books of note, history in the media, public history and museum exhibitions, and more.” 7

Frequency of publication: “Our print edition is published monthly and online during the academic year, with online-only articles in Perspectives Daily updated regularly all year round. A print subscription is available only with AHA membership.” 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.historians.org/perspectives/submit

Types of contributions accepted: “We do consider full manuscripts, but we prefer to receive pitches to give us a better understanding of the topic and your viewpoint as an author. Potential writers should familiarize themselves with the sort of articles we publish and the sections in which they fit. If a story is immediately relevant to discussions about current events, please flag it as a possible contribution to Perspectives Daily if you envision it being published quickly.” 9

Perspectives on History and Perspectives Daily welcome articles by historians from all kinds of institutions (including but not limited to colleges and universities, K–12 schools, museums, and archives), at all degree levels, and of all professional ranks. They also accept Letters to the editor, In Memoriam essays, and ‘Everything Has a History’ essays. 10

Submission and review process: “Articles for Perspectives on History should normally be about 1,500 words in length. Perspectives Daily articles are about 800–1,000 words, letters to the editor should be no more than 500 words, In Memoriam essays about 650 words, and Everything Has a History essays about 500 words. 11

“While Perspectives on History does commission articles, it also accepts both completed submissions and proposals. Articles and letters are reviewed by the editorial board, and, in the case of article submissions, the board may make suggestions for revisions.” 12

“To ensure that no errors are inadvertently introduced into the text in the copyediting process, the copyedited version of articles accepted for publication may be sent to authors for final approval (when major revisions are suggested). Since both Perspectives on History and Perspectives Daily run on a tight schedule, the editors typically will ask authors to respond within 24 to 48 hours.” 13

Editorial tone: The submission guidelines state a preference for a journalistic or conversational style. In general, the articles in Perspectives on History are written with a semi-formal tone. Additionally, authors are asked to limit the number of citations in their articles.14

Style guide used:    “We encourage authors of articles to supply a working title for the essay, although the final determination of headlines, captions, pull quotes, and other forms of “display type” are made by the editors. A brief autobiographical description (25-30 words) should be appended at the end of the article, indicating the author’s institutional affiliation (if any), recent major publications, interests, and so on. Spelling—especially of proper names used in drafts—and all factual information (dates, place names, statistical data, and so on) provided should be verified by the author(s) before submission.” 15

The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.). For copy-editing, the editors also use Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.) and the most recent edition of MerriamWebster’s Collegiate Dictionary. In general, the editors attempt to make an author’s prose as effective as possible, both in the author’s interest and that of our publications. The editors seek to remove redundancies and errors—if any—in grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Perspectives on History and Perspectives Daily support the use of gender-neutral language in their articles, except when a change in pronoun would lead to a historical inaccuracy.” 16

Letters to the editor should be guided by the AHA’s Statement on Standards of Professional Conduct. 17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The organization and preservation of information are central to the tasks of both the historian and the LIS professional, and so it is not uncommon for their interests to intersect. Many developments in the Information field would be of interest to historians, especially if those developments were presented specifically for that audience. Such a presentation could generate a significant amount of name recognition if received favorably.

While Perspectives on History is not, strictly speaking, a scholarly publication, it does possess enough prestige that an article printed in it would add weight to a tenure or promotion cause. However, this is not a venue for early-career publishing.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Population circulation: Nearly 15,000.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AHA members are generally based in the United States, and the magazine is published in English.19 AHA members will be familiar with many of the same research terminologies that librarians use, but they will be completely unfamiliar with much of the jargon of information science. Similarly, historians have their own jargon, and an author writing for a history publication would do well to familiarize themselves with it.

Reader characteristics: “… AHA brings together historians specializing in every period, geographic region, and topic of history. Through its scholarly and professional activities, the AHA represents the broad diversity of the historical enterprise today. More than 60 percent of the Association’s members are professors of history, with the remaining 40 percent consisting of students, teachers, administrators, and publishers in the field.” 20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As historians, the members of the AHA will generally have a strong understanding of research and research tools. However, they will not be familiar with aspects of LIS subjects outside those that apply to their discipline.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The historians who comprise the membership of the AHA are, like most faculty, very busy people. It is essential, when writing for them, to show them — in their own terms — how you can save time or make their research easier. Perspectives on History is primarily a newsletter, even though it does publish some research-based articles. A librarian writing for this publication would do well to simplify the presentation of their research, and focus primarily on the practical application of their results.

Last updated: October 19, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Perspectives on History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522198707097/40994
  2. “About.”, Historians.org, accessed September 13, 2018, https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/about-page
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions.”, Historians.org, accessed September 13, 2018, https://www.historians.org/perspectives/submit
  5. “Advertising in Perspectives.”, Historians.org, accessed October 16, 2020, http://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/advertising
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Guidelines for Articles.”, Historians.org, accessed October 17, 2020, https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/about-page/submissions/guidelines-for-articles
  13. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  14. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  15. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  16. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  17. “Submissions.”
  18. “Advertising in Perspectives.”
  19. “Advertising in Perspectives.”
  20. “Advertising in Perspectives.”
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Huntington Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Huntington Library Quarterly

ISSN: 0018-7895 (Print) and 1544-399X (Online)1

Website: http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Huntington Library Quarterly publishes articles on the literature, history, and art of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries in Britain and America, with special emphasis on:

  • The interactions of literature, politics, and religion
  • The social and political contexts of literary and art history
  • Textual and bibliographic studies, including the history of printing and publishing
  • American studies, through the early nineteenth century;
  • The performance history of drama and music.”2

Target audience: Academic librarians and academics with a focus on American Literature and History between 1500 and 1700.[3 Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/]

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: Art, Literature, and History; scholarly. The main content of the publication is oriented toward research-based and scholarly articles.5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Academic articles, book reviews, review articles on important research in the field. The Quarterly also has an Intramuralia section that details acquisitions of rare books, manuscripts, and ephemera by the Huntington Library.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://hlq.pennpress.org/media/80097/hlq_authorguidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: Full-length academic feature articles, book reviews, and essays9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted for review via the ScholarOne website. Each manuscript should be accompanied by an abstract. In addition, any illustrations must be provided in hard copy.10

Editorial tone: Academic and formal11

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors who are interested in sixteenth-to-eighteenth century British and American society would benefit from publishing an article to this prestigious journal. Authors should be sure of their information, as readers of the journal are experts in the field and expect to have high-quality research in the journal.

Huntington Library Quarterly is abstracted in America: History and Life; Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL); Bibliography of the History of Art: BHA; British Humanities Index; FRANCIS; Historical Abstracts; Humanities Index; Humanities International Complete; I B R – Internationale Bibliographie der Rezensionen Wissenshcaftlicher Literatur; I B Z – Internationale Bibliographie der Geistes-und Sozialwissenschlaftlichen; MLA International Bibliography; Periodicals Index Online; ProQuest Research Library; Religion Index One: Periodicals; Routledge ABES; SCOPUS.13

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific numbers available. The Quarterly is available by subscription only but is abstracted and indexed in a variety of locations.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Though online access makes an international audience possible, the thematic focus of the journal indicates most readers would be academics in English-speaking countries.15

Reader characteristics: No specific information available, but readers are most likely experts in the subjects and time period highlighted by the Quarterly. Most will have at least one, if not more, advanced degree. It can be assumed that readers are highly interested in British and American history, art, and literature, as well as in archival studies.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although it may be assumed that some readers of HLQ have a knowledge of archival practice, others will have a purely academic or aesthetic interest in the period. Readers will not have a great interest in non-archival aspects of librarianship.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Huntington Library Quarterly is a prestigious academic journal with a very specific purpose: to highlight scholarship in early modern history and literature in England and the US. Publication in the Quarterly would be a boost to an academic or writing career. Readers are assumed to have deep knowledgeable about archival studies and British and American culture of 1500 to 1900, so authors should be very sure of their information and provide new research and thinking in the field.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Huntington Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1908295256
  2. Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  3.  Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  4.  Huntington Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405962725458/46882
  5. Huntington Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405962725458/46882
  6. Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  7.  Huntington Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  8. Huntington Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405962725458/46882
  9.  Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  10. Huntington Library Quarterly, Author Guidelines,” University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/media/80097/hlq_authorguidelines.pdf
  11. Huntington Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405962725458/46882
  12. Huntington Library Quarterly, Author Guidelines,” University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/media/80097/hlq_authorguidelines.pdf
  13. Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  14. Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  15. Huntington Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405962725458/46882
  16. Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
  17. Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Pennsylvania Press, accessed April 26, 2017, http://hlq.pennpress.org/home/
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