Wiki Tags Archives: Collections

First Monday

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: First Monday

ISSN: 1396-0466 (Online) and 1396-0458 (CD-ROM)1

Website: http://www.firstmonday.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to research about the Internet.”2 First Monday believes the impact of digitization on society is universal and ubiquitous, and seeks articles about how digitization is changing our understanding of society.3

Target audience: First Monday’s target audience includes intelligent, independent-thinking people located in more than 180 countries. Because readers’ cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly, readership is diverse. The journal is not geared toward those in academia, and many readers do not speak English as a first language.4

Publisher: First Monday Editorial Group at the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library5 First Monday was originally designed in Copenhagen and published by Munksgard, a Danish publisher.6

Peer reviewed? Yes7

Type: Computers and Internet, scholarly8 (First Monday is published in conjunction with the university library at the University of Illinois-Chicago, which indicates that the LIS community has a vested interest in the publication and represents a large proportion of its readership. Due to its diverse readership, we have categorized First Monday as both a “scholarly” and a “civilian” publication.)9

Medium: Online10

Content: First Monday publishes original interdisciplinary research papers about the Internet and related technologies. Articles emphasize subjects that are particularly interesting or groundbreaking. This publication’s strength lies in its diversity of content centered around the influence of the Internet and related technologies.11

Frequency of publication: Monthly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: First Monday publishes articles on interesting and novel ideas related to the history, present, and future of the Internet.13 Published topics of interest to LIS authors include: knowledge management, trends and standards, information-seeking behavior, emerging electronic classification frameworks, digital copyright, social networks, education, information society, the internet’s technological and commercial development, technical issues, and the political and social implications of the Internet. Research surveys, studies, exploratory and critical theory articles tied to the internet and related technologies would be welcome here.14 The publication also provides detailed Guidelines for Authors. These guidelines include writing tips; citation, reference, and abstract guidelines; submission format; formatting templates; and a final checklist for use in preparing manuscript submissions.15

Submission and review process: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions. Papers are subject to a double-blind peer review for originality and timeliness in the context of related research.16

Editorial tone: Articles published in First Monday are as diverse as its readership. All articles are written in an academic tone, though style varies in complexity. Many are written in an easy-to-read style, while others employ more sophisticated language. In either case, writers maintain the active voice and employ short sentences and paragraphs.17

Style guide used: First Monday provides its own style guide.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

First Monday publishes interdisciplinary research articles on all aspects of the internet, from highly-specialized technical issues to the internet’s social and political impact. Given the increasing digitization of information, this journal holds tremendous promise for LIS authors.

Because this audience is not academic, writing standards are not rigid, and an international distribution creates the potential to reach many readers. This publication’s diverse readership allows for writing from a variety of disciplines–LIS authors with backgrounds in engineering, literature, or history would be equally at home here. First Monday would be an excellent place to publish a thesis, or research on emerging Web technologies or trends. Additionally, the fact that the journal is peer reviewed makes it an attractive choice for those who wish to add a published article to their curriculum vitae.

Started in 1996, the journal has published 1,381 papers in 218 issues written by 1,888 authors. The journal is also abstracted in Communication Abstracts, Computer & Communication Security Abstracts, DoIS, eGranary Digital Library, INSPEC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, LISA, PAIS.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 314,559 per month.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are located in over 180 countries, concentrated in western Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim. First Monday is published by the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, where its server is also located.21 Due to the publication’s international scope, many readers’ first language is not English. Additionally, many readers are not academics. Authors should avoid using specific cultural references or idioms unless these are explained. Simple explanations, active voice, and less complex sentences will help this diverse audience better understand your message.22

Reader characteristics: Because First Monday‘s focus is international and its scope is interdisciplinary, the cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly among First Monday readers. Cultural, educational, and professional interests vary greatly among readers, and this publication’s interdisciplinary scope is larger than library information science alone. That said, the publication’ s focus is salient to the discipline. This, combined with the fact that it is published by a university library, makes it reasonable to presume that many readers are LIS professionals with shared professional interests and workplaces. The articles published in First Monday represent a wide variety of standpoints and approaches. The articles do not show overt bias or attitude toward any particular view, which seems indicative of the audience’s diversity.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many articles published in First Monday are not directly related to LIS, so it is reasonable to presume that many readers are involved in other aspects of Internet technology. In view of this, authors should cautiously employ LIS jargon and explain any specialized terms they use.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

First Monday prides itself on its interdisciplinary scope, and publishes a wide variety of articles from multiple perspectives. Demographic information about readers’ professional affiliations could not be obtained, and nothing in this publication’s submission guidelines indicates a preference toward LIS authors or topics. However, First Monday‘s publisher indicates that librarians have a vested interest in this publication and may represent a large proportion of its readers. First Monday’Audience Profile stresses that many readers are not academics, but one might conclude that many are librarians.25

Library science is an interdisciplinary field, and LIS students and professionals possess specialized knowledge of digital information collection, organization, and dissemination. This uniquely positions them as potential authors for First Monday. When writing for this publication, explain any professional terminology that would be unfamiliar to those outside the LIS field. For example, a study of library cataloging standards and information-seeking behavior on the web should explain terms like MARC21 or RDA. To be well-suited for First Monday, such an article might focus on digitization’s broad affects on LIS cataloging and how these are shaping practices.

While First Monday’s readership is not primarily academic, the content of articles is often sophisticated and complex. This may be why the editors stress simplicity and brevity in style; readers from different backgrounds will better understand a complex message through simple explanations and short sentences.

Last updated: October 17, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-181985152
  2. First Monday, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 25, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  3. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  4. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  5. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  6. “Editorial Policies,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  8. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  9. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  10. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  11. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  13. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Archives,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/archive
  15. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  19. First Monday,  University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  20. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  21. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  22. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  23. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  24. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  25. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
Continue Reading

Journal of Creative Library Practice, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Creative Library Practice

ISSN: 2330-42271

Website: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’€™s About page: “The Journal of Creative Library Practice provides an outlet for librarians and information professionals to €œdescribe and encourage greater creativity in library and information center communications, policies, collections, instruction, and other areas of librarianship€.”2

Target audience: “This journal reaches librarians and information professionals of all types, including academic, public, school, special, medical, legal, and others.” The journal is working to broaden its readership to individuals outside the profession, to anyone interested in creative solutions to LIS issues; or anyone who wants to participate in discussions about creative issues and solutions.3

Publisher: Published as an online blog-format journal by Creative Library Practice4

Peer reviewed? Yes,5 though this blog-style journal also publishes non-peer reviewed content. The refereed articles are distinguished from the blog posts on the site.6

Type: LIS scholarly and professional7

Medium: Online,8 peer-reviewed blogposts9

Content: Posts on creative solutions to LIS issues.10

Frequency of publication: This online journal is updated as frequently as the editors write posts and peer-reviewed articles are accepted.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Any article focusing on creative solutions to LIS issues, including communications barriers, technology issues, reviews of relevant books or websites.12

Submission and review process: The website provides a link to email manuscripts in MS-Word .doc, .docx, or RTF format.13

Editorial tone: Editor Joseph Kraus, in a Q&A with Library Journal, stated, “€œWe want to encourage prospective authors to write with less formal rhetoric.”14

Style guide used: References should be provided in a consistent format, whether Chicago, Turabian, MLA, or APA, or author may simply provide links to cited material.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal’s editors consider the publication to be an open source alternative to the stodgy print publications usually favored by the LIS community. They are a creative group open to all sorts of submissions, so this would be a great place to expand on an LIS student paper or thesis, or write about a creative approach tried at a library-related job, and how it helped the organization.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics are not available, but as this journal is also an informal blog there is potential to reach a large audience.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is online and the editors are LIS professionals at colleges and universities around the United States.16 The journal is written in American English.17

Reader characteristics: This journal appeals to forward thinking, creative, multidisciplined, against-the-grain LIS professionals seeking to share information with like-minded peers. The journal is written for and by LIS professionals in all possible settings, including academic, public, school, special, medical, and law libraries. It also aims to reach those readers who are interested in libraries but not necessarily working in them, including teachers, parents, students, and businesses.18

The journal was created by LIS professionals who wish to have a truly open access information sharing site that features creative solutions to common problems in information organizations. This is an open minded, nontraditional group that sees the value in current technologies and is working to take advantage of anything that can help the library community achieve its goals. The journal leans toward the informal, so potential authors should keep this in mind while writing for the publication. The goal is to provide articles from a variety of perspectives.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The knowledge level is probably quite high, but as the editors are attempting to appeal to laypeople as well as LIS students and professionals, potential authors should keep the jargon to a minimum and avoid highly technical terms and unusual acronyms.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Creative Library Practice is part of a new LIS journal standard: using open access for peer-reviewed articles under Creative Commons licensing, and providing relatively loose guidelines in terms of content, and even citations.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523479339830/779051
  2. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  3. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  4. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  5.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  6. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  7.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  8.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  9. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  10. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  12. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  14. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  16. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  17. The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017,
  18. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  19. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  20. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
Continue Reading

Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship

ai

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship

ISSN: 1941-126X (Print) and 1941-1278 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wacq20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the publication website, “The Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship aims to inform librarians and other information professionals about current research, evolving work-related processes and procedures, and the latest news on topics related to electronic resources and the digital environment’s impact on collecting, acquiring and making accessible library materials.”2

Target audience: “The Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship is intended for library administrators, librarians, and other information professionals who work with managing electronic resources in libraries. It is also intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice for LIS educators and students, and is a starting point for information professionals from various backgrounds concerned with issues surrounding the changes in collections, acquisitions and services in libraries in the digital age.”3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: According to the publication website, “This journal will highlight pivotal, interesting and thought-provoking articles and conference presentations to keep professionals and staff of all levels on top of the latest ideas and changes in the field. The journal will also have relevant book reviews to enable readers to target their professional readings.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So

Types of contributions accepted: “Current research, evolving work-related processes and procedures, and the latest news on topics related to electronic resources and the digital environment’s impact on collecting, acquiring and making accessible library materials.”10

Submission and review process: Authors are strongly encouraged to submit manuscripts electronically.  Please submit your manuscript in Microsoft Word format to the Editor-in-Chief, Gary Pitkin, gary.martin.pitkin@gmail.com.”11 All articles are subject to double-blind review.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Writers who have expertise in electronic resources will have the opportunity to develop their reputation and strengthen their resume with a publication in this highly topical, peer-reviewed journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although this is journal is based in the United States, its readership is not geographically limited to North America. The journal publishes in English.15

Reader characteristics: According to the publication website, readers are librarians and information professionals at all levels.16 Readers will likely have a strong interest in collection management, and specifically eletronic resources and the “digital environment’s impact on collecting, acquiring and making accessible library materials.”17

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about issues in the LIS community. As this is a scholarly journal, it is assumed that readers will be knowledgeable about electronic resources in the field of LIS.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal will be knowledgeable about LIS issues and interested in electronic resources and the latest news on the digital environment’s impact on library practices. As this journal  “deals with a single, broad, but well-defined and practical issue . . . of immediate concern to librarians and information professionals,”18 the potential for writers with expertise in this area to increase their impact on the LIS community is great.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-1339490187
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  4. Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  5.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  6.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  7.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  9.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So
  13.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So
  15.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  16. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  18.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
Continue Reading

Journal of Digital Information (JoDI)

*As of July 2014, Journal of Digital Information is not accepting submissions.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Digital Information (JoDI)

ISSN: 1368-75061

Website: http://journals.tdl.org/jodi

Purpose, objective, or mission: JoDI focuses on “Publishing papers on the management, presentation, and uses of information in digital environments.”2 JoDI “Covers digital libraries, hypertext and hypermedia systems, and digital repositories and the issues of digital information.”3

Target audience: Information professionals, researchers, and scholars interested in digital information and environments.4

Publisher: Texas A & M University Libraries.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Online8

Content: “…the Journal of Digital Information is an electronic-only, peer-reviewed journal covering the broad topics related to digital libraries, hypertext and hypermedia systems and digital repositories, and the issues of digital information.”9

Frequency of publication: Irregular, often several volumes per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: This publication accepts articles these themes: information discovery, visual interfaces and digital libraries. Per the website, “Papers submitted to JoDI must be original. As a peer-reviewed journal JoDI is unable to consider papers that have been accepted by or published in another peer reviewed source, or any other publication where copyright in the work has been assigned to another party (this does not include any copy on your personal or your institutional websites). For the same reason, JoDI is also unable to consider papers while they may be being considered for publication elsewhere.”11

Submission and review process: Submission is online and requires authors to create an account with the site. From the site: “Since JoDI is a web-based journal, the preferred presentation format is HTML. We strongly recommend submission in this form but we will accept manuscripts in other Web-viewable formats, such as PDF. Where a non-html paper is submitted the author’s final, refereed and accepted copy will be presented unedited, supplemented with an edited html ‘front page’ version.”12 Once an article is submitted an author is able to monitor the review process by logging into their account.

Editorial tone: Academic13

Style guide used: None specified; however, the submission guidelines document does provide specific examples of references and formatting.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Digital information is a very good journal for librarians interested in writing on the technical aspects of digital information (metadata, indexing, hypermedia, digital curation, etc).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation for this online, open-access journal is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers’ geographic locations are unknown, though there are probably more readers in Texas as that is where the journal is based.15 The Journal of Digital Information is a highly specialized electronic journal, so even though Texas may have more readers per capita, the publication’s readership most likely spread throughout the United States and, to some extent, other English-speaking countries.16 The Journal of Digital Information is published in English. Since JoDI is an academic journal, it is likely that most readers are students, professors, and professionals.17 Despite academia being a sort of micro-culture, it is still important for writers to refrain from cultural references that may be too local.

Reader characteristics: Readers of the Journal of Digital Information are most likely information professionals specializing in digital storage and retrieval. Workplaces may range from libraries, software companies, various technical services,  and IT departments. Readers of the Journal of Digital Information are highly specific in their reading interest; hence, it is not safe to assume that the average reader will have a high degree of knowledge or interest in libraries or information organizations — except as they may pertain to digital information dissemination. Writers wishing to publish should keep in mind that readers are highly specialized and most likely are well versed in the field of digital information.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have extensive knowledge related to digital information (such as tagging, indexing, web2.0, and database-design) but may not have such a well-versed comprehension of other aspects of librarianship.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors for the Journal of Digital Information should know that their readers are well-read and comfortable with technical jargon. Readers come to JoDI for research-oriented essays and reports, and expect to see research conveyed with tables and charts. Keeping this in mind, readers can be creative with their essays as long as it still pertains to the topic (a good example is from 2006’s vol.7 no. 2 issue: “Finding Murphy Brown: How Accessible are Historic Television Broadcasts?” by Jeff Ubois20). JoDI is a free electronic publication, so it may be of interest to potential authors that their work will be online and available to anyone who creates an account with the Texas Digital Library.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523818902306/270336
  2.  “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  3. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  4. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  5. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  6. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  7. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  8. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  9. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  10. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  11.  “Editorial Policies,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12.  “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13.  Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  14. “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  16. “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  18. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  19. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  20. Jeff Ubois, “Finding Murphy Brown: How accessible are historic television broadcasts?” Journal of Digital Information, 7(2),  https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/article/view/172
Continue Reading