Wiki Tags Archives: Accessibility

Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

ISSN: 1932-2909 (Print) and 1932-2917 (Online).1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship is an international, peer-reviewed journal focused on all aspects of librarianship as practiced on the World Wide Web, including both existing and emerging roles and activities of information professionals.”2

Target audience: Information professionals (worldwide) interested in Web-based librarianship.3

Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: Hybrid: LIS scholarly journal and LIS professional news source. JWL is a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal which also publishes a significant number of professional articles. Taylor and Francis mentions that JWL “strives to find a balance between original, scholarly research, and practical communications.”6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The journal covers a wide variety of topics, including library website design and usability, strategies for cataloging web information, Web 2.0 technologies (i.e., wikis, RSS, etc.), search engines, and the future of web librarianship.8 Issues contain editorials, articles, professional communications, global connections, and reviews.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship welcomes articles covering topics including but not limited to library web page design and redesigns, web project management, usability testing of library or library-related sites, cataloging or classification of Web information, international issues in web librarianship, library integration with other web sites, and future aspects of web librarianship. The journal is also interested in articles related to user behavior on the web, including search behaviors, social networking site trends, and the connection between the web-at-large and library web resources.”11

“The journal accepts empirical studies providing objective evidence related to current web-related challenges for libraries, including usability test reports, user survey results, and analyses of web statistics. The journal will also consider case studies of cutting-edge web projects in all types of libraries and best practices based on library experiences, literature, tutorials, and literature reviews.”12

Submission and review process: Work is submitted via the ScholarOne Manuscripts program and must be accompanied by a statement that the manuscript has not been published or submitted elsewhere. Articles should contain a 100 to 200-word abstract.13

Authors can expect JWL‘s double-blind peer review process to take anywhere from six to eight weeks. Additionally, two editors typically review each manuscript, adding an additional layer of objectivity.14

Editorial tone: Most manuscripts should have a scholarly, unbiased tone (e.g., scholarly research articles). Considering that the journal also publishes practical communications, it seems reasonable to assume that these non-scholarly communications should have a slightly more down-to-earth tone.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JWL is a relatively new journal (its first issue was released in 2007),17, its credible and highly relevant information on “hot” topics in LIS make it an exciting and unique publishing opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and student authors. LIS practitioners could submit a case study on the practical application of a Web 2.0 technology in their workplace, while educators might conduct original research in the field of virtual librarianship. LIS students could submit an interview, an article describing an internship experience practiced in the Web environment, or an in-depth literature review (to name but a few options).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although there is no detailed information available regarding the geographic location of JWL readers, a significant portion of the publication’s content is devoted to international issues. For example, many issues feature a “Global Connections” section, which has featured articles on Jamaica, Scotland, South Africa, and Egypt.18 Additionally, editors from all over the world serve on the Editorial Board.19 Thus, although the journal is published solely in American English, authors should limit their use of colloquialisms and specific cultural references.20

Reader characteristics: No demographic information is available for JWL readers. Since the journal is published in American English and is geared towards Web-based technologies, it seems safe to assume that most readers live in the U.S., work in information-based organizations, and are technologically inclined.21 In addition to information professionals of all types, LIS students are likely to be part of the journal’s core audience. Regardless of their profession, readers of JWL almost certainly share common professional interests, such as virtual library services or web design.22

JWL readers are likely to have established attitudes about the future direction of librarianship and might be considered progressive (especially in light of how articles in previous issues have enthusiastically advocated for new technologies and services).23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JWL readers are likely to be knowledgeable about certain LIS jargon and subjects, such as those that specifically relate to technology and Internet use in librarianship.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because JWL is both a professional and scholarly journal, authors have multiple opportunities to reach readers. Whether an author decides to submit a theoretical research paper or a practical case study, it is important to focus the work on the highly specialized interests of JWL readers. As mentioned in the Publication Analysis, appropriate topics might include such issues as Web 2.0/Library 2.0, web design and usability testing, international or comparative issues in web librarianship, or the future of the profession. In order to connect with this audience, articles should demonstrate superior technological expertise and cutting-edge research.

Last updated: February 17, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjwl20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  4.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  5. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  6.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Taylor and Francis, accessed February 16, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/jwl-cfp16
  7.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  9. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  10. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  15.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  17. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  18. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  19. “Editorial Board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7tDhbGdROg
  20. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  21. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  23. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  24. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 17, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
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LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

ISSN: 1058-6768

Website: https://www.libres-ejournal.info/

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBRES, an international refereed e-journal, publishes research and scholarly articles in library and information science and services (LIS). “It has a particular focus on research in emerging areas of LIS, synthesis of LIS research areas, and on novel perspectives and conceptions that advance theory and practice.”1

Target audience: LIBRES is for information science professionals and librarians interested in all aspects of LIS research and scholarship, but especially in emerging areas, novel perspectives, and new understandings of LIS theory and practice.2

Publisher: LIBRES is jointly published by the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information and the NTU Libraries at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. It was previously published by the Department of Information Studies at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia.3

Peer reviewed? At least two referees blind review each paper.4

Type:  LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: LIBRES is an online, open-access journal.

Content: This journal has three main sections, Research Papers, Synthesis & Perspectives, and Special Sections. The journal publishes research papers on studies that advance LIS, synthesis papers that survey areas of LIS for new or better understandings, and scholarly opinion or perspective papers that explore new conceptions of LIS.5 Each Special Section is devoted to papers from conferences from around the globe, promoting the journal’s commitment to regional LIS scholarship.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year, in June and December.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: LIBRES accepts scholarly research, synthesis, and perspective papers on any aspect of LIS, especially in emerging areas or with novel conceptions that advance theory and practice. 8

Submission and review process: Submissions should be sent in Microsoft Word documents to the editor at LIBRESeditor@ntu.edu.sg. Submissions are usually reviewed within 60 days of receipt. Papers should not be under review or published elsewhere. “The reviews will pay particular attention to whether the papers are interesting, useful, thoughtful, and a significant contribution to knowledge in the LIS field.”9

Editorial tone: The journal uses a formal academic style. The journal’s official language is English, but the editor encourages submissions from developing countries and countries where English is not the native language; revision and editing for readability are part of the publication process.10

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIBRES is focused on new research and novel perspectives from the LIS international academic community. Authors can submit to either the Research Papers section or to the Synthesis & Perspectives section. The journal’s authorship is international, and it publishes articles from developed and developing countries; LIBRES takes “a nurturing attitude towards papers and authors,” and the editorial board provides “substantive guidance to the authors,” especially those who are not native English speakers.12 “In subject coverage, it has a particular strength in library/information service,” and it promotes worldwide regional LIS community scholarship by publishing conference papers.13 It publishes high-quality research, often on technology and service, from a many different countries, pushing LIS regional and international innovation forward.


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  LIBRES is published in English and is international in scope,14 and the editorial board is especially interested in linking up with “regional LIS research communities worldwide.”15

Reader characteristics: The audience of LIBRES is LIS academics and professionals from around the world,16 and papers are published by authors from the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Qatar, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Malaysia, to name a few. The conference papers in the Special Sections expand its international scope in terms of research and readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a professional and scholarly understanding of LIS practice and research.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This scholarly journal’s readers will expect formal research and high-level syntheses. Topics for submission include current and emerging LIS research areas, emerging technology, and library service. For LIS professional and student researchers, LIBRES is a good place to research that investigates practices within library and information science environments and advances in new and emerging technology. For LIS scholars, LIBRES encourages synthesis papers that consider theory and practice in a new light and opinion and perspective pieces that explore new ideas in LIS.

Last updated: January 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About LIBRES,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/about-libres/.
  2. “About LIBRES.”
  3. “About LIBRES.”
  4. “About LIBRES.”
  5. “Author Guidelines,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/author-guidelines/.
  6. For example, Special Section: Digital Curation Projects and Research in Asia, LIBRIS 26, no. 1 (2018), accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/all-issues/volume-26-issue-1/.
  7. “About LIBRES.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 25, no. 1 (2015), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1621/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 24, no. 1 (2014), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1369/.
  13. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  16. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
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Library Juice Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Library Juice Press

Website: http://libraryjuicepress.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Juice Press is an imprint of Litwin Books, “specializing in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science.” They publish topics such as “library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and in general anything that can be placed under the rubric of ‘critical studies in librarianship.'”1

Target audience: Professional librarians and students of library science.”2

Owner: Litwin Books, LLC. 3

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. “Manuscripts submitted to us undergo a peer-review process to ensure their quality according to academic or professional standards, depending on the title.”4

Types of books published: LIS-specific books with a critical edge. Sample titles include:5

  • Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership
  • Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings
  • Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom
  • Where are the Librarians of Color? The Experiences of People of Color in Academica

Medium: Print.

Topics covered: Library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and any topics under the rubric of “critical studies in librarianship.” 6

Number of titles published per year: Approximately five.7

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://libraryjuicepress.com/authors.php 8

Types of submissions accepted: The publisher accepts book proposals and full manuscripts on topics that are within its editorial scope.9 

Submission and review process: The Authors page provides specific submission and manuscript formatting requirements, but the publisher’s formal review process is not outlined. More information can be found in the recorded webinar.10

Editorial tone: Academic.11

Style guide usedChicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Library Juice Press titles focus on theoretical investigations into library activism, social justice, feminist pedagogy, as well as practically oriented books like So You Want to Be a Librarian. The publisher produces serious, in-depth works with alternative perspectives.

A related and worthwhile opportunity to submit writing that is not book-length is Library Juice’s annual paper contest (2,000 to 10,000 words), which is designed “to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.”13 The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others. “Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined. Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of a study.”14

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published): Publishing since 2006, Library Juice Press has approximately 30 frontlist and backlist titles.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: While the publisher is based in California and books are published in English, recent Library Juice Press titles focus on international perspectives—i.e., academic librarian labor activism in Canada, and librarianship in the context of the Cuban revolution.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are interested in content that addresses: social responsibility; information as a public good; intellectual freedom and civil liberties; print culture, web culture, visual culture, and the meaning of literacy; information policy and ethics; and the state of the library profession (issues of identity, work life, and deprofessionalization).17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are “professional librarians and students of library science” who likely have a very strong knowledge of or strong interest in specific LIS subject areas.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Library Juice Press originated as a webzine and blog, covering “topics of interest to passionate librarians from a political left perspective that is linked to the fundamental values of the profession.”18 LIS authors seeking to publish works that are politically oriented or rooted outside the cultural mainstream may potentially find an audience through Library Juice Press.

Last updated: January 29, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Litwin Books, LLC, http://litwinbooks.com/about.php.
  2. Litwin Books, LLC, accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com.
  3. “Litwin Books, LLC.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Our Books,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 21, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/books.php.
  6. “About Us.”
  7. “Catalog,” Library Juice Press,  accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com/catalog.php.
  8. “Authors,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 21, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/authors.php.
  9. “Authors.”
  10. “Authors.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Litwin Books Submission Guidelines,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com/litwin-books-submission-guidelines.pdf.
  13. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 15, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/contest.php.
  14. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest.”
  15. “Our Books.”
  16. “Our Books.”
  17. “Library Juice Blog,” last modified August 30, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/blog/.
  18. “Library Juice Blog.”
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Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve

ISSN: 1072-303X (Print) and 1540-3572 (Online)1

Website: http://www.informaworld.com/wild

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve is dedicated to providing the latest and most current information about interlibrary loan and electronic reserves librarianship. It combines articles about practice and research.2

The journal also provides a forum for all cooperative library endeavors, including consortial purchasing and multilibrary digitization projects as well as more traditional resource sharing and supply services like interlibrary loan and reserves.3

In 2005, the name was changed from Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Information Supply to the current title to reflect the changing nature of the information world.4

Target audience: The journal is tailored towards librarians and staff who work in interlibrary loan and electronic reserve as well as administrators.5

Publisher: Routledge.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: This publication falls into a gray area. The content is peer reviewed, and although many articles are oriented toward practitioners, others are more research oriented. Overall, the publication could be categorized as an LIS scholarly publication. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory categorizes it as scholarly and academic.8

Medium: Print and online.9

Content: The journal runs the gamut from practical to research articles. Sample subject matter includes the role of emerging technologies in interlibrary loan delivery, the use of inter-library loan statistics for acquisitions and collection development purposes, copyright issues, and interlibrary loan as a career specialization.10

Frequency of publication: 5 issues per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on innovations in interlibrary loan, document delivery, and research sharing. Scholarly articles usually adhere to the same format and generally contain an abstract, keywords, and a literature review.12

Submission and review process: This publication receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts website. Previously published and simultaneous publications are not accepted.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal is an excellent choice for LIS authors, especially those with a strong knowledge of interlibrary loan, electronic reserves, or access services in general. As Ulrich’s Global Serials Directory notes, “Interlibrary loan and document delivery is arguably the area of library service experiencing the most growth in the last several years. As libraries increasingly are unable to collect everything needed by their own users, the provision of materials through interlending or commercial document delivery has seen a phenomenal increase.”16 Consequently, LIS authors will find a wide audience when publishing with this journal, especially since it’s indexed in a number of prominent databases, including FRANCIS, LISA, ProQuest 5000, and many others.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available.

Audience location: The primary audience for this publication is the United States, and–to a slightly lesser degree–other English-speaking countries such as Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Most of the articles are geared towards library applications in North America. English language speakers comprise the majority of the audience.18 Many of the articles are predicated on the principles espoused by the ALA Interlibrary Code for the United States, which would mean the laws and standard practices of North American libraries are often given space in the journal.19 However, there is evidence that the audience is becoming more international, as evidenced by the inclusion of case studies from countries outside of North America.20

Reader characteristics: Most readers have a vested interest in the success of an interlibrary loan office. Often, readers are veteran staff members, but just as often, readers may be learning the tricks of the trade, as interlibrary loan can be very specialized. Additionally, many readers are librarians or administrators who are responsible for making the overarching decisions in an interlibrary loan office. The vast majority of readers are from the interlibrary loan or access services worlds. Paraprofessional staff comprise a large portion of the readership, as well as interlibrary loan department supervisors (mostly librarians). Finally, administrators have a vested interest in the scholarship of this subject, as they are most often the decision makers.21

Two issues frequently permeate this journal: the worth of interlibrary loan services and the issue of position in the interlibrary loan office. Interlibrary loan is often unknown or forgotten in many libraries, despite its enormous value to communities.  As for position, interlibrary loan offices must decide whether paraprofessionals or librarians should be in charge. There is a strong feeling that the position of ILL librarian is valuable and useful.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this publication are usually very knowledgeable about libraries, especially the specialized field of interlibrary loans. Civilians with little exposure to libraries, as well as staff outside of access service departments are, for the most part, outside this journal’s intended audience. Some of the articles meticulously detail the day-to-day work in interlibrary loan offices, even when the subject mater is more theoretical.23For example, in a past article, the issue of free document delivery is discussed. On the one hand, the article discussed the philosophical issues behind charging or not charging patrons, but on the other hand, the article goes into significant detail about the reality of providing articles for a large patron base.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because interlibrary loan and electronic reserves are very specialized fields within the library world, thorough knowledge of the subject is key. Additionally, the interlibrary loan community is very close-knit and collaborative by design. Potential authors need to be very aware of this community, and if they are not already part of it, become part of it.

Last updated: January 26, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wild20.
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  4.  Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  5. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  6. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  7. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  8. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  9. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  10. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
  11. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  16.  Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  17.  Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  18. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  20. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
  21. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  22. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  24. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

ISSN: 1069-1316 (Print) and 1545-2530 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”2

Target audience: Academic library staff3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? “Full length articles are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”5

Type: College & Undergraduate Libraries is an open access hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.6 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides college librarians with “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”7

Medium: Print and online8

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttps://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wcul20

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”11 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.12

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .13

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”14

Editorial tone: Academic15, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.16

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”18 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,20 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”21

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”22 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”23 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”25

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”26

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: December 19, 2020


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  College & Undergraduate Libraries, UlrichsWeb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 19, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis, accessed December 19, 2020, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed December 19, 2020, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20
  4. College & Undergraduate Libraries, UlrichsWeb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 19, 2020,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed December 19, 2020, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20
  6. College & Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 19, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  7. College & Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed December 19, 2020, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  8. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed December 19, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed December 19, 2020, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20
  10. College & Undergraduate Libraries, UlrichsWeb Global Serials Directory, accessed December 19, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed December 19, 2020, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#
  12. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  14. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  15. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  19. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  21. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  22. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  23. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  24. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  25. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  26. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

ISSN: 1712-44411

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”2

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”3

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”4

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Online8

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”11

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”12 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.13

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”14

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”15

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”16

Editorial tone: Academic17

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,19, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”20

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26921

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.22

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”23 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”24, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.25 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523478909052/597635
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  9. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  18. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  19. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  21. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  22. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  25. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
Continue Reading

Faculty of Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Faculty of Information Quarterly (*Publication currently on hiatus.*)

ISSN: 1925-91071

Website: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Faculty of Information Quarterly (FIQ) is a student-led, peer reviewed journal and provides immediate open access to its content by publishing online, on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Edited by graduate students at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information, the journal seeks to provide an environment for the voices of emerging and established scholars and practitioners in diverse Information fields, including but not limited to the following: archival science, accessibility studies, book history and print culture, communication theory, critical theory, cultural informatics, health informatics, information studies, information systems and technology, knowledge theory, library science, management science, media theory, museum studies, semiotics, and technology studies.”2

Target audience: University of Toronto LIS students, faculty and global LIS community3

Publisher: University of Toronto, Faculty of Information4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: Research articles covering any topic relevant to LIS community. Recent article titles include Research as a Social Process: Considerations for Academic Libraries, Applying Concepts of Bug-Tracking Software to e-Resource Management in Academic Libraries, and The Rare e-Vent: Concepts of Rarity and Scarcity in e-Books.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9 *The last edition published was Volume 3, Number 4, in 2011.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles from the LIS and related academic communities. Per the publication website, “While there is an emphasis on encouraging student work in FIQ we certainly support submissions from all members of the Information community. Masters and PhD students and faculty of all disciplines, practitioners and Information professionals with an interest in scholarly work, and interested members of the Information community in its broadest sense are all welcome to submit works to this publication.”11 “We encourage students to submit articles they think are of an academic calibre, which can include conference papers, reworked course papers, personal research projects, reflections on the scholarly and practical elements of Information, or other communications of excellent quality.”12

Submission and review process: All work is submitted online through the publication  website. Detailed instructions provided for authors including a checklist to ensure all requirements are met. FIQ is peer-reviewed and publication is subject to approval and review by the Editorial Staff.13

Editorial tone: Formal14

Style guide used: For Canadian English spelling, authors should consult the latest edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary; for citations and references authors should use the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although FIQ was founded in part to promote publication of student research and writing, all members of the information community are invited to submit manuscripts.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. As an open access, online publication of a leading information school, FIQ is freely accessible to academic and professional members of the information community the world over.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Toronto, Canada.18 While its target audience is the global information community, the publication requires its authors to use Canadian spellings and to ensure the relevance of articles to Canadian culture.19

Reader characteristics: Though FIQ is an open-access publication with an international reach, it is likely, given its editorial bias,20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers would have an LIS background or education; however, since FIQ strives for a global reach and LIS education varies around the global, writers should consider this when writing.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication run by graduate students and primarily for graduate students and academics in the the LIS community, fellow graduate student authors would seem to have a better chance of publication in FIQ.

Last updated: April 24, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523472560543/717394
  2. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  5. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  6. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  7. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  8. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  9. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  10. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  11. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  15. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  18. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  19. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  20.  “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines that the majority of its readers are Canadian or North American. Readers of this student-run journal will have a keen interest in the latest developments in the LIS field. The journal does state a preference for publishing the student work, so this is an ideal venue for a first publication.[21. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations) Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: IFLA Journal (International Federation of Library Associations)

ISSN: 0340-0352 (Print) and 1745-2651 (Online)

Website: www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal (1992-2002 archived at http://www.ifla.org/V/iflaj/index.htm)

Purpose, objective, or mission: “IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”1

Target audience: Library professionals around the world, especially those interested in library services in developing areas2

Publisher: Sage Publications3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online open access6

Content: The journal publishes articles on “library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#submission-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”9 Though the journal publishes primarily original research, case studies on successful and unsuccessful projects and opinion pieces on library issues are also accepted.10 Articles should be between 3,000 to 8,000 words and accompanied by an abstract of no approximately 150 words. Authors whose primary language is not English should not be inhibited from submitting, as correction of minor errors and revision to standard English is considered standard editorial procedure.11

Submission and review process: IFLA requests submissions be sent as an email attachment, preferably as MS Word document. Expect approximately six weeks for the editorial committee to review submissions.12

Editorial tone: The tone of IFLA Journal is academic,13 but attempts to use unbiased language to make examples and practices applicable to library staff from around the world.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors wishing to convey current and upcoming library innovations to developing areas, this journal is well regarded. It presents issues that smaller libraries and countries are dealing with as compared to the United States and Europe. Well-researched articles about procedures that have been tested at large libraries are highly valuable to librarians in developing countries. Some services may be beyond the technology of small countries, but writers should strive to keep the theories simple and useful.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific numbers provided, but the journal is promoted to IFLA members16 and is available online.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in the United Kingdom,18 but the editorial board is international.19 Although most articles are published in English, some are published in other major languages such as Spanish, Russian, French, or German, when appropriate.20 Potential authors should take care to describe a specific system or local procedure, because the reader may be familiar with LIS terms in general but not with local practice.

Reader characteristics: While most librarians in the United States are women, the author should keep in mind that some restrictions are put on women in other countries so this demographic may be different among IFLA Journal readers. Librarians in most countries have college or graduate degrees, and are considered professionals. Though many readers of IFLA Journal work in libraries in developing countries, there is a genuine desire to learn about practices in major libraries throughout the world. In terms of education and professional skills, there may be emphasis placed on less technical aspects of librarianship.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It may be assumed that the readers of this journal understand LIS jargon and current issues. Despite the scholarly tone of the journal, library services are still developing in some countries, so discussion of current-generation digital technologies and digital information may have to be explained or simplified.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors for IFLA Journal should be prepared to do academic research into their topics, and to thoroughly study the region or country they are addressing. Readers might range from a librarian or teacher in a one-room school in Kenya with limited resources to a LIS professor in Germany with digital access.23 An author from the United States should be careful not to “preach” about advanced services which may not be relevant to developing countries. The members of IFLA are likely to be curious about policies and practices that are successful in other regions, especially when discussed in factual, not proscriptive way.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  2. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/
  3. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  4. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  5. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  6. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  7. “IFLA Journal/Description,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal
  8. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  9. “IFLA Journal/Aims and Scope,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#aims-and-scope
  10. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#ARTICLETYPES
  11. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  13. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  16. “Membership,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/membership
  17. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  18. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  19. “IFLA Journal/Editorial Committee,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal/editorial-committee
  20. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  22. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  23.  “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
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San Diego Reader

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: San Diego Reader

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: To cover all aspects of life in San Diego.1

Target audience: People living in, or visiting, the San Diego region.

Publisher: James E. Holman.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian weekly alternative newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: The Association of Alternative Newsweeklies (AAN) describes the content as follows: “Specializing in feature stories, the Reader covers San Diego life in general, with emphasis on politics and the arts and entertainment. The Reader publishes comprehensive listings of movies, events, theater, and music; restaurant and film reviews; and free classifieds.”4

Frequency of publication: Weekly.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/contact/

Types of contributions accepted: Their website allows for online submission (requires free registration) of articles in four specific categories: CD or concert review, neighborhood news story, travel story, waterfront story, or cover story.6 They also accept letters to the editor.7 Per their website: “Woo us with actual reporting, not a cover letter written to impress your creative-writing teacher.”8

Submission and review process: There are online submission forms for each type of story.9

Editorial tone: Informal but informative.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The San Diego Reader celebrates San Diego and its diverse people. It focuses on a variety of ordinary people and places within the county. The potential for publication of San Diego LIS authors by the San Diego Reader exists for a variety of reasons. A call for the commencement of construction on the new central library, designed a decade ago, could be shaped as a letter to the editor. Other issues that librarians and the Reader feel strongly about are equal access to information and censorship. A concise reporting of banned books week events may be framed as a neighborhood story.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 90,000 as of March 2015.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The focus of the Reader articles is on local San Diego life, politics, and entertainment. Its reach extends beyond San Diego County, (the sixth-largest county in the United States) into under-represented Imperial County and Baja California.

Although the Reader is written in English, there is an awareness that San Diego is a culturally diverse region. The tone is informal and direct, the vocabulary concrete, and the sentence structure is not complex. The investigative articles usually feature five to ten San Diegans to show how the issue impacts different people from a variety of backgrounds. Frequently, the names of cities and communities, as well as local businesses, are used as examples, without bothering to explain a reference to readers outside the region.

Reader characteristics: Audience demographics are not available, but readers will be residents of the San Diego area. The publication is progressive; its coverage of local politics confronts issues critically. Its bias is inherent in its values. The attitude calls attention to those who exploit the average person. Some topics are intended to evoke outrage.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The level of knowledge of LIS issues will vary and it can be safely assumed that readers have the same level of LIS knowledge as the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Reader has a reputation for high-quality writing that the readers have come to expect, suggesting, even in the limited fashion that contributions are accepted, that quality of writing would play a role in acceptance. Living in San Diego would be important in order to convey the essence of the city and county to readers.

Last updated: September 28, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “San Diego Reader,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/
  2. “San Diego Reader,” Ulrichsweb, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1415817959160/559101
  3. San Diego Reader.”
  4. “San Diego Reader,” Altweeklies.com, accessed November 1, 2016, from http://www.altweeklies.com/aan/san-diego-reader/Company?oid=80
  5. “Archives,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/archives/
  6. “Contact Us,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/contact/
  7. “Letters to the Editor,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/letter-editor/
  8. Contact Us.”
  9. Contact Us.”
  10. San Diego Reader.”
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Boing Boing

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Boing Boing

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://boingboing.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “A Website devoted to technology and culture. We publish feature articles, links to things we find interesting online, podcasts, videos and comics created by the Boing Boing editorial team and other invited contributors. We also provide a discussion forum so you can participate in the conversation; and sell merchandise in the Boing Boing Shop.”1 Boing Boing allows users to submit interesting, cool, newsworthy links to articles, videos, and any minutia you find interesting.

Target audience: If you’re interested in anything outside the mainstream, this would be the place to look. The website is hailed as a bastion of free speech and imagine sharing; it was founded by an editor of Make Magazine, which is dedicated to all things DIY, and the four primary editors have all written for Wired Magazine.2

Publisher: Happy Mutants, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication / online forum.5

Medium: Online

Content: A blog/forum that shares member-reader links of all sorts -informational, fun, noteworthy.

Frequency of publication: Blog updated with at least several new posts per day.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Forum Rules

Types of contributions accepted: Any kinds.

Submission and review process:

“You can browse the Site without logging in. However, to participate in our Discussion Forum, you need to create an account. We use the Discourse.org forum platform and the creators CDCK host it on their servers and run it for us. To participate in the forum, you may create a new account, use an existing Discourse.org user name and password or log-in using one of your social networking user name and passwords.” 6

Editorial tone: As informal, but informative, as possible. Headlines and pictures are purposely titillating or attention grabbing. Example: under the “Science” category is the headline: “Anne of Green Gables Had Herpes (and you probably do, too),”an article about herpes. Or “The Librarian and the Hot Rod Shop,” a post about a mobile initiative that provides library resources to people who are unaware of the library, or can’t make it to the local branch.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have any little library related tidbit to share, this is a great website on which to post it. These are non-reviewed blog posts, so it’s not a site that will help towards your tenured work or that you should cite in a scholarly article, but it’s a great source for getting and sending information to a curious, intelligent, and supportive audience. It would be a great first start for book reviews, for example, or just to write about or re-post some interesting library-related news.

Creative Commons License: non-commercial sharing, with attribution. Just make sure you say where your link/review/article originated.7

Of note to LIS writers: a team from the American Library Association ran a Boing Boing member interest group called Library Boing Boing from 2012 to 2014. See Library Boing Boing, and their first Boing Boing post; the full collection is tagged LIBRARYLAB. To learn more, see the LibraryLab community on the ALA Connect website.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: In an article in Fast Company, according to Quantcast data, it gets about 2.5 million unique visitors a month. The article also states that, in 2004-2005, it “had become one of the most-read and linked-to blogs in the world.”8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Quantcast data, Boing Boing reaches an international audience, though 63% of its readers are in the United States.9 English is the primary language, but as the site also links to websites, videos, etc., as long as you explain the reason for submitting your article/website/repost, the language of the thing itself isn’t too strict. Culture is progressive and friendly, hacker-ish and non-mainstream.

Reader characteristics: Quantcast data reports that the majority of readers are white, male, and highly educated.10 Hackers, DIY-ers, those who like to stay current on news/gadgets/things, and anyone with an eye on web culture and interesting news of all kinds will gravitate towards the blog. The blog’s bias lies on the side of being, for the most part, uncensored and relishing in re-posting links that test freedom of speech and censorship in the online community. They are very much an “anything goes” site, as long as “anything” is interesting to readers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: More civilian than professional; LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum, use layman’s terms and just get your point across in the least scholarly tone possible. The readership comprises a savvy group of people, but they are not all LIS aficionados, so use regular, everyday terms when describing your link and why you find it interesting.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Boing Boing would be a great place to post information relevant to the library community: its readers, while very much an online-loving group, seem to enjoy hearing about LIS-related news, particularly if it has to do with free speech, public access, or challenges to the LIS community. They are well-read, spoken, and intelligent, and, with the inclusion of the LIS-specific posting group, would appreciate links coming from the Library world. Although not scholarly in tone, the links posted can be of scholarly caliber, and the blog has garnered attention and awards, and holds a certain status in the blogosphere; posts here are likely to be reposted elsewhere and shared.

Last updated: September 1, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”, BoingBoing.net, accessed September 10, 2016, http://boingboing.net/tos
  2. “Boing Boing.”, Wikipedia, accessed October 24, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boing_Boing
  3. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  4. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  5. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  6. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  7. “Boing Boing Terms of Service.”
  8. “10 Tips from Boing Boing on Making Online Content Sing.”, FastCompany.com, accessed September 10, 2016, http://www.fastcompany.com/3005636/10-tips-boing-boing-making-online-content-sing
  9. “boingboing.net.”, Quantcast.com, accessed September 10, 2016, https://www.quantcast.com/boingboing.net
  10. “boingboing.net.”
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