Wiki Tags Archives: Book reviews

Public Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Public Libraries

ISSN: 0163-55061

Website: Public Libraries magazine: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries; Public Libraries Onlinehttp://publiclibrariesonline.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Public Libraries is the official trade publication of the Public Library Association (PLA), a division of American Library Association (ALA), and thus reflects its standards. The magazine seeks to provide public librarians with the news and information they need to be as successful in their careers as possible.2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.3

Publisher: Public Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS professional news. This publication focuses on the public library workplace rather than on scholarly research.6

Medium: Print.7 Public Libraries Online, a complement to the printed journal, is available online.8

Content: Quality articles and information germane to all aspects of public libraries.9

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl

Types of contributions accepted: The following types of contributions are considered for publication:

  • Feature articles. Manuscripts should be 3,000-6,000 words.
  • €œVerso€ pieces, of no more than 1,500 words.
  • Vendor announcements. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)
  • Reviews of professional literature. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)11

Submission and review process: Public Libraries has a specific style guide that authors should adhere to before submitting manuscripts to the editor. Manuscripts are evaluated by the Feature Editor and persons knowledgeable about the topic of the work.12 All submissions are reviewed in a double-blind process to ensure that published papers are of high quality.13

Articles are accepted on a rolling basis and the evaluation process generally takes eight to twelve weeks. Articles are typically scheduled for publication in the order in which they are received.14

All submissions must be submitted through the online Public Libraries Editorial Manager. First-time authors will need to register. You may then submit your manuscript and track its progress through the system.15

Editorial tone: From the website: “Write in a clear, simple style. Use the active voice whenever possible. Avoid overly long sentences.”16

Style guide used: Consult the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. and the Random House Webster’€™s College Dictionary for questions about grammar, usage, or spelling.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an excellent publication for public librarians, LIS professionals or student authors interested in sharing unique knowledge or experiences germane to public libraries. This is a credible resource since it is published by the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association. Potential topics this publication may address include: career development, serving diverse populations in public libraries, and improving public programming.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Subscription accompanies membership in the Public Library Association (PLA),18 meaning that each issue of Public Libraries circulates to nearly 10,000 PLA members and subscribers throughout the entire United States and Canada.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLA is a division of the American Library Association, indicating that readers of this publication are primarily located throughout the United States.20 The information in this publication is printed in the English language.21 It is culturally focused on the U.S. and on library and information science issues relevant to American librarians working in the public library realm.22

Reader characteristics: Expect readers to be familiar with current library technologies and policies. Readers are likely working in a public library, and are knowledgeable of procedures and technologies related to their field. By subscribing the magazine, the readers are displaying a personal interest in bettering themselves and their knowledge of their chosen field. The majority of this publication’€™s readers include reference, children, youth, special collections, and technical librarians working in public libraries. Although most of the audience has an MLIS education, there are professionals who have worked in libraries for an extensive amount of time and may have gotten involved when a graduate degree was not required. Furthermore, this publication is appealing to LIS graduate students interested in learning more about issues in the public library realm. This publication is progressive insofar as it is concerned with ensuring that the general public, including the disadvantaged, has access to information, services and programs.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that this is a professional publication, most readers are already familiar with issues relevant to the library and information science profession. They will also be familiar with LIS jargon, specifically that used in public libraries.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Public Library‘s readers are professionally affiliated with both the American Library Association and the Public Library Association. Collectively, readers are very likely to be public library employees. Most read this publication to learn about national public library news, to build camaraderie within the field, and to gain insight about how they might approach issues within their own libraries. Considering this publication’s national audience, it is important to link unique experiences to national issues. For instance, an article about lending e-readers in one library would make connections to copyright or cost issues relevant to other libraries.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Public Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 11, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399522510/23515
  2. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries
  3. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Library Association, “Write for Public Libraries Magazine,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl
  6. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  7. Proquest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  9. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl/editorialguidelines
  12. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  14. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  15. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  16. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  17. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  18. American Library Association, “Subscribe to Public Libraries,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/subscribe
  19. American Library Association, “Advertise with PLA,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/advertise
  20. American Library Association, Subscribe to Public Libraries.
  21. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  22. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  23. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  24. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
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Community & Junior College Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Community & Junior College Libraries

ISSN: 1545-2522[1 ProQuest, “Community & Junior College Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728955023/484756]

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjcl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Through research and insightful interviews with professionals in the field, Community & Junior College Libraries provides a coherent voice for community college librarians. It addresses the need to define and enhance the leading edge of LRC planning and practice in the United States and abroad. Readers receive information on pertinent topics such as information literacy, collection development, programming initiatives, proven policies, conference reports, and networks and consortia.”1

Target audience: Librarians and educators who deliver information resources to community college students and other lower-division undergraduates.2

Publisher: Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS professional news publication. Although submissions are peer-reviewed, the content is news oriented rather than research oriented, so the publication isn’t considered scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, “news of special relevant legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges” and also “Book reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and ongoing columns with specific focus are also included.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (4 issues per volume).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their Instructions for Authors, “Theoretical research and practical studies dealing with the broad general topic of the delivery of information resources to lower division undergraduate students. This unique publication specifically targets issues concerning community college libraries and learning resource centers. Contributors to this fundamental resource present profiles of learning resource centers (LRCs) around the country and address news of special relevance: €”legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges.”9 Topics for submission include information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming or initiatives which involve the library and the academy at large.10

Submission and review process: The journal provides MS Word templates for authors to properly format their submissions. All submissions and reviews are completed and managed through Editorial Manager, which requires authors to create an account.11

Editorial tone: Academic.12

Style guide used: An in-house style guide based on The Chicago Manual of Style. The guide can be found here.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS authors, especially those who work in two-year colleges. Since both theoretical research and practical studies are welcomed on the many topics covered in the journal, LIS authors in any stage of their careers may publish their works on the topics covered in the journal.14

Topics for possible articles include: information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming and initiatives that involve the library and the academy at large.15

The focus on community and junior college libraries creates varied opportunities for LIS authors, as it encourages dialogue regarding the new challenges in the library science field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication focuses primarily on learning resource centers in two-year colleges throughout the United States. The current editor-in-chief is affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC.16 The publication is aimed at educated, LIS-focused readers involved in the community colleges of the United States, indicating a familiarity with LIS jargon without any special consideration for language other than the courtesy of avoiding regionalism. Readers are most likely familiar with diverse cultures due to the varied population that often makes up urban community and junior colleges.17

Reader characteristics: No specific information was found on gender and ethnicity for this specialized group of librarians. The workplace similarity is the tie that binds together the professional librarians in libraries and learning resource centers within community junior colleges.18 Safely assume readers have a commitment to accessibility of information and to providing it to the public, given the open admissions policies and low tuition of two-year colleges that help to create a rich diversity of people of all ages, cultural backgrounds, and socioeconomic backgrounds.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The professionals would have working knowledge of most LIS subject matter related to academic and school library settings. Use of jargon and acronyms of associations would be familiar to the reader.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Community & Junior College Libraries has a readership that works with a wide variety of patrons. Each type of patron or student has different reasons for being at the community college. The librarians try to fulfill the information needs of many different kinds of patrons including those with low incomes, those who need adult school, a GED or remedial education. Some students are prepared for college and their transition to four-year institutions. Some students are enrolled in high school but are taking accelerated programs at the college. There are also many certificate programs that prepare students for a specific career. The librarian must meet the information needs of all of these groups. Author’s writing for this publication must take all this in to consideration.21

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjcl20#.VChU1xawS3M
  2. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  3. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions#.VChZShawS3M
  10. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  13. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  14. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  16. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group). 2019. Editorial Board. Community & Junior College Libraries. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjcl20
  17. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  18. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  19. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  20. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  21. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
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Voice of Youth Advocates

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

ISSN: 0160-4201

Website: http://www.voyamagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Focuses on library services to/with young adults (aka “teenagers” “adolescents,” typically youth of middle and high school ages). VOYA‘s policy is based on the following principles: specialize in young adult library service; intellectual freedom and equal access; and youth advocacy and youth participation.1

Target audience: Public librarians, school librarians and educators serving youth ages 12 to 18, paraprofessionals serving youth, publishers, authors of young adult books, and other young adult advocates.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The journal includes book reviews on fiction, nonfiction, and genre titles, as well as articles about YA services, programming, space design, and lists of award winners.7

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly publication.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Literary analysis, author interviews, research, practical project ideas, controversies, and new YA space redesigns or makeover profiles are accepted. Booklists and columns are usually planned by the editor, but new content suggestions are accepted as queries.9

Submission and review process: Short articles should be between 800 to 1,700 words and up to 3,500 words for longer pieces. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Information for specific column requirements is available on the website. Authors should query the editor before submitting manuscripts, to ensure the piece is suitable for the journal.10

Editorial tone: VOYA solicits articles written in an approachable style for practitioners serving YA users. The goal is to publish articles by authors who express enthusiasm in working with YA and who can speak from experience about YA services.11

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VOYA is a well-respected journal in the field of library and information services for young adults. The journal is written in an approachable style which may not meet tenure requirements for academic faculty. Also, this journal is intended for public and school librarians who work with YA and not academic librarians. Those interested in tenure may not want to submit manuscripts for publication to this journal.

The journal welcomes articles about new, progressive, informative, and controversial issues as they relate to youth culture. Authors who have experience in working with YAs and who can demonstrate enthusiasm for working with them through their writing are encouraged to submit manuscripts. VOYA‘s wide range of readers provides authors with a large audience which will provide them wide recognition in the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: VOYA has 6,000 subscribers. According to the last reader’€™s survey, each subscriber circulates the journal to 3.5 colleagues which means that the journal experiences a readership of 21,000 people.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published within the United States,13 but there is a possibility that there are subscribers outside of the country. The journal is printed in English.14 Due to wide readership, it is important that language remain clear of local jargon. This also means that all acronyms should be spelled out. Cultural consideration should also be taken into account. Pop culture references should be explained so that all readers will understand. This is very important for this journal since it focuses on young adults, who are very interested in pop culture.15

Reader characteristics: There is no statistical breakdown on the readers of this journal. However, the journal does say that the readers of this journal are public and school librarians, educators, authors of young adult books, publishers, and other youth advocates. The common interest among this group is young adults. However, they may not all be interested in this age group in the same way. School librarians may be more interested in the book review section and have marginal interest in programming, which public librarians are keen on. Publishers and authors might also be interested in the book review sections and the interviews with authors. The journal does not profess itself to be liberal or conservative, however, it does value intellectual freedom, young adults, literature for this group, and advocacy for YA resources, all of which lean more towards a progressive attitude. The journal often features articles about controversial topics, books, or authors.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the breadth of professions represented in this readership community, it is suggested that authors avoid using LIS specific jargon which may not be understood or interesting to lay readers.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal are a very diverse group in terms of language, geographic location, profession, and educational attainment. Authors should consider writing articles about new and interesting topics in the field of library services. However, the topics should not be scholarly in tone or esoteric. Authors should remember that the readers have different backgrounds and interests in young people.

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About,” accessed June May 6, 2019, http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  2. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  3. ProQuest, “Voice of Youth Advocates,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions,” accessed May 8, 2019, http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  10. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  11. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  12. Voice of Youth Advocates, 2018, Media Kit, http://voyamagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/VOYA2018-mediakit_web.pdf
  13. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  14. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  15. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  16. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  17.  Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
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American Indian Library Association Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Indian Library Association Newsletter

ISSN: 2152-35251

Website: https://www.ailanet.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Their website states, “An affiliate of the American Library Association, the American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.”2 “The American Indian Libraries Newsletter is an official publication of the American Indian Library Association. It includes information about decisions, goals, activities, and business meetings of AILA, as well as articles on programs, projects, grants, and resources relating to American Indian culture and library and information services. A column by the current president is a regular feature. In addition, you will find books reviews, interviews, and other information that furthers the goals of the association. “3

Target audience: Individuals and institutions interested in working to improve library services to American Indians and Alaska Natives in every type of library.4

Publisher: The American Indian Library Association (AILA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: This is the official publication of the American Indian Library Association. Per their website, it includes “committee and member updates and events; interviews with indigenous authors; scholarly articles; and conference program details.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines are not listed online, but you can contact the newsletter editor, George Gottschalk, for more information about submitting work to the newsletter.11

Types of contributions accepted: Their website states that the newsletter “contains information of professional interest to AILA’s members.” Contributions include updates, events, scholarly articles, author interviews, and conference program details. Book and media reviews are published on the AILA website. 12

Submission and review process: All inquiries should be directed to the current editor.13

Editorial tone: An overview of recent, archived issues suggests that articles should be informative and engaging for library professionals without relying on technical jargon.14

Style guide used: No style guidelines are listed for the newsletter.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are interested in submitting articles should consider contacting the editor, whose information appears on the AILA Publications website. Even though there are no submission guidelines listed, many of the articles are written by members. Interested authors can see the types of articles accepted by looking at previous submissions to the newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: While membership and circulation numbers are unavailable, the newsletter is mailed to all AILA members and digital copies are available to those without memberships.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Members are located throughout the United States and Canada.17 The newsletter is written in English18 and contains library terminology. Readers are aware of the different tribes and expect articles to identify specific tribes and/or bands. Some cultural considerations that authors need to consider may be using the correct term to identify American Indian people. Some readers may object to the term American Indian or Native American. This publication uses the term American Indian in their articles.19

Reader characteristics: “Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve Indian library, cultural, and informational services in school, public, and research libraries on reservations.” Readers are tribal librarians, are associated with tribal libraries or have an interest in issues that affect library and information services for American Indian people. Some readers may be educators in a Native community, or public librarians working with Native people. It is assumed that many readers have LIS degrees. Readers value respect of American Indian communities and their drive to be self sufficient. Factors that aid in independence, such as programs to assist under served American Indian tribal members located on the reservation are important issues and a conduit for receiving that information is the American Indian Library Association Newsletter.20€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with library terminology and the use of LIS jargon is present but does not dominate in the publication. Articles are written for a professional, educated audience.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The American Indian Library Association Newsletter is a respected publication read by librarians and other interested individuals who provide services to American Indian people. Authors writing for this publication will gain recognition within the American Indian LIS community. If published, authors will have a small but concentrated audience of American Indian library professionals. Authors have a good chance of being published if they involve tribal colleges and library-related issues in some way. When writing for this newsletter, it is suggested that authors include tribal affiliation of American Indian people.

Authors that are interested in submitting articles may consider topics such as the future for tribal libraries, improving services for traditionally underserved populations, or articles regarding reading and American Indian children.

Last updated: April 12, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest, “American Indian Library Association Newsletter,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 12, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521736632647/124732
  2. American Indian Library Association, “About,” accessed April 12, 2109, https://ailanet.org/about/about-aila/
  3. American Indian Library Association, “Frequently Asked Questions,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/about/frequently-asked-questions/#q5
  4. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Indian Library Association, “Publications,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  9. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  12. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  13. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  14. American Indian Library Association, “Newsletters,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/newsletter/
  15. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  16. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  17. American Indian Library Association, About.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  20. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  21. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
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Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

ISSN:1911-9593

Website: http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Partnership is the journal of The Partnership organization, which is “Canada’s national network of provincial and territorial library associations.” The journal “promotes the exchange of ideas about libraries, librarianship, and information science among practitioners across all library sectors.”1

Target audience: Canadian librarians and library workers and LIS professionals, archivists, scholars, researchers, and students. Although the journal is published by The Partnership, a network of Canadian library associations with more than 7,000 people, it is an open-access journal, so its audience is not limited to members.2

Publisher: The Partnership: The Provincial and Territorial Library Associations of Canada (Ontario, Canada).3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts submitted to the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.5

Content: Regular sections in Partnership include Editor’s Comments, Innovations in Practice, Theory and Research, Features, Book Reviews, and News and Announcements.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Partnership accepts “original, unpublished manuscripts in French or English on a broad range of topics relevant to library and information science practitioners in all library sectors.” The editors “encourage submissions which consider the Canadian context, but this is not a necessary condition for acceptance to the journal.”8 Each section has its own editorial guidelines in terms of topic, word count, tone, and approach.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the journal’s website.10 Manuscripts for the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo a double-blind peer-review process, usually within two months of submission.11

Editorial tone: The tone depends on the section; it is overall scholarly but not overly formal.

Style guide used: APA (6th edition), with a modified style for online articles and documents.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This open-access journal appears to be an excellent opportunity for Canadian LIS authors, as it is written for the Canadian LIS community. LIS authors outside of Canada are not excluded by the guidelines, but they should ensure their work meets the needs of the Canadian readers.13 The many sections–theory, pedagogy, practice, professional development, reviews, and library news–cover a huge variety of content and offer writers many opportunities for submitting work that ranges from scholarly to practical to reflective.14  There are a few must-read articles and editorials for authors submitting to Partnership, especially “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership15 and editorials reflecting on the journal’s past and future.16 Furthermore, the journal “provides a chance for librarians and library workers to be editors and reviewers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to a past announcement, in 2017 the journal received over 45,000 views. They have 1500 readers registered with their website.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  This is a Canadian bilingual publication (English and French) for librarians and information professionals of Canada. Authors would need to ensure their work meets their needs and explains any cultural or language differences.

Reader characteristics: Overall, Partnership has a very broad spectrum of readers in the Canadian library and information professions: librarians, library works, scholars, researchers, practitioners, and students. It can be safely assumed the readers are interested in promoting successful libraries and acquiring knowledge to allow them to succeed in their own work. The authors and content of the publication suggests that the majority of readers are working in all types of libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The journal works to connect members of the Canadian library community,19 and the journal’s sections are variously academic, reflective, and newsy. Readers probably have a range of LIS knowledge, from the practical to the academic.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should first take into consider how their work is broadly or specifically related to libraries and library scholarship in Canada. Furthermore, readers come to this journal to read on a a wide range of current topics in the library profession: research, pedagogy, professional development, and current news and profiles. Readers work at every level of the Canadian library profession and in all types of libraries.

Last updated: April 8, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “What is The Partnership?” ThePartnership.ca, accessed February 19, 2018, http://www.thepartnership.ca/web/PARTNERSHIP/About/PARTNERSHIP/About.aspx?hkey=57981e1d-6cc7-4b09-822e-ebdfd7f2e3b2.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Submissions,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/submissions.
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Information for Authors,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/information/authors#.WouLFRPwZUM.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “Editorial Policies.”
  15. See David Fox, “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership,Partnership 8, no. 1 (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v8i1.2692.
  16. See Robin Bergart, Leanne Olson, and Nathalie Soini, “Editorial: Charting the Course of Partnership,Partnership 12, no. 1 (2017): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v12i1.3976, and Jennifer Richard, “Celebrating 10 Years of Canadian Librarianship through the Partnership Journal,” Partnership 11, no. 1 (2016): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i1.3682.
  17. “Journal History,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/history#.WouedhPwZUM.
  18. “Top Viewed Articles,” Partnership, December 06, 2017, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/announcement/view/128.
  19. “Journal History.”
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Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
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Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

ISSN: 2475-0158 (Print) 2475-0166 (Online)1

Website: https://www.alia.org.au/jalia

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is the flagship journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA).”2. “The Journal aims to stimulate discussion and inform practice by showcasing original peer reviewed research articles and other scholarly papers about, or relevant to, the Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions.”3

Target audience: “It is a quarterly publication for information science researchers, information professionals, related disciplines and industries.”4

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis5

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All Research and Research-in-Practice articles in JALIA have undergone double-blind peer review. Information-in-practice papers will undergo editorial screening.”6

Type: LIS scholarly journal

Medium: Print and Online7

Content: According to their website, this journal publishes, research papers; research-in-practice papers; information-in-practice papers; and book reviews.8 Research papers and book reviews make up the majority of the publication. Book reviews are accepted for any library related topic or resource and can range from personal digital archiving, marketing, genealogy, youth resources, and much more. If it is a topic a librarian might find useful, it has a chance of being published here. Research-in-practice and information-in-practice papers appear to be research papers that focus on practical applications. Examples can be seen by viewing the journal’s table of contents.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj21&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: “This journal accepts the following article types: Research papers; Research-in-practice papers; Information-in-practice papers; Book reviews.”10

Submission and review process: “Please ensure your manuscript is anonymised for peer review. A minimum of two files should be prepared for submission: 1) Title page (including title, author names and details, acknowledgements as well as funding and grant-awarding bodies) 2) Manuscript – anonymised (including title, abstract and keywords on first page; main text; references; appendices (as appropriate); table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages); figure caption(s) (as a list). If you are including tables and/or figures in your manuscript, please submit these as additional files headed ‘Tables’ or ‘Figures’. Please include a word count for your paper. A typical peer reviewed research paper for this journal should be more than 5000 and no more than 8000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical peer reviewed research-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2500 and no more than 5000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical information-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2000 and no more than 2500 words; this limit does not include tables, references, footnotes, figure captions, endnotes. For other types of submissions, please contact the editors.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly

Style guide used: “Please refer to these quick style guidelines when preparing your paper, rather than any published articles or a sample copy. Please use British (-ise) spelling style consistently throughout your manuscript. Please use single quotation marks, except where ‘a quotation is “within” a quotation’. Please note that long quotations should be indented without quotation marks.”12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association offers a variety of publishing opportunities for LIS authors. Whether it’s original research, advancements in professional practice, or book reviews, there are many different writing avenues to explore. As this journal focuses on Australian library and information research, potential authors should tailor their writing to this geographical area and take care to submit works that will be relevant to Australia and Southern Asia Pacific regions. That said, this journal also invites contributions from around the world. For the North American LIS researcher and author, this journal provides an opportunity to showcase original research to a global community. Additionally, this publication also publishes a wealth of book reviews.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not readily available for this journal. However, as the flagship publication for the ALIA, the journal is available to 5000 institutional members of the professional organization and therefore should be assumed has a wide audience.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A majority of readership will be information professionals from Australia, however, “ALIA welcomes anyone with an interest in libraries and information management,”14 so readership is likely diverse both in profession and location. This publication prints in English and requests British English style spellings be used.15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this publication will have a strong interests in library and information science research and many will be ALIA members. They are an educated and diverse group interested in staying on top of the latest research and resources for LIS fields.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although some readers may not be information science professionals, the majority work in LIS fields and would therefore be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is an internationally recognized publication that holds high standards for its published works. This journal reaches a wide audience of library and information professionals who are interested in current research in the field as well as relevant issues in their workplaces. Focus on LIS topics relevant to Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions will be prevalent but there is also opportunity for broader library science articles as well as reviews of a variety of LIS related books/resources.

Last updated: October 4, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  2. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  3. Journals
  4. Journals
  5. Journals
  6. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  7. Journals
  8. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  9. Journals
  10.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  11.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  12.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  13. “About ALIA,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 4, 2018  https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia
  14.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  15.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
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Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

ISSN: 2474-7459 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:  The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is the official journal of the American Library Associations’s Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF).2 It seeks to be at the center of all library related discussions on intellectual freedom and privacy issues.3

Website: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/index

Target audience: The primary audience for this publication are librarians, scholars, and researchers. However, given the nature of the content, it is likely that a wider audience of professionals, for example, those who work in education, technology, or other cultural institutes, will find the topics posed in this journal to be of interest and use.

Publisher: American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 606114

Peer reviewed? This publication welcomes both peer reviewed (research/feature) articles and non-peer reviewed (commentary) articles.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content:  The Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy (JIFP) replaces and expands on ALA’s Newletter on Intellectual Freedom (NIF) which was published from 1952 to 2015. As a reincarnation of the newsletter, it continues to cover book banning, legal controversies, and success stories in addition to its newer content, such as refereed essays, peer reviewed articles, book reviews, and opinion pieces.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy welcomes submissions related to intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and in the wider world.”9 According to their website, submissions can include:

Research articles/Features: These are original research articles submitted for peer review. Submissions should be 4,000-8,000 words and anonymized for double-blind peer review.

In addition to research articles there are also vast options for those who want to submit non-peer reviewed material which will be reviewed by the editorial staff. These include:

Commentaries: Shorter essays, think pieces, or general commentary on topical issues, controversies and emerging questions for the field. Non-peer reviewed articles and essays discussing or describing policies, practices, projects, law, and scholarship related to intellectual freedom and privacy. Personal accounts of censorship and intellectual freedom challenges. Opinion pieces and essays on current and topical issues. Commentaries are typically 500-1000 words.

Book Reviews: Reviews of recent books or publications relevant to the field. Reviews should be 800-1000 words.

Please note, per the journals guidelines, word count must include references.10

Submission and review process: Queries can be sent to Managing Editor Deborah Caldwell-Stone (dstone@ala.org) or Editor Shannon Oltmann (shannon.oltmann@uky.edu).11

Editorial tone: Peer-reviewed feature articles are expected to be scholarly, while commentaries, book reviews, and news items might take on a more conversational tone as long as their content is well researched and arguments are well supported.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style is required for all submission formats.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy provides much potential to LIS authors. Since this journal publishes both peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed articles, professionals with diverse backgrounds and various publishing goals will find  this a suitable journal to submit to. Intellectual freedom and privacy are some of the core principles libraries are built on, therefore, librarians of all areas are likely to have much to contribute to this publication. As a fairly recent publication, The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is actively seeking submissions and enjoys working with new authors. This is an excellent opportunity for LIS professionals to gain publishing credentials and be published in a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available for this publication, however, as a journal of the American Library Association, it can be assumed that a large portion of its 58,000 members are potential readers.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is international in scope and published in English.14

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers of this publication are likely librarians, scholars, researchers, and other LIS professionals interested in intellectual freedom, privacy, and related topics. Additionally, since intellectual freedom and privacy are topics that interest a diverse audience, readers are also likely to be professionals in other sectors such as business, technology, and education.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a scholarly journal of the American Library Association, strong knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed by readers coming from an LIS background. However, since this publication is likely to engage a wider audience, and also publishes non-research based articles, it might be best to also assume some readers will not be as familiar with library jargon and to keep it to a minimum or provide additional clarification.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy’s readers will be eager and open to learning about the most recent research and concerns regarding intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and around the world. Readers are educated professionals and advocates of libraries and their core principles.

Last updated: 11/14/2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, OCLC World Cat, accessed November 6, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/journal-of-intellectual-freedom-privacy/oclc/953205347
  2. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  3. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  4. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  5. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  6. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  7. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  8. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  10. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  12. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  13. “ALA Annual Membership Statistics,” AlA.org, accessed November 8, 2018, http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/annual_memb_stats
  14. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
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