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Against the Grain

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

This website provides more than 3,500 pages with continuously updated content, including full-text access to articles from the print Against the Grain publication (access is limited to subscribers), along with a additional free, available, web-only content like breaking industry news, blog posts, job openings, conference announcements, and an online version of the popular “If Rumors Were Horses” column by editor Katina Strauch.1

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. It is a unique collection of reports on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals.”2

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.3

Publisher: Against the Grain.4

Peer reviewed? All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.5

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.6

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.7 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.8

Content: Articles. The ATG website also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.9

Frequency of publication: Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews and people profiles, Reviews, Legal Issues, International Dateline, Publishing, Bookselling and Vending, and Technology and Standards.11 Some issues have specific focuses, such as the December 2013/January 2014 issue, “eBook Platforms for Academic Librarians.”12 Articles should be approximately 2000 words, although the editors allow authors to make a piece as long or short as needed by their subject. They like a minimum of 200 dpi for charts and graphs and 300 dpi for photos.13

Submission and review process: Contact Leah Hinds at leah@katina.info or Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.14

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,15 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.16

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.18 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.19 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (ATG’s current editors are affiliated with College of Charleston or the Charleston Conference).21 Written in American English.22

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.23 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”24 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics0 and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

Last updated: April 20 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  2. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  3. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  4. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  5. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  6. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  7. Against the Grain. (2014). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  8. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  9. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  10. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  11. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  12. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  13. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  14. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  15. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  16. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  17. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  18. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  19. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  20. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  21. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  22. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  23. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  24. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  25. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  26. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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Letters to a Young Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Letters to a Young Librarian

Website: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This blog offers “advice to those who are new (or even not so new) to librarianship from someone who has been doing this work for a while now.”1 The objective is to “break down the barriers between library schools & students and professional librarians.”2

Target audience: Library science graduate students and new professional librarians.3

Publisher: Jessica Olin.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Articles (ideas! advice! pep talks!) on all areas of librarianship. Examples from the last two months (March and April, 2015) include: a discussion of management vs. leadership, a reminder about patron privacy, and a description of and tips for whiteboard polling.8 Interspersed with the professional advice are “just for fun” posts.9 Guest posts are also included and welcomed.10

Frequency of publication: Very frequent, averaging 7-9 posts per month.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html

Types of contributions accepted: Olin poses this question to potential contributors: “Is there something you wish you’d known when you were a graduate student and/or a brand new to libraries?”12 “In some posts, you see the author’s philosophy of an aspect of librarianship. In others, the piece is about developing job skills. So long as it answers that basic question, pretty much everything is germane to this blog.”13

Writing on exactly the same topics that have already been covered, or approaching topics in the same way, will not be published.14

Submission and review process: Casual tone is required (no footnotes allowed). Posts should be between 500-750 words. Submissions will be edited by Jessica Olin. Send topic ideas to librarianjessica@gmail.com15

Editorial tone: Tone is casual and welcoming.16 “This isn’t an academic, refereed publication. It’s a conversation. That means personal pronouns are encouraged and footnotes/endnotes/etc. are not allowed.”17

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If this is your first foray into writing for your peers, this blog is an excellent place to start. As this is a blog specifically written for new librarians and library school students, you will be writing for peers and like-minded individuals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016, this blog has 254 followers.18 In addition, Olin has 2,222 followers on Twitter.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This blog is written in American English for a mostly North American audience.20

Reader characteristics: Readers seem to be mostly students or recent graduates with many and varied interests in the LIS world. As per the guest post guidelines, “this is a conversation.”21 Readers will expect informative and thoughtful posts written in an informal manner. As “posts need to be geared toward a general audience”22, readers represent all areas of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS issues could range from the first year LIS graduate student, to a professional librarian starting a career in the field. Don’t assume that the reader will understand LIS-speak; keep jargon to a minimum.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Letters to a Young Librarian want to learn about the profession in a way that is not taught at their graduate schools. They want first-hand accounts of first-time librarians. They are interested in everything from your philosophy of librarianship, to tips on networking. The possible topics are as varied as the profession.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  2. Olin, J. (2016). Why I Decided to Start a Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2011/06/why-i-decided-to-start-blog.html
  3.  Olin, J. (2016). About This Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-this-blog.html
  4.  Olin, J. (2016). About Me. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-me-with-contact-information.html
  5.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  6.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  7.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  8. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  9.  Olin, J. (2016). Just for Fun: Big Hero 6. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2015/04/just-for-fun-big-hero-6.html
  10. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  11. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  12.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  13. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  14. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  15. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  16. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  17. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  18.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  19. Twitter. (2016). Jessica Olin. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/olinj
  20. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  21. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  22. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  23. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
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The Huffington Post

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Huffington Post

Website: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The online destination for breaking news and opinion.”1

The site is sort of a CliffsNotes of water cooler fodder: anything and everything current is most likely being discussed on The Huffington Post, through its regular bloggers, celebrity contributing bloggers, and news spotted and posted by regular readers. In 2012, it won a Pulitzer prize for reporting on wounded veterans.2

Target audience: A politically-engaged audience seeking the latest news in entertainment, politics, and world affairs.

Publisher: The Huffington Post Media Group.3

Peer reviewed? No. Most articles posted on the site are in the form of blog posts.

Type: Civilian publication; online news site.

Medium: Online.

Content: A roundup of political, entertainment, and news from around the globe.

Of special interest to LIS writers, there’€™s a Books section under Entertainment, featuring articles and reviews by various bloggers, and the Libraries section featuring library-related news and articles. In 2012 a a section titled Libraries in Crisis was created to examine the role of libraries in today’s society. The section’€™s first series was titled The Death Of The Public Library?, and it has been somewhat controversial among LIS professionals, with a Hack Library School post noting, “€œI understand that stories of library closures are much sexier than the latest controversies with Overdrive, but if we want to see the libraries as a national tradition continue, we need to step away from the extremism and start proving what we are capable of. Let’s see some library success stories on this page, too.”

Frequency of publication: Updated daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Use the Contact Page to determine the best place to send your post. You can send scoops to the editors, send a blog pitch to the Blog Team, or search current job openings.4

A helpful 2013 article on Digital Media Zone (from Ryerson University in Canada) goes into some detail on becoming a blogger for The Huffington Post, including tips on getting noticed and advice on sending the finished post to the site editors.

Types of contributions accepted: Mostly articles and commentary in the form of blog posts.

Submission and review process: Send an email to the appropriate section you’€™d like to blog for.5

Editorial tone: Very informal and informational at the same time. Writers don’€™t talk down to readers, and readers are encouraged to log in and contribute to content and discussion.6

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Huffington Post is an excellent resource for librarians to reach a wide ranging global and local audience with news from the LIS world. The Libraries section would be a great place to discuss library efforts and updates, technological and otherwise, and news from the LIS sector, with a readership who is truly interested. Also a good place to suggest and write about books for review.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Total digital population of 79 million monthly unique visitors.”7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based out of the US, the site has local editions such as Huff Post San Francisco and Chicago; as well as international versions covering Canada, France, Italy, Spain and the UK.8 The US versions are written in American English; culturally the site is considered a left-leaning publication, with special attention to U.S. political and entertainment news.

Reader characteristics: The Huffington Post was created in 2005 and became known as a liberal website for commentary/and alternative to more right wing sites such as the Drudge Report & Fox News. Although founder/creator Arianna Huffington is careful to note that the site does not consciously lean in either party direction, the site has a more left-leaning feel.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although readers are educated and The Huffington Post has a special library section, this site is more informal information and entertainment, not really the place for LIS jargon. If submitting a query or blog for the Books/Library section, the focus is more on specific voice or activity, not the formal academic jargon commonly found in LIS publications.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are interested in what’s going on with US libraries, and in discussing the most recent books and book news. While articles are not scholarly in tone, this site would most likely welcome posts written by LIS students as long as the topic is interesting and appealing to Huffington Post readers.

Last updated: November 25, 2016


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “Huffington Post,” Advertising.AOL.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://advertising.aol.com/properties#huffington-post
  2. Michael Calderone, “Huffington Post Awarded Pulitzer Prize.” The Huffington Post, January 14, 2013. Accessed November 25, 2016, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/16/huffington-post-pulitzer-prize-2012_n_1429169.html
  3. “The Huffington Post,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1414718214018/716779
  4. “Contact us,” HuffingtonPost.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/contact/
  5. Contact us.”
  6. “Frequenty Asked Questions,” HuffingtonPost.com, accessed November 25, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/p/frequently-asked-question.html#moderation
  7. Huffington Post.”
  8. “Huffington Post,” Wikipedia.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Huffington_Post
  9. Huffington Post.”
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Hack Library School

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Hack Library School

Website: http://hacklibschool.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Hack Library School (HLS) was inspired by a 2010 post by Micah Vandegrift on In the Library with the Lead Pipe, a train of thought brought about by Hacking the Academy, where “a group of academics, librarians and higher ed techies crowdsourced submissions for a born-digital book.”1

Per Vandegrift’€™s challenge: “It is time for the emerging library professionals (we students) to take an active role in what we learn, need to learn, didn’t learn, and wish we had learned in library school by curating our own hack.”2

Hack Library School was formed from the idea of allowing LIS students and practitioners to decide upon and create “standards and foundations of the profession,” outside the institutional framework. “€œThis is not meant to subvert the education that library school provides, but to supplement it. I propose that the body of library school students should become the change they wish to see enacted.”3

Target audience: “By, for, and about library school students.”4

Publisher: Hack Library School (a WordPress site)

Peer reviewed? No. The site is written by and for LIS students, to share information.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online. The primary content is via the blog; information is also shared via Twitter, and Facebook.7

Content: The original intention, per Vandergift, was that “Content should have a focus on library school, providing tips, insights, challenges, definitions or any other type of “€œhack” that a current or future student might benefit from.”8 The site contains just that.

Frequency of publication: All online media updated as frequently as contributors post. The goal is to post new content three times per week.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For guest posts, see the guidelines.10 To be a regular contributor, see 2012’s Call for New Writers.11

Types of contributions accepted: Anything related to LIS, from a you-should-know, student perspective. Posts are meant to be conversation starters.12

From the Call for New Writers, HLS is “looking for a diverse group of writers: diversity of experience, professional interest, and opinions. We strive to critically engage with topics and we’€™re not afraid of ‘€˜stirring the pot.'”13

Submission and review process: Send an email to hacklibschool@gmail.com. If accepted, HLS will get back to you with comments and start working on scheduling your post to the site.14

Editorial tone: Informal. From the guest post guidelines, this is not a site for essays or student papers: HLS wants to hear your voice. “€œPosts that raise questions are at the heart of HLS. We need the discussion and sometimes discomfort and disagreement in order to dig into the heart of (L)IS.”15

Style guide used: None. Links to other sites, citations and references to other points of view are encouraged but not strictly regulated.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

HLS is gaining recognition around the LIS blogosphere, and already has a great Twitter and Facebook following. This is the place to post your experiences in the LIS world, thoughts on improvements, gripes, and ideas for a group who really gets it, and will use the information you provide in the quest of their own LIS degree and pursuits. If you haven’€™t written articles or blogs yet, this would be a great place to get started, writing to like-minded peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of April 2013, HLS‘s blog has 420 followers, Facebook has 1371 and Twitter has 6023.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Hackers are almost exclusively based at US colleges & universities, but the site is read internationally.18 Written in American English, to be easily read and interpreted by anyone interested in LIS.19

Reader characteristics: Writers are purposefully as diverse as the many facets of the LIS world. They are interesting, informative, encouraging, supportive and happy to share information. The writers are all LIS students or recent graduates, with interests in just about every aspect of the LIS world, from academic library data collection to reference services, children’€™s lit and library advocacy programs.20 The prevailing bias is that information should be shared, and discussed, and that learning need not only take place within educational institutions. And that we respect each other’€™s opinions, comments, and posts. From the Guest Post guidelines: “Take responsibility for your own opinion and respect other opinions.”21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but in various stages. HLS is written for, by and about LIS students, but that also means people in their first year in the program, or those just considering getting their degree. Don’t assume readers will understand LIS jargon; explain what you’€™re referencing so lay readers can easily comprehend.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of HLS want to know what you think, what your experiences, thoughts and cautions are on the LIS degree and anything related to it. The idea is for LIS students to imagine, discuss and develop the profession the way we want to see it, alongside what’€™s being taught in school. If you know something that’s outside of the books -€“ please share it. If you have ideas, concerns, professional advice, career tips, or just a cool LIS subject you’€™d like to broach, the editors and readers of HLS will be happy to hear from you.23

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  2. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  3. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  4. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  5. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  6. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  7. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Home. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/
  8. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  9. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  10. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  11. Pho, A. (2016). Call for new writers! (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/2012/09/18/call-for-new-writers/
  12. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  13. Pho, A. (2016). Call for new writers! (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/2012/09/18/call-for-new-writers/
  14. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  15. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  16. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  17. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  18. Lai, P. (2013). Mapping Hack Library School. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/2013/06/14/mapping-hack-library-school/
  19. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  20. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  21. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  22. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  23. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
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Reading, Writing, Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Reading, Writing, Research

Website: http://www.allpurposeguru.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the blog’€™s subtitle: “€œa librarian’€™s blog for anyone who needs to do research€…or otherwise wants to use the library.”1 David M. Guion is an All-Purpose-Guru, author, and librarian who writes this particular blog to help civilians understand how to make the best use of libraries.2

Target audience: Anyone who uses the library or needs research or writing tips.3 Laypeople as well as librarians will find the blog helpful.

Publisher: Reading, Writing, Research.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian blog.

Medium: Online; blog format.

Content: Posts about libraries, research, writing, and everything that falls under these general categories. David talks about spelling and punctuation; how the American public uses libraries; library privacy regulations; new technologies in libraries; and e-librarians and the use of robots in libraries, among other topics.5

Frequency of publication: It varies, but generally around one new post per week.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no specific guidelines at this point.

Types of contributions accepted: Per a comment in American Libraries Magazine to an article titled “€œWriting for Civilians“: the blog “€œwould be pleased to accept guest posts from other librarians with something to say to ‘civilians.'”

Submission and review process: Email David Guion directly at dmguion [at] allpurposeguru.com.7

Editorial tone: Very civilian-friendly. The posts are relevant to today’€™s library users and don’€™t talk down to the non-LIS crowd, but are written in a way that anyone can easily understand them.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a purely helpful, informational blog that anyone can read to get up-to-speed on current LIS issues, and to check in for help with library research tips. It’€™s ideal for LIS students, who can suggest posts about local library news (such as a post on Southern California and Nevada library systems helping residents with foreclosure information), library trends, and stories from the LIS trenches. Think about what you want library patrons to know about libraries: this is a great place to write to those patrons.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The blog is written in English and is generally US-centric, but the blog can be accessed by anyone with an internet connection.

Reader characteristics: Readers are interested in the library, and in reading about library resources, news, trends, and updates – local or nationwide. David Guion is a musician (trombone player) with degrees in performance and musicology; a certified lay speaker in the United Methodist Church; librarian; and a sustainability/environmental expert who loves cooking, writing, fitness, travel and, naturally, research.8

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The blog is written by a librarian of 12 years9, but is aimed at civilians who need library and research assistance. Write to those readers, rather than LIS professionals or students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS students could gain considerable insight into library patron’s needs and library use by regularly posting to the blog and following up on reader feedback. This is the only blog (that we know of) written by an LIS professional specifically for nonprofessionals10, and thus seems like a valuable resource to promote to other libraries and users.

Last updated: October 30, 2016


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Reading, Writing, Research,” Allpurposeguru.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.AllPurposeGuru.com/
  2. “About,” AllPurposeGuru.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.allpurposeguru.com/about/
  3. About.”
  4. Reading, Writing, Research.”
  5. Reading, Writing, Research.”
  6. Reading, Writing, Research.”
  7. “Contact me,” AllPurposeGuru.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.allpurposeguru.com/contact-me/
  8. “About David,” AllPurposeGuru.com, accessed October 30, 2016,  http://home.allpurposeguru.com/about/about-david
  9. About David.”
  10. About.”
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Journal of Creative Library Practice, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Creative Library Practice

Website: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’€™s About page: “The Journal of Creative Library Practice provides an outlet for librarians and information professionals to €œdescribe and encourage greater creativity in library and information center communications, policies, collections, instruction, and other areas of librarianship€.”1

Target audience: “This journal reaches librarians and information professionals of all types, including academic, public, school, special, medical, legal, and others.” The journal is working to broaden its readership to individuals outside the profession, to anyone interested in creative solutions to LIS issues; or anyone who wants to participate in discussions about creative issues and solutions.2

Publisher: Published as an online blog-format journal by Creative Library Practice3

Peer reviewed? Yes,4 though this blog-style journal also publishes non-peer reviewed content. The refereed articles are distinguished from the blog posts on the site.5

Type: LIS scholarly and professional6

Medium: Online,7 peer-reviewed blogposts8

Content: Posts on creative solutions to LIS issues.9

Frequency of publication: This online journal is updated as frequently as the editors write posts and peer-reviewed articles are accepted.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Any article focusing on creative solutions to LIS issues, including communications barriers, technology issues, reviews of relevant books or websites.11

Submission and review process: The website provides a link to email manuscripts in MS-Word .doc, .docx, or RTF format.12

Editorial tone: Editor Joseph Kraus, in a Q&A with Library Journal, stated, “€œWe want to encourage prospective authors to write with less formal rhetoric.”13

Style guide used: References should be provided in a consistent format, whether Chicago, Turabian, MLA, or APA, or author may simply provide links to cited material.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal’s editors consider the publication to be an open source alternative to the stodgy print publications usually favored by the LIS community. They are a creative group open to all sorts of submissions, so this would be a great place to expand on an LIS student paper or thesis, or write about a creative approach tried at a library-related job, and how it helped the organization.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics are not available, but as this journal is also an informal blog there is potential to reach a large audience.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is online and the editors are LIS professionals at colleges and universities around the United States.15 The journal is written in American English.16

Reader characteristics: This journal appeals to forward thinking, creative, multidisciplined, against-the-grain LIS professionals seeking to share information with like-minded peers. The journal is written for and by LIS professionals in all possible settings, including academic, public, school, special, medical, and law libraries. It also aims to reach those readers who are interested in libraries but not necessarily working in them, including teachers, parents, students, and businesses.17

The journal was created by LIS professionals who wish to have a truly open access information sharing site that features creative solutions to common problems in information organizations. This is an open minded, nontraditional group that sees the value in current technologies and is working to take advantage of anything that can help the library community achieve its goals. The journal leans toward the informal, so potential authors should keep this in mind while writing for the publication. The goal is to provide articles from a variety of perspectives.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The knowledge level is probably quite high, but as the editors are attempting to appeal to laypeople as well as LIS students and professionals, potential authors should keep the jargon to a minimum and avoid highly technical terms and unusual acronyms.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Creative Library Practice is part of a new LIS journal standard: using open access for peer-reviewed articles under Creative Commons licensing, and providing relatively loose guidelines in terms of content, and even citations.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  2. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  3. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  4.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  5. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  6.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  7.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  8. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  9. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  11. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  13. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  15. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  16. The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017,
  17. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  18. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  19. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
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Ilovelibraries.org

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ilovelibraries.org

Website: http://www.ilovelibraries.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Ilovelibraries.org is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA), designed to keep America informed about what’s happening in today’s libraries. Ilovelibraries.org promotes the value of libraries and librarians, explains key issues affecting libraries, and urges readers to support and take action for their libraries.”1

“Ilovelibraries.org is a place to learn more about the health and vitality of today’s libraries, emerging trends, and current issues affecting libraries around the country, whether in public, school, academic, corporate or institutional libraries. While intended for the general public, we are encouraging members of the library community to use Ilovelibraries as a tool help them tell the library story when they cannot – 24/7, around the clock.”2

 

Target audience: The general public.3

Publisher: The American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Publication of an LIS professional organization, the American Library Association, for a lay audience, the general public.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The website includes feature articles on what’s happening in today’s libraries, book reviews, ways for readers to share stories about their own library experiences, and ways to advocate for libraries in their communities, including links to advocacy software that allows users to contact members of Congress. There is a blog that collects library stories from the news, a blog from Booklist magazine about running a book group, and a section titled “Real Life Stories” for readers to share what the library means to them.7

Frequency of publication: New content is posted frequently.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ilovelibraries.org/about/editorial

Types of contributions accepted: ilovelibraries.org seeks feature articles about local libraries and their programs, staff, or volunteers; stories about viewers’ experiences with libraries; and “Library Showcase” articles highlighting specific libraries.9

Submission and review process: Queries must be sent to the editors at ilovelibraries@ala.org. Features should be between 500-1500 words, and Library Showcase articles between 300-500 words. The review process generally six to eight weeks.10

Editorial tone: Informal but informative, with a clear, simple style. Factual articles must be inviting and readable. Use active voice whenever possible.11

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication appears to be a possible outlet for those of us who are not yet professional librarians to submit articles about what libraries have to offer us as patrons. Articles are short and informal, the site is always accepting submissions, and the editors will get back to contributors fairly quickly. It could be a good place to get one’s feet wet in the publishing experience. It is a good place for librarians to submit pieces about their their libraries, or profiles about librarians, speakers or patrons who may have interesting stories to tell.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

 Publication circulation: No website traffic information available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The website can be viewed internationally, but as it is an initiative of the American Library Association, we can assume most readers are within the United States. Articles and news postings cover libraries in the U.S., and reader postings seem to be limited to the U.S. as well.13

Reader characteristics: Individuals who use or work in libraries. Website users, their interests and workplaces, would likely be as diverse as the population of the United States. The publisher of this website publication represents libraries in North America and has a vested interest in presenting libraries in a positive manner.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: For the target audience, the general public,15 their knowledge of LIS subject matter would be limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This site would be one avenue to encourage and promote libraries to the general public. Visitors to the site would most likely already have a positive image of libraries and are looking for reasons to continue on this path. This site provides a fun way to showcase library events, new trends such as makerspaces, e-readers, and digital libraries. There are sections of library quotes, book reviews, and spotlights on public libraries and librarians.

Last updated: October 2, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” ilovelibraries.org, accessed October 2, 2016, http://www.ilovelibraries.org/about
  2. About.”
  3. About.”
  4. About.”
  5. “Editorial Guidelines,” ilovelibraries.org, accessed October 2, 2016, http://www.ilovelibraries.org/about/editorial
  6. About.”
  7. “ilovelibraries,” ilovelibraries.org, accessed October 2, 2016, http://www.ilovelibraries.org/
  8. ilovelibraries.”
  9. Editorial Guidelines.”
  10. Editorial Guidelines.”
  11. Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. ilovelibraries.”
  14. About.”
  15. About.”
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Stanford Social Innovation Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR)

Website: http://www.ssireview.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “To advance, educate, and inspire the field of social innovation by seeking out, cultivating, and disseminating the best in research- and practice-based knowledge.”1 The goal is to bring together academic theory and practice to create ideas for achieving social change, and to inform and inspire new social change.

Target audience: Leaders in nonprofit organizations, foundations, or other philanthropic institutions, along with people working in business, government, academia, and other fields.2

Publisher: Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society at Stanford University.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: The website is extensive, and includes links to past issues as well as original content:€“ blogs, webinars, podcasts, SSIR events. The Review covers people and organizations whose work has an impact on business, nonprofit, and government sectors, particularly those with cross-sector ideas and solutions to global issues. Subjects include social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, and philanthropic strategies, as well as educational reform, poverty alleviation, and environmental protection.6

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: External authors (anyone outside SSIR’€™s editorial team) can submit articles under Features, which run 4000-4500 words; 3500-4500 word Case Studies; 1500-word Viewpoint articles; 800-word Books (formerly called Reviews); or blog posts for the website, running between 600-800 words.8 The guidelines list specific details for each submissions category that writers should take into consideration.

Submission and review process: Submissions are sent via a brief email pitch, Word format, to SSIR editors covering the specific section you’€™re submitting under. Submission guidelines list the current editor of each section and how to contact them, and detail the questions to cover in the pitch.9

You’€™ll get acknowledgement of your proposal within 1-2 weeks. The review process takes up to two months, as each editor (including managing and academic editors, depending on the proposal) participates in the review, and then sends the proposal to the editorial committee, who makes the final decision. A list of criteria for submissions is found in the guidelines.10

Additionally, SSIR editors and stable freelance journalists write articles under What Works, What Didn’t Work, What’€™s Next, Reviews of books, Q&A and Research. You can submit pitches for these categories as well, for a particular person, organization, trend or research. The website also details what the editors want to see for ideas for these sections.11

Editorial tone: Easy to read, thoughtful articles chock full of information and interesting ideas, theories, suggestions, and solutions to global challenges.

Style guide used: If the submission is accepted, SSRI editors will work closely with the author on style guides and citations.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Submissions on LIS issues would do well in the Review, if approached from an innovative, thought-provoking way, such as describing grass-roots LIS efforts and their outcomes, or discussing LIS in a global setting, or how LIS practices can be used to promote social change. Writers need to make sure the topic submitted would be relevant or interesting to all the Review’€™s readers, so it should not be too LIS specific. Real-world examples described through research or firsthand experience are ideal. LIS efforts on providing information to mass populations, particularly under served, or information technologies that bridge communities and allow information sharing would most likely do well in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print magazine has a circulation of 13,000, while the website averages 165,000 unique visitors per month.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is published by Stanford University, which is located in Santa Clara County, CA, and the print magazine is sold in newsstands across the United States and Canada. English is the primary language of this Silicon Valley publication, but the Review is written for an audience of change makers€ around the world.14

Reader characteristics: Per the submission guidelines: “€œSSIR’€™s readers are highly educated, widely read, and well informed about the field of social innovation. They want to be provoked, surprised, and presented with memorable information and rigorous analysis. They don’€™t want long-winded arguments, insider jargon, or excessively narrow and technical writing.”€

Readers are overwhelmingly CEO’s, presidents, or senior executives of their organization. Half work for nonprofits, and a small group are philanthropists or foundation leaders.15

The writing is smart and well researched, and poses interesting questions and theories to readers, assuming that everyone is at the same high level of education, and that readers are interested in viewing challenges from a global perspective.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Not a publication specifically aimed at the LIS community, and, per their submission guidelines, readers don’€™t want “€œinsider jargon€.”16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Articles submitted to the Review should be timely, forward thinking, and offer solutions as well as pose questions for readers, who are thought leaders and executives looking for new ways to lead their organizations and foster social change. The LIS field is ripe for this type of exploration, and Review readers would most likely benefit from learning about innovations in the LIS world.

Last updated: November 17, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Overview,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/about/overview
  2. “Submission Guidelines,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines
  3. Overview.”
  4. Submission Guidelines.”
  5. Overview.”
  6. Submission Guidelines.”
  7. “All Issues,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/issue
  8.  “Submission Guidelines.”
  9. Submission Guidelines.”
  10. Submission Guidelines.”
  11. Submission Guidelines.”
  12. Submission Guidelines.”
  13. “Information for Advertisers,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/advertising
  14. Overview.”
  15. Submission Guidelines.”
  16. Submission Guidelines.”
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SNAP Roundtable Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: SNAP (Students & New Archives Professionals) Roundtable Blog

Website:  https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SNAP Roundtable is a sub-group formed within the Society of American Archivists (SSA) to focus on student and new professional goals and issues.1 The SNAP Blog provides SNAP Roundtable members with a forum sharing information in a more public forum, in conjunction with members-only listserv, and other social media outlets.2

SNAP’s mission, per the Goals of SNAP:

  • To advocate for students, interns, new professionals, early-career project archivists and archivists looking for their first professional jobs;
  • To provide a forum to share concerns and learn from each other;
  • Promote awareness of the needs of new archivists;
  • Raise the visibility of new archivists, the skills and expertise they bring to the profession;
  • To bridge the gap between participation in SAA (Society of American Archivists) student chapters and participation in SAA;
  • And to facilitate remote participation in the group through social media and other online resources.
  • To support new archivists as they begin their archival careers and as they move from entry-level positions into mid-career or managerial positions. This can be accomplished through mentoring, facilitating networking, and making recommendations to the Committee on Education for relevant training and workshops. The roundtable will coordinate with SAA sections and roundtables, as well as external organizations, to support new archivists and promote relevant services to its members.3

Target audience: Entry level or student archivists, particularly those involved in the SAA: students, interns, new professionals, early-career archivists, and those still looking for their first professional job. Per the bylaws, any member or nonmember of SAA, including new and more experienced archives professionals, may participate in SNAP in accordance with the most current Guidelines for Roundtables as set forth by the SAA Council.4

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Sharing information relevant to the student and new archive professional community, including archive-relevant blogs, regional meetings or courses, project ideas, general Q&A regarding research, professional and student issues, and the Ask An Archivist Q&A section.9

Frequency of publication: Updated as often as members post online – currently averaging one new post per week.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: To sign up for the SNAP Roundtable Listserv, you must first create an SAA profile here. SAA membership is not required to participate in the Roundtable, but a profile is required.11

To login to the Listserv once you’€™ve created your SAA profile, click here.

Note: once you register for the Listserv, your name will appear in the Members Roster, where you can interact with other members, and join/leave the group.12

To write a guest post to the SNAP blog, email: newarchivistsRT@gmail.com. Include “guest blog post” in the subject.13

Types of contributions accepted: Blog reviews, accounts of regional meetings or courses, project ideas, and anything of interest to the archival community.14

Submission and review process: Per SNAP’€™s bylaws: Roundtable communications will be coordinated by a communications subcommittee which will consist of the Roundtable secretary, web coordinator, outreach/newsletter coordinator, and social media coordinator.15

To post to the listserv, just log in and post.16

To post to the blog as a guest, email newarchivistsRT@gmail.com.17 Alternatively, leave a message on the Contact the Blog Team page.18

Editorial tone: Informal.19

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The SNAP Roundtable Blog is an excellent forum for sharing archival information and concerns among a like-minded group.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently 152 people follow the blog21 and there are 1419 Roundtable members.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: North American. English is the primary language.23

Reader characteristics: Readers could be students or “new or more experienced archival professionals”.24 Regardless of experience, readers will have an interest in archival librarianship, whether to learn from others or share their own concerns.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Some LIS terminology and understanding is expected; but this is not a professional-grade publication, just sharing among peers.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The SNAP Blog offers an excellent venue for neophyte archivists to share knowledge about their profession.27 On the listserv, members can ask questions or post updates on virtually any LIS topic, but the focus is specific to archives.28 This is a very organized, enthusiastic group of students and new professionals who are addressing the needs of those LIS professionals new to archival librarianship.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 28 footnotes

  1. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Mission Statement. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-mission-statement
  2. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Roundtable. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable
  3. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Mission Statement. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-mission-statement
  4. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Bylaws. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-bylaws
  5. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Roundtable. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable
  6. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Mission Statement. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-mission-statement
  7. Society of American Archivists. (2016). About. SNAP Blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  8. Society of American Archivists. (2016). About. SNAP Blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  9. Society of American Archivists. (2016). About. SNAP Blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  10. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Home. SNAP blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from http://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/
  11. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Find/Create an SAA Profile. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://saa.archivists.org/4DCGI/saa/profile/intro.html
  12. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Students and New Archives Professionals Roundtable Roster. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://saa.archivists.org/4DCGI/committees/Roles.html?Action=Show_Comm_Roles&CommCode=SAA**TBL-SNAP&Name=A&Status=Active
  13. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP User-Submitted Project Proposals. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-user-submitted-project-proposals
  14. Society of American Archivists. (2016). About. SNAP Blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  15. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Bylaws. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-bylaws
  16. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Mission Statement. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-mission-statement
  17. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP User-Submitted Project Proposals. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-user-submitted-project-proposals
  18. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Contact the Blog Team. SNAP Blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/contact-the-blog-team/
  19. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Bylaws. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-bylaws
  20. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Bylaws. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-bylaws
  21. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Home. SNAP blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016 from http://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/
  22. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Students and New Archives Professionals Roundtable Roster. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://saa.archivists.org/4DCGI/committees/Roles.html?Action=Show_Comm_Roles&CommCode=SAA**TBL-SNAP&Name=A&Status=Active
  23. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Roundtable. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable
  24. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Bylaws. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-bylaws
  25. Society of American Archivists. (2016). About. SNAP Blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  26. Society of American Archivists. (2016). SNAP Bylaws. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable/snap-bylaws
  27.  Society of American Archivists. (2016). About. SNAP Blog (web log). Retrieved May 14, 2016, from https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  28. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Roundtable. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-roundtable
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Boing Boing

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Boing Boing

Website: http://boingboing.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “A Website devoted to technology and culture. We publish feature articles, links to things we find interesting online, podcasts, videos and comics created by the Boing Boing editorial team and other invited contributors. We also provide a discussion forum so you can participate in the conversation; and sell merchandise in the Boing Boing Shop.”1 Boing Boing allows users to submit interesting, cool, newsworthy links to articles, videos, and any minutia you find interesting.

Target audience: If you’€™re interested in anything outside the mainstream, this would be the place to look. The website is hailed as a bastion of free speech and imagine sharing; it was founded by an editor of Make Magazine, which is dedicated to all things DIY, and the four primary editors have all written for Wired Magazine.2

Publisher: Happy Mutants, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication / online forum.5

Medium: Online

Content: A blog that shares member-reader links of all sorts -€“ informational, fun, noteworthy.

Frequency of publication: Blog updated with at least several new posts per day.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://boingboing.net/sub/

Types of contributions accepted: Any kinds. (Of note to LIS writers: a team from the American Library Association ran a Boing Boing member interest group called Library Boing Boing from 2012 to 2014. See Library Boing Boing, and their first Boing Boing post; the full collection is tagged LIBRARYLAB. To learn more, see the LibraryLab community on the ALA Connect website.)

Submission and review process:

“Find something interesting, write an informative blurb about it, and send it along.”6 Submit links via the form, never by email, and provide an explanation of what the link is and why it would interest readers. Be clear and concise in your description; don’t obscure it with humor or irrelevant information, and don’t submit content without a link.7

Editorial tone: As informal, but informative, as possible. Headlines and pictures are purposely titillating or attention grabbing. Example: under the “€œScience”€ category is the headline: “€œAnne of Green Gables Had Herpes (and you probably do, too),”€ an article about herpes. Or “€œThe Librarian and the Hot Rod Shop€,” a post about a mobile initiative that provides library resources to people who are unaware of the library, or can’€™t make it to the local branch.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have any little library related tidbit to share, this is a great website on which to post it. These are non-reviewed blog posts, so it’€™s not a site that will help towards your tenured work or that you should cite in a scholarly article, but it’€™s a great source for getting and sending information to a curious, intelligent, and supportive audience. It would be a great first start for book reviews, for example, or just to write about or re-post some interesting library-related news.

Creative Commons License: non-commercial sharing, with attribution. Just make sure you say where your link/review/article originated.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: In an article in Fast Company, according to Quantcast data, it gets about 2.5 million unique visitors a month. The article also states that, in 2004-2005, it “had become one of the most-read and linked-to blogs in the world.”9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Quantcast data, Boing Boing reaches an international audience, though 63% of its readers are in the United States.10 English is the primary language, but as the site also links to websites, videos, etc., as long as you explain the reason for submitting your article/website/repost, the language of the thing itself isn’€™t too strict. Culture is progressive and friendly, hacker-ish and non-mainstream.

Reader characteristics: Quantcast data reports that the majority of readers are white, male, and highly educated.11 Hackers, DIY-ers, those who like to stay current on news/gadgets/things, and anyone with an eye on web culture and interesting news of all kinds will gravitate towards the blog. The blog’€™s bias lies on the side of being, for the most part, uncensored and relishing in re-posting links that test freedom of speech and censorship in the online community. They are very much an “€˜anything goes”€™ site, as long as “€œanything”€ is interesting to readers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: More civilian than professional; LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum, use layman’s terms and just get your point across in the least scholarly tone possible. The readership comprises a savvy group of people, but they are not all LIS aficionados, so use regular, everyday terms when describing your link and why you find it interesting.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Boing Boing would be a great place to post information relevant to the library community: its readers, while very much an online-loving group, seem to enjoy hearing about LIS-related news, particularly if it has to do with free speech, public access, or challenges to the LIS community. They are well-read, spoken, and intelligent, and, with the inclusion of the LIS-specific posting group, would appreciate links coming from the Library world. Although not scholarly in tone, the links posted can be of scholarly caliber, and the blog has garnered attention and awards, and holds a certain status in the blogosphere; posts here are likely to be reposted elsewhere and shared.

Last updated: September 10, 2016


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “Boing Boing Terms of Service,” BoingBoing.net, accessed September 10, 2016, http://boingboing.net/tos
  2. “Boing Boing,” Wikipedia, accessed October 24, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boing_Boing
  3. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  4. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  5. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  6. “How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing,” Peter Shankman blog, August 15, 2007, http://shankman.com/how-to-get-something-posted-to-boing-boing/
  7. How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing
  8. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  9. “10 Tips from Boing Boing on Making Online Content Sing,” FastCompany.com, accessed September 10, 2016, http://www.fastcompany.com/3005636/10-tips-boing-boing-making-online-content-sing
  10. “boingboing.net,” Quantcast.com, accessed September 10, 2016, https://www.quantcast.com/boingboing.net
  11. boingboing.net
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