Wiki Tags Archives: Blogs

iSchool Connext

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: iSchool Connext Blog

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “iSchool Connext fosters connections between students and alumni of the SJSU iSchool program through communications, events, and programs open to all students and alumni in order to promote scholarly and professional development and achievement.”1 In 2011, the SJSU School of Information’s alumni association and its student organization were merged into a single organization with a shared blog in order to promote “expanded collaboration and communication between current students and alumni, creating lifelong connections that enrich their scholarly and professional careers.”2

Target audience: All students and alumni of the School of Information at San José State University.3

Publisher: Student and alumni members of the iSchool Connext organization.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Web-based publication.7

Content: “Information on the LIS field, career ideas, job opportunities, or any other topic that may be helpful to others.”8 Recent posts include event announcements, spotlight features of alumni, and recruitment announcements for leadership positions within the organization.9

Frequency of publication: Continuously. As of 2019, the most recent post is from January 2018.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/ (Scroll to the bottom-right corner in the footer of each page.)

Types of contributions accepted: Op ed pieces, as well as announcements and discussions of events, scholarships, and resources related to students and alumni of the School of Information. “Guest posts” from recent years include opinion pieces on the importance of doing research while in school, the use of social media for networking, and interview techniques. Any insight or news relevant to any library profession or education would be welcome here.11

Submission and review process: iSchool Connext members are encouraged to participate by emailing the organization through the website.12 The Blog Correspondent and iSchool WebMaster are responsible for soliciting blog submissions from members and managing online presence,13 and are presumably in charge of reviewing and posting submissions, since “guest posts” are technically posted by the WebMaster.14 The most recent (2017-2018) list of officers indicates open seats for at least the WebMaster position.15

Editorial tone: Informal.16

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The iSchool Connext Blog provides many publication, editorial, and leadership opportunities for iSchool students and alumni at SJSU. Any student or alumni of the school could begin to develop a publication portfolio by contributing opinion or news pieces to the blog. The current lack of activity and leadership indicates a small audience, but any involvement would indicate commitment to improving and participating in communication of the school’s students and alumni. In addition to writing, members of the group could show leadership and further develop their publication skills by seeking out any of the currently open Officer positions and making the blog a more active and widely-read publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation or membership information is available, but blog content makes its way to the organization’s social media pages. As of July 2019, Facebook page has 980 followers and their Twitter account has over 500.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: San José State University is located in San José, California, yet all of its current students complete the program online. Students and alumni may live, study, or work anywhere in the world. Since members have all completed coursework through the program, they will be familiar with English and LIS jargon at least to the extent that it appears in iSchool courses. The School of Information has been around since 1954, so school alumni could have very different cultural and professional experiences than current students.18

Reader characteristics: Since we have no current data on the group’s membership or the blog’s readership, we can only assume that the reader characteristics are the characteristics of the school’s students and alumni. They could possess or be working towards a MLIS or MARA degree with a career pathway in academic libraries, special libraries, public libraries, school libraries, teacher librarianship, archives and preservation, data science, digital curation, information organization, digital services, and more. They could be in their first semesters in the program, or they could be longtime professionals in the field.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: iSchool students and alumni have a command of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the potential membership of this group is so diverse in experience, authors can interest an audience by writing about any topic in the field or by making connections between different topics in the field. Whether reading an observational piece on teacher librarianship or an opinion piece on controversies in digital preservation, most readers will be interested in understanding what their fellow students and alumni are thinking about and experiencing. Members read this blog to keep up on the events and opinions of their classmates and former classmates, not to read the latest best practices and research articles. A focus on connecting life lessons to iSchool experiences would be especially welcome in this blog.

Last updated: July 13, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/?page_id=67
  2. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext,” accessed July 13, 2019, https://ischool.sjsu.edu/node/3204.
  3. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext.”
  4. iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement.”
  5.  iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement.”
  6. iSchool Connext, “Mission Statement.”
  7. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext.”
  8. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/
  9. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  10. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  11. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  12. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  13. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext By-Laws,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/?page_id=1919
  14. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  15. iSchool Connext, “Leadership,” accessed July 13, 2019, http://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/connext/?page_id=49
  16. iSchool Connext, “iSchool Connext.”
  17. SJSU School of Information, “iSchool Connext.”
  18. SJSU School of Information, “History and Accreditation,” accessed July 13, 2019, https://ischool.sjsu.edu/history-and-accreditation
  19. SJSU School of Information, “MLIS Career Pathways,” accessed July 13, 2019, https://ischool.sjsu.edu/mlis-career-pathways
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SNAP Section Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: SNAP (Students & New Archives Professionals) Section Blog

ISSN: N/A

Website:  https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SNAP Section is a sub-group formed within the Society of American Archivists (SAA) to focus on student and new professional goals and issues.1 The SNAP Blog provides SNAP Section members with a forum sharing information in a more public forum, in conjunction with other social media outlets.2 The blog meets supports SNAP’s goals to “provide a forum to share concerns and learn from each other” and to “facilitate remote participation in the group through social media and other online resources.”3

Target audience: Entry level or student archivists, particularly those involved in the SAA: students, interns, new professionals, early-career archivists, and those still looking for their first professional job. Per the bylaws, any member or nonmember of SAA, including new and more experienced archives professionals, may participate in SNAP in accordance with the most current Guidelines for Roundtables as set forth by the SAA Council.4

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Sharing information relevant to the student and new archive professional community, including archive-relevant blogs, regional meetings or courses, project ideas, general Q&A regarding research, professional and student issues, and the Ask An Archivist Q&A section.9

Frequency of publication: Updated as often as members post online. Recently the rate has been about three times per month.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/

Types of contributions accepted: Blog reviews, accounts of regional meetings or courses, project ideas, and anything of interest to the archival community.11 Special columns offer more structured writing opportunities, and can be found here.12

Submission and review process: Authors who want to contribute to the blog should submit a contact form with information about themselves and about the topic they plan to write about.13 It can be assumed that the blog team will work with authors to develop their idea and get it posted.

Editorial tone: Informal.14

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The SNAP Section Blog is an excellent forum for sharing archival information and concerns among a like-minded group. It should be easy for novice writers to practice publishing their thoughts, ideas, and announcements in this public forum. Posting on this blog promises networking potential, as well as the possibility of becoming a strong voice in the newest generation of archivists, who may bring to light new perspectives on issues not emphasized to more established archivists.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently 218 people follow the blog,15 though the number of views that blog posts receive on the site and on linked-to social media could potentially be much greater.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience is largely North American, as the blog concerns members of the SAA. English is the primary language. Recent blog posts demonstrate comfort with social media and current internet language.16

Reader characteristics:  Since the Section focuses on students and new professionals, members are likely overall to be younger than their other SAA Section counterparts, though new archive professionals may be older individuals in the midst of a career change. Readers may also be more established archivists who want to keep up with what issues their new colleagues find important.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Some LIS terminology and understanding is expected; but this is not a professional-grade publication, just sharing among peers. Contributors writing about their personal experiences in the field are not necessarily expected to walk readers through each step of what their work entails.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The SNAP Blog offers an excellent venue for new and student archivists to share knowledge, insights, and new ideas about their profession.19 This is a very organized, enthusiastic group of students and new professionals who are addressing the needs of those LIS professionals new to archival librarianship. Readers are hoping to learn career tips, gain insight on issues they have different perspectives on, and network with other professionals. Write from personal experience and with passion for maximized readership.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section/snap-mission-statement
  2. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  3. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.”
  4. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  5. Society of American Archivists, “Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Section,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section
  6. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.
  7. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  8. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  9. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  10. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section,” Accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com
  11. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  12. Students & New Professionals Section, “Series,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/series/.
  13. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  14. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  15. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  16. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  17. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  18. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  19. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
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Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Journal (LJ)

ISSN: 0363-02771

Website: http://www.libraryjournal.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal is produced as a trade publication with the intent to provide library news and related information. Although the emphasis of the journal is on public libraries, the journal contains information pertinent to a wide variety of professionals in the library world. Library Journal also provides reviews of books, ebooks, audiobooks, DVDs/videos, and other media annual to assist library professionals in purchasing for their institution. The mission of the journal is to provide feature articles and news stories which inform library professionals about current issues in a readable style.2

Target audience: The target audience is composed of librarians in public, academic, and special libraries, as well as library administrators, staff, and directors.3

Publisher:  Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news. Library Journal is a non-research-oriented LIS professional news journal that includes advertising, bibliographies, illustrations, and book reviews.6

Medium: Library Journal is a print publication with free online content. Online archives are free, though they do not necessarily contain everything that is in the print edition.7 You can also subscribe to LJ’s RSS feeds and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.8 The online version of Library Journal also includes blogs, podcasts and message boards, links to affiliated newsletters, and tools to assist in collection development and other areas of library administration.9

Content: Library Journal content includes news, reviews, LJ bestsellers, commentary, departments, info-tech, special reports, letters to the editor, upcoming events, classified ads, and photos.10 Library Journal evaluates over 8,000 books annually and also provides reviews of library-related equipment and materials.11

Frequency of publication: The print publication is issued 12 times a year.12 Online content is updated continuously.13 Reviews are also welcomed, though review contributors are expected to regularly write, rather than simply submitting one review.14

Submission and review process: Submissions to the Features and Columns sections should be 2 to 4 pages in a magazine, or 1800 to 2700 words. Finalized drafts can be sent as an attachment along with a query describing the coverage and approach of the article as well as the writer’€™s connection to the subject and his or her expertise. The query can be a paragraph or several paragraphs in length. Response to queries may take between 4 to 6 weeks. LJ also accepts opinion pieces and rants about topics and concerns in the library profession for its “BackTalk” . Pieces should be in the range of 900 words. Be sure to email the appropriate editor for the type of content being submitted.15

Book reviewer guidelines for contracted and unpaid review writers can be found here.16

Editorial tone: As this publication is aimed at the general librarian population, the tone of articles should be objective as well as thought-provoking while providing topical and useful information. Articles should be written in an “accessible and readable style.”17

Style guide used: No particular style guide is indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A trusted and respected publication for the library community, Library Journal certainly has the potential for an LIS author to reach a wide audience. Since the journal reaches out to public, academic, and special libraries, there are a multitude of articles that could possibly be written for this publication.

Library Journal is open to ideas for articles and columns, and also encourages “opinion pieces and rants.”18 Library Journal prefers an approach that is widely accessible by its readers.19 There is therefore great potential for newer writers who are not necessarily comfortable with a more scholarly voice. There is also a market here for librarians to offer insight and advice on practical issues facing contemporary libraries. This is a wonderful opportunity for librarians (including those who may not consider themselves to be professional authors) to share their real-world experience with others.

Library Journal Reviews+ is a popular selection tool used in public and academic libraries, and an ongoing opportunity exists here to publish reviews in a wide range of disciplines. Reviewers are not required to have previously published reviews.20 This would be an excellent opportunity for library students with graduate degrees in other areas to review books in their specialty and begin to publish in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Library Journal is distributed to 43,000 print subscribers, and its online equivalent registers over 91,000 monthly visits. The publication is also popular on social media, with over half a million followers across various social media platforms, on which journal content is shared.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LJ is printed in English, and most articles focus on topics affecting libraries in the United States. A scan of recent article titles reveals an editorial comfort with acronyms specific to the American context, such as CIA, ALA, and NYPL.22 However, authors should remain sensitive to the possibility of diverse readership, since cultural diversity and international issues are embraced by the publication, as demonstrated by recent articles on Indigenous Academic Libraries, Spanish-language collection development, and inclusion in scholarly publishing.23

Reader characteristics: Because the audience largely consists of librarians and library staff, readers are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship.24 The readership is large,25 however, and likely diverse in their particular perspectives on library issues.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:  Library Journal is read by people all across the library profession, so a working knowledge of library terms can be assumed, but authors should be aware that members of their audience may not have MLIS degrees.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Library Journal include library directors, administrators, and staff in all types of libraries. An article written for this publication has the potential to reach and influence people across the library field, nationally and even internationally. Authors should remain aware that their readers are familiar with both the current highest standards of librarianship, yet also the practical difficulties that come with working in the field. It is recommended to aim for a broad reach, even when writing about an issue specific to one kind of library, so that readers from all types of libraries can gather ideas or inspiration from each article.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521665093762/48829
  2. Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=About-Us.
  3. Library Journals, “About Us.”
  4. Media Source, Inc., “Media Source Inc.,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://mediasourceinc.com/
  5. Library Journal, “Submissions,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news.
  6. Library Journal, “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com
  7. Library Journal, “Reviews+,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=Reviews%2B
  8. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  9. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  10. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  11. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://media.libraryjournal.com/library-journal/.
  12. Library Journal, “Subscribe to Library Journal, accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=subscribe.
  13. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”

    About the publication’s submission guidelines

    Location of submission guidelines: For articles: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news. For reviews: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ

    Types of contributions accepted: Feature articles that are broad in scope and/or offer useful information and ideas. The journal also accepts news pieces, announcements, photos of library-related news and events, letters to the editor, and opinion pieces.[14. Library Journal, “Submissions.”

  14. Library Journal, “Review for LJ,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ.
  15. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  16. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  17. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  18. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  19. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  20. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  21. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  22. Library Journal, “News,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=News
  23. Library Journal, “News.”
  24. Library Journal, “About Us.”
  25. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  26. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
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LISNews

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LISNews

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.lisnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “LISNews is a collaborative weblog devoted to current events and news in the world of library and information science.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals and anyone interested in reading about library and information science news.2

Publisher: Blake Carver, MLS.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news and forum.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The content on LISnews varies from day to day and includes newspaper articles from the United States and other English-speaking countries, editorials, interviews, book reviews, and original writings. Glancing at the most recent postings reveals excerpts and links from LIS-related articles in popular publications and organizations. Activity on the site has slowed down significantly in recent years, but new blog posts are added about once a week by the blog’s owner. Some articles do not speak anyone’s interest; other postings can generate heated, but civilized discussion for several days.7

Frequency of publication: According to the blog owner, content is updated “frequently, usually 7 days a week.”8 However, recent activity suggests a pattern of updating slightly more than once per week.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no guidelines as this is an informal forum for open discussion. The author attempts to maintain accuracy and fairness in postings and gently hints that others do the same.10

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, editorials, original work; anything of interest to a LIS audience.11

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent to the ”submit suggestion” link on the website. Contributions remain the property of the author and can be removed from the website any time by request. There is no review process other than the publication of that which interests a majority of readers. The author does caution that anything that “causes trouble” will be deleted.12

Editorial tone: Informal blog that accepts any writings about LIS news. Authors are free to post and opine on the blog regarding any previously published works. The publisher does, however, “reserve the right to remove any work at any time for any reason.”13

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LISNews does not provide any scholarly writing opportunities, but does offer an almost daily opportunity for new writers to post their work and ideas on any library topic. The blog offers a nice opportunity to get one’s feet wet in the world of LIS writing but not much else. This may be good venue to find the pulse of library and information science news, to find out what others are talking about, what is of interest to other LIS professionals, and what LIS topics are making headlines in mainstream publications.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There is no circulation information available. However, readership is not necessarily restricted to the activity on the site, as the blog is also be delivered via an email subscription list.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publisher is in New York, and it is claimed that there is some international reach.15 American English is the standard for communication as the focus is on North American information science and news. Newspaper articles posted here are from all over the country, Canada, and the UK.16

Reader characteristics: A majority of the readers are librarians of every specialty; however, the publisher does not ask any specific information. The readers are likely to have similar types of workplaces, as the majority of most recent posts focus on public or academic librarianship.17 Readers, as librarians, tend to be open to new information, are willing to express their opinion online, and listen to what others have to say. The editor will post anything of value related to library issues but will remove anything that causes too much discord.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since this is an audience of mostly librarians (as determined by the editor)19, there is a great deal of LIS knowledge. Information is gathered from many sources for contributions to LISNews. Some posted articles are highly technical, while others are newspaper articles free of any jargon.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a resource for librarians to contribute information on anything related to library and information science from the conventional to the bizarre.21 Some articles are very technical and directed toward librarians with a specialization and a knowledge of library jargon and acronyms. Other articles are of a general nature that are of interest to not only librarians, but a general audience as well. Authors are welcome to contribute on any library related topic. Since there are few productive authors relative to prior years, there is opportunity for authors to stand out and be heard by posting frequently. 22 This is an informal and engaged audience of librarians that will be interested in anything that writers have to post.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Carver, B., “About LISNews,accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.lisnews.org/about_lisnews
  2. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  3. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  4. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  5. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  6. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  7. Carver, B., “Recent Posts,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.lisnews.org/supertracker
  8. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  9. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
  10. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  11. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  12.  Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  13. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  14. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  15. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  16. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
  17. Carver, B. “Recent Posts.”
  18. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  19. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  20. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
  21. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  22. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
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Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
Continue Reading

BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
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I Need a Library Job (INALJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: I Need A Library Job (INALJ)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its seventh year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Information on guest blogging: http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207

Types of contributions accepted: Articles or interviews of any length (but at least 550 words) on all sorts of topics—archives, volunteering, diversity, resumes etc.5

Submission and review process: You must provide proof of identity in order to post an article or blog—use a professional work email address or have a LinkedIn connection or colleague vouch for you. A landscape orientation jpeg photo is required, as well as a personal bio. The bio can also be a link to your own site.

Submit photos, Word document of your article, bio and proof of identity to: articles@inalj.com.6

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: No style guide is used.7

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing. Naomi states that she does not publish any articles that are holiday related, since she has a back log to work through.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published in the past year span a broad range of topics–networking for reluctant networkers, the importance of saying “no” in the workplace and a q & a with Dr. Sandra Hirsch from SJSU’s iSchool. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. “Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed March 13, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. “About INALJ”
  4. “Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ is usually updated Monday-Friday.[4. “About INALJ.”

  5. “Write for INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207
  6. “Write for INALJ.”
  7. “Write for INALJ.”
  8. Write for INALJ.”
  9. “About INALJ.”
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

ISSN: 1052-5726 (print), 1052-5722 (online)

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian “is a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive “discourse and action on library issues.” Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG) members receive a subscription, or individuals can subscribe without joining the guild.2

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, by the editorial board.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online. Full text of complete issues and individual articles are available online.5

Content: Progressive Librarian publishes “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”6 Articles cover topics such as sexual violence, social justice, sustainability, youth empowerment, intellectual freedom, international activism, and a wide variety of progressive critiques and analyses of national and international LIS issues.

Frequency of publication:  Two times a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: A Call for Papers for future issues of Progressive Librarian asks for “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, documents, artwork and poetry that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”8

Submission and review process: All manuscripts submitted to Progressive Librarian are reviewed by each member of the editorial board. Manuscripts outside the expertise of board members are sent to outside reviewers for comment and evaluation. The journal also welcomes prints and digital images. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions before publication. For book reviews, please contact the book review editor.9

Editorial tone: The articles are innovative and present alternative views to those of other LIS publications. The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.

Style guide used: Authors may use their preferred citation style “for in-text (parenthetical) citations, footnotes, and endnotes, as well as a bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian), works cited (MLA), and references (APA & Harvard) sections.” The citation style has to be used consistently throughout the manuscript.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Progressive Librarian is a innovative and welcoming journal for LIS authors who write about any issue related to progressive librarianship or the relationship of library and information science to issues of social justice and responsibility. Articles are international in scope and are often focused on current events and actions. LIS professionals and students may submit artwork and poetry, as well as documents, reports, and bibliographies, on progressive issues.

Prospective authors should read the editorial in issue 45 for an understanding of the journal’s philosophy and perspective,11 as well as the Progressive Librarians Guild Statement of Purpose.12

For LIS graduate students, each year the PLG awards the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize “for the best paper about some aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.” The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian, and the winner receives a $500 stipend toward travel costs to the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, where the award is presented.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal as an international readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, although there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.14 As with any scholarly writing, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.15 The readership is made up of librarians, librarian graduate students, and library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and in how politics informs LIS practices.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals, or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have an understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about news and events in the LIS world, and about national and international politics and current events, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues, or events others may not be familiar with.

 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Broadly speaking, the readers of Progressive Librarian are LIS professionals, scholars, and students who consider themselves socially and politically progressive and who bring their passion for social justice and action to their work in various library and information settings. PLG works against the current idea that “the library is merely a neutral institutional mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society of atomized information consumers.” Rather,  a “progressive librarianship demands the recognition of the idea that libraries for the people has been one of the principal anchors of an extended free public sphere which makes an independent democratic civil society possible, something which must be defended and extended.”16

 

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml.
  2. “Subscription,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_subscribe.shtml.
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml.
  5. “Archive,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml.
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Call for Papers,” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017): verso, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45.pdf.
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. Elaine Harger, “Editorial: Why PLG? Why Paper? Why Bridge Generations?” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017),  http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45/003.pdf.
  12. “Statement of Purpose,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml.
  13. “The Braverman Award,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml.
  14. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  15. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  16. “PLG’s History,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/history.shtml.
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Against the Grain

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

ISSN: 1043-20941

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

This website provides more than 3,500 pages with continuously updated content, including full-text access to articles from the print Against the Grain publication (access is limited to subscribers), along with a additional free, available, web-only content like breaking industry news, blog posts, job openings, conference announcements, and an online version of the popular “If Rumors Were Horses” column by editor Katina Strauch.2

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. It is a unique collection of reports on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals.”3

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.4

Publisher: Against the Grain.5

Peer reviewed? All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.6

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.7

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.8 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.9

Content: Articles. The ATG website also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.10

Frequency of publication: Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews and people profiles, Reviews, Legal Issues, International Dateline, Publishing, Bookselling and Vending, and Technology and Standards.12 Some issues have specific focuses, such as the December 2013/January 2014 issue, “eBook Platforms for Academic Librarians.”13 Articles should be approximately 2000 words, although the editors allow authors to make a piece as long or short as needed by their subject. They like a minimum of 200 dpi for charts and graphs and 300 dpi for photos.14

Submission and review process: Contact Leah Hinds at leah@katina.info or Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.15

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,16 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.17

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.19 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.20 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (ATG’s current editors are affiliated with College of Charleston or the Charleston Conference).22 Written in American English.23

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.24 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”25 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.26

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics0 and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

Last updated: April 20 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1.  “About,” Against the Grain, LLC, accessed March 18, 2018, http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  2. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  3. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  4. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  5. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  6. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  7. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  8. Against the Grain. (2014). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  9. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  10. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  11. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  12. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  13. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  14. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  15. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  16. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  17. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  18. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  19. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  20. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  21. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  22. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  23. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  24. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  25. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  26. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  27. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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