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Rowman & Littlefield

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: http://rowman.com/RLPublishers

Purpose, objective, or mission: Rowman & Littlefield “publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.”1 Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others.2

Target audience: Rowman & Littlefield offers “serious works of scholarship, core textbooks for introductory courses, supplemental, affordable paperbacks for alternative approaches to teaching, and general interest and trade books for the curious reader.”3 LIS books are targeted toward practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars.

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group4 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN).5 The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, AltaMira Press, Scarecrow Press and Sheed & Ward.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal.6

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.7

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.8 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.9

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.10 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.11

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).12 The number of LIS titles published per year is unknown.

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes13

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for publication should be submitted to the appropriate acquisitions editor,14 and include a prospectus, outline (annotated table of contents), author’s CV or resume, one to two brief writing samples, and a list of potential peer reviewers.15 Full book manuscripts are not accepted unless requested by the acquisitions editor. See the publisher’s website for detailed submission guidelines.

Submission and review process: The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.16

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. Formal book proposals require a detailed description, author qualifications, previously published works, writing samples, competitive analysis, and potential markets for a book.17 The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences and conventions.18 Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A Spring 2017 catalog listed approximately 150 LIS books geared toward students, professionals, and academics.19 Print runs for titles are not publicly available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material.20 However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: February 2, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Home,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  2. “Subjects,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, PublishersGlobal.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  5. “About,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/Page/About
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  7. “Library Services,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  8. “About.”
  9. “Library Services.”
  10. “About.”
  11. “Library Services.”
  12. “Publisher Details,” NetGalley.com, accessed February 2, 2018, https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/29645
  13. “Submission Guidelines.”
  14. “Editors,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  15. “Submission Guidelines.”
  16. “Submission Guidelines.”
  17. “Submission Guidelines.”
  18. “Convenions Schedule,” Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018,https://rowman.com/Page/ConventionsSchedule
  19. “Digital Catalogs, Rowman.com, accessed February 2, 2018, http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  20. “Digital Catalogs.”
  21. “About.”
  22. “Digital Catalogs.”
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Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table 

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Endnotes Committee is part of the ALA’€™s New Members Round Table (NMRT), a which consists of ALA members with fewer than ten years’ membership. The committee’s mission is to provide support for librarians who want or need to publish scholarly articles, and to publish peer-reviewed research by NMRT members and directed at new librarians.1

The committee oversees publication of Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table.2

Target audience: American Library Association new members, specifically those who are part of the New Members Round Table (ALA NMRT)3

Publisher: American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the Endnotes Committee Charge, “Each edition of the journal will contain 2-4 scholarly articles written by members of NMRT, as well as web site reviews and scholarly book reviews of titles relevant to new librarians.”8

Frequency of publication: One issue per year, with the possibility of more issues if there is interest. The editor welcomes suggestions for special themed issues from NMRT members.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-endnotes-committee

Types of contributions accepted: Original research, practitioner-based research, case studies, book and media reviews. Articles range between 2000-4000 words; book and media reviews 300-500.10

Submission and review process: Endnotes accepts article submissions on a rolling basis, but NMRT members are encouraged to contact the editor about proposals to determine if it fits the journal’€™s scope.11

Send typed, double-spaced MS word docs to nmrtendnotesjournal@gmail.com.12

The committee reviews manuscripts via an double-blind peer-review process. Accepted manuscripts will be returned with committee suggestions for edits, and authors will have about a month to revise the manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly, but not too formal. The articles and reviews are almost conversational.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

To submit a manuscript for publication, register with the ALA and then join the NMRT, whose mission is to provide support for librarians with that specific goal. The publication is for NMRT members and directed at new librarians.€“ Endnotes is the perfect place for LIS students and new authors to submit a query to supportive editorial staff and among a group of peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Endnotes is an open-access journal available online for anyone to read, but is primarily for members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALA is based in Chicago, IL, but the website and newsletter are online open access, available to anyone with internet access, or through a library. œA network of affiliates, chapters, and other organizations enables the ALA to reach a broad audience. Although it is written in American English and published by the American Library Association, the ALA does not limit itself to U.S. library concerns.17

Reader characteristics: Most readers of Endnotes, and all authors, are members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.18 ALA members include “librarians, library trustees, and other interested people from every state and many nations. The association serves public, state, school, and academic libraries, as well as special libraries for people working in government, commerce and industry, the arts, and the armed services or in hospitals, prisons, and other institutions.”19 The ALA’€™s mission is “€œto provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this scholarly journal are part of the ALA’€™s New Members Roundtable, so they may be expected to be aware of current LIS trends and terminology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are primarily new members to the ALA, and are interested in reading the most recent LIS scholarly research, news, reviews and updates in order to further their education or careers, and to inspire their own research and writing. This is an ideal publication for new authors to consider, and as it’€™s part of the ALA, has built-in credibility and respect, as well as readership.

Last updated: April 22. 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “About NMRT,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-nmrt
  2. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  3. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  4. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  5. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  6. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  7. American Library Association. (2014). Endnotes Committee. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  8. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  9. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  10. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  11. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  12. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  13. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  14. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  15. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  16. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  17. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  18. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  19. “Membership,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  20. “Mission,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  21. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
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Federal Librarian

Note: The most recent edition of this publication was the Winter/February 2018 issue. This profile is being retired as of June 2019 and will be a candidate for deletion in 2020. At that time, please contact the editor again to verify that the publication is no longer active.

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Federal Librarian

ISSN: 1940-3534(Print) and 0273-1061 (Online)1

Website: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Federal Librarian is the official newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Libraries Round Table (FAFLRT).2 Federal and Armed Forces Libraries represent a wide variety of library types: research, law, school, and public. Librarians working for the U.S. federal government have opportunities that span the library field, from direct services to the public, to in-depth research support for America’€™s military and civilian services.

The Round Table has developed a successful series of programs to inform new and incoming library professionals about careers in federal libraries, and to assist established federal librarians grow their careers. FAFLRT also sponsors awards and recognition for outstanding federal librarians.3

From their site: FAFLRT’s mission is “to promote library and information service and the library and information profession in the federal and armed forces communities; to promote appropriate utilization of federal and armed forces library and information resources and facilities; and to provide an environment for the stimulation of research and development relating to the planning, development, and operation of federal and armed forces libraries.”4

Target audience: Members of the Federal and Armed Forces Round Table. “FAFLRT membership is open to all individual ALA Members interested in issues affecting Federal or Armed Forces libraries.”5

Publisher: American Library Association.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: LIS professional and trade publication.8

Medium: Online.9

Content: Federal Librarian “presents recent developments and events of interest to Federal and Armed Forces library community, including news and reports on international, federal, DoD, state and local government issues.”10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing

Types of contributions accepted: Federal Librarian includes a mix of current events, trends or issues affecting member libraries, tributes, feature articles, award recipients and a message from the FAFLRT president.12

Submission and review process: Send contributions to:

Anne Harrison, interim editor
6200 Wilson Blvd. Apt. 1107
Falls Church, VA 22044
telephone:  202-707-4834
E-mail: harrisonanne57@yahoo.com

The review process is not outlined.13

Editorial tone: Reviewing the latest issue (Vol. 31 #4, 2014) provides a selection of items ranging from an accounting of closures at base libraries, to a lively description of the first “Library Con” held at the JBER Library, to a tribute to a retiring librarian. Articles are written in an informal tone.14

Style guide used: None specified.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Federal Librarian offers the LIS author interested in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries a forum for informal professional discussions of issues and events that are important to this community. As one of the current strategic goals of the FAFLRT is to “establish new and continue existing liaison relationships with relevant ALA committees and round tables”16, one can assume that this journal would also be open to writers from various areas of librarianship to build connections with the FAFLRT through its newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Federal Librarian subscription base is approximately 600.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership of the Federal Librarian covers a wide range of LIS professionals in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries, from all over the U.S. These libraries run the gamut from public, school, military academic or special.18 Bearing in mind the wide variety of issues that are of interest to the reader, but also the overriding cultural umbrella of membership in the FAFLRT, potential authors should tailor their submissions to this group. Articles are written in American English.19

Reader characteristics: Demographics are not given for the readers of Federal Librarian. However, because subscription is included in membership to FAFLRT, readers are among 600 federal and military LIS professionals.20 Readers have a vested interest in matters concerning library and information services in the federal and armed forces communities.21

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Federal Librarian work and live in Federal and Armed Forces communities.22 Authors who also belong to this community would have an interested and supportive audience for their writing. Because the issues examined in the Federal Librarian encourage professional development of their LIS peers, the potential impact on the published author’s career is great. This is a special community who, with their shared interests, would be a knowledgeable and interested audience for the potential author.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Federal Librarian, American Library Association, accessed March 21, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1701525525
  2. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  3.  American Library Association. (2016). Initiatives and Projects. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/initiatives
  4.  American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  5.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  8.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  9.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  10. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  11.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  12.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  13.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  14.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/newsletters/2014_vol.31_4_Federal_Librarian.pdf
  15.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  16. American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  17.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  18. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  19.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  20. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  21.  Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  22.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
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Journal of Creative Library Practice, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Creative Library Practice

ISSN: 2330-42271

Website: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’€™s About page: “The Journal of Creative Library Practice provides an outlet for librarians and information professionals to €œdescribe and encourage greater creativity in library and information center communications, policies, collections, instruction, and other areas of librarianship€.”2

Target audience: “This journal reaches librarians and information professionals of all types, including academic, public, school, special, medical, legal, and others.” The journal is working to broaden its readership to individuals outside the profession, to anyone interested in creative solutions to LIS issues; or anyone who wants to participate in discussions about creative issues and solutions.3

Publisher: Published as an online blog-format journal by Creative Library Practice4

Peer reviewed? Yes,5 though this blog-style journal also publishes non-peer reviewed content. The refereed articles are distinguished from the blog posts on the site.6

Type: LIS scholarly and professional7

Medium: Online,8 peer-reviewed blogposts9

Content: Posts on creative solutions to LIS issues.10

Frequency of publication: This online journal is updated as frequently as the editors write posts and peer-reviewed articles are accepted.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Any article focusing on creative solutions to LIS issues, including communications barriers, technology issues, reviews of relevant books or websites.12

Submission and review process: The website provides a link to email manuscripts in MS-Word .doc, .docx, or RTF format.13

Editorial tone: Editor Joseph Kraus, in a Q&A with Library Journal, stated, “€œWe want to encourage prospective authors to write with less formal rhetoric.”14

Style guide used: References should be provided in a consistent format, whether Chicago, Turabian, MLA, or APA, or author may simply provide links to cited material.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal’s editors consider the publication to be an open source alternative to the stodgy print publications usually favored by the LIS community. They are a creative group open to all sorts of submissions, so this would be a great place to expand on an LIS student paper or thesis, or write about a creative approach tried at a library-related job, and how it helped the organization.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics are not available, but as this journal is also an informal blog there is potential to reach a large audience.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is online and the editors are LIS professionals at colleges and universities around the United States.16 The journal is written in American English.17

Reader characteristics: This journal appeals to forward thinking, creative, multidisciplined, against-the-grain LIS professionals seeking to share information with like-minded peers. The journal is written for and by LIS professionals in all possible settings, including academic, public, school, special, medical, and law libraries. It also aims to reach those readers who are interested in libraries but not necessarily working in them, including teachers, parents, students, and businesses.18

The journal was created by LIS professionals who wish to have a truly open access information sharing site that features creative solutions to common problems in information organizations. This is an open minded, nontraditional group that sees the value in current technologies and is working to take advantage of anything that can help the library community achieve its goals. The journal leans toward the informal, so potential authors should keep this in mind while writing for the publication. The goal is to provide articles from a variety of perspectives.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The knowledge level is probably quite high, but as the editors are attempting to appeal to laypeople as well as LIS students and professionals, potential authors should keep the jargon to a minimum and avoid highly technical terms and unusual acronyms.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Creative Library Practice is part of a new LIS journal standard: using open access for peer-reviewed articles under Creative Commons licensing, and providing relatively loose guidelines in terms of content, and even citations.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523479339830/779051
  2. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  3. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  4. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  5.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  6. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  7.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  8.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  9. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  10. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  12. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  14. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  16. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  17. The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017,
  18. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  19. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  20. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
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Education Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Education Libraries

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Websitehttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Education Libraries is an electronic, refereed journal of the Special Libraries Association’s (SLA) Education Division.  It offers a forum for new and challenging ideas in education, and library and information science. It also explores the effect of new technologies on the library profession and library and information curriculum.”1

Target audience: The target audience is the membership of the Special Libraries Association, which includes those employed at “a variety of venues, including special libraries and information centers, academic libraries, public libraries, and school libraries.”2

Publisher: Special Libraries Association, Education Division3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and Education; scholarly5

Medium: Online, open access since 20156

Content: Education Libraries publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, member profiles, and case studies.7 Recent feature articles include faculty-librarian collaboration, 3-D printing in education libraries, collection development, and school library advocacy.8

Frequency of publication: Biannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Education Libraries accepts “research studies, descriptive narratives, or other thoughtful considerations of topics of interest to the education information professional. Manuscripts focusing on issues relevant to more general concerns either in the field of education or in the field of library and information science are also welcome provided they include a significant component specifically germane to education, libraries and librarianship.”10

Submission and review process: Authors submitting manuscripts are required to register using a link provided on the publication website.11 All submissions will be considered for publication and are subject to the double-blind peer review process. Inquiries about particular manuscripts may be sent via email to the editor. See the publication website for details.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) style manual, most recent edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Education Libraries presents an interesting opportunity for LIS writers from different types of libraries to discuss and share information that is related to education. This journal is well established, which means writers can be assured that they are submitting their work to a credible source and contributing to the scholarly conversation.

The journal is indexed in Education Libraries is indexed in ERIC, EBSCOhost’s Education Collection, and Library Literature.15

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the SLA’s website there are more than 9,000 association members based in more than 75 countries.16 Information about exactly how many are a part of the Education Division is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Just as members of the Special Libraries Association are located around the world, the readers of Education Libraries are also international.17 Because this is an international publication, differences in language and cultural practice should be considered.

Reader characteristics: It is safe to assume the readers of this publication are interested in academic libraries and their role in education. Due to the professional focus of this publication the readership is largely comprised of individuals already working in academic libraries with considerable experience in the field. The readers of this publication are likely to value education and research. They are likely to be interested in learning about new technologies as well as in innovative teaching methods. Recent articles demonstrate a general acceptance of new technologies and changes in librarianship.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is likely that, as library employees, a  majority of readers are very familiar with LIS subject matter. Additionally, we can assume that the readers are familiar with new information technologies issues as well as issues surrounding the growth of digital content in library collections.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of the Education Libraries audience is its interest in education and technology related to instruction and learning. Authors must keep in mind the fact that this journal is scholarly, and the widest audience is those who work in higher education libraries, therefore well researched studies are particularly important. Potential contributors writing book or technology reviews as well as opinion pieces may want to relate their subject back to its value to learning in order to appeal to the audience.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  3.  “Journal Sponsorship,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/journalSponsorship
  4.  “Peer Review Process,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  5. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  7. “Section Policies,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  8.  “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  9. “Publication Frequency,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#publicationFrequency
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Online Submissions,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  14. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  17. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  18. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  19.  “Author Guidelines, Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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Perspectives on History

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Perspectives on History

ISSN: 1940-80481

Website: http://www.historians.org/perspectives/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Perspectives on History is the newsmagazine of the American Historical Association (AHA); it serves as the, “…principal source for news and information about the discipline of history.”2

Publication Tagline: “Perspectives cultivates the community of historians and promotes our work.” 3

“We strive to be a place for historians across the discipline’s broad spectrum to share their ideas and enthusiasm.” 4

Target audience: Members of the AHA; College and university professors, and K–12 teachers of history; historical administrators; editors; museum professionals; publishers; librarians; and students of history. 5

Publisher: American Historical Association.6

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian. While some members of the AHA might also be information professionals (and many other members will have a strong understanding of the library profession), most members will not be intimately familiar with the LIS profession.

Medium: Print. Online content is also published under Perspectives Daily.

Content: “We offer articles and commentary on research and archives, teaching, digital projects, new books of note, history in the media, public history and museum exhibitions, and more.” 7

Frequency of publication: “Our print edition is published monthly and online during the academic year, with online-only articles in Perspectives Daily updated regularly all year round. A print subscription is available only with AHA membership.” 8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.historians.org/perspectives/submit

Types of contributions accepted: “We do consider full manuscripts, but we prefer to receive pitches to give us a better understanding of the topic and your viewpoint as an author. Potential writers should familiarize themselves with the sort of articles we publish and the sections in which they fit. If a story is immediately relevant to discussions about current events, please flag it as a possible contribution to Perspectives Daily if you envision it being published quickly.” 9

Perspectives on History and Perspectives Daily welcome articles by historians from all kinds of institutions (including but not limited to colleges and universities, K–12 schools, museums, and archives), at all degree levels, and of all professional ranks. They also accept Letters to the editor, In Memoriam essays, and ‘Everything Has a History’ essays. 10

Submission and review process: “Articles for Perspectives on History should normally be about 1,500 words in length. Perspectives Daily articles are about 800–1,000 words, letters to the editor should be no more than 500 words, In Memoriam essays about 650 words, and Everything Has a History essays about 500 words. 11

“While Perspectives on History does commission articles, it also accepts both completed submissions and proposals. Articles and letters are reviewed by the editorial board, and, in the case of article submissions, the board may make suggestions for revisions.” 12

“To ensure that no errors are inadvertently introduced into the text in the copyediting process, the copyedited version of articles accepted for publication may be sent to authors for final approval (when major revisions are suggested). Since both Perspectives on History and Perspectives Daily run on a tight schedule, the editors typically will ask authors to respond within 24 to 48 hours.” 13

Editorial tone: The submission guidelines state a preference for a journalistic or conversational style. In general, the articles in Perspectives on History are written with a semi-formal tone. Additionally, authors are asked to limit the number of citations in their articles.14

Style guide used:    “We encourage authors of articles to supply a working title for the essay, although the final determination of headlines, captions, pull quotes, and other forms of “display type” are made by the editors. A brief autobiographical description (25-30 words) should be appended at the end of the article, indicating the author’s institutional affiliation (if any), recent major publications, interests, and so on. Spelling—especially of proper names used in drafts—and all factual information (dates, place names, statistical data, and so on) provided should be verified by the author(s) before submission.” 15

The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.). For copy-editing, the editors also use Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.) and the most recent edition of MerriamWebster’s Collegiate Dictionary. In general, the editors attempt to make an author’s prose as effective as possible, both in the author’s interest and that of our publications. The editors seek to remove redundancies and errors—if any—in grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Perspectives on History and Perspectives Daily support the use of gender-neutral language in their articles, except when a change in pronoun would lead to a historical inaccuracy.” 16

Letters to the editor should be guided by the AHA’s Statement on Standards of Professional Conduct. 17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The organization and preservation of information are central to the tasks of both the historian and the LIS professional, and so it is not uncommon for their interests to intersect. Many developments in the Information field would be of interest to historians, especially if those developments were presented specifically for that audience. Such a presentation could generate a significant amount of name recognition if received favorably.

While Perspectives on History is not, strictly speaking, a scholarly publication, it does possess enough prestige that an article printed in it would add weight to a tenure or promotion cause. However, this is not a venue for early-career publishing.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Population circulation: Nearly 15,000.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AHA members are generally based in the United States, and the magazine is published in English.19 AHA members will be familiar with many of the same research terminologies that librarians use, but they will be completely unfamiliar with much of the jargon of information science. Similarly, historians have their own jargon, and an author writing for a history publication would do well to familiarize themselves with it.

Reader characteristics: “… AHA brings together historians specializing in every period, geographic region, and topic of history. Through its scholarly and professional activities, the AHA represents the broad diversity of the historical enterprise today. More than 60 percent of the Association’s members are professors of history, with the remaining 40 percent consisting of students, teachers, administrators, and publishers in the field.” 20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As historians, the members of the AHA will generally have a strong understanding of research and research tools. However, they will not be familiar with aspects of LIS subjects outside those that apply to their discipline.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The historians who comprise the membership of the AHA are, like most faculty, very busy people. It is essential, when writing for them, to show them — in their own terms — how you can save time or make their research easier. Perspectives on History is primarily a newsletter, even though it does publish some research-based articles. A librarian writing for this publication would do well to simplify the presentation of their research, and focus primarily on the practical application of their results.

Last updated: October 19, 2020


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Perspectives on History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522198707097/40994
  2. “About.”, Historians.org, accessed September 13, 2018, https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/about-page
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions.”, Historians.org, accessed September 13, 2018, https://www.historians.org/perspectives/submit
  5. “Advertising in Perspectives.”, Historians.org, accessed October 16, 2020, http://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/advertising
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “About Us.”
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Guidelines for Articles.”, Historians.org, accessed October 17, 2020, https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/about-page/submissions/guidelines-for-articles
  13. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  14. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  15. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  16. “Guidelines for Articles.”
  17. “Submissions.”
  18. “Advertising in Perspectives.”
  19. “Advertising in Perspectives.”
  20. “Advertising in Perspectives.”
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