Wiki Tags Archives: Music

Razorcake

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Razorcake

Website: http://www.razorcake.org/site/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Razorcake provides consistent coverage of do-it-yourself punk culture that you won’t find anywhere else. We believe in positive, progressive, community-friendly DIY punk. We do our part.”1 Razorcake‘s philosophy is as simple as it is rare: cover, support, foster, and celebrate a vibrant independent artistic community that lives well below corporate media’€™s radar. Coverage includes some of the most in-depth interviews of the underground and features a staff of over 180 writers, photographers, graphic designers, and comic book artists.2

Target audience: Anyone interested in DIY punk culture. 3

Publisher: Razorcake/Gorksy Press, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian webzine and fanzine.5

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Music, book, and zine reviews; guest opinions; web comics; and international “€œscene”€ reports, written by over 180 regular writers, graphic artists, and photographers.6

Frequency of publication: The zine is published bimonthly7, and the website updated regularly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://archive.razorcake.org/faqs#5

Types of contributions accepted: According to the FAQs, most of publication is written by staff. As stated in their FAQs, “A good way to start out is to send us a live review of a show you went to or reviews of recently released music you purchased and have written about. We appreciate attention to detail. If you can follow the format of reviews on our site, pick bands that make sense being on this site, and write an engaging review, we pay much more attention to that than a resume. Send your finished review to our zine editor for consideration.”8

Submission and review process: Submissions by email, see FAQ and Contact. Submissions approved by editorial staff. Writers are not paid for articles, but they do retain full copyright of their work.9

Editorial tone: Casual but varies considerably. While some utilize brazen humor, as well as profanity, all articles are engaging, thought provoking, and executed with a strong grasp of grammar and consistent, effective voice.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Razorcake is a fine example of a nontraditional and groundbreaking opportunity that is commonly overlooked by the professional community. Razorcake‘s main focus is music, but there is potential for interviews, commentary, and intellectual freedom articles to name but a few. The creative, informative, and social benefits for information professionals is limited only by imagination and creativity.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Our print run is 6,000 copies. […] Almost every single one of those 6,000 copies go directly into stores or directly into homes.”10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based in Los Angeles, California11 and distributed to over twenty countries.12 This publication has a strong multinational appeal, as it provides music coverage for bands worldwide. In addition, the scope and variance of political and social perspective provides accessibility to numerous cultures and communities desiring alternative approach.

Reader characteristics: Reader demographics are not available, but as this is a punk zine, most readers will be interested in progressive politics, activism, and counter culture.

Readers are generally not going to tolerate racist, homophobic, or sexist attitudes, yet a vibrant lack of political correctness is prevalent in both readers and content. Based on evaluation of contributors, political leanings of the reader base spans from apolitical to the most extreme of philosophies. A healthy dose of humor, positivism, self-reliance, individuality and “€œDIY”€ (do it yourself) spirit permeates both versions of the publication. Noteworthy is the fact that this publication, more than many in underground culture, owns readers highly interested in the correlation between information access, privacy, laws such as the Patriot Act, and a specific form of entertainment, rather than general ethical or legal discussions of such topics.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The reader base, versed in music, writing, politics by default, demonstrates LIS proclivities and knowledge. A randomly reviewed interview revealed discussion of technological obsolescence, archival, copyright concerns, and the reduction of creative ephemera and networking due to internet proliferation. While such discourse promotes at least an implicit understanding of core information issues, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication presents both opportunities, and some challenges, for those from the LIS community wishing to contribute. Writers with a lack of music knowledge, including music culture, history, and social dynamic are going to have difficulty presenting anything in a relevant, engaging manner. This readership suggests intelligence, and their continual deviation from mainstream society’s perception requires contributors from what some deem a rather dull profession to stretch their creativity in presentation. This readership, interested in history and ephemera, nostalgia and the technological capacity for music enjoyment, affords contributors the capacity to educate, inform, and demonstrate the LIS world in a package of immense creative potential. Feminist issues regarding topics such as female artistic expression or emerging technology skills, incorporated into information science themes, increase the potential for LIS writers to express themselves in meaningful ways that potentially fine-tune their chosen area of expertise. In addition, authors wishing to prepare for peer-reviewed writing on issues of the aforementioned information privacy and library law will find a demanding yet non-academic opportunity for publication.

Last updated: October 28, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “Mission Statement,” Razorcake.org, accessed October 28, 2016, http://razorcake.org/mission-statement/
  2. Mission Statement.”
  3.  “Mission Statement.”
  4. Mission Statement.”
  5. Mission Statement.”
  6. “Razorcake,” Razorcake.org, accessed October 28, 2016, http://razorcake.org/category/home/
  7. “Razorcake Subscription,” Razorcake.org, accessed October 28, 2016, http://razorcake.org/subscribe-to-the-zine/
  8. “”FAQ,” Razorcake.org, accessed October 28, 2016, http://archive.razorcake.org/faqs#5
  9. FAQ.”
  10. “Advertising,” Razorcake.org, accessed October 28, 2016, http://www.razorcake.org/advertising
  11. Razorcake.”
  12. Mission Statement.”
  13. “Columns,” Razorcake.org, accessed October 28, 2016, http://razorcake.org/category/read/column/
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Boing Boing

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Boing Boing

Website: http://boingboing.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “A Website devoted to technology and culture. We publish feature articles, links to things we find interesting online, podcasts, videos and comics created by the Boing Boing editorial team and other invited contributors. We also provide a discussion forum so you can participate in the conversation; and sell merchandise in the Boing Boing Shop.”1 Boing Boing allows users to submit interesting, cool, newsworthy links to articles, videos, and any minutia you find interesting.

Target audience: If you’€™re interested in anything outside the mainstream, this would be the place to look. The website is hailed as a bastion of free speech and imagine sharing; it was founded by an editor of Make Magazine, which is dedicated to all things DIY, and the four primary editors have all written for Wired Magazine.2

Publisher: Happy Mutants, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication / online forum.5

Medium: Online

Content: A blog that shares member-reader links of all sorts -€“ informational, fun, noteworthy.

Frequency of publication: Blog updated with at least several new posts per day.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://boingboing.net/sub/

Types of contributions accepted: Any kinds. (Of note to LIS writers: a team from the American Library Association ran a Boing Boing member interest group called Library Boing Boing from 2012 to 2014. See Library Boing Boing, and their first Boing Boing post; the full collection is tagged LIBRARYLAB. To learn more, see the LibraryLab community on the ALA Connect website.)

Submission and review process:

“Find something interesting, write an informative blurb about it, and send it along.”6 Submit links via the form, never by email, and provide an explanation of what the link is and why it would interest readers. Be clear and concise in your description; don’t obscure it with humor or irrelevant information, and don’t submit content without a link.7

Editorial tone: As informal, but informative, as possible. Headlines and pictures are purposely titillating or attention grabbing. Example: under the “€œScience”€ category is the headline: “€œAnne of Green Gables Had Herpes (and you probably do, too),”€ an article about herpes. Or “€œThe Librarian and the Hot Rod Shop€,” a post about a mobile initiative that provides library resources to people who are unaware of the library, or can’€™t make it to the local branch.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have any little library related tidbit to share, this is a great website on which to post it. These are non-reviewed blog posts, so it’€™s not a site that will help towards your tenured work or that you should cite in a scholarly article, but it’€™s a great source for getting and sending information to a curious, intelligent, and supportive audience. It would be a great first start for book reviews, for example, or just to write about or re-post some interesting library-related news.

Creative Commons License: non-commercial sharing, with attribution. Just make sure you say where your link/review/article originated.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: In an article in Fast Company, according to Quantcast data, it gets about 2.5 million unique visitors a month. The article also states that, in 2004-2005, it “had become one of the most-read and linked-to blogs in the world.”9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Quantcast data, Boing Boing reaches an international audience, though 63% of its readers are in the United States.10 English is the primary language, but as the site also links to websites, videos, etc., as long as you explain the reason for submitting your article/website/repost, the language of the thing itself isn’€™t too strict. Culture is progressive and friendly, hacker-ish and non-mainstream.

Reader characteristics: Quantcast data reports that the majority of readers are white, male, and highly educated.11 Hackers, DIY-ers, those who like to stay current on news/gadgets/things, and anyone with an eye on web culture and interesting news of all kinds will gravitate towards the blog. The blog’€™s bias lies on the side of being, for the most part, uncensored and relishing in re-posting links that test freedom of speech and censorship in the online community. They are very much an “€˜anything goes”€™ site, as long as “€œanything”€ is interesting to readers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: More civilian than professional; LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum, use layman’s terms and just get your point across in the least scholarly tone possible. The readership comprises a savvy group of people, but they are not all LIS aficionados, so use regular, everyday terms when describing your link and why you find it interesting.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Boing Boing would be a great place to post information relevant to the library community: its readers, while very much an online-loving group, seem to enjoy hearing about LIS-related news, particularly if it has to do with free speech, public access, or challenges to the LIS community. They are well-read, spoken, and intelligent, and, with the inclusion of the LIS-specific posting group, would appreciate links coming from the Library world. Although not scholarly in tone, the links posted can be of scholarly caliber, and the blog has garnered attention and awards, and holds a certain status in the blogosphere; posts here are likely to be reposted elsewhere and shared.

Last updated: September 10, 2016


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “Boing Boing Terms of Service,” BoingBoing.net, accessed September 10, 2016, http://boingboing.net/tos
  2. “Boing Boing,” Wikipedia, accessed October 24, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boing_Boing
  3. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  4. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  5. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  6. “How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing,” Peter Shankman blog, August 15, 2007, http://shankman.com/how-to-get-something-posted-to-boing-boing/
  7. How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing
  8. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  9. “10 Tips from Boing Boing on Making Online Content Sing,” FastCompany.com, accessed September 10, 2016, http://www.fastcompany.com/3005636/10-tips-boing-boing-making-online-content-sing
  10. “boingboing.net,” Quantcast.com, accessed September 10, 2016, https://www.quantcast.com/boingboing.net
  11. boingboing.net
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Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association

Website: http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, Notes is the journal of the Music Library Association and since 1934 has offered “its readers interesting, informative, and well-written articles in the areas of music librarianship, music bibliography and discography, the music trade, and on certain aspects of music history.”1

Target audience: Primarily music librarians, but also musicologists, musicians, and music lovers.2

Publisher: Music Library Association, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly. Notes is a top-tier humanities scholarly journal. It is peer-reviewed, and contributors are almost exclusively academic music librarians and/or musicologists preeminent in their field. This is a publication primarily by and for scholars.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Issues typically contain an editorial section, general articles on music and music librarianship,7 and reviews of books, periodicals, and media materials.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors

Types of contributions accepted: According to the journal’s submission guidelines, “Notes welcomes submissions of interesting, informative, and well-written articles in the areas of music librarianship, music bibliography, the music trade, and discography, and on certain aspects of music history.”10 Unsolicited reviews are not accepted, but persons who wish to become reviewers for the publication “are invited to send a curriculum vitae and a statement delineating their special areas of interest and competence to the appropriate editors.”11

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted in electronic form as an email attachment. A brief author note should be included as the fist (unnumbered) note. The article should be followed by an abstract of not more than 250 words. Manuscripts are first read by the editor for “general suitability,” and then are subjected to a double-blind peer review process. Once a submission is accepted, the author is informed of the conditions governing that acceptance.12

Editorial tone: Not specified.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As the quarterly journal of the Music Library Association, Notes clearly belongs to the library and information science literature. Music librarianship, however, is still largely the domain of librarians who are also scholars in the field of musicology–they have advanced degrees, teach, and publish in both disciplines. As such, publishing in Notes is only an option for LIS authors with a great deal of expertise in both librarianship and some area of musicology, such as music history, music theory, or the music trade. Being published in Notes would be a huge boost to the career of any LIS author who could manage it, and it would be sure to impress almost any tenure committee.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to Editor Jim Cassaro, 2,200 copies of each issue of Notes are printed; 2,000 of these are sent to Music Library Association members (individual and institutional) and individual subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Notes is the quarterly journal of the Music Library Association.15 According to a profile of that organization’s membership that was published in Notes, as of 2000 93% of MLA’s members work in the United States, so the bulk of this publication’s readers are American.16 That said, according to Cassaro the publication is “global in nature, and certainly in its readership.”17 The journal is published in English, but foreign languages (especially the musical languages: French, German, Italian, and Latin) are often included in quotes, citations, reviews of foreign-language materials, etc.18

Reader characteristics: According to the profile of MLA’s membership cited above, the average age of MLA members is just over 49 years old with a standard deviation of 12.5 years (meaning 2/3 of MLA members are between the ages of 37 and 61). Of the 213 members responding to the survey, 54% were female, and 44% male (the remaining 2% chose not to respond to this question). A demographic study of the readers of Notes would likely yield similar results. “Most MLA members have undergraduate education in music, but with a fairly wide spread of actual majors. However, those MLA members who pursue graduate work (in addition to the MLS) have a much narrower focus, and tend to specialize in musicology. 206 MLA members (97%) had at least one graduate degree. 134 (63%) had either the MA or MM, and 43 (20%) had a doctorate in music.”19 From this we can extrapolate that most readers of Notes share a professional interest in music and/or musicology.

According to the same profile, MLA members work:

  • In academic/conservatory libraries (58%)
  • In public libraries (13%)
  • In other types of libraries (archives, etc.) (12%)
  • As educators (7%)
  • In publishing (3%)
  • Retired (13%)

(Note: 18% of respondents indicated multiple categories)20

The readership of Notes likely includes many scholars and students in music, musicology, and related fields from outside the LIS professions, too.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Of the MLA members who responded to the surveys used in the profile cited above, “147 (69%) had an accredited MLS, and 7 (3%) had a doctorate in library science.”21 The majority of the readers of this publication can therefore be said to be familiar with LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Notes readers are a very educated group of people who typically have advanced degrees in both library science and musicology. It’s reasonable to assume that they expect a comparable expertise from the publication’s authors, so Notes is probably a venue that should be left for authors with that kind of background. Writers who do publish in Notes can assume that their readers are familiar with the terminology of both the music/musicology and LIS fields. According to Editor Jim Cassaro, the publication is including more articles on music librarianship itself than ever before, so that’s a good body of subjects for prospective authors to draw on.22 Scholarly language is appropriate for this publication.

Last updated: October 31, 2014


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  2. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  5. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  7. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  8. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Where to Send Materials for Review. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notesmaterials
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  10. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  11. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  12. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  13. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  14. Cassaro, J. (2008) Personal communication. Received September, 2008
  15. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  16. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  17. Cassaro, Jim. (2008) Personal communication. Received September, 2008
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  19. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  20. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  21. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  22. Cassaro, J. (2008) Personal communication. Received September, 2008
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Pittsburgh City Paper

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pittsburgh City Paper

Website: http://www.pghcitypaper.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This publication provides weekly information on current local news about entertainment, events, politics, sports, and other local interests. Most readers look to this as a guide for weekly events.1

Target audience: Pittsburgh residents.

Publisher: Steel City Media.2

Peer reviewed? No.3

Type: Civilian, alternative newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Information on local music, art, entertainment, sports, news, and politics.4

Frequency of publication: Weekly.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/FreelanceInternGuide/Page

Types of contributions accepted: The guidelines state: “We use freelance talent every week, and we value the contributions made by our freelancers. But we don’t just take freelancers from off the street; that’s how we hire editors. When a prospective freelancer wants to write for us, we have two questions: Is this person able to bring us stories we can’t get on our own? and Is this person capable of actually writing the story? To answer the first question, you need to bring us some story pitches. These should be stories you think we’ll want — and stories we don’t already have.”6

“How can you tell what sort of material qualifies? The easiest way is to look at the paper. See what we already publish … and what we don’t. Tailor your ideas accordingly. Here are a few hints to get you started. What we are interested in: Stories about local artists. Stories about local news and politics. Stories about Pittsburgh, in all its love and squalor. What we’re not interested in: Political screeds about how great President Obama is. Political screeds about how awful President Obama is. First-person essays. Your problems.”7

“As to that second question — can this person write the story themselves? — we’re looking for skilled writers and thorough reporters who know the territory. The best proof of these qualities is clips of previously published work. Articles for your college newspaper, freelance stuff you did for community papers, Pulitzer Prize-winning multi-part series from The New York Times … we’ll look at almost anything.”8

Submission and review process: Submission method depends on the type of article. The guidelines provide the editors responsible for each type and their preferred contact method. Review and acceptance of submissions responsibility of editors.9

Editorial tone: Informal and clever.

Style guide used: Not specified in guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication provides a fair opportunity for LIS authors residing in Pittsburgh or familiar with the area. Submitting a review of new music or book release or an article on the new services at a local library (gaming, ebooks) that would interest the younger audience of the newspaper. Authors from the Pittsburgh area, with personal knowledge of the area and population, would find it easier to write for this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 58,000.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Metro Pittsburgh area.

Reader characteristics: Readers are described as “younger and more affluent,” though the age breakdown in the media kit indicates that readership spans a range of age groups, with 25% between 25 and 34 and 20% over 65.11

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While some readers will certainly be librarians, library administration and staff, and library students who live in the Pittsburgh area, this publication does not specialize in LIS subject matter, nor are any readers expected to have knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers might be interested in technology, local events (possibly library events), interesting stories and news about their local libraries.

Last updated: October 23, 2016


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “Pittsburgh City Paper,” PGHCityPaper.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/
  2. “Pittsburgh City Paper,”Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 23, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1415656305764/623286
  3. “Freelance/Intern Guide,” PGHCityPater.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/FreelanceInternGuide/Page
  4. Pittsburgh City Paper.”
  5. “Subscriptions,” PGHCityPaper.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/Subscriptions/Page
  6. Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  7. Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  8. Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  9. Freelance/Intern Guide.”
  10. “Pittsburgh City Paper Media Kit,” PGHCityPaper.com, accessed October 23, 2016, http://www.pghcitypaper.com/general/pdfs/CP-Web-Media-Kit-07-01-16.pdf
  11. Pittsburgh City Paper Media Kit.”
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