Wiki Tags Archives: Digitization

First Monday

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: First Monday

ISSN: 1396-0466 (Online) and 1396-0458 (CD-ROM)1

Website: http://www.firstmonday.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to research about the Internet.”2 First Monday believes the impact of digitization on society is universal and ubiquitous, and seeks articles about how digitization is changing our understanding of society.3

Target audience: First Monday’s target audience includes intelligent, independent-thinking people located in more than 180 countries. Because readers’ cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly, readership is diverse. The journal is not geared toward those in academia, and many readers do not speak English as a first language.4

Publisher: First Monday Editorial Group at the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library5 First Monday was originally designed in Copenhagen and published by Munksgard, a Danish publisher.6

Peer reviewed? Yes7

Type: Computers and Internet, scholarly8 (First Monday is published in conjunction with the university library at the University of Illinois-Chicago, which indicates that the LIS community has a vested interest in the publication and represents a large proportion of its readership. Due to its diverse readership, we have categorized First Monday as both a “scholarly” and a “civilian” publication.)9

Medium: Online10

Content: First Monday publishes original interdisciplinary research papers about the Internet and related technologies. Articles emphasize subjects that are particularly interesting or groundbreaking. This publication’s strength lies in its diversity of content centered around the influence of the Internet and related technologies.11

Frequency of publication: Monthly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: First Monday publishes articles on interesting and novel ideas related to the history, present, and future of the Internet.13 Published topics of interest to LIS authors include: knowledge management, trends and standards, information-seeking behavior, emerging electronic classification frameworks, digital copyright, social networks, education, information society, the internet’s technological and commercial development, technical issues, and the political and social implications of the Internet. Research surveys, studies, exploratory and critical theory articles tied to the internet and related technologies would be welcome here.14 The publication also provides detailed Guidelines for Authors. These guidelines include writing tips; citation, reference, and abstract guidelines; submission format; formatting templates; and a final checklist for use in preparing manuscript submissions.15

Submission and review process: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions. Papers are subject to a double-blind peer review for originality and timeliness in the context of related research.16

Editorial tone: Articles published in First Monday are as diverse as its readership. All articles are written in an academic tone, though style varies in complexity. Many are written in an easy-to-read style, while others employ more sophisticated language. In either case, writers maintain the active voice and employ short sentences and paragraphs.17

Style guide used: First Monday provides its own style guide.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

First Monday publishes interdisciplinary research articles on all aspects of the internet, from highly-specialized technical issues to the internet’s social and political impact. Given the increasing digitization of information, this journal holds tremendous promise for LIS authors.

Because this audience is not academic, writing standards are not rigid, and an international distribution creates the potential to reach many readers. This publication’s diverse readership allows for writing from a variety of disciplines–LIS authors with backgrounds in engineering, literature, or history would be equally at home here. First Monday would be an excellent place to publish a thesis, or research on emerging Web technologies or trends. Additionally, the fact that the journal is peer reviewed makes it an attractive choice for those who wish to add a published article to their curriculum vitae.

Started in 1996, the journal has published 1,381 papers in 218 issues written by 1,888 authors. The journal is also abstracted in Communication Abstracts, Computer & Communication Security Abstracts, DoIS, eGranary Digital Library, INSPEC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, LISA, PAIS.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 314,559 per month.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are located in over 180 countries, concentrated in western Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim. First Monday is published by the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, where its server is also located.21 Due to the publication’s international scope, many readers’ first language is not English. Additionally, many readers are not academics. Authors should avoid using specific cultural references or idioms unless these are explained. Simple explanations, active voice, and less complex sentences will help this diverse audience better understand your message.22

Reader characteristics: Because First Monday‘s focus is international and its scope is interdisciplinary, the cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly among First Monday readers. Cultural, educational, and professional interests vary greatly among readers, and this publication’s interdisciplinary scope is larger than library information science alone. That said, the publication’ s focus is salient to the discipline. This, combined with the fact that it is published by a university library, makes it reasonable to presume that many readers are LIS professionals with shared professional interests and workplaces. The articles published in First Monday represent a wide variety of standpoints and approaches. The articles do not show overt bias or attitude toward any particular view, which seems indicative of the audience’s diversity.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many articles published in First Monday are not directly related to LIS, so it is reasonable to presume that many readers are involved in other aspects of Internet technology. In view of this, authors should cautiously employ LIS jargon and explain any specialized terms they use.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

First Monday prides itself on its interdisciplinary scope, and publishes a wide variety of articles from multiple perspectives. Demographic information about readers’ professional affiliations could not be obtained, and nothing in this publication’s submission guidelines indicates a preference toward LIS authors or topics. However, First Monday‘s publisher indicates that librarians have a vested interest in this publication and may represent a large proportion of its readers. First Monday’Audience Profile stresses that many readers are not academics, but one might conclude that many are librarians.25

Library science is an interdisciplinary field, and LIS students and professionals possess specialized knowledge of digital information collection, organization, and dissemination. This uniquely positions them as potential authors for First Monday. When writing for this publication, explain any professional terminology that would be unfamiliar to those outside the LIS field. For example, a study of library cataloging standards and information-seeking behavior on the web should explain terms like MARC21 or RDA. To be well-suited for First Monday, such an article might focus on digitization’s broad affects on LIS cataloging and how these are shaping practices.

While First Monday’s readership is not primarily academic, the content of articles is often sophisticated and complex. This may be why the editors stress simplicity and brevity in style; readers from different backgrounds will better understand a complex message through simple explanations and short sentences.

Last updated: October 17, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-181985152
  2. First Monday, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 25, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  3. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  4. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  5. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  6. “Editorial Policies,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  8. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  9. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  10. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  11. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  13. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Archives,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/archive
  15. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  19. First Monday,  University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  20. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  21. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  22. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  23. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  24. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  25. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
Continue Reading

Code4Lib Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ)

ISSN: 1940-57581

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, “the Code4Lib Journal exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.”2 It “aims to help engender collective understanding and the necessary support for improving library technology and digital services.”3Website: http://journal.code4lib.org/

Target audience: The target audience includes anyone who is involved in the “wider library community” who has an interest in libraries and technology.4

PublisherCode4Lib. Publication began in 2007.5

Peer reviewed? Submissions to the journal are reviewed by a non-anonymous editorial committee of professional peers. The journal does not use a refereed process.6

Type: Although the editorial committee consists mainly of those involved in the academic library community, contents do not necessarily have the format of a traditional scholarly research article, and the journal does not use a traditional blind refereed review. Articles can vary in formality, and can include case studies and personal opinion pieces. Articles do not generally include extensive literature reviews. For these reasons, the journal is currently classed here as ‘professional news’. Articles tend to be focused on the practical application of the ideas presented.7

Medium: Code4Lib Journal is available online.8

Content: From the Call for Submissions, “the editorial committee is looking for content that is practical, demonstrates how to exploit technology to create digital library collections and services, or offers insight and forethought regarding the use of computers in any type of library setting.”9

The journal publishes articles on a multitude of subjects, as long as they support the mission statement, and is flexible with length (1,500 to 5,000 words is an approximate word count). The types of articles published in the journal include:

  • Case studies of projects (failed or successful), how they were done, and challenges faced.
  • Descriptions of projects in progress, project updates, and new project proposals.
  • Effective processes for project management.
  • Reviews/comparisons of software, frameworks, libraries, etc.
  • Analyses and case studies of using library metadata in technological application: novel applications or solutions, or unsolved challenges,
  • Thought pieces on the big problems associated with library and technology, ideas for new solutions, visions for the future.
  • Findings on user behavior and interaction with systems.
  • Best practices.10

Frequency of publication: It is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The types of articles the journal is looking for include:

  • Book & software reviews
  • Code snippets & algorithms
  • Conference reports
  • Opinion pieces12

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent in the form of either an abstract or a complete draft. Submit articles using the online form, or via email to journal@code4lib.org. Once submitted the article goes through an editorial process, and not a peer review.13

Editorial tone: “Writers should aim for the middle ground between, on the one hand, blog or mailing-list posts, and, on the other hand, articles in traditional journals.”14

Style guide used: From the article guidelines: “While articles in C4LJ should be of a high quality, they need not follow any formal structure or guidelines.”15 However, end notes and references should be cited using the Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a semiformal setting in which to discuss issues of technology in the library and information science world. It is a newer journal, which may make it less competitive than more established journals. The information in the journal is concentrated around technology, and its place within the library setting, so it would be a good place for anyone with an interest in this subject to find a home for one of their articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Since the journal is 100% online, there was no information on the exact circulation available.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editorial committee is based throughout the United States, but the writers come from both within and outside the United States.18 The journal is written in English, and although the editorial committee is American, not all of the contributors are. (Article guidelines note that articles should be written in good English, and that “American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these.”)19  Also, due to the online nature of the journal, people from anywhere in the world would have the ability to access the articles. Because of this, it would most likely be prudent to avoid the use of any language or content that was too culturally specific.

Reader characteristics: Code4Lib is a “volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff’.” From looking through the author information supplies with the articles, it appears that almost all of the contributors work in academic libraries, although their actual job titles vary quite a bit. These job titles range from web designer to information technology coordinator to systems librarian. While this information is about the writers, it goes to show that the journal is of interest to all different types of professionals involved technologies in libraries. Of course, they also all have a professional interest in the intersection of libraries and technology. Code4Lib is of interest to “technology folks in libraries, archives and museums to informally share approaches, techniques, and code across institutional and project divides.”20 The readers of this journal are likely to have established opinions about the place of technology in libraries. A look at the mission statement shows that the readers are likely to feel that technology holds a key position in the future of libraries.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of Code4Lib Journal would have a good knowledge and understanding of LIS topics and issues. They would also be familiar with library jargon. On top of that, due to the technical nature of the journal, they would also be familiar with most technical jargon.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The common thread running among these readers is an interest in, and a passion for, technology and its use within a library setting. Their level of technical knowledge would be rather high, and this would be an important thing for writers to keep in mind. In fact, it would also be a necessity for the writers of a proposed article for Code4Lib Journal to be technological experts. An important element of the journal is the inclusion of the actual coding used in the project being discussed, hence the name of the journal. That being said, the readers would most likely not only have an understanding of technology, but also experience with its application and creation.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Code4Lib Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521729571530/658750
  2. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  3. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  4. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  5. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  6. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Process and Structure. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/process-and-structure
  7. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Issue 25, 2014-07-21. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/issues/issues/issue25
  8. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  9. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  10. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  11. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  12. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  13. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  14. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  15. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  16. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  17. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  18. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Editorial Committee. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/editorial-committee
  19. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  20. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
  21. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  22. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
Continue Reading

Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals

ISSN: 1361-32001

Purpose, objective, or mission: Ariadne is based in the U.K. and aims to “keep the busy practitioner abreast of current digital library initiatives as well as technological developments further afield.”2Website: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Target audience: Information professionals working primarily in higher education; but also in libraries, archives, or museums (both in the U.K. and internationally).3

PublisherUKOLN, a research organization based at the University of Bath, which “advises on digital infrastructure, information policy and data management…and provide[s] resources and services to the higher and further education sectors including Web journals and other publications, Web services and tools, innovation support, research and development and events management.”4

Peer reviewed? No. The editor makes all decisions regarding manuscript submissions.5

Type: LIS professional news. Although Ariadne does publish some research-oriented content, it is not peer reviewed and it cannot be considered “scholarly.” ISSN is 1361-3200.6

Medium: Entirely online. Ariadne is free and open access, so the full text of all issues (current and archived) is available on the website. Content is also available as an RSS feed.7

Content: Ariadne publishes a “variety of articles in each issue, some technical, some of a more strategic nature.”8 A standard issue contains an editorial, a number of articles, an “at the event” section, and a “news and reviews” section. Prominent topics include emerging technologies and trends, digital libraries and collections, information architecture, search engines, metadata, and Web 2.0.9

Frequency of publication: Not defined. The magazine was published quarterly up through 2010; as of 2013 there are two issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines can be found on the Contact page and the About page. The publication’s website indicates that the editor will send information about the submission and editorial process once an article proposal has been accepted.11

Types of contributions accepted: Ariadne accepts a variety of contributions, including articles (i.e., scholarly papers, position pieces, and case studies), reviews, and reports on events, workshops, meetings, and conferences. The magazine also accepts proposals regarding organizations and work-related projects. There are no stated requirements for length.12

Submission and review process: Ariadne requires an initial proposal for all articles. Authors should submit an abstract, outline, or general description to the editor prior to submission of the completed manuscript. After an agreement is reached, a date for submission is set and the editor then sends out an explanation of the editorial process. No peer-review process is used.13

Proposals can be submitted via the online form or through an email to the editor: ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk.14

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for editorial tone. Main articles tend to have a more formal, scholarly tone, while reviews and other articles appear to be relatively informal (i.e., first person is acceptable).15

Style guide used: Ariadne does not use a formal style guide.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Ariadne has remained on the forefront of the open access movement and continues to focus its content on current and emerging LIS trends and technologies. Thus, although it is not peer reviewed, it is a credible and highly accessible source with great publishing potential for LIS practitioners, educators, and students. Contributors might consider writing about LIS conferences or workshops, workplace technologies, online learning, digital collections, social networking, Web 2.0./Library 2.0, or Web-based information seeking behavior.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Ariadne is an open access electronic publication that is available free to anyone with Internet access. As such, there is no formal subscription process and no readily available circulation data. Generally, though, freely accessible online resources do at least have the potential of a large audience base.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Ariadne‘s editor notes in the Submission guidelines that “despite having a global audience, and a U.S. readership twice that of our home readership, our core audience remains that which is based in the UK.” 17 Thus, although Ariadne maintains an international audience, the majority of readers are located in the U.S. and U.K., and content reflects this.

From the FAQ author profiles, authors are mostly European, with 414 from the U.K./Ireland, and 60 from the U.S. Pakistan, South Africa, and Armenia are also represented, among other countries.18

Ariadne is published solely in English, and based on geographic information, it can be assumed that the vast majority of readers are, in fact, native English speakers. However, authors should be aware of the somewhat substantial language and cultural differences that exist between the U.S. and the U.K. For example, submission guidelines indicate that “UK English” should be used rather than “US English.” Beyond spelling, colloquialisms and U.S. centered cultural references should be avoided, and authors should also consider the needs of a global audience. 19

Reader characteristics: Ariadne does not provide any detailed demographic information relating to the gender, age, or ethnicity of its readers. Because this is an international professional publication geared towards practicing information professionals, it is likely that the audience is relatively mature and experienced, but also demographically diverse. Specific workplace data for readers is not available, but the website clearly states that Ariadne is published to “inform policy-makers and practitioners in Higher Education libraries and associated sectors of developments in the online environment.”20 Although readers are therefore very likely to hold a wide variety of professional specializations, they are also very likely to share professional interests based on Ariadne‘s primary topics, which include digital libraries, technological developments, digital information management, and online learning. As a large portion of Ariadne readers work in libraries and archives, they are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship in an information society. It should be noted that Ariadne also features more opinion-based reader reviews, retrospectives, and reflections.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Ariadne readers are likely to be quite knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and jargon. As practicing information professionals, they would certainly be interested in library topics that are directly applicable to their careers. After reading through current and back issues of the publication, however, it is clear that readers might not necessarily be knowledgeable about LIS topics outside of digital initiatives and technological developments.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Ariadne is a professional publication with a very specific focus on practical articles that discuss sophisticated technological issues and developments in LIS. Overly general library articles, theoretical papers, or pieces that fail to directly address digital information systems or web technologies may not interest Ariadne readers. Submissions should be professional but not necessarily scholarly in tone, and they should focus on relating practical applications for LIS practitioners (see topic suggestions in the Publication Analysis above).

It is important for the author to note that although Ariadne is a British publication with a core following in the UK, the majority of readers actually reside in the U.S., and it is a global magazine. This allows for increased opportunities to effectively reach Ariadne readers.

Last Updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals, UKOLN, accessed March 22, 2018, http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/
  2. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  3. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  4. University of Bath. (2016). About UKOLN. UKLON. Retrieved from http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/
  5. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  6. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  8. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  9. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  10. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
  11. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  12. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  13. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  14. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  15. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
  16. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  17. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  18. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  19. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  20. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  21. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  22. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
Continue Reading

Collection Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Management

ISSN: 0146-2679 (Print) and 1545-2549 (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Collection Management states that the publication “offers library professionals of all types crucial guidance in the fast-changing field of collection management, including the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”2

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/aboutThisJournal?journalCode=wcol20

Target audience: Librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries.3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Collection management covers topics on collection management, planning, allocation of resources, selection, and acquisitions, development of virtual collections, consortia, resource sharing, preservation, and other relevant topics8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t792303985~tab=submit~mode=paper_submission_instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per the publication website, “The journal welcomes articles that provide library professionals with crucial guidance about the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”10

Submission and review process: Collection Management does not require initial queries or proposals; it accepts completed manuscripts. Using the ScholarOne Manuscript software, Taylor and Francis offers an extensive website, Authors Services, that provides guidance beyond the submission guidelines for this specific journal and is full of helpful information.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, suitable for practitioners and academics in the LIS field.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Management is an authoritative and credible LIS scholarly publication. This peer-reviewed journal publishes articles on collection development and related topics. With this in mind, potential authors may contribute articles on a broad variety of topics, from electronic resource acquisitions to recreational reading collections to book preservation. Authors need to be certain they submit work that contributes to the body of knowledge on collection management.

The journal is indexed in Cabells Education Technology and Library Science, CSA, CSA Technology Research Database, EBSCOhost Online Research Databases, H.W. Wilson Indexes, Informed Librarian, JournalSeek, Periodicals Index Online, SwetsWise All Titles.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the United States, but has an international audience.15 The issues covered are of interest to librarians whether they are in United States, Taiwan, or Germany, with topics including how to manage collection development in a digital environment, selection versus censorship, and the use of circulation statistics and interlibrary loan data in collection management.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range from associate university librarians to assistant professors to electronic resources librarians. Often the audience will have earned several degrees: BA, MLS or MLIS, MA, and perhaps PhD. Readers often have supervisory functions with purchasing responsibility, either selecting or authorizing resources for purchase. Readers of Collection Management will most likely have several publications of their own in their portfolio and therefore expect to see well-thought-out and well-researched articles.17

The readers of Collection Management have the same professional interests in common, building their library collections in support of the research and teaching agendas of their parent institutions. They meet the challenge of changing technology, providing the latest publications, and staying within limited library budgets. Collection Management has well-researched theoretical and practical articles that help librarians of any rank succeed in their work. It explores “the future and emerging trends in the field and provides reviews of relevant books, technological resources, and software. This useful resource examines technological advances that help librarians manage and assess collections, such as electronic resource management modules, utilities that provide journal coverage data, and developments in the preservation of library materials.”18

Collection Management is geared towards librarians and information professionals who are interested in articles that help them understand how collection assessment tools and methods can help improve their overall resource management and planning for the future, including how to effectively use staff, facilities, and computing resources.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Collection Management is a peer-reviewed publication that focuses on collection development in college, university, and research libraries of all types. The main readers are librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries. These readers have a strong background on LIS topics and issues. Not only will they understand library jargon, but they will expect to find it in articles written for this journal.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors for Collection Management would do best to consider the education level of the audience and the journal’s reputation for addressing the challenges of their profession. Successful submissions will target current issues in collection management.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/934649605
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  4. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  5. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  6. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  7. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcol20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  9. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GIGLFiND4
  15. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  16. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wcol20#.U9GEeLFiND4
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
Continue Reading

Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

ISSN: 2163-52261

Website: http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the official publication of LITA (the Library and Information Technology Association), ITAL is primarily concerned with keeping LITA members informed about the technologies that shape their workplaces and profession.2

Target audience: Members of LITA, primarily librarians and information professionals3

Publisher: Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: ITAL is an open-access, electronic-only publication.7 Full-text versions of all content published since 2004, as well as tables of contents and abstracts for earlier issues, are also available electronically.8

Content: ITAL “publishes material related to all aspects of information technology in all types of libraries. Topic areas include, but are not limited to, library automation, digital libraries, metadata, identity management, distributed systems and networks, computer security, intellectual property rights, technical standards, geographic information systems, desktop applications, information discovery tools, web-scale library services, cloud computing, digital preservation, data curation, virtualization, search-engine optimization, emerging technologies, social networking, open data, the semantic web, mobile services and applications, usability, universal access to technology, library consortia, vendor relations, and digital humanities.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

It is important to note, when perusing author information such as this, that specific types of submissions, such as book or software reviews, may require contact with someone other than the main editor. Failing to note such differences could result in a solid article or query being lost in the shuffle.

Location of submission guidelines: https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: ITAL accepts feature articles that contain original research or in-depth analysis of 3,000 to 5,000 words or longer. Communications of 1,000 to 3,000 words are also accepted, such as “brief research reports, technical findings, and application notes,”as well as tutorials and letters to the editor.11

Submission and review process: Individuals must submit original and unpublished manuscripts only. Manuscripts that are being considered elsewhere should not be submitted. Responsibility for the accuracy of the information falls upon the author of the manuscript. This includes references, URLs, and statistics.12

Articles are to be submitted online; registration and login are required.13

Editorial tone: Formal, with most articles including an abstract. Articles are evidence and research-based, written in language that is clear and direct.14

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style for notes and bibliography15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals or students focusing on the technical services side of libraries who can contribute to the community’€™s knowledge of emerging technologies should consider writing for this publication. Opportunity is also ripe for those with an understanding of technical services and public services who can explain complicated technical jargon and its importance to the uninitiated. A survey of recent articles includes usability of next-generation catalogs such as VuFind, the application of geographic information systems (GIS) in LIS research, widgets, interoperable catalog models, semantic web technologies, web design for patrons with disabilities, applying CIPA regulations and other issues. Tutorials included cloud computing and digitizing documents to make them accessible on the web. Articles and tutorials are pragmatic, so topics and information presented need to be relevant to professionals in their LIS workplace.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics not available, but as ITAL is an open-access, online publication a wide readership may be assumed.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LITA is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) and is therefore located in the United States,18 but subscribers come from all over the world. ITAL is published in English.19

Reader characteristics: ITAL is read by administrators, librarians, and information technologists interested in all aspects of information technology. These readers include library directors, systems managers and analysts, automation consultants, and both technical and public service librarians using technology to serve users.20

Readers are interested in subjects that include library automation, access to information through technology, digital libraries, electronic journals and electronic publishing, computer security, intellectual property rights, library consortia, technical standards, and software development. Articles display a strong emphasis on service orientation. Readers likely share this value.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This journal covers a broad spectrum of topics and issues relating to LIS subject matter, and most articles would be comprehensible to any librarian; specialized knowledge of technical services is usually not assumed.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because readers come from both technical and public services, papers should not be only technical in nature. Demonstrating how a technology can be leveraged to solve a human need, whether that is user experience or library operations, will be fundamental. In a survey of articles, many papers demonstrate the impact of technologies on libraries, the communities they serve, and on society. Authors also emphasize service orientation, a value readers likely share.

Last updated: May 7, 2017


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523477092994/48154
  2. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  3. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  4. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  5. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  6. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  7. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,  http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  8. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  9. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  10. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  11. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  17. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  18. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  19. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  20. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  21. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  22. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
Continue Reading

Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship

ai

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship

ISSN: 1941-126X (Print) and 1941-1278 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wacq20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the publication website, “The Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship aims to inform librarians and other information professionals about current research, evolving work-related processes and procedures, and the latest news on topics related to electronic resources and the digital environment’s impact on collecting, acquiring and making accessible library materials.”2

Target audience: “The Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship is intended for library administrators, librarians, and other information professionals who work with managing electronic resources in libraries. It is also intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice for LIS educators and students, and is a starting point for information professionals from various backgrounds concerned with issues surrounding the changes in collections, acquisitions and services in libraries in the digital age.”3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: According to the publication website, “This journal will highlight pivotal, interesting and thought-provoking articles and conference presentations to keep professionals and staff of all levels on top of the latest ideas and changes in the field. The journal will also have relevant book reviews to enable readers to target their professional readings.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So

Types of contributions accepted: “Current research, evolving work-related processes and procedures, and the latest news on topics related to electronic resources and the digital environment’s impact on collecting, acquiring and making accessible library materials.”10

Submission and review process: Authors are strongly encouraged to submit manuscripts electronically.  Please submit your manuscript in Microsoft Word format to the Editor-in-Chief, Gary Pitkin, gary.martin.pitkin@gmail.com.”11 All articles are subject to double-blind review.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Writers who have expertise in electronic resources will have the opportunity to develop their reputation and strengthen their resume with a publication in this highly topical, peer-reviewed journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although this is journal is based in the United States, its readership is not geographically limited to North America. The journal publishes in English.15

Reader characteristics: According to the publication website, readers are librarians and information professionals at all levels.16 Readers will likely have a strong interest in collection management, and specifically eletronic resources and the “digital environment’s impact on collecting, acquiring and making accessible library materials.”17

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about issues in the LIS community. As this is a scholarly journal, it is assumed that readers will be knowledgeable about electronic resources in the field of LIS.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal will be knowledgeable about LIS issues and interested in electronic resources and the latest news on the digital environment’s impact on library practices. As this journal  “deals with a single, broad, but well-defined and practical issue . . . of immediate concern to librarians and information professionals,”18 the potential for writers with expertise in this area to increase their impact on the LIS community is great.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-1339490187
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  4. Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  5.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  6.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  7.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  9.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So
  13.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wacq20&page=instructions#.VQ2qwvnF8So
  15.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
  16. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wacq20#.VQ2m2fnF8So
  18.  Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426957279183/459153
Continue Reading

Journal of Digital Information (JoDI)

*As of July 2014, Journal of Digital Information is not accepting submissions.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Digital Information (JoDI)

ISSN: 1368-75061

Website: http://journals.tdl.org/jodi

Purpose, objective, or mission: JoDI focuses on “Publishing papers on the management, presentation, and uses of information in digital environments.”2 JoDI “Covers digital libraries, hypertext and hypermedia systems, and digital repositories and the issues of digital information.”3

Target audience: Information professionals, researchers, and scholars interested in digital information and environments.4

Publisher: Texas A & M University Libraries.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Online8

Content: “…the Journal of Digital Information is an electronic-only, peer-reviewed journal covering the broad topics related to digital libraries, hypertext and hypermedia systems and digital repositories, and the issues of digital information.”9

Frequency of publication: Irregular, often several volumes per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: This publication accepts articles these themes: information discovery, visual interfaces and digital libraries. Per the website, “Papers submitted to JoDI must be original. As a peer-reviewed journal JoDI is unable to consider papers that have been accepted by or published in another peer reviewed source, or any other publication where copyright in the work has been assigned to another party (this does not include any copy on your personal or your institutional websites). For the same reason, JoDI is also unable to consider papers while they may be being considered for publication elsewhere.”11

Submission and review process: Submission is online and requires authors to create an account with the site. From the site: “Since JoDI is a web-based journal, the preferred presentation format is HTML. We strongly recommend submission in this form but we will accept manuscripts in other Web-viewable formats, such as PDF. Where a non-html paper is submitted the author’s final, refereed and accepted copy will be presented unedited, supplemented with an edited html ‘front page’ version.”12 Once an article is submitted an author is able to monitor the review process by logging into their account.

Editorial tone: Academic13

Style guide used: None specified; however, the submission guidelines document does provide specific examples of references and formatting.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Digital information is a very good journal for librarians interested in writing on the technical aspects of digital information (metadata, indexing, hypermedia, digital curation, etc).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation for this online, open-access journal is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers’ geographic locations are unknown, though there are probably more readers in Texas as that is where the journal is based.15 The Journal of Digital Information is a highly specialized electronic journal, so even though Texas may have more readers per capita, the publication’s readership most likely spread throughout the United States and, to some extent, other English-speaking countries.16 The Journal of Digital Information is published in English. Since JoDI is an academic journal, it is likely that most readers are students, professors, and professionals.17 Despite academia being a sort of micro-culture, it is still important for writers to refrain from cultural references that may be too local.

Reader characteristics: Readers of the Journal of Digital Information are most likely information professionals specializing in digital storage and retrieval. Workplaces may range from libraries, software companies, various technical services,  and IT departments. Readers of the Journal of Digital Information are highly specific in their reading interest; hence, it is not safe to assume that the average reader will have a high degree of knowledge or interest in libraries or information organizations — except as they may pertain to digital information dissemination. Writers wishing to publish should keep in mind that readers are highly specialized and most likely are well versed in the field of digital information.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have extensive knowledge related to digital information (such as tagging, indexing, web2.0, and database-design) but may not have such a well-versed comprehension of other aspects of librarianship.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors for the Journal of Digital Information should know that their readers are well-read and comfortable with technical jargon. Readers come to JoDI for research-oriented essays and reports, and expect to see research conveyed with tables and charts. Keeping this in mind, readers can be creative with their essays as long as it still pertains to the topic (a good example is from 2006’s vol.7 no. 2 issue: “Finding Murphy Brown: How Accessible are Historic Television Broadcasts?” by Jeff Ubois20). JoDI is a free electronic publication, so it may be of interest to potential authors that their work will be online and available to anyone who creates an account with the Texas Digital Library.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523818902306/270336
  2.  “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  3. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  4. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  5. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  6. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  7. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  8. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  9. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  10. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  11.  “Editorial Policies,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12.  “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13.  Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  14. “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  16. “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  18. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  19. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  20. Jeff Ubois, “Finding Murphy Brown: How accessible are historic television broadcasts?” Journal of Digital Information, 7(2),  https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/article/view/172
Continue Reading