Wiki Tags Archives: Collaboration

Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
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Teacher Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Teacher Librarian: The Journal for School Library Professionals

ISSN: 1481-1782

Website: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Teacher Librarian “is one of the leading journals designed specifically for librarians working with K-12 students” as well as classroom teachers and administrators. “The name Teacher Librarian reflects the journal’s focus on the essential role of the school librarian, or ‘teacher-librarian,’ as educator, a partner and collaborator with classroom teachers, school administrators, and others.”1

Target audience: Librarians and other information professionals, classroom teachers, and administrators working in K-12 schools.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, as appropriate to the article.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Teacher Librarian publishes several major articles in each issue which deal with major topics of current interest as well as articles addressing the very foundation of teacher-librarianship.”6 Articles address a broad spectrum of topics, including Future Ready Libraries, inquiry, equity, leadership, open educational resources, cultural responsiveness, project-based learning, advocacy, digital citizenship, STEM and STEAM, and school library design.7 Regular sections include app and website reviews; advocacy; technology and PC issues; education and library product reviews; library resources management; reviews of new books, videos, and software for children and young adults; and Internet resources.8

Frequency of publication: Five times per year: February, April, June, October, and December.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Teacher Librarian accepts articles on a broad range of topics; among the most popular are “learning commons, digital and multiple literacies, reading, professional collaboration, professional development, teaching and curriculum ideas, and makerspaces” in the context of the K-12 school library. Authors may submit proposals for articles to the editors.10 The journal accepts manuscripts that are based on research, personal experience, and practice; the column Tips & Tactics features “information that can be easily transferred to practice on a daily basis.”11

Submission and review process: Submit manuscripts as an email attachment, preferably in Word, to the editors. As appropriate, proposed articles are blind reviewed “by at least two members of the Teacher Librarian peer review board, all of whom are either scholars or recognized professionals.” The editors make the final decisions on manuscripts and reserve the right “to edit for brevity, clarity and consistency of style.”12

Editorial tone: The tone of the articles ranges from scholarly, but not overly formal, to casual and informative, depending on the article type.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an especially good journal for LIS students interested in K-12 school librarianship and the current topics that affect the field. The journal publishes both research- and practice-based articles, under a wide range of topics that are of interest to those working in the schools, so LIS writers have a choice on the type of articles they would like to submit, as long as the guidelines are followed. Potential writers can also submit proposals to the editors to make sure the topic falls within the journal’s scope.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Teacher Librarian has about 2,750 subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of Teacher Librarian are mostly located in the United States and Canada, and the journal focuses on North American school libraries, although many of the issues discussed can apply to school libraries in other regions. The advisory board is made up of professionals from a range of school types from the United States, Canada, and Australia.15 Authors should not have any problems using cultural references or jargon common in schools, although regional terms and usages may need explanation.

Reader characteristics: This journal is designed specifically for library professionals, school administrators, and classroom teachers working with children and young adults in the K-12 schools. Readers expect both research-based articles and articles that have clear guidelines for immediate, practical implementation in school libraries. Readers also expect helpful reviews on new materials and articles that explore up-and-coming trends in the field of school librarianship. Teacher Librarian does not look like a “typical” scholarly journal in that it is colorful and features photos and graphics.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this journal range from librarians with MLIS degrees, to library professionals without a master’s, to school administrators and classroom teachers.16 Some readers may be less familiar with library jargon, and so explanations may be warranted. Most readers will be familiar with the terminology and concepts of K-12 education.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Teacher Librarian are library professionals who are working with K-12 students. These professionals are looking for articles that present strategies to better manage library resources for students, or articles that review education- and library-related materials. The readers need to be kept up to date on the latest happenings in information technology, as well as resources that can be found on the Internet. Collection development is a large part of the duties of the teacher librarian, so reliable reviews of new books and other media is of great interest. Articles on collaboration, leadership, advocacy, management, or any aspect of information technology in the K-12 schools would also appeal to this group.

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/.
  2. “About.”
  3. Frontpiece, Teacher Librarian 45, no. 3 (February 2018): 6.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/.
  5. “Subscribe,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/subscribe/.
  6. “About.”
  7. “2018 Media Kit,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/TELI2018-mediakit_web.pdf.
  8. “About.”
  9. “Subscribe.”
  10. “Submissions,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Author Guidelines.”
  13. “Author Guidelines.”
  14.  “2018 Media Kit.”
  15. “Advisory Board,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/advisory-board/.
  16. “About.”
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ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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portal: Libraries and the Academy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: portal: Libraries and the Academy

ISSN:  1531-2542 (print), 1530-7131 (online)

Website: https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy

Purpose, objective, or mission: portal is an award-winning journal that focuses “on important research about the role of academic libraries and librarianship” and “features commentary on issues in technology and publishing.” 1 The journal “publishes articles that focus on all aspects of librarianship, knowledge management, and information services and studies within higher education.”2

Target audience: portal is “intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of libraries within the academy.”3

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Each issue of portal “includes peer-reviewed articles on subjects such as library administration, information technology, new forms of support for research and teaching, and information policy. Other articles address technological issues, research, standards, and policy and strategic planning.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: portal accepts research and scholarship on libraries in the academy, especially work that explores the effects of technology on librarianship, the roles of libraries in meeting institutional missions, how the information revolution is challenging and changing library and information practices, and how libraries and librarians address the changing needs of the academy and academics. portal “welcomes submission of inquiries and proposals for topics that authors have under development and will provide guidance on the suitability for publication in portal.” The journal maintains a rigorous review policy, which requires scholarship to be unique in advancing knowledge in the field; needed and in demand, with intrinsic value and use; and used locally and of value to the field. For Features, authors may direct proposals to the appropriate editor.9

Submission and review process: The preferred method for submitting manuscripts to portal is via email with a Microsoft Word attachment. “All submissions to portal are subjected to the double-blind review process, and referees are explicitly asked to indicate when a manuscript is worthy but needs more detailed guidance to be fully acceptable for publication in portal.”10 Authors will usually receive the editor’s decision and the referees’ comments within four to eight weeks after submission.

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

portal is a well-established, respected, award-winning journal.12 LIS authors who want to publish in it should read the 2004 article “Research and Scholarship Defined for portal: Libraries and the Academy.13 The editors of portal encourage authors, especially new authors, to find experienced mentors to guide them through the research and publishing process. For manuscripts deemed “worthy” but in need of revision, authors are encouraged to work with an experienced mentor to incorporate the referees’ comments and to do further revision; revised manuscripts will be subject to double-blind review with different referees. Overall, portal maintains high standards of scholarship; however, the journal also values collaborative work between novice and experienced LIS writers in order to bring well-written, innovative articles to its pages.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available; the journal is available through Project MUSE.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: portal is a U.S.-based journal that is published in English for an international LIS audience.16

Reader characteristics: The readers of this journal are interested in the role and impact of libraries within an academic environment. The journal’s readers are aware of the importance of a librarian’s work and of the need for careful and scholarly research in the LIS field. Readers work in academic libraries around the world and are researchers and scholars of librarianship in the academy.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are engaged academic librarians who will have considerable knowledge of LIS terms and subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The main audience for portal is academic librarians, faculty, library science students, information professionals, and anyone interested working in a library environment in higher education. Readers expected consistently high-quality, novel research and scholarship that helps librarians improve and innovate their practices and approaches in the academic library environment.

Last updated: February 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Overview,” portal: Libraries and the Academy, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy.
  2. “Author Guidelines,” portal: Libraries and the Academy, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy/author-guidelines.
  3. “Author Guidelines.”
  4. “Overview.”
  5. “Author Guidelines.”
  6. “Overview.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Available Issues,” Project MUSE, accessed February 23, 2018, https://muse.jhu.edu/journal/159.
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Author Guidelines.”
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Awards,” portal: Libraries and the Academy, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal-libraries-and-academy/awards.
  13. Charles B. Lowry, “Research and Scholarship Defined for portal: Libraries and the Academy,” portal: Libraries and the Academy 4, no. 4 (October 2004): 449-453, https://doi.org/10.1353/pla.2004.0068.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Available Issues.”
  16. “Author Guidelines.”
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New Review of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: New Review of Academic Librarianship

ISSN1361-4533 (print), 1740-7834 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/racl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: The New Review of Academic Librarianship is an international journal that works to establish “the relevance and applicability of theory and/or research for the academic library practitioner.” The journal’s intent is “disseminate developments and encourage discussion on the future role of academic libraries and their services.”1

Target audience: The target audience is academic librarians and information professionals from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: The New Review of Academic Librarianship publishes a comprehensive range of topics in the realm of academic libraries and their services, including scholarly communication and institutional repositories, learning and research support, information literacy, technological advances, physical space, monitoring and evaluation, collection management, conservation and preservation, collaboration, electronic content, and national and international higher education library policy.6 The journal regularly publishes special issues; past themes include Supporting Researchers: Sustainable Innovation in Strategy and Services7 and Librarian as Communicator.8

Frequency of publication: Four times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Original research articles, literature review articles,10 and scholarly perspectives “based on theory and research that advance the understanding of the development of high quality academic library and information management practices.”[1o. “Aims and Scope.”]

Submission and review process: New Review of Academic Librarianship uses ScholarOne Manuscripts for submissions.11 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and anonymous peer review.12 Taylor & Francis provides a website for authors that gives an overview of the publishing process and help with submitting manuscripts.13

Editorial tone: The tone of the writing in the New Review of Academic Librarianship is academic yet less formal than one might expect in a scholarly journal. Since the journal is intended for an international readership, authors are instructed to adopt “a straightforward writing style…avoiding over-long or complex sentence structures.”14

Style guide used: APA (6th edition); Taylor & Francis provides a reference guide as well.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The New Review of Academic Librarianship is a prestigious LIS journal with an international scope and a focus on research and practice in academic libraries. Submissions reflect advanced and original research and high-level scholarship. LIS authors are encouraged to submit manuscripts that “significantly contribute to the knowledge base of academic librarians.” Futhermore, the journal welcomes perspectives “from academic library practitioners, educationalists involved with academic libraries and others with relevant knowledge and interest.”16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although published in the United Kingdom, the New Review of Academic Librarianship is intended for an international readership, including both English-speaking and non-English-speaking countries, especially in Europe. The journal is published in English; however, given its intended international audience, the publishers stress the importance of using a straightforward writing style.17

Reader characteristics: The readers targeted are most likely librarians and information specialists associated with colleges and universities. While the specific practices at institutions of higher education may differ in the various nations where the journal is read, the librarians are most likely highly educated individuals providing educational and research support for faculty and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is safe to assume that the readers of this journal are well versed in LIS issues. However, an author should remember that the readers are academic librarians and will not necessarily be familiar with the details or practices of other types of libraries. Furthermore, an author writing for the New Review of Academic Librarianship should consider that the experiences of academic librarians in other countries might differ significantly from those in their own countries, and so provide some context and explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the New Review of Academic Librarianship should understand that the readership is international in scope and focused on theory and practice in academic libraries and information services targeted to faculty and students in colleges and universities. They should keep in mind regional and cultural considerations that may need to be explicated for readers from different regions. The readership expects high-level scholarship and research, as well as analyses that emphasize how LIS scholarship can be implemented in practices and services in academic libraries.

 

Last updated: February 10, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Journal Information,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=racl20.
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Journal Information.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. Wendy White, “Libraries and Research: Five Key Themes for Sustainable Innovation in Strategy and Services,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 23, nos. 2-3: 85-88, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2017.1355637.
  8. Helen Fallon, “Librarian as Communicator: Case Studies and International Perspectives,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 22, nos. 2-3: 107-111, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2016.1216216.
  9. “Journal Information.”
  10. Jo Alcock, “Literature Reviews and Academic Librarianship: The Review Editor’s Perspective,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 22, no. 4: 351-354, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2016.1246291.
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=racl20&page=instructions.
  12. “Aims and Scope.”
  13. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed February 10, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” Taylor & Francis Author Services, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Aims and Scope.”
  17. “Instructions for Authors.”
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

ISSN: 1052-5726 (print), 1052-5722 (online)

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian “is a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive “discourse and action on library issues.” Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG) members receive a subscription, or individuals can subscribe without joining the guild.2

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, by the editorial board.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online. Full text of complete issues and individual articles are available online.5

Content: Progressive Librarian publishes “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”6 Articles cover topics such as sexual violence, social justice, sustainability, youth empowerment, intellectual freedom, international activism, and a wide variety of progressive critiques and analyses of national and international LIS issues.

Frequency of publication:  Two times a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: A Call for Papers for future issues of Progressive Librarian asks for “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, documents, artwork and poetry that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”8

Submission and review process: All manuscripts submitted to Progressive Librarian are reviewed by each member of the editorial board. Manuscripts outside the expertise of board members are sent to outside reviewers for comment and evaluation. The journal also welcomes prints and digital images. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions before publication. For book reviews, please contact the book review editor.9

Editorial tone: The articles are innovative and present alternative views to those of other LIS publications. The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.

Style guide used: Authors may use their preferred citation style “for in-text (parenthetical) citations, footnotes, and endnotes, as well as a bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian), works cited (MLA), and references (APA & Harvard) sections.” The citation style has to be used consistently throughout the manuscript.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Progressive Librarian is a innovative and welcoming journal for LIS authors who write about any issue related to progressive librarianship or the relationship of library and information science to issues of social justice and responsibility. Articles are international in scope and are often focused on current events and actions. LIS professionals and students may submit artwork and poetry, as well as documents, reports, and bibliographies, on progressive issues.

Prospective authors should read the editorial in issue 45 for an understanding of the journal’s philosophy and perspective,11 as well as the Progressive Librarians Guild Statement of Purpose.12

For LIS graduate students, each year the PLG awards the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize “for the best paper about some aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.” The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian, and the winner receives a $500 stipend toward travel costs to the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, where the award is presented.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal as an international readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, although there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.14 As with any scholarly writing, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.15 The readership is made up of librarians, librarian graduate students, and library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and in how politics informs LIS practices.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals, or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have an understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about news and events in the LIS world, and about national and international politics and current events, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues, or events others may not be familiar with.

 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Broadly speaking, the readers of Progressive Librarian are LIS professionals, scholars, and students who consider themselves socially and politically progressive and who bring their passion for social justice and action to their work in various library and information settings. PLG works against the current idea that “the library is merely a neutral institutional mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society of atomized information consumers.” Rather,  a “progressive librarianship demands the recognition of the idea that libraries for the people has been one of the principal anchors of an extended free public sphere which makes an independent democratic civil society possible, something which must be defended and extended.”16

 

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml.
  2. “Subscription,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_subscribe.shtml.
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml.
  5. “Archive,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml.
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Call for Papers,” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017): verso, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45.pdf.
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. Elaine Harger, “Editorial: Why PLG? Why Paper? Why Bridge Generations?” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017),  http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45/003.pdf.
  12. “Statement of Purpose,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml.
  13. “The Braverman Award,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml.
  14. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  15. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  16. “PLG’s History,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/history.shtml.
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Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

ISSN: 1533-290X (Print) and 1533-2918 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/WLIS

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning €addresses the issues and concerns of librarians and information specialists in the rapidly growing field of distance education.”2

Target audience: The journal primarily targets scholars, librarians, and library students.3

Publisher: Routledge.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The journal reports that it “€addresses a wide variety of subjects that are vital to the field, including but not limited to: collection development strategies, faculty/librarian partnerships or collaborations, cutting edge instruction and reference techniques, document delivery, remote access, evaluation, etc.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.UxCmcYVUPpw

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning is comprised of “€original research, theoretical papers, substantive articles, essays, book and literature reviews, and research reports that cover programs and innovations throughout the international community.”10€ Submissions should include an abstract with a maximum of 100 words, while the main text should be between 3,000 and 5,000 words. Additionally, submissions cannot be previously published and cannot be simultaneously submitted to another publication. Authors should provide 3-10 keywords for indexing purposes.11

Submission and review process: Both editorial screening and peer review are conducted anonymously.12Authors should submit manuscripts electronically via ScholarOne Manuscripts at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/wlis.13

Editorial tone: While the journal is scholarly in nature, many of the articles cover practical subjects, such as reference techniques.14

Style guide used: APA Publication Manual.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles in the specific and emerging field of distance learning. In particular, library instructors with experience using Web 2.0, virtual reference, LibGuides, etc. in conjunction with distance learning will feel right at home with this journal’s subject matter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation figures not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The primary audience for this publication is the United States, and–to a slightly lesser degree–other English-speaking countries such as Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.16

Reader characteristics: Although the journal does not provide information about its readers, its website reports that it covers “€programs and innovations throughout the international community.”17€ The journal’s focus on distance learning contributes to its international reach. Readers consist mainly of librarians, LIS instructors, and LIS students who value education, specifically programs and innovations in distance learning relating to LIS education. Workplaces for these readers primarily include academic libraries and institutions.18€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning addresses a wide variety of subjects relating to distance learning within the field of LIS. Because most readers will have familiarly with the LIS field, LIS authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.19€

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that that the readers of this journal have extensive knowledge of distance learning specifically within the LIS field. As long as they are aware of the specialized nature of this journal, potential authors can use this forum to make valuable connections and establish professional rapport.

Last updated: January 29, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wlis20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  3.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  4.  Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  5. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  6. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  7. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  9. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  14. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  16. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
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Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleJournal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS)

ISSN: 2572-1364

Website: http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS) “aims to showcase innovative research that queries and critiques current and prevailing paradigms in library and information studies, in theory and practice through critical approaches and perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences. JCLIS is committed to supplying a platform for the publication of rigorous inter-/multi-/trans-disciplinary research that might be otherwise marginalized from dominant discourses.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) and archival science scholars, practitioners, and students, especially those interested in critical and multidisciplinary research, theory, and practice.

Publisher: Library Juice Press.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: Each issue of JCLIS is focused on a theme.4 JCLIS announces themes and deadlines for upcoming issues on its Announcements page.5 The inaugural issue examined why a journal that focuses on critical LIS studies is necessary, and the editors reviewed each article to illustrate the new journal’s scope and purpose.6 The second issue focuses on critical archival studies.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Within the scope of each issue’s theme, the journal welcomes research articles, literature reviews, interviews, perspectives, and book or exhibition reviews.9

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts on the JCLIS online submission system, which requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages to ensure that the review process is anonymous and that manuscripts are appropriately formatted. Authors must also ensure that manuscripts comply with each item of the Submission Preparation Checklist.10

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The editors of JCLIS encourage submissions from “senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.”12 Potential authors should read the announcements of upcoming issues to guide their submissions or to explore if their work might fit in any of the themes.13 Graduate students may find that JCLIS is quite receptive to their work, and it could prove to be an excellent opportunity for current students and recent graduates.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal published in the United States. JCLISprovides immediate open access to its published content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.14

Reader characteristics: The journal’s readers are LIS and archival science professionals, scholars, practitioners, and students. According to the inaugural issue’s Editors’ Note, JCLIS “is a community of scholars and practitioners who share interests and investments in the vitality of critical perspectives and approaches within and with respect to our institutions, organizations, and educational programs. As such, JCLIS requires and relies upon the critical observations of librarians, archivists, museum professionals, educators, and researchers, as well as their critical imaginations and re-imaginings.”15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong understanding, in theory and practice, of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

JCLIS describes its authors and readers as a community. Readers value critical analyses of LIS and new explorations and theorizations of how LIS research can critique current paradigms and support nondominant discourses.16 The journal’s readers expect new, interesting, and perhaps unexpected examinations of LIS in the context of “critical approaches and perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences.”17

Last updated: April 8, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about.
  2. “Contact,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about/contact.
  3. “About the Journal.”
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “Announcements,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/announcement.
  6. Andrew J. Lau, Alycia Sellie, and Ronald E. Day, “Why Is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies Needed Today?” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1, no. 1 (2017), https://doi.org/10.24242/jclis.v1i1.48.
  7. Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, and T-Kay Sangwand, “Critical Archival Studies: An Introduction,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1, no. 2 (2017), https://doi.org/10.24242/jclis.v1i2.50.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. “Submissions,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about/submissions.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Announcements.”
  14. “About the Journal.”
  15. Lau, Sellie, and Day, “Why Is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies Needed Today?” 6.
  16. “About the Journal.”
  17. “About the Journal.”
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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

ISSN: 2379-95281

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.2 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”3 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”4

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.5

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional news.8

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.9

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Active Librarian, Michael J. Carlozzi, accessed March 18, 2018, http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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