Wiki Tags Archives: Technology

Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

ISSN: 0748-5786 (Print) and 2328-2967 (Online)1

Website: http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445

Purpose, objective, or mission: “JELIS supports scholarly inquiry in library and information science (LIS) education by serving as the primary venue for the publication of research articles, reviews, and brief communications about issues of interest to LIS educators.”2

Target audience: LIS faculty and educators, and more specifically, ALISE members3

Publisher: Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS and education scholarly6 JELIS is a peer-reviewed journal that features scholarly papers, original research, reports, and studies. Although the journal does also publish brief communications, reader comments, and guest editorials, its primary purpose is the presentation of scholarly research.7

Medium: Online8

Content: JELIS publishes peer-reviewed research articles that contribute to scholarship in the field of education in library and information science and brief communications on topics important to the field. The later is not subject to peer review, but editorial approval only.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458

Types of contributions accepted: JELIS accepts submission of major articles of up to 7,000 words and more reflective, brief communications of up to 1,500 words.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted via the online submission widget. The publication acknowledges the receipt of all submissions. Major articles go through a double-blind review process.12

Editorial tone: Formal and academic.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Additional information on style and formatting guidelines is included in the guidelines.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal in the field of LIS education, JELIS would be a suitable publication venue for those involved in academic librarianship or graduate-level teaching. Although its readership may be relatively small, publication in JELIS would definitely help in the process of building tenure and establishing professional credibility. Ulrichsweb notes that “(JELIS) Authors are most often professors in schools of library and information science.”15 However, information professionals, LIS faculty, and even LIS students with relevant experience and strong academic writing skills should consider submitting work to JELIS.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Actual numbers are not available, but JELIS is made available to all ALISE members, both individual and institutional, as a benefit of membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although detailed geographic information is not available, the ALISE mission specifically mentions serving faculty in North America.17 JELIS is published solely in English, 18 and its North American base would suggest that most readers are comfortable communicating in English. Due to the prominent Canadian reader contingent, authors would definitely want to avoid colloquialisms and cultural references that are specific to the United States.19

Reader characteristics: Though demographic information on readership is not available, ALISE does note that its members are generally faculty in library and information science graduate programs.20 It is difficult to make blanket characterizations in terms of age, gender, and ethnicity, as readers range from LIS students to deans. No detailed breakdown of reader workplaces is provided by JELIS or ALISE. The ALISE membership brochure notes that its members include “All levels of faculty, administration, students, librarians, researchers, educational institutions, and others interested in library and information science education.”21 Readers likely share a high level of education and a professional interest in LIS education and graduate-level teaching.

JELIS readers, particularly LIS faculty members, are likely to have established opinions based on their area of expertise.22 They are also likely to share the core values of librarianship and view the profession as highly important and relevant in both the academic and professional spheres. Yet JELIS does also feature divergent viewpoints and constructive criticism in its reader comments and guest editorials.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JELIS readers are extremely knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and well-versed in library jargon, particularly that which relates to education.24 Authors will want to focus their submissions on the most relevant topics for LIS educators, as this publication is quite specialized and readers might not be interested in more general or overarching library concepts.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a scholarly publication that features specialized content geared towards a relatively small audience of LIS educators and students. Successful submissions will exhibit a professional and academic tone, and should specifically address emerging issues and trends in LIS education in the United States and Canada, or internationally. Appropriate topics might include technological advances in distance learning, course management systems such as Blackboard or WebCT, the use of Web 2.0 applications (i.e., blogs, wikis, podcasts) in teaching, or a comparative analysis of international LIS education. Additionally, authors might consider including original research to more effectively connect with JELIS readers.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/738510419
  2. Journal for Library and Information Science Education, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  3. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  4. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  5.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  6.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  7.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  8.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  9.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  10.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  11. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  12.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  13.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  14.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  15.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  16. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  17. “ALISE Strategic Plan 2017-2020,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/alise-strategic-plan-2017-2020
  18.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  19. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  20. Association for Library and Information Science Education. (2013). About ALISE. Retrieved from http://www.alise.org/about-alise
  21. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  22. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  23. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  24. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  25. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
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Journal of Digital Information (JoDI)

*As of July 2014, Journal of Digital Information is not accepting submissions.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Digital Information (JoDI)

ISSN: 1368-75061

Website: http://journals.tdl.org/jodi

Purpose, objective, or mission: JoDI focuses on “Publishing papers on the management, presentation, and uses of information in digital environments.”2 JoDI “Covers digital libraries, hypertext and hypermedia systems, and digital repositories and the issues of digital information.”3

Target audience: Information professionals, researchers, and scholars interested in digital information and environments.4

Publisher: Texas A & M University Libraries.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Online8

Content: “…the Journal of Digital Information is an electronic-only, peer-reviewed journal covering the broad topics related to digital libraries, hypertext and hypermedia systems and digital repositories, and the issues of digital information.”9

Frequency of publication: Irregular, often several volumes per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: This publication accepts articles these themes: information discovery, visual interfaces and digital libraries. Per the website, “Papers submitted to JoDI must be original. As a peer-reviewed journal JoDI is unable to consider papers that have been accepted by or published in another peer reviewed source, or any other publication where copyright in the work has been assigned to another party (this does not include any copy on your personal or your institutional websites). For the same reason, JoDI is also unable to consider papers while they may be being considered for publication elsewhere.”11

Submission and review process: Submission is online and requires authors to create an account with the site. From the site: “Since JoDI is a web-based journal, the preferred presentation format is HTML. We strongly recommend submission in this form but we will accept manuscripts in other Web-viewable formats, such as PDF. Where a non-html paper is submitted the author’s final, refereed and accepted copy will be presented unedited, supplemented with an edited html ‘front page’ version.”12 Once an article is submitted an author is able to monitor the review process by logging into their account.

Editorial tone: Academic13

Style guide used: None specified; however, the submission guidelines document does provide specific examples of references and formatting.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Digital information is a very good journal for librarians interested in writing on the technical aspects of digital information (metadata, indexing, hypermedia, digital curation, etc).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation for this online, open-access journal is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers’ geographic locations are unknown, though there are probably more readers in Texas as that is where the journal is based.15 The Journal of Digital Information is a highly specialized electronic journal, so even though Texas may have more readers per capita, the publication’s readership most likely spread throughout the United States and, to some extent, other English-speaking countries.16 The Journal of Digital Information is published in English. Since JoDI is an academic journal, it is likely that most readers are students, professors, and professionals.17 Despite academia being a sort of micro-culture, it is still important for writers to refrain from cultural references that may be too local.

Reader characteristics: Readers of the Journal of Digital Information are most likely information professionals specializing in digital storage and retrieval. Workplaces may range from libraries, software companies, various technical services,  and IT departments. Readers of the Journal of Digital Information are highly specific in their reading interest; hence, it is not safe to assume that the average reader will have a high degree of knowledge or interest in libraries or information organizations — except as they may pertain to digital information dissemination. Writers wishing to publish should keep in mind that readers are highly specialized and most likely are well versed in the field of digital information.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have extensive knowledge related to digital information (such as tagging, indexing, web2.0, and database-design) but may not have such a well-versed comprehension of other aspects of librarianship.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors for the Journal of Digital Information should know that their readers are well-read and comfortable with technical jargon. Readers come to JoDI for research-oriented essays and reports, and expect to see research conveyed with tables and charts. Keeping this in mind, readers can be creative with their essays as long as it still pertains to the topic (a good example is from 2006’s vol.7 no. 2 issue: “Finding Murphy Brown: How Accessible are Historic Television Broadcasts?” by Jeff Ubois20). JoDI is a free electronic publication, so it may be of interest to potential authors that their work will be online and available to anyone who creates an account with the Texas Digital Library.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523818902306/270336
  2.  “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  3. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  4. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  5. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  6. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  7. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  8. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  9. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  10. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  11.  “Editorial Policies,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12.  “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13.  Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  14. “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  16. “Submissions,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. Journal of Digital Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405444978063/270336
  18. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  19. “Journal of Digital Information,” Texas Digital Library, accessed May 14, 2017, https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi
  20. Jeff Ubois, “Finding Murphy Brown: How accessible are historic television broadcasts?” Journal of Digital Information, 7(2),  https://journals.tdl.org/jodi/index.php/jodi/article/view/172
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Slashdot

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Slashdot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://slashdot.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Slashdot is an online forum that provides “News for Nerds. Stuff that Matters.” This “stuff” includes stories on various aspects of technology, from discussing user’s rights online to sharing ideas and news on various IT subjects. Content is submitted by readers, who can also assist editors in the selection of material by utilizing the site’s collaborative moderation system called “Firehose,” which contains RSS Feeds, story submissions, and journals that have color-coding to indicate popularity. Using the color spectrum scale, “Red is hot, violet is not,” users can tag and vote on entries, in addition to providing feedback.

Target audience: People interested in all-things tech, particularly news and opinion on tech “with discussion backed by professional insight, polls, and analysis.”1

Publisher: Slashdot Media 2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication. This is an online forum that publishes reader’s articles on various aspects of technology, in addition to providing an interactive networking environment. Although it is likely to appeal to techie librarians, the primary target audience is not librarians; thus, it would be considered a lay publication rather than a LIS publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Story sections are self-explanatory, with some exceptions: “Apache” (news about the Apache web server); “Apple” (news on all things Mac); “Ask Slashdot” (ask the readership any questions about software problems, hardware, jobs, etc.); “BSD” (news about “modern UNIXes derived from Berkeley’s distribution [like Free, Open and NetBSD]”); “Developers” (news that affects any aspect of programming, such as language, licensing, or techniques); “Features,” “Games,” “Geeks in Space” (not currently open for submissions, this was an audio broadcast provided by the editors); “Interviews”; “IT;” “Linux;” “Politics;” “Polls” (submit “thought-provoking 4-6 question polls to share); “Science;” and “Your Rights Online” (news and information on spam, privacy, and other issues affecting our rights online). Archived articles, book reviews, and job listings complete the content.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “The closer a submission is to featuring all the “perfect” characteristics, the better the chances are that it will run. While we will sometimes tweak submitters’ grammar, spelling and punctuation, attempt to fix broken links, and even edit with brackets and ellipses (in the interest of brevity, clarity and good taste), the nicer a submission starts out, the less tempted we are to hit “delete.” Not every Slashdot post is perfect — but the better they are, the better it is for everyone.”3 “A perfect Slashdot submission is: interesting, informative, clear, snappy, presented neutrally, submitted with appropriate topics, usually based on text and still images, labeled with an understandable, concise headline, well-linked, and grammatically correct.”4

Submission and review process: Use the Submit link located at the top right of the website’s home page. Creation of an account is required first. This is a moderated site allowing administrators and editors to approve or remove posts.5

Editorial tone: Informal.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors with a technical bent will find the latest news, stories, and feeds on technology informative. This forum is an informal way to get stories submitted without a formal publishing process and allows for feedback from the target audience. Authors can pitch ideas and ask questions6, perhaps opening the discussion for more library and information science issues.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 32 million monthly visitors.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this publication is only available online, there is no central geographic location. It is likely that users are international. The publication is written in English and no information is provided on the possible cultural considerations of the audience. This matter could be important, as different countries may have varying technical standards that would need to be further investigated and considered, perhaps by reading further into archives and different sections to find out if any stories on international issues are submitted.

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers work in IT.8 The general audience of Slashdot may not seem the ideal audience for a LIS writing, as they have concerns that would not necessarily reflect the ethics, interests, or issues of LIS. However, with the future of LIS moving quickly with new technology, this audience could be a great source of objective information. The technical aspects of the profession could be introduced into this forum with a group who might have new ideas or strategies unknown to a LIS author.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This forum does not actively promote LIS subject matter unless there is a newsworthy story to share. However, with the influx of technology influences on LIS, this would be an interesting forum to share LIS information and get feedback that might be more objective on emerging technology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writing for and participating in this website would certainly not be a project for the light-hearted “LIS techie.” LIS authors with an avid interest in technology might be able to find middle ground with this publication on issues such as privacy concerns. The ability to collaborate with an audience with general technical backgrounds might open a dialog on the various ways that technology affects libraries.

Last updated: September 13, 2020


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “Our Brands,” Slashdot Media, accessed September 13, 2020, https://slashdotmedia.com/our-brands/
  2. “Slashdot Media to Merge with BIZX, LLC, Creating a Market Leader in B2B, Software, Technology, and Data”, PRNewswire, accessed September 13, 2020, https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/slashdot-media-to-merge-with-bizx-llc-creating-a-market-leader-in-b2b-software-technology-and-data-300978561.html
  3. “Submissions,” Slashdot.org, accessed November 14, 2016, http://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml?source=autorefresh
  4. Submissions.”
  5. Submissions.”
  6. “Frequently Asked Questions,” Slashdot.org, accessed September 13, 2020, https://slashdot.org/faq
  7. Our Brands.”
  8. Our Brands.”
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The Recorder

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Recorder

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://www.law.com/therecorder/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Law.com is the premiere source for trusted and timely legal news and analysis. Subscribers to the site can access stories from across ALM’s national and regional publications, with the opportunity to view news by practice area.” Also,  “ALM, an information and intelligence company, provides customers with critical news, data, analysis, marketing solutions and events to successfully manage the business of business.1

Target audience: Legal professionals, law librarians, and the general public.2

Publisher: ALM Media Properties, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication for people in the legal industry.

Medium: Online.5

Content: A rich selection of articles curated by ALM’s expert editorial team from across ALM’s national and regional publications, featuring leading voices in the legal field.6

Frequency of publication: Daily.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.therecorder.com/contact

Types of contributions accepted: Although most articles are written by professional journalists, the publication does accept letters to the editor and story suggestion ideas. Contact the editor to discuss other types of contributions.

Submission and review process: There are no specific guidelines on the website, but letters to the editor should match the tone of other articles in the publication.

Editorial tone: No tone specified, but articles are written as informational news pieces.

Style guide used: None mentioned.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is vital to a law library as a resource for the legal community and to keep law librarians updated on new laws and procedures. Law librarians may work daily with the legal professionals who read The Recorder.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of October 2016, The Recorder is only published online.8 Specific publication numbers for The Recorder could not be determined. The publisher, ALM, indicates that across their 20 publications, there are 1.58 million website visitors a month.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Aimed at attorneys and executives in the United States and written in English.10

Reader characteristics: Considering that readership is comprised largely of attorneys and executives, most readers are college-educated professionals.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of the readership are lawyers who will have knowledge of law libraries. Issues involving law libraries might be of interest to them, including articles on new publications in a specific field of law.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Due to the level of expertise and understanding, the readers have of the law, LIS authors also need to have a high level of legal knowledge to write for this publication.

Last updated: September 8, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” TheRecorder.com, accessed September 16, 2018, https://www.law.com/therecorder/static/about-us/
  2. About Us.”
  3. About Us.”
  4. About Us.”
  5. About Us.”
  6. About Us.”
  7. About Us.
  8. “The Recorder Expands Daily Digital News Platform,” prnewswire.com, accessed September 8, 2020, https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-recorder-expands-daily-digital-news-platform-300337603.html
  9. “2020 Legal Media Kit,” Law.com, accessed September 8, 2020, https://images.law.com/contrib/content/uploads/documents/1/2020-Legal-Media-Kit.pdf
  10. About Us.”
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Wired Magazine

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Wired Magazine

ISSN: 1059-1028 (Print)1

Website: http://www.wired.com/magazine/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the website, “Wired is the ultimate authority on the people and ideas changing our world.”2 The magazine examines technology and its effect on all aspects of culture, from social and recreational to business and politics.

Target audience: Readers who have an interest in technology and its effect on cultures worldwide.

Publisher: Conde Nast Publications Inc. and Wired Ventures Ltd.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Articles on the intersection of technology and business, culture, politics, science, etc.

Frequency of publication: Monthly.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.wired.com/2016/08/how-to-submit-to-wired-opinion/

Types of contributions accepted: Op-eds which are no longer than 1,000 words, and argue a certain point of view.5

Submission and review process: Pitches and/or completed pieces should be sent to opinion [at] wired.com. If sending a pitch, clearly state your thesis and why you specifically are writing about it. Include your biographical information; they want to know who you are and why you’re writing. Mark the subject of your email as “Op-Ed Pitch: Sentence Describing Your Opinion.”6

Editorial tone: Informal but polished.

Style guide used: None noted.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Wired is for the writer with fresh, definitive ideas about how the various cultures of our world will respond, influence, and share the future of technology and science. LIS authors who are passionate about innovations in the information field and how these ideas affect people will enjoy writing for this publication. Wired allows LIS authors to release themselves from the rigid boundaries of academic styles and create anecdotes rich with cultural, moral, or institutional conflict within digital technologies. Publishing for this popular magazine will also create contacts beyond the LIS field and expand the breadth of publication opportunities for the LIS writer.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print circulation of over 870,000, with a digital monthly reach of 20 million.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is based in San Francisco, CA, but international subscriptions are available. Although the magazine is in English, international subscriptions are available.8 Audience demographic information doesn’t include geographic location.

Reader characteristics: Readership is roughly 70% male, 30% female. Most have graduated from college and are fairly affluent.9 Readers are described as “globally-minded thought leaders, innovators, bloggers, and connectors” who are “constantly seeking new ideas.”10

The assumption that this audience works mainly in tech industries should not be made, as this publication covers a diverse range of subjects that are affected by technology, such as culture, cars, politics, and entertainment.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Library terminology or other discipline-specific language will need to be defined for this more general audience. This popular, civilian publication may have many LIS readers who are interested in gaining a new perspective on technology from a civilian viewpoint. However, this would not be an appropriate venue to discuss LIS subject matter in detail. The majority of readers will not be familiar with LIS issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This group of readers may be very interested to learn how technology is affecting their possibly preconceived ideas of what the library offers and represents. An interest in librarian issues may be cultivated through the technology issues. Readers might be interested in technological innovations within libraries as well as other issues such as privacy concerns.

Last updated: August 30, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1.  Wired, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 28, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522261645312/211317
  2. “Wired Advertising,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/wired-advertising
  3. “Wired,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed December 5, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1416948580144/211317
  4. “Wired Magazine Subscription,” Subscribe.Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://subscribe.wired.com/subscribe/wired/109077?source=AMS_WIR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR&pos_name=AMS_WIR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR
  5. “Here’s How to Submit to Wired Opinion,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/2016/08/how-to-submit-to-wired-opinion/
  6. Here’s How to Submit to Wired Opinion.”
  7. “2017 Media Kit,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/WMG_Media_Kit_2017_v3.pdf
  8. Wired Magazine Subscription.”
  9. 2017 Media Kit.”
  10. 2017 Media Kit.”
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Information and Learning Science

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information and Learning Science (previously published as Library World and then New Library World and incorporating Asian Libraries)1

ISSN: 2398-5348 (Print) and 1758-6909 (Online)2

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Information and Learning Science advances inter-disciplinary research that explores scholarly intersections shared within 2 key fields: information science and the learning sciences / education sciences. The journal provides a publication venue for work that strengthens our scholarly understanding of human inquiry and learning phenomena, especially as they relate to design and uses of information and e-learning systems innovations.”3

Target audience: The target audience is international in scope, including academics, information professionals, and librarians, along with researchers and teachers involved in the library and information community.

Publisher: Emerald Publishing.

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and Online.

Content: “We invite research that builds upon and advances theories, methods, results, innovation designs, evidence bases and frameworks for action present across both information science, and the learning/education sciences scholarly domains. We especially welcome the submission of papers that directly address, explicate and discuss the inter-disciplinary boundaries and intersections present across these two fields, and that offer new conceptual, empirical and technological syntheses. Such investigations may include but are not limited to:

  • E-learning perspectives on searching, information-seeking, and information uses and practices engaged by a full diversity of youth, adults, elders and specialized populations, in varied contexts including leisure time activities; e-learning at work, in libraries, at school, home, during playtime, in health/wellness settings, etc.
  • Design and use of systems such as MOOCs, social media, learning management systems, search systems, information systems, and other technology design innovations that contribute to human inquiry, formal and informal learning, searching, information-seeking, information uses, knowledge building and sharing, and instruction;
  • HCI, socio-technical systems research, and materiality research perspectives on information and learning systems design; social learning ecologies; and creation and use of physical objects and settings that elicit human inquiry and learning;
  • Ethnographic; emancipatory; social justice-based; feminist; critical race theory; and post-structuralist research involving information, learning, equity, design;
  • Information, communication, and technology (ICT) considerations in computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) contexts;
  • Innovations and e-learning solutions that address digital / information / media / data literacy and/or address the digital divide;
  • Innovations involving problem-, project-, and inquiry-based learning contexts and goods;
  • Learning analytics and/or data science perspectives on measurement and analysis of learning in information / search / e-learning systems;
  • Social and ethical issues in e-learning contexts such as design, measurement, and evaluation — such as privacy and security concerns around student confidentiality, data ownership and ethical data uses by researchers, teachers, institutions, etc.”5

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (six times a year).

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Information and Learning Science accepts articles in the following categories: research paper, viewpoint, technical paper, conceptual paper, case study, literature review, and general review (between 2,500 and 6,000 words). Structured abstracts must be submitted with all articles. The journal also publishes conference reports and book reviews.6

Submission and review process: Authors submit and track manuscripts on ScholarOne Manuscripts. The editor reviews submissions and sends appropriate manuscripts to two referees for double-blind review. Conference reports and book reviews are not peer reviewed.7

Editorial tone: The editorial tone is scholarly and academic.

Style guide used: Information and Learning Science uses Harvard Style and provides examples of references and citations.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information and Learning Science is multidisciplinary and international in scope. It publishes many different types of high-quality articles on a broad range of LIS topics. Further, the journal takes account of “social, cultural, economic, ergonomic, ethical and sectoral issues,” which appeals to LIS authors worldwide.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information and Learning Science is published in English in the United Kingdom; however, its audience is international. Editorial Advisory Board members are from all over the world, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Nigeria, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Hungary,  Greece, and the United Arab Emirates.10

Reader characteristics: Due to the journal’s international reach, Information and Learning Science attracts readers from the LIS professional spectrum, including teachers, librarians, researchers, and students, from a variety of library types and information settings, who are interested in understanding LIS practices from around the world.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader of Information and Learning Science has a broad understanding of LIS subject matters and issues and an understanding of library jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the readership is international, published articles should have a broad level of interest and be applicable to LIS professionals and academics from all over the world. Information and Learning Science is a scholarly journal with a large number of academics in its audience; the articles they would be most interested in would be those based on original and novel scholarship and research.

Last updated: April 14, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Journal History,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  2.  Information and Learning Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/901530879
  3. “Aims & Scope,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ils.
  5. “Aims & Scope.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Aims & Scope.
  10. “Editorial Team,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=ils.
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