Wiki Tags Archives: Public libraries

The Writer Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Writer Magazine

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.writermag.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the online submission guidelines, “The Writer is dedicated to expanding and supporting the work of professional and aspiring writers with a straightforward presentation of industry information, writing instruction and professional and personal motivation. In the pages of our magazine, writers share experiences, expertise, struggles, advice, successes and suggestions.”1

Target audience: Professional and aspiring writers.2

Publisher: Madavor Media.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication for writers.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Features instructive articles on how to improve writing and get work published. Also includes up-to-date market lists for aspiring and experienced writers and book reviews for newly published material in the field.

Frequency of publication: Monthly.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.writermag.com/the-magazine/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: “We are interested in how-to stories, reported pieces, narrative essays and profiles of writers and others in the field.” 5

Submission and review process: Query first. All queries via email to tweditorial [at] madavor.com along with your name, phone number, and short bio. “We receive hundreds of pitches every week and cannot respond to all of them. If you haven’t heard from us in two weeks, please feel free to move your submission to another publication.”6

Editorial tone: Step-by-step how-to instructional advice, written in an easy-to-digest tone. Narrative essays should provide some take-away advice and benefits to a writing audience, but should not be self-promoting. Tone should support aspiring and experienced writers alike, although beginning writers are more likely to read the magazine.7

Style guide used: No style guide or preferences are stated in the submission guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

No matter the field, all writers share the same pitfalls, challenges, and success. LIS authors can convey their experiences and even review books they found helpful to the craft of writing. One column, entitled “Breakthrough,” publishes first-person narratives as new writers “break through” to publication and all authors are eligible to submit upon publishing their first article (presumably in an LIS publication).8 LIS authors are also great at discovering and organizing resources for writers, which would be great for the how-to instructional features, such as helping authors do research for articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 38,000 print and digital readers; more than 40,000 opt-in e-newsletter subscribers; 26,000 unique monthly website visitors.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in the United States; available by subscription internationally as well.10 Readers are well cultured and interested in literature and writing as an art. Literary and writing jargon can be used.

Reader characteristics: Readers of The Writer are literary in nature. Readers want informative, how-to advice and stories about how to succeed at the craft and business of writing. There is no place for negativity regarding the profession in this publication. Readers have one important thing in common, they are passionate about the craft of writing. Because writing is mostly a freelance profession, information related to managing a freelance career is also well received and well featured in the magazine. Another important thing to remember is that this publication caters to all types of writers, which does give a broad array of possible types of readers to target.

Readers of The Writer are only interested in reading articles written in a supportive and encouraging tone with the honest intention of helping other writers further their craft. Readers expect The Writer to teach them how to write all types of articles and stories. Readers are generally open to new ideas on the publication’s subject matter, and believe they too can become professional writers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this publication have limited knowledge of LIS subject matter, except as it relates to book reviews and literature. Readers can easily digest writing that dissects published works, and also can appreciate labeling materials for certain audiences. Readers will not understand technical LIS jargon, but they will appreciate information that will help them use library and research resources more efficiently.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most obvious characteristic that readers of The Writer have in common is that they are all writers. While it can be assumed readers are literary to a certain degree, their level of technical knowledge when discussing LIS-related issues or services must be presented in a language that is easy for someone unfamiliar to LIS jargon to understand. Readers of this publication could benefit from research instruction, such as how to research a great book or article idea, but it must be presented in layman’s terms. Potential authors should consider the level of research skills to be moderate to none among readership, and therefore mimic the publication’s simplified tone when providing advice on these or related topics. Furthermore, potential authors should keep in mind that readers expect articles to be very descriptive, with step-by-step instructions on how to achieve whatever goal the article promises. This style is what keeps readers interested and coming back issue after issue.

Last updated: September 25, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” WriterMag.com, accessed December 9, 2016, http://www.writermag.com/the-magazine/submission-guidelines/
  2. Submission Guidelines.”
  3. Submission Guidelines.”
  4. “Subscriptions,” WriterMag.com, accessed December 9, 2016, http://www.writermag.com/the-magazine/subscriptions/
  5. Submission Guidelines.”
  6. Submission Guidelines.”
  7. Submission Guidelines.”
  8. Submission Guidelines.”
  9. “Advertising,” WriterMag.com, accessed September 21, 2018, https://www.writermag.com/the-magazine/advertising/
  10. Subscriptions.”
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Tri-City Voice

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tri-City Voice

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.tricityvoice.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: An independent newspaper serving the southeast San Francisco Bay Area.1

Target audience: The target audience includes lay people interested in local news and events in the Fremont, Hayward, Milpitas, Newark, Sunol, and Union City areas.2

Publisher: Tri-City Voice.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content: Coverage of local news, art, culture, sport, entertainment, and events in the southeast Bay Area.5

Frequency of publication: Weekly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: No submission guidelines are available online. There is an online form on the Contact page to fill out for story ideas or letters to the editor.7

Types of contributions accepted: The newspaper accepts letters to the editor and articles about local events and news.

Submission and review process: Submit Opinions, Letters to the Editor, or article ideas through the online form.8

Editorial tone: Casual and informal.

Style guide used: A specific style guide was not indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a local newspaper with an audience limited to a specific region. However, because of the sense of the small audience, information and reports about the local libraries would be of great interest to the readers of the newspaper. This would be a great venue to submit manuscripts about events in the library, programs, library news, and interviews with authors.

This newspaper does not have a wide readership within the LIS profession so articles written may not get noticed by a large audience within this community. However, Hayward Public Libraries and libraries within the Alameda and Santa Clara County library system fall within the areas covered by this newspaper. Librarians who submit articles for publication will gain recognition within their own library systems and possibly further if the article is of interest to those outside of the city or county libraries. Publishing in this newspaper will also provide readers with a closer look at library services. Those interested in fulfilling tenure requirements should not consider this publication as it is not peer reviewed and does not include research.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Employees distribute over 30,000 copies each week to thousands of locations throughout the community,” and the website receives 16,000 visitors per day.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The newspaper is delivered within the Northern California cities of Hayward, Fremont, Union City, Newark, Milpitas, and Sunol.10 This publication serves a diverse population. Scholarly tone should be avoided and articles should be clear for readers who claim English as a second language.

Reader characteristics: The southeast San Francisco area is highly diverse, and the newspaper is devoted to covering local issues and interests.11 The audience for this newspaper may not have a general interest in libraries, but will be interested in library services, issues, and events that affect the community.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A knowledge of LIS subject matter shouldn’t be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As in many cities, the audience for this newspaper is very diverse in terms of language, education, ethnicity/race, income, profession, age, and areas of interest. It is important for the author to write about topics that the readers will find of interest. They may want to consider writing articles about computer use and classes, using online and print resources available at the library, and featured authors or new books. Articles that would be of interest to English language learners are also important. However, the articles should not be filled with LIS jargon or go into depth about library topics that practitioners would be more interested in.

Based on the articles published in the newspaper, it can be assumed that the readers of this newspaper are very community oriented, have strong family values, and are interested in different cultures. Authors should take all of this into consideration when submitting manuscripts for publication.

Last updated: Septemeber 19, 2018


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” TriCityVoice.com, accessed September 19, 2018, https://tricityvoice.com/about/
  2. About Us.
  3. About Us.
  4. About Us.
  5. About Us.
  6. About Us.
  7. “Contact Us,” Tri-City Voice, September 19, 2018, https://tricityvoice.com/contact/
  8. “Contact Us,” Tri-city Voice, September 19, 2018 https://tricityvoice.com/contact/
  9. About Us.
  10.  “About Us.
  11.  “About Us.
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The Sun Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Sun Magazine

ISSN: 0744-96661

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Sun is an independent, ad-free magazine that for more than forty years has used words and photographs to evoke the splendor and heartache of being human. Each monthly issue celebrates life, but not in a way that ignores its complexity. The personal essays, short stories, interviews, poetry, and photographs that appear in The Sun’s pages explore the challenges we face and the moments when we rise to meet them.”2

Website: http://thesunmagazine.org

Target audience: The target audience is the general public; specifically, The Sun targets readers who are intelligent, educated, concerned about community and social issues, and enjoy reading stories, essays, and interviews that they might not find in more mainstream publications.

Publisher: The Sun Publishing Company, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Essays, interviews, fiction, poetry, and black and white photography.5

Frequency of publication: Monthly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing

Types of contributions accepted: The Sun accepts submissions of essays, interviews, fiction, and poetry. There is no minimum word count, but submissions of longer than 7,000 words are rarely accepted. The Sun favors personal writing, but is also looking for “provocative pieces on political and cultural issues.”7 Interview pieces should focus on “innovative and provocative thinkers,” and The Sun is particularly interested in interviews with women and people of color.8 Submissions may also be made to magazine’s “Readers Write” series, in which readers respond to a given theme each month with a short, nonfiction piece.9

Submission and review process: The Sun does accepts submissions online via Submittable. They also accept mailed submissions. Submissions must be typed (single-spaced is acceptable for poetry, double-spaced for all other types) and sent with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The review process typically takes three to six months, but may be longer. Queries are suggested prior to submitting interview pieces. Interview pieces can be lightly edited prior to submission, and will be further revised upon acceptance.10

Editorial tone: Personal, provocative writing preferred.11

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Sun offers an excellent opportunity for LIS authors to reach a more mainstream audience than an industry publication. Since it appeals to people who tend to be educated, socially active, and well read, The Sun provides an audience who will likely be interested in issues facing libraries and their roles in society and community, including funding challenges, services to minorities, and trends in information literacy. Interestingly, The Sun provides subscriptions for free or at reduced rates to institutions such as prisons and homeless shelters (and often includes submissions from inmates and other “marginalized” members of society)12, so would provide a forum for submission of writing concerning library services to these populations.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 70,000.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Sun’s publication is read and distributed throughout the United States. At this time, The Sun is only available in English. However, it does appeal to a multicultural, multi-generational audience, often presenting viewpoints from minority and disenfranchised populations.

Reader characteristics: Reader information is unavailable. The magazine’s content would suggest that readers care about human issues and are informed about national and global politics. The Sun is available in many jails, prisons, treatment centers, and homeless shelters, so many readers are in fact currently homeless or incarcerated.14

This publication is not targeted toward any particular profession. It does attract a number of writers and other artists, as well as those who have an appreciation for good writing and photography. Many of the readers who send letters to The Sun or submit to the “Readers Write” section work in the nonprofit sector, or in various “human service” fields such as addiction treatment, counseling, health care, and services to homeless people.

The Sun is a liberal publication, with an audience that likely embraces diversity, is politically active and involved in social activism, and values creativity and artistic expression.It is likely that readers hold education, literacy, and librarianship in high esteem, but may not necessarily be well-versed in issues relating to these areas.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since The Sun is a civilian publication that does not specialize in library and information science, audience knowledge of LIS subject matter cannot be assumed. It can be assumed that readers are supporters of libraries, and may have knowledge of library services from the patron’s point of view. While it is likely that issues facing libraries may be of interest to this publication’s readership, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Sun share an interest in the arts and in creating a better world for the future. They are concerned about the environment, education, and other issues that will have a long-term impact on our world. They may be politically active, usually at the grass-roots level.

The Sun‘s audience will be interested in and responsive to articles such as those about the roles of libraries as cultural institutions; funding challenges faced by public libraries; educational opportunities offered to children through library programs; services to immigrants and other non-native English speakers; and services to populations such as homeless adults and children and inmates.

Authors who are interested in being published in The Sun will want to ensure that their submissions deal with current issues facing libraries. They will want to focus less on the technical aspects of librarianship, and more on the social and cultural implications. They may want to consider interviews with leaders in the field of library and information science who are implementing innovative programs and ideas, especially those who are working to bring library services to traditionally underserved populations.

Last updated: September 18, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  The Sun Magazine, WorldCat, accessed March 28, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/sun/oclc/243522787
  2. “About The Sun,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/about_the_sun
  3. About The Sun.”
  4. “Submission Guidelines Writing,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016,  http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing
  5. About The Sun.”
  6. About The Sun.”
  7. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines Interviews,” TheSunMagazine.org, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/interviews
  9. “Submission Guidelines Readers Write,” TheSunMagazine.com accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/readers_write
  10. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  11. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  12. “FAQ,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/faq
  13. About The Sun.”
  14. FAQ.”
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San Francisco Chronicle

 

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: San Francisco Chronicle

ISSN: 1932-8672 (Print)1

Website: http://www.sfchronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The San Francisco Chronicle is, “…committed to coverage of subjects that are uniquely important to our readers: local issues and those topics with national impact such as economy, politics, technology, ecology, as well as breaking news, crime, education, national and foreign news.”2

Target audience: Readers throughout the Bay Area.3

Publisher: Hearst Communications, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Local, state and national news, sports, politics, business, travel, entertainment and food. Online version also includes blogs.6

Frequency of publication: Daily in print; updated more frequently online.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sfgate.com/chronicle/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: The Chronicle accepts Letters to the Editor and Commentary pieces.7

Submission and review process: Submission is via online form on website, and review process depends on the type of submission. Limit on length of articles is: Commentary pieces (700 words), Letters to the editor (200 words).8 No information is provided as to acceptance rates or method of acceptance.

Editorial tone: Freewheeling. The newspaper, and especially the online edition, takes a tone of local interest that may mirror its audience. The Bay Area community is thought to be more liberal than other parts of the country.

Style guide used: None specified for the type of contributions accepted.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication’s participation in Chronicle in Education,9 which provides teacher lessons and information, suggests an active community involvement and would make the Chronicle a possible publication for an LIS-related article.

Chronicle readers pride themselves on being intelligent and well educated and keeping abreast of current events, especially at the local level. Publication in this newspaper offers a unique opportunity for those in the library field to inform and instruct a huge lay audience about issues facing libraries today. The Sunday edition’s Insight section “aims to provide a forum to shake up conventional wisdom and provoke fresh thinking.”10 This might be an excellent arena for librarians to bring library-related issues to the forefront of the public’s awareness.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Daily circulation of 170,354; Sunday circulation of 222,793.11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: San Francisco, California, United States; online features are available worldwide. English.

Reader characteristics: Just under half of readers are college graduates, with a median household income of $96,769. The median age of readers is 53, and 79% do not have children.12 It is likely that the interests of the Chronicle’s readers are local issues, and those affecting middle-class families. Considering the industries of San Francisco and the Bay Area, readers are likely to work in technology and computer jobs, the arts, and tourism. San Francisco is famous for being politically, socially, and economically progressive. Overall, its constituents are antiwar, pro-equal rights (including gay marriage), and San Francisco was one of the first cities in the country to give library cards to homeless persons.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The newspaper does not regularly focus on LIS subject matter, but local library issues and concerns might be raised in an editorial piece.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience of the San Francisco Chronicle are educators, parents, cab drivers, in the mayor’s office; they are you and me. With this in mind, authors should avoid library jargon (e.g., MARC, CONSER, AACR2) and specialized library science themes. Topics dealing with promoting library services, such as lobbying for the public’s free and open access to information, new reading programs, and issues with banned books, would be appropriate as this newspapers is targeting the general public.

Last updated: September 16, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1.  San Francisco Chronicle, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522201781182/551873
  2. “San Francisco Chronicle,” Hearst.com, accessed September 16, 2018, http://www.hearst.com/newspapers/san-francisco-chronicle
  3. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  4. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  5. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  6. San Francisco Chronicle.”
  7. “Submissions & Contributions,” SFGate.com, accessed November 4, 2016, http://www.sfgate.com/submissions/
  8. Submissions & Contributions.”
  9. “San Francisco Chronicle,” NIEonline.com, accessed November 4, 2016, http://nieonline.com/sfchronicle/
  10. Submissions & Contributions.”
  11. “Media Kit 2018,” Hearst.com, accessed September 16, 2018, https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/655969/Media_Kit_and_File_Assets/MEDIA_KIT_GENERAL.pdf
  12. Media Kit 2018.”
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Sacramento Bee

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Sacramento Bee

ISSN: 0890-5738 (Print)1

Website: http://sacbee.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “…to produce a newspaper that serves the needs of its community without becoming subservient to the whims of public opinion or the pressures of the powerful.”2

Target audience: Sacramento residence and neighboring cities at large.3

Publisher: The McClatchy Company.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Local, state and national news, politics, community events calendar, sports, and entertainment.

Frequency of publication: Daily.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/submit-letter/article3351588.html

Types of contributions accepted: The Bee accepts letters to the editor (150 words),7 opinion columns of roughly 600 words, and shorter, more personal views of 400-500 words.8

Submission and review process: Use the separate online forms for submitting a letter or opinion piece, and read the instructions for each.

Editorial tone: None identified.

Style guide used: None mentioned.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

An LIS author who resides in or has personal knowledge of the market served by the publication could write a letter to the editor about a current library funding issue, a longer article on the value of libraries specifically to a population within Sacramento, or write in response to a published article in The Bee about the state of library services. There are many possibilities for an LIS author familiar with the market area.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 163,482 paid daily, 177,626 paid Sunday, average monthly online audience of 3,329,917.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: “The Bee’s circulation area covers the Northern Sacramento Valley and surrounding areas: south to Stockton, north to Redding, east to Reno and west to the San Francisco Bay Area.”10 This is an English language publication serving a racially diverse population.

Reader characteristics: Demographic information is not available, but according to the United States census, Sacramento County is is 64% white and. 22% Hispanic or Latino.11 The publication supports community arts and champions environmental causes.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this publication are the general public and would have limited knowledge of LIS matters and terminology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since the readers of The Bee will not be familiar with LIS jargon or library issues, an author needs to keep writing for this publication general and be certain to provide convincing reasons for the reader to care about the library topic of their article.

Last updated: September 16, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1.  Sacramento Bee, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522200710528/552222
  2. “About Us,” Sacbee.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.sacbee.com/customer-service/about-us/
  3. About Us.”
  4. About Us.”
  5. About Us.”
  6. About Us.”
  7. “Submit your letter to the editor,” Sacbee.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/submit-letter/
  8. “Submit viewpoints article,” Sacbee.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/submit-letter/article3351588.html
  9. “2016 General Information,” Sacbee.com, accessed October 30, 2016, https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B66cMBdLj9xlU2kzVUpOVUNpU1E/view
  10. About Us.”
  11. “Sacramento County, California,” Census.gov, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.census.gov/quickfacts/
  12. About Us.”
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Press-Telegram

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Press-Telegram

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.presstelegram.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The purpose of the Press-Telegram is to provide news and information of interest to local constituents.1

Target audience: Residents of Long Beach and the surrounding areas.2

Publisher: MediaNews Group, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian newspaper.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: General information relevant to citizens of the Long Beach and Orange County area. Includes varied content such as: sports, entertainment, business, religion, travel, lifestyles, obituaries, and special sections. This newspaper also includes information at the global, national, state, and local levels.7

Frequency of publication: Daily.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.presstelegram.com/share-your-news

Types of contributions accepted: Letters to the editor are accepted on all issues of public concern. From their Share Your News section: “Letters must include the writer’s home community and a daytime phone number for confirmation. Please limit submissions to 150 words and send via email (without attachments) to speakout [at] presstelegram.com.”9 Guest commentaries of no more than 600 word are also considered for publication. “We look for topical commentary on public policy and social issues that are of general interest to our print and digital readership. We give preference to local, regional and California topics and writers.”10 “Email your submission to opinion [at] langnews.com with the subject line “Op-ed submission.” Include a sentence or two at the end including your position, city or community of residence, and any background relevant to your expertise in the topic.”11

Editorial tone: Not specified.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newspaper lends itself to publishing local LIS-related issues. LIS practitioners and students living in the covered area should consider submitting opinion pieces of local library issues. Topics may include: Long Beach library improvement initiative, Long Beach library special events, or a review of past public programming. Library-themed articles or letters may be published in this newspaper; however, they must be focused on local library issues and be free of library jargon in order to reach the public.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 78,057 daily; 80,093 Sunday, with 375,000 unique monthly visitors to the website.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Press-Telegram market area reaches from Downey to the Long Beach Shoreline and from Orange County to the peninsula.13 Although this is a local newspaper, it does tackle state, national, and global issues. However, these issues tend to be related in some fashion to the local audience. Although this newspaper is written in English, part of its audience is the large Hispanic community residing in the marketed cities. In addition, it includes information relevant to the Cambodian community because Long Beach has the largest Cambodian population in the United States.14

Reader characteristics: Reader are 52% female and 48% male with a median age of 44 years old. Over half, 55% of readers are Hispanic and 50% have a college education. The average household income $63,000. 15 The Press-Telegram readers likely do not have established opinions about library science subjects because they are not library professionals. This publication, much like the city of Long Beach, is much more progressive in nature due to its culturally diverse demographics.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: After reviewing various articles in the Press-Telegram, it is clear that they do not specifically tackle library and information science issues, however they will publicize events and news relevant to the local Long Beach public library or other libraries in the surrounding cities. It is very likely that the lay person will not understand library jargon, so technical terms are discouraged when attempting to publish in this newspaper.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this publication are a culturally diverse people, who also do not share a similar type of job. When writing for this audience it is important to keep in mind that this is a progressive audience who cares about about state, national, and global issues.

Last updated: September 15, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Press-Telegram,” PressTelegram.com, accessed October 26, 2016, http://www.presstelegram.com/
  2. Press-Telegram.”
  3. “Press-Telegram (Long Beach),” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 26, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1415670209155/552102
  4. Press-Telegram.”
  5. Press-Telegram.”
  6. “Subscriber Services,” PressTelegram.com, accessed October 26, 2016, https://myaccount.presstelegram.com/
  7. Press-Telegram.”
  8. Press-Telegram (Long Beach).”
  9. “Share Your News,” PressTelegram.com, accessed October 26, 2016, http://www.presstelegram.com/share-your-news
  10. Share Your News.”
  11. Share Your News.”
  12. “Long Beach Press-Telegram,” LANGnews.com, accessed October 26, 2016, http://www.losangelesnewspapergroup.com/About/newspapers.shtml#
  13. “Advertising info,” PressTelegram.com, accessed September 15, 2018, http://advertising.scng.com/southern-ca-advertising-scng-ad-inquiry-long-beach-press-telegram
  14. “Cambodian general’s visit to Long Beach revives anger about its government’s murderous legacy,” LATimes.com, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-cambodia-clash-20160421-story.html
  15. “Media Kit” Presstelegram.com, accessed September 15, 2018.”
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Perspectives on History

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Perspectives on History

ISSN: 1940-80481

Website: http://www.historians.org/perspectives/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Perspectives on History is the news magazine of the American Historical Association (AHA); it serves as the, “…principal source for news and information about the discipline of history.”2

Target audience: Members of the AHA; although many members are not affiliated with an academic institution, the content of Perspectives is heavily oriented toward faculty interests.3

Publisher: American Historical Association.4

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editorial board.5

Type: Civilian: Perspectives is the primary news publication of the historical profession.6 While some members of the AHA might also be information professionals (and many other members will have a strong understanding of the library profession), most members will not be intimately familiar with the LIS profession.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: In addition to a letter from the president, and administrative news from the AHA, each issue of Perspectives on History contains several articles on diverse topics of interest to historians. While some will present original research, more common are opinion pieces, news reports on developments affecting historians, and reports on new approaches or tools for teaching or research. Each issue also contains letters to the editor, as well as extensive listings of job openings, grant programs, and upcoming conferences.7

Frequency of publication: Nine issues per year (September to May).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.historians.org/perspectives/submit

Types of contributions accepted: Articles (approximately 1,500 words), reviews, and shorter letters to the editor.9

Submission and review process: While Perspectives on History does commission articles, it also accepts both completed submissions and proposals. Articles and letters are reviewed by the editorial board, and, in the case of article submissions, the board may make suggestions for revisions.10

Editorial tone: The submission guidelines state a preference for a journalistic or conversational style. In general, the articles in Perspectives on History are written with a semi-formal tone. Additionally, authors are asked to limit the number of citations in their articles.11

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.). For copy-editing, the editors also use Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.) as well as in-house guidelines, such as gender-neutral pronouns when possible.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The organization and preservation of information are central to the tasks of both the historian and the LIS professional, and so it is not uncommon for their interests to intersect. Many developments in the Information field would be of interest to historians, especially if those developments were presented specifically for that audience. Such a presentation could generate a significant amount of name recognition if received favorably by some of the more than 15,000 members of the AHA.13

While Perspectives on History is not, strictly speaking, a scholarly publication, it does possess enough prestige that an article printed in it would add weight to a tenure or promotion cause. However, this is not a venue for early-career publishing.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Population circulation: Nearly 15,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AHA members are generally based in the United States, and the magazine is published in English.15 AHA members will be familiar with many of the same research terminologies that librarians use, but they will be completely unfamiliar with much of the jargon of information science. Similarly, historians have their own jargon, and an author writing for a history publication would do well to familiarize themselves with it.

Reader characteristics: Readership includes, “More than 60 percent of the Association’s members are professors of history, with the remaining 40 percent consisting of students, teachers, administrators, and publishers in the field.”16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As historians, the members of the AHA will generally have a strong understanding of research and research tools. However, they will not be familiar with aspects of LIS subjects outside those that apply to their discipline.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The historians who comprise the membership of the AHA are, like most faculty, very busy people. It is essential, when writing for them, to show them — in their own terms — how you can save time or make their research easier. Perspectives on History is primarily a newsletter, even though it does publish some research-based articles. A librarian writing for this history magazine would do well to simplify the presentation of their research, and focus primarily on the practical application of their results.

Last updated: September 13, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  Perspectives on History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522198707097/40994
  2. “Perspectives on History,” Historians.org, accessed September 13, 2018, https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/about-page
  3. Perspectives on History.”
  4. Perspectives on History.”
  5. “Submissions,” Historians.org, accessed September 13, 2018, https://www.historians.org/perspectives/submit
  6. Perspectives on History.”
  7. Perspectives on History.”
  8. “Subscriptions,” Historians.org, accessed October 20, 2016, https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/subscriptions
  9. Submissions.”
  10. “Guidelines for Articles,” Historians.org, accessed October 21, 2016, https://www.historians.org/perspectives/submit
  11. Guidelines for Articles.”
  12. Guidelines for Articles.”
  13. “Advertise with the AHA,” Historians.org, accessed October 21, 2016, http://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/advertising
  14. Advertise with the AHA.”
  15. Advertise with the AHA.”
  16.  “Advertise with the AHA.”
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Wired Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Wired Magazine

ISSN: 1059-1028 (Print)1

Website: http://www.wired.com/magazine/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the website, “Wired is the ultimate authority on the people and ideas changing our world.”2 The magazine examines technology and its effect on all aspects of culture, from social and recreational to business and politics.

Target audience: Readers who have an interest in technology and its effect on our culture.

Publisher: Conde Nast Publications Inc. and Wired Ventures Ltd.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Articles on the intersection of technology and business, culture, politics, science, etc.

Frequency of publication: Monthly.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.wired.com/2016/08/how-to-submit-to-wired-opinion/

Types of contributions accepted: Op-eds which are no longer than 1,000 words, and argue a certain point of view.5

Submission and review process: Pitches and/or completed pieces should be sent to opinion [at] wired.com. If sending a pitch, clearly state your thesis and why you specifically are writing about it. Include your biographical information; they want to know who you are and why you’re writing. Mark the subject of your email as “Op-Ed Pitch: Sentence Describing Your Opinion.”6

Editorial tone: Informal but polished.

Style guide used: None noted.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Wired is for the writer with fresh, definitive ideas about how the various cultures of our world will respond, influence, and share the future of technology and science. LIS authors who are passionate about innovations in the information field and how these ideas affect people will enjoy writing for this publication. Wired allows LIS authors to release themselves from the rigid boundaries of academic styles and create anecdotes rich with cultural, moral, or institutional conflict within digital technologies. Publishing for this popular magazine will also create contacts beyond the LIS field and expand the breadth of publication opportunities for the LIS writer.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print circulation of over 870,000, with a digital monthly reach of 20 million.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is based in San Francisco, CA, but international subscriptions are available. Although the magazine is in English, international subscriptions are available.8 Audience demographic information doesn’t include geographic location.

Reader characteristics: Readership is roughly 70% male, 30% female. Most have graduated college and are fairly affluent.9 Readers are described as “globally-minded thought leaders, innovators, bloggers, and connectors” who are “constantly seeking new ideas.”10

The assumption that this audience works mainly in tech industries should not be made, as this publication covers a diverse range of subjects that are affected by technology, such as culture, cars, politics, and entertainment.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Library terminology or other discipline-specific language will need to be defined for this more general audience. This popular, civilian publication may have many LIS readers who are interested in gaining a new perspective on technology from a civilian viewpoint. However, this would not be an appropriate venue to discuss LIS subject matter in detail. The majority of readers will not be familiar with LIS issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This group of readers may be very interested to learn how technology is affecting their possibly preconceived ideas of what the library offers and represents. An interest in librarian issues may be cultivated through the technology issues. Readers might be be interested in technological innovations within libraries as well as other issues such as privacy concerns.

Last updated: September 11, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1.  Wired, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 28, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522261645312/211317
  2. “Wired Advertising,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/wired-advertising
  3. “Wired,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed December 5, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1416948580144/211317
  4. “Wired Magazine Subscription,” Subscribe.Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://subscribe.wired.com/subscribe/wired/109077?source=AMS_WIR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR&pos_name=AMS_WIR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR
  5. “Here’s How to Submit to Wired Opinion,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/2016/08/how-to-submit-to-wired-opinion/
  6. Here’s How to Submit to Wired Opinion.”
  7. “2017 Media Kit,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/WMG_Media_Kit_2017_v3.pdf
  8. Wired Magazine Subscription.”
  9. 2017 Media Kit.”
  10. 2017 Media Kit.”
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Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication (GKMC) (formerly Library Review)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication (GKMC) (formerly Library Review). The title change went into effect in January 2018.1

ISSN: 2514-9342.2

Purpose, objective, or mission: GKMC “publishes contemporary research and practice which explores the way that people and organisations interact in the digital information environment.” It’s “concerned with innovation and developments in digital information, as they relate to global knowledge, communication and world memory.  It covers the creation, management, dissemination and use of the full range of information objects.”3

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc

Target audience: Academics, LIS teachers and researchers, all practicing librarians and information professionals, interested library users, and practitioners in related fields.4

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: “Submissions are welcomed on the following major themes:

Global Knowledge and Communication:

  • Social interaction, networking, social media and space
  • Free/open access to information: legal, technical,  social and managerial issues
  • Information and knowledge as agents of and for social, political, cultural and organisational change
  • Connecting the individual: personalised and meta-services
  • Sociological and philosophical aspects of information and knowledge, including service provision

World Memory: Text, Sound, Vision and Artefacts:

  • Information creation, ‘collection’ and curation
  • Information seeking, discovery and use
  • Sustainable preservation, including environmental, social, technical and legal issues
  • Sharing and facilitating individual engagement with archival, cultural and literary heritage: objects and services
  • Memory institutions and organisations: role and purpose, design, delivery, evaluation and cultural issues
  • Professional collaboration – consortia, exchange and sharing.”9

Frequency of publication: Nine times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions should belong to one of the following categories: research paper, viewpoint, technical paper, conceptual paper, case study, literature review, or general review.11

Submission and review process: The journal welcomes original, unpublished manuscripts (between 6000 and 8000 words) which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Submissions should be accompanied by a structured abstract which contains four to seven subheadings (maximum of 250 words). (Please see the How to…Write an Abstract guide here for more details.) Additionally, Emerald Publishing Limited partners with Peerwith, an organization which provides editing, translation, and other useful services. Submissions to GKMC are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts. Information on registering and using the ScholarOne Manuscripts is located here. Per the “Author Guidelines,” “Each paper is reviewed by the editor and, if it is judged suitable for this publication, it is then sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review.”12

Editorial tone: Scholarly, assumes professional industry knowledge of LIS issues.13

Style guide used: Harvard style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication is an excellent choice for authors looking to publish with a respected journal addressing global LIS issues. GKMC dates all the way back to 1927,15 and its recent name change reflects its commitment to memory institutions (e.g., museums, archives, etc.) in addition to libraries.16 Thus, authors interested in publishing with this journal have a wider range of topics to choose from than they do with traditional LIS journals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although specific circulation statistics are unavailable, the journal likely enjoys substantial readership (due to its international focus).17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the U.K. and has readers and subscribers worldwide.18 GKMC‘s international scope is exemplified by its first issue published under its new name, with topics such as “The State of Institutional Repositories and Scholarly Communications in Nigeria,” “Utilisation of Subscribed Electronic Resources by Library Users in Mzumbe Library, Tanzania,” etc.19

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to value cutting-edge research on information-based topics pertaining to libraries and other information organizations. Additionally, readers will expect articles to be meticulously researched and to clearly document all findings, in keeping with the standard current and past articles have set.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Writers can assume that readers have considerable knowledge of LIS issues and terminology, as well as information terminology in general.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

In keeping with the journal’s new name, readers will expect articles on a broad spectrum of information science issues. For instance, a 2018 article entitled “Chinese Female Preference of Cosmetic Products Information Channels” describes Chinese women’s information-seeking behaviors in regards to cosmetics.22 In other words, readers will expect articles to be varied in terms of topic selection but remain grounded in solid LIS theory.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Emerald Journal News,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://smtp.aslib.co.uk/products/journals/news_story.htm?id=7607
  2.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  3. “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  4.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  5.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  6. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  7. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  8. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  9. “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  10.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc
  13. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc
  15.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  16. “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  17.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  18.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  19. Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication 67, no. 1/2 (2018).
  20.  Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication 67, no. 1/2 (2018).
  21.  “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 12, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  22.  Yonghe Lu and Xiaohua Liu, “Chinese Female Preference of Cosmetic Products Information Channels,” Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication 67, no. 3 (2018): 180-192, https://doi.org/10.1108/GKMC-04-2017-0042.
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The Valley Chronicle

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Valley Chronicle

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://thevalleychronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: To supply residents of the San Jacinto Valley with a community newspaper featuring stories of local and national interest.1

The Valley Chronicle is the local weekly newspaper serving the San Jacinto Valley in Southern California, focusing on the cities of Hemet and San Jacinto.2

Target audience: Valley residents (Hemet, San Jacinto and Valle Vista communities) and former residents.3

Publisher: Eric Buskirk, founder of the technology company Verican, bought the paper in 2011, days before the planned cessation of the publication.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian. This is a public newspaper originating in Hemet, California.6

Medium: Printed daily newspaper as well as an online version. The online version can be updated several times a day while the print version is published once a week.7

Content: The Valley Chronicle provides local news, feature stories, local jobs, classifieds, and sports for the Hemet and San Jacinto Valley. A full-text archive is available for any article appearing over 14 days of publication. Archived articles have to be purchased.8

Frequency of publication: Once a week, on Thursdays.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:  There is a masthead in the print version noting the names of the editorial staff and the paper’s address. There are no online submission guidelines listed.

Types of contributions accepted: Letters to the editor of 300 words or less are accepted for the Opinion section. All submissions are reviewed by the editor and may be revised for spelling and grammar.

Submission and review process: Letters of up to 300 words are accepted via email (editor@thevalleychronicle.com) or U.S. mail.

Editorial tone: There are no guidelines listed. The current articles reflect a conversational and informal tone.10

Style guide used: A specific style guide was not indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Valley Chronicle is the hometown newspaper of the San Jacinto Valley and aims to appeal to that community. The paper supports local issues and has had numerous articles appear over the years about the public library and related events. Any LIS authors in the area wanting to write articles for the paper should have good reception by the newspaper staff. In past issues I have seen notices asking for local area information. Because the newspaper staff is small, it increases the chances for publication for an author who wants to write about the library and related issues. Letters to the editor and articles should avoid technical library jargon in order to appeal to San Jacinto Valley readers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to an audit report from Verified Audit Circulation, in October 2013, The Valley Chronicle has a press run of 26,625, with 2,169 paid subscriptions.11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The paper’€™s headquarters is located in Hemet and they serve the cities of Hemet and San Jacinto. Although readership may extend outside of these areas, the majority of readers are in the San Jacinto Valley. The Valley Chronicle is published in English and is considerate of the diverse cultures within the communities it serves. This is reflected in the variety of articles they publish and events that are covered in the community.12

Reader characteristics: The Valley Chronicle‘€™s readers vary from young students to the many retirees in the valley. Hemet used to be primarily retirees but now has an average median age of 45 years old.

The Valley Chronicle serves individuals in Hemet and San Jacinto. Their level of education, places of employment and professional interests vary widely. The United States Census estimated Hemet’s 2013 population to be 81,750, with the number of households at 30,096, and a median household income of $33,460.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The Valley Chronicle is a lay publication and does not specialize in library and information science. Readers may be library users and may have knowledge of library service from their own personal experiences. It is unlikely that the majority of readers will have knowledge of LIS subject matter therefore, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The majority of the readers are high school graduates with some college and few have graduate degrees.14 Authors must be aware that The Valley Chronicle‘€™s main purpose is a focus on the local community. There is an excellent chance of being published if the articles submitted are relevant to local news or events in the San Jacinto Valley.

The community this paper serves is very diverse and has readers that represent a range of different cultures and varying educational backgrounds. Authors that are interested in submitting articles may want to write articles that inform potential patrons about library services and programs directed to underserved populations. Other possibilities are articles that highlight Friends of the Library events to publicize the need for volunteers or additional funds.

Last updated: September 9th, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  2. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  3. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  4. Pierceall, K. (2011, September 16). HEMET: Investor buys Valley Chronicle, newspaper won’t close. The Press-Enterprise. Retrieved from http://www.pe.com/articles/newspaper-629591-buskirk-hemet.html
  5. Verican, Inc. (2014). Letter to the Editor. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/1communityindexbody.lasso?-token.miscgetlppage=easyaddletter1.lasso
  6. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  7. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  8. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  9. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  10. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  11. Verified Audit Circulation. (2014). The Valley Chronicle. Verified Audit Circulation. Retrieved from http://www.verifiedaudit.com/masthead.php?pid=2018&mid=000
  12. Verican, Inc. (2014). Home. The Valley Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.thevalleychronicle.com/Site.Home.html
  13. United States Census Bureau. (2014). State and County QuickFacts. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0633182.html
  14. United States Census Bureau. (2014). State and County QuickFacts. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0633182.html
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