Wiki Tags Archives: Preservation

Library Trends

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Trends

ISSN: 0024-2594 (Print) and 1559-0682 (Online)1

Website: http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “Library Trends is an essential tool for professional librarians and educators alike. Every issue explores critical trends in professional librarianship, and includes practical applications, thorough analyses, and literature reviews.”2

Target audience: College and research libraries, public libraries, library systems and networks, special libraries, and international college and research libraries.3

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly; provides resources for the professional development of librarians and educators, with its research-oriented analysis of current library trends, literature reviews, and coverage of practical applications.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Articles on library trends, practical applications, special libraries, emerging technologies, and more.8 Recent article topics include empowerment as it pertains to connectivity (specifically, Native Americans affiliated with Standing Rock, as well as parents living in rural parts of the Congo), informed asset-based pedagogy, and LIS services through WeChat in Chinese university libraries.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Library Trends does not accept single-article submissions; rather, each issue covers a specific topic, and manuscript submissions are invited and organized by guest editor(s). “Articles published in Library Trends are typically in the range of 4,000-10,000 words, not including references and supplementary material. Longer or shorter submissions can be accommodated, but this is dependent on the significance of the content and subject to consultations with the guest and general editors.”11

Submission and review process: “Articles must be submitted in Microsoft Word, typically via e-mail or an electronic file sharing service, to the guest editor, who will then shepherd it through for review.”12

Editorial tone: “The style and tone of the journal is formal rather than journalistic or popular.”13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Trends is an excellent choice for LIS authors who work well with specific writing prompts. “A guest editor proposes the theme and scope of a new issue, draws up a list of prospective authors and article topics, calls for submissions to the issue, arranges for review of the manuscripts, provides short annotations of each article’s scope, and prepares a statement of philosophy guiding issue development.”15 Working closely with a guest editor in such a structured manner allows LIS authors to hone desirable skills such as discipline and teamwork. It also provides valuable networking opportunities. All in all, this journal is a prestigious choice for both new and seasoned LIS authors.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Print circulation: 459.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the U.S.17, so it’s safe to say that a substantial portion of its readers live in the U.S. However, as mentioned above, many articles cover issues pertaining to libraries around the world, so authors should limit colloquialisms, specific cultural references, etc. to ensure their pieces appeal to readers worldwide.

Reader characteristics: No readership information is provided, although the journal allows advertisers to rent lists of subscribers who belong to a variety of scholarly associations, including the American Studies Association (ASA).18 Most readers will be interested in scholarly topics and will likely have advanced degrees. The publication notes, “Issue topics for Library Trends are developed in many ways. We value recommendations from professional librarians, archivists, and other information personnel, from members of the faculties of schools of library and information science, and from others whose concern is with issues of the management of cultural heritage,”19 suggesting that many readers value the preservation of cultural heritage as it pertains to libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to have a solid understanding of LIS issues and terminology pertaining to public libraries, international libraries, research libraries, special libraries, etc.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers expect authors to provide well-researched articles on new and emerging LIS trends.21Additionally, readers will expect a thoughtful analysis of the theme in question (e.g., empowerment for the volume 66, no. 2 issue).22 Finally, due to the journal’s international focus, readers will expect authors to be well-informed on the ways specific cultures and LIS trends intersect.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Library Trends, Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends
  2.  Library Trends, Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends
  3. “Advertising Info,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/advertising-info
  4.  Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  5.  Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  6. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  7.  Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  8.  Library Trends, Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends
  9. Antony Bryant, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Trends 66, no. 2 (2017).
  10. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  11. “Author Instructions,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/author-instructions
  12.  “Author Instructions,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/author-instructions
  13. “Guest Editing an Issue,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/guest-editing-issue
  14.  “Author Instructions,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/author-instructions
  15. “Guest Editing an Issue,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/guest-editing-issue
  16. “Advertising Info,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/advertising-info
  17. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  18. “Mailing List Rental,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 12, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/advertising-mail-lists/mailing-list-rental
  19.  “Guest Editing an Issue,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/guest-editing-issue
  20. “Advertising Info,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/advertising-info
  21. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  22. Antony Bryant, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Trends 66, no. 2 (2017).
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Library Resources & Technical Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Resources & Technical Services (LRTS)

ISSN: 2159-96101

Website: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alcts/resources/lrts/index.cfm

Purpose, objective, or mission: LRTS “is the official journal of the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services. Its purpose is to communicate thoughtful reflection on practice as well as research.”2 Also, LRTS‘s website states it is a “peer-reviewed journal that takes a critical approach to the questions and challenges facing librarians and libraries.”3

Target audience: All LIS professionals and those involved with cataloging, continuing resources, collection management, and preservation in particular.4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS scholarly journal.7

Medium: LRTS was available in print until 2014. As of 2012, it became available online.8

Content: LRTS offers scholarly articles on “collections, scholarly communication, preservation (including digitization), acquisitions (including licensing and economic aspects of acquisitions), continuing resources, cataloging (including descriptive metadata, authority control, subject analysis, and classification).”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authinst

Types of contributions accepted: “Editorials, book reviews, letters to the editor, and the annual report of the president of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services” are regularly published.11

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit original, unpublished manuscripts (between 5,000 and 10,000 words) which aren’t currently under consideration elsewhere.12 LRTS asks authors to submit their manuscripts through the site’s Editorial Manager.13 All manuscripts are subject to a double-blind peer review. “The editor and members of the editorial board will work with authors whose work is promising in order to improve methodology, analysis, or presentation.”14

Editorial tone: Per the journal guidelines, “Write the paper in a grammatically correct, simple, readable style. Use active voice to the extent possible. Avoid jargon, anthropomorphism, and informal vocabulary. The first use of acronyms must be accompanied by their full spelled-out form.”15 Additional manuscript requirements can be found on the For LRTS Authors page.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Resources & Technical Services is an excellent publication for LIS authors interested in analyzing how behind-the-scenes library work (e.g., collection management, acquisitions, etc.) impacts the profession as a whole. Of particular note, LRTS welcomes contributions from new and seasoned authors alike, noting that “For the profession to thrive, beginning professionals, as well as experienced librarians, should address the most pressing issues we face.”17 Additionally, as mentioned above, LRTS is published by the prestigious American Library Association, “the oldest and largest library association in the world.”18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 5,800. This number includes 4,600 ALA members, 860 other paying subscribers, and 340 complimentary subscriptions.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Most subscribers and ALA members live in the United States, though approximately 150 live outside the U.S.20 The journal is published in English (with technical services jargon added where necessary).21

Reader characteristics: Sixty percent of LRTS readers work in academic libraries; the other 40% work in public, school, and special libraries. In addition, approximately 75% of LRTS readers are also members of ALCTS. ALA members who subscribe to LRTS share similar interests in cataloging information, collection development, archival materials, etc. They read LRTS for information on their area of expertise, as well as strategies for managing their respective libraries. (Each journal includes a section entitled “notes on operations” that serves the latter purpose.)22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most subscribers are members of ALCTS, they will have general knowledge of LIS topics and understand technical terms and practices related to cataloging and classification (FRBR, RDA), archival studies (digitization, OCR), etc. It is vital that prospective authors be familiar with specialized practices and responsibilities relevant to this publication.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication are familiar with technical terms used in behind-the-scenes LIS operations. Additionally, studies indicate that LRTS is ranked twelfth among the seventy LIS “refereed journals in supporting promotion and tenure decisions.”24 To effectively reach this audience, articles must be well-written and thoroughly researched. The editor of LRTS suggests browsing through recent issues “to get a sense of style, length, and tone.”25

Last updated: March 8, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Library Resources & Technical Services, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520461833714/340494
  2. “What Is the Focus of LRTS?” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authfaq#1
  3.  Library Resources & Technical Services, American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts
  4. “What Is the Focus of LRTS?” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authfaq#1
  5. Library Resources & Technical Services, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520461833714/340494
  6.  Library Resources & Technical Services, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520461833714/340494
  7.  Library Resources & Technical Services, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520461833714/340494
  8.  Library Resources & Technical Services, American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts
  9.  Library Resources & Technical Services, American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts
  10. Library Resources & Technical Services, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520461833714/340494
  11.  Library Resources & Technical Services, American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts
  12. “For LRTS Authors,” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authinst
  13. “How Do I Submit a Paper?” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authfaq#4
  14. “What Is the Focus of LRTS?” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authfaq#1
  15. “For LRTS Authors,” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authinst
  16. “For LRTS Authors,” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authinst
  17. “For LRTS Authors,” American Library Association, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources/lrts/authinst
  18. “About ALA,” American Library Association, accessed March 8, 2018, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/
  19. Mary Beth Weber, email message to author, September 15, 2008.
  20. Mary Beth Weber, email message to author, September 15, 2008.
  21.  Library Resources & Technical Services, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520461833714/340494
  22. Mary Beth Weber, email message to author, September 15, 2008.
  23. Mary Beth Weber, email message to author, September 15, 2008.
  24. Mary Beth Weber, email message to author, September 15, 2008.
  25. Mary Beth Weber, email message to author, September 15, 2008.
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Facet Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Facet Publishing

Website: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Facet Publishing is “the commercial and publishing and bookselling arm of CILIP: the Library and Information Association,” with a focus on global business and attention to detail.1

Target audience: LIS professionals.

Owner: CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: LIS professional books, textbooks, series and ebooks.

Medium: Print and electronic, though not all titles are available in both formats.

Topics covered: Over thirty LIS subjects are published by Facet, ranging from academic libraries to website & intranet management.2

Number of titles published per year: Exact number unknown, though Facet’s ‘Recently published’ page lists thirty books published between April 2017 and January 2018.3

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php

Types of submissions accepted: Facets asks potential authors to “think carefully about the intended market, the competition and the unique selling points”4 before sending in a proposal. They are looking for “a mixture of content: practice oriented books for working professionals, textbooks that particularly dovetail with the iSchools curriculum and emerging developments and thinking in research for a scholarly audience.”5 Book proposals should contain sections regarding the book’s content, market, and competition, as well as information about yourself.

The content:

  • “A synopsis of the book, including a detailed outline of the work with intended chapter headings, together with a description of each chapter and its estimated length
  • An estimate of the total length of the book
  • A rationale describing why the book is needed, what it hopes to achieve and how, and any new ideas and developments you intend to cover, or new approaches that you intend to use. Notes on additional features such as case studies, checklists, diagrams, photographs, software, etc.
  • Sample material (one or two chapters), if possible
  • An estimated date of manuscript completion”6

The market:

  • “Who is the intended reader?
  • How large do you estimate the potential readership to be?
  • A description of the potential readers (e.g., students, practising library and information professionals/managers, policy makers) with specific details about why they need this book:
    • what sectors/organizations they are working in
    • the required level of professional expertise
    • courses
  • Are there any potential secondary audiences and markets? (e.g., museums, archives, publishers, record managers)
  • Is there international potential? Where? Why?”7

The competition: “Does this book fill a gap in the market? What evidence is there for this gap? Provide a list of any competing books with price, publisher, year of publication, and any other useful information, together with a comment as to how your book differs, what makes it superior and how it will compete.”8

Yourself: “Details of yourself, your experience, related activities, and any other previous publications (whether articles, reports or books).”9

Submission and review process: All proposals should be submitted to the Commissioning Editor. If a proposal is accepted, the author and commissioning editors will work together on a realistic schedule for the book’s publication.10 Facet prides themselves on timeliness and detail, and are quick to market new publications.11

Editorial tone: None listed, but consider that Facet publishes for students and professionals already well versed in the LIS field.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Facet publishes across a wide array of LIS topics, making them a publisher to strongly consider no matter what your subject field may be. Potential authors should keep in mind that Facet requests very detailed information from each book proposal, so authors should have a clear idea of their marketability and relevance. Authors should be sure to carefully read the book submission guidelines to ensure that all questions have been addressed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s readers

Publication circulation: Based in the United Kingdom, but Facet has agents and representatives around the world.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Facet is the bookseller for CILIP, a library and science information association in the U.K., though they emphasize that their publications extend into the international LIS world. They have representatives and agents in countries all over the world, making publications available to a world wide audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Facet publications are information professionals, though there may be a secondary audience in fields such as archives and museums. Facet’s bestselling publications include titles such as Managing Records: A handbook of principles and practice and Practical Cataloging, so it can be assumed that their readers have more than a casual knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics and professionals with a strong knowledge or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Facet publishes for an audience in and outside of the United Kingdom. Their works range from LIS textbooks to simple ‘No-nonsense’ guides about topics such as archives and legal issues in Web 2.0, showing that Facet’s readers vary in their knowledge on contemporary LIS topics. This span in readership could make Facet a viable publisher for potential authors across many different subjects.

Last updated: February 26, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/
  2. “Home,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/index.php/a>
  3. “Recently published,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/category.php?category_code=38
  4. “Book proposal guidelines,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php
  5. “Write for us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/write_for_us.php
  6. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  7. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  8. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  9. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  10. “The publishing process,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February, 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/Guidance_for_Existing_Authors/04%20The%20publishing%20process%20Jan%202012.pdf
  11. “About us.”
  12. “About Us.”
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Oral History Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Oral History Review

ISSN: 0094-0798 (print), 1533-8592 (online)

Website: https://academic.oup.com/ohr and http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The mission of The Oral History Review “is to explore the nature and significance of oral history and advance understanding of the field among scholars, educators, practitioners, and the general public.” The journal reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the field of oral history. It is considered “the U.S. journal of record for the theory and practice of oral history and related fields.”1

Target audience: The Oral History Review is a publication of the Oral History Association, which has an international membership and “serves a broad and diverse audience including teachers, students, community historians, archivists, librarians, and filmmakers.” The journal is  international and cross-disciplinary, reaching “people committed to the value of oral history.”2

Publisher: Oxford University Press.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Available in print and online.5

Content: The Oral History Review “publishes narrative and analytical articles and reviews…that present and use oral history in unique and significant ways and that contribute to the understanding of the nature of oral history and memory.”6 A typical issue includes an editor’s introduction; original articles on research, method, practice, and theory; articles on pedagogy; and media and book reviews. Occasionally, the journal will publish a guest-edited special section, such as Looking Back, Looking Forward: Fifty Years of Oral History.7

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines appear on the Oral History Association website (http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/) and on the Oxford University Press website (https://academic.oup.com/ohr/pages/Instructions_To_Authors).

Types of contributions accepted:  The Oral History Review “publishes narrative and analytical articles and reviews, in print and multimedia formats, that present and use oral history in unique and significant ways and that contribute to the understanding of the nature of oral history and memory. It seeks previously unpublished works that demonstrate high-quality research and that offer new insight into oral history practice, methodology, theory, and pedagogy.”8

Submission and review process: Manuscripts for articles are submitted through ScholarOne Manuscripts for blinded peer review. Review manuscripts are submitted via email attachment to the appropriate editor.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition).10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS professionals to contribute to this publication. Guidance can be provided about cataloging and preservation methodologies for oral history collections. LIS professionals can also weigh in on the ethics of information, including collection, copyright, distribution, and access. LIS professionals should also be aware that the Oral History Association has published goals, guidelines, and standards for oral history interviews.11 Prospective authors should also explore the journal’s blog.12

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Oral History Association members receive a free subscription and online access to current and back issues. Other circulation data are not available.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Oral History Association is located in the United States but has an international membership. The Oral History Review is published in English but “reflects the international scope of the field and encourages work from international authors and about international topics.”14

Reader characteristics: Readers have a high knowledge of and interest in oral history, from both a local and an international perspective. Readers will expect articles that are well-written and original and that exemplify the best practices and principals in oral history research and practice, as established by the Oral History Association.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is not strictly an LIS publication, although librarians do read it and contribute to its content. Articles should avoid LIS jargon and be directed toward a broad, international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Oral History Review is written for an academic and international audience, so writers who contribute should be sure that their articles exhibit the knowledge and novelty that the experienced readership has come to expect. This could make it a difficult journal for oral history novices to write for. LIS professionals and students who have expert knowledge of the field of oral history and its preservation and archival techniques would find a good outlet in this journal.

Last updated: February 16, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  The Oral History Review, Oral History Association, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/.
  2. “About OHA,” Oral History Association, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.oralhistory.org/about/.
  3. The Oral History Review, Oxford Academic, accessed February 16, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/ohr.
  4. “Information for Authors,” The Oral History Review, Oxford Academic, accessed February 16, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/ohr/pages/Instructions_To_Authors.
  5.  The Oral History Review, Oral History Association.
  6. “About the Journal,” The Oral History Review, Oxford Academic, accessed February 16, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/ohr/pages/About.
  7. Teresa Barnett, “Guest Editor’s Introduction,” The Oral History Review 43, no. 2 (Summer/Fall 2016): 315-317, https://doi.org/10.1093/ohr/ohw079.
  8. “Information for Authors.”
  9. “Information for Authors.”
  10. “Information for Authors.”
  11. “Principles for Oral History and Best Practices for Oral History,” Oral History Association, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.oralhistory.org/about/principles-and-practices/.
  12. “About the Blog,” oralhistoryreview.org, accessed February 16, 2018, http://oralhistoryreview.org/about/.
  13.  The Oral History Review, Oral History Association.
  14. “Information for Authors.”
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

ISSN: 1069-1316 (Print) and 1545-2530 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”2

Target audience: Academic library staff3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.6 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”7

Medium: Print and online8

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”11 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.12

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .13

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”14

Editorial tone: Academic15, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.16

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”18 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,20 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”21

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”22 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”23 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”25

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”26

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  College & Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/773306169
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  7. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  8.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  10. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  12. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  14. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  15. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  19. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  21. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  22. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  23. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  24. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  25. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  26. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
Continue Reading

Information Discovery and Delivery

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Discovery and Delivery, formerly Interlending and Document Supply

ISSN: 2398-6247 (Print) and 2398-6255 (Online)1

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal “covers information discovery and access for digital information researchers.”2

Target audience: Information Discovery and Delivery is read by “educators, knowledge professionals in education and cultural organizations, knowledge managers in media, health care, and government, as well as librarians.”3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: This journal investigates the transport, flow, tracking, exchange, and sharing of information within and between libraries. It also covers digital information capture, packaging, and storage by repositories of all kinds.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles, opinion pieces, product and service reviews, theoretical works, case studies, literature reviews, and descriptive or instructional papers10

Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 4,000 and 6,000 words in length, including references and appendices.11

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. Individuals submitting manuscripts are invited to register, create an account, and go through a submission process to upload an article.12 Emerald Publishing offers and editing service for non-native English-speaking authors.13 Authors should also consult the Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that  submissions are complete.14 According to the author guidelines, “each paper is reviewed by the editor and, if it is judged suitable for this publication, it is then sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review.”15 Submissions are welcome at any time, though authors may wish to consult the schedule of submission deadlines for upcoming issues of the journal.16

Editorial tone: Though the guidelines for submission do not discuss tone, the writing is in an academic style and often technical.

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17 References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS practitioners who are responsible the discovery and transmission of digital information, this journal offers an excellent opportunity to share knowledge. As Information Discovery and Delivery emphasizes the sharing of information within and between repositories the world over,19 there is a strong international component to the content of this publication. Authors published in this journal will also have an excellent opportunity to draw attention to practices unique to their geographical area in this specialized field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information Discovery and Delivery is written in English.20 Given that the editorial advisory board represents countries as diverse as the United Kingdom, France, Turkey, Denmark, Lebanon, Australia, Taiwan, Saudi Arabia, and the United States, an international readership may be assumed.21

Reader characteristics: As this journal’s focus is in the specific field of information retrieval and transmission, readers will share an interest in this topic. 22 Representing countries worldwide, articles in this journal will be read by a global audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior librarians. 23 They will also have specific knowledge about document lending and supply, and will be comfortable with terminology from this field of library and information science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Discovery and Delivery is read by a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Subscribers will expect thorough and professional research on digital information issues in libraries. Being international in scope, readers will be open to cultural differences in approaching this topic, and will welcome innovative ideas.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Information Discovery and Delivery, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/475322977
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  4. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  5. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  6. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  7. “Purchase Information,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  9. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  13. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  17. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  18. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  20. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  21. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Group Publishing,  accessed May 13, 2017 http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=idd
  22. Emerald Group Publishing, Ltd. (2015). Journal Information. Interlending and Document Supply. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=ilds
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

ISSN: 1931-54731

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Society of California Archivists Newsletter is the official voice of SCA. It carries professional news, reports the Board’s actions, announces SCA seminars, and workshops, and informs members of other archival issues and events of interest.2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.6

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.7

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archive, and museum communities.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from managers and directors to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists Newsletter is distributed to members and is open access with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses on archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and non-academic.


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1.  SCA Newsletter, Society of California Archivists (SCA), accessed May 9, 2020, http://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from https://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter/
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2020). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4. ProQuest. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  6. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2020). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9. Society of California Archivists. (2020). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
Continue Reading

Family Tree Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Family Tree Magazine

ISSN: 1529-0298 (Print)1

Website: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A how-to publication for readers interested in family history and genealogy research.2

Target audience: It is directed toward beginner genealogists and family history enthusiasts.3

Publisher: F+W Media, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication. The publication describes itself magazine as a special-interest consumer magazine.6

Medium: Print magazine with online content and research tools.7

Content: Family Tree Magazine covers all areas of family history including ethnic heritage, family reunions, scrapbooking, oral histories and memoirs.8 A typical issue might include articles, lists of resources (including apps, websites, and databases), tutorials, and tips.9

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should appeal to a general audience: non technical enough for beginning genealogists but informative enough for seasoned researchers. New writers are encouraged to submit short pieces of new online resources for the Toolkit section, or short, amusing stories of “the lighter side of family history.” The editors caution that personal experiences or the histories of specific families are not accepted. 11

Submission and review process: Writers should query with a story idea; completed manuscripts are not accepted. Queries should be emailed to ftmedit@fwmedia.com only and include writing samples. Issues are planned at least six months in advance, with the December issue planned a year in advance.12

Editorial tone: The publisher says the tone is “bright, breezy, helpful and encouraging,” but warns writers never to talk down to the reader.13 The typical article has short paragraphs of two or three sentences with vocabulary that might be found in Good Housekeeping or Reader’s Digest.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be a good publication for reference librarians, adult services librarians and LIS students who are knowledgeable about genealogy and history resources. The editors specifically mention wanting articles about new reference materials, and past articles have focused on organizing research materials. They are also looking for how-to articles that will help beginners start their family history projects.14 Librarians have a good understanding of what questions patrons generally ask about family history research; those questions can be turned into simple, informative article ideas for this magazine.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 75,000.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This US based publication is distributed nationally on newsstands, through a retail sales program, for purchase as a download on their website, and by subscription.16 The editorial staff does not provide any statistics on geographic distribution of readers. Family Tree Magazine is printed in English.The editorial staff does not offer any information on ethnic orientation of its readers; however, they welcome articles on ethnic and cultural heritage. Feature articles on how to trace Caribbean, African American, Japanese and European roots and Latin American research have been published.17

Reader characteristics: The publisher provides a reader profile in its media kit. According to the profile, the average reader is 63 years old. The audience is largely female, and 89% of readers have education beyond high school. The readers are passionate about family history, averaging almost eleven hours per week on genealogy-related activities, with most of that time spent online.  On average they spend in excess of $500 a year on this hobby.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These readers will most likely have limited knowledge of LIS-related topics, so technical subjects as well as LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The comprehensive reader’s profile is a writer’s dream come true. That coupled with details from the editorial staff on what they are looking for should provide plenty of guidance on subject matter and writing style. LIS authors can look at the typical reader and see that the overwhelming number are well-educated women, aged 60 and older.19 Perhaps an article about organizing home office spaces (using the cataloging techniques that are familiar to a librarian) would be popular. And the fact that the majority use the Internet each day offers a whole range of possibilities for articles about researching online or how to evaluate a website. Readers who travel for their hobby will want to know about travel resource materials. The well-educated reader might want an online resource for translating family documents (like a birth certificate) that are in a foreign language. Those who are retired might be interested in historical picture books that they can read to their grandchildren to help them begin to learn about their heritage. The possibilities are endless.

Last updated: October 10, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Family Tree Magazine, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521894414381/310957
  2. “About Us,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/Info/About_Us
  3. About Us.”
  4. About Us.”
  5. “Writer’s Guidelines,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines
  6. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  7. About Us.”
  8.  “About Us.”
  9. “Family Tree Magazine March/April 2016,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.shopfamilytree.com/family-tree-magazine-march-april-2016
  10. About Us.”
  11. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  12. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  13.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  14.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  15. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  16. “2014 Media Planner,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/FTM_media_kit_2014.pdf
  17. “Article Index,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/ArticleIndex
  18. “2015 Media Planner,” Family Tree Magazine, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/2015_FTM_media_kit.pdf
  19. 2015 Media Planner.”
Continue Reading

Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

ISSN: 2163-52261

Website: http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the official publication of LITA (the Library and Information Technology Association), ITAL is primarily concerned with keeping LITA members informed about the technologies that shape their workplaces and profession.2

Target audience: Members of LITA, primarily librarians and information professionals3

Publisher: Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: ITAL is an open-access, electronic-only publication.7 Full-text versions of all content published since 2004, as well as tables of contents and abstracts for earlier issues, are also available electronically.8

Content: ITAL “publishes material related to all aspects of information technology in all types of libraries. Topic areas include, but are not limited to, library automation, digital libraries, metadata, identity management, distributed systems and networks, computer security, intellectual property rights, technical standards, geographic information systems, desktop applications, information discovery tools, web-scale library services, cloud computing, digital preservation, data curation, virtualization, search-engine optimization, emerging technologies, social networking, open data, the semantic web, mobile services and applications, usability, universal access to technology, library consortia, vendor relations, and digital humanities.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

It is important to note, when perusing author information such as this, that specific types of submissions, such as book or software reviews, may require contact with someone other than the main editor. Failing to note such differences could result in a solid article or query being lost in the shuffle.

Location of submission guidelines: https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: ITAL accepts feature articles that contain original research or in-depth analysis of 3,000 to 5,000 words or longer. Communications of 1,000 to 3,000 words are also accepted, such as “brief research reports, technical findings, and application notes,”as well as tutorials and letters to the editor.11

Submission and review process: Individuals must submit original and unpublished manuscripts only. Manuscripts that are being considered elsewhere should not be submitted. Responsibility for the accuracy of the information falls upon the author of the manuscript. This includes references, URLs, and statistics.12

Articles are to be submitted online; registration and login are required.13

Editorial tone: Formal, with most articles including an abstract. Articles are evidence and research-based, written in language that is clear and direct.14

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style for notes and bibliography15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals or students focusing on the technical services side of libraries who can contribute to the community’€™s knowledge of emerging technologies should consider writing for this publication. Opportunity is also ripe for those with an understanding of technical services and public services who can explain complicated technical jargon and its importance to the uninitiated. A survey of recent articles includes usability of next-generation catalogs such as VuFind, the application of geographic information systems (GIS) in LIS research, widgets, interoperable catalog models, semantic web technologies, web design for patrons with disabilities, applying CIPA regulations and other issues. Tutorials included cloud computing and digitizing documents to make them accessible on the web. Articles and tutorials are pragmatic, so topics and information presented need to be relevant to professionals in their LIS workplace.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics not available, but as ITAL is an open-access, online publication a wide readership may be assumed.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LITA is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) and is therefore located in the United States,18 but subscribers come from all over the world. ITAL is published in English.19

Reader characteristics: ITAL is read by administrators, librarians, and information technologists interested in all aspects of information technology. These readers include library directors, systems managers and analysts, automation consultants, and both technical and public service librarians using technology to serve users.20

Readers are interested in subjects that include library automation, access to information through technology, digital libraries, electronic journals and electronic publishing, computer security, intellectual property rights, library consortia, technical standards, and software development. Articles display a strong emphasis on service orientation. Readers likely share this value.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This journal covers a broad spectrum of topics and issues relating to LIS subject matter, and most articles would be comprehensible to any librarian; specialized knowledge of technical services is usually not assumed.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because readers come from both technical and public services, papers should not be only technical in nature. Demonstrating how a technology can be leveraged to solve a human need, whether that is user experience or library operations, will be fundamental. In a survey of articles, many papers demonstrate the impact of technologies on libraries, the communities they serve, and on society. Authors also emphasize service orientation, a value readers likely share.

Last updated: May 7, 2017


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523477092994/48154
  2. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  3. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  4. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  5. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  6. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  7. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,  http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  8. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  9. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  10. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  11. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  17. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  18. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  19. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  20. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  21. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  22. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
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Information & Culture: A Journal of History (formerly Libraries and the Cultural Record)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information & Culture: A Journal of History

The journal has gone through a number of name changes:
1966-1972, Journal of Library History
 1972-1973, Journal of Library History, Philosophy, and Comparative Librarianship
1973-1987, Journal of Library History
1987-2006, Libraries and Culture
2006-2012, Libraries and the Cultural Record.1

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.infoculturejournal.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per journal website, Information & Culture “. . . publishes high-quality, peer reviewed articles on topics related to the history of information. The journal’s scope has broadened significantly in recent years to encompass the historical study of any topic that would fall under the purview of the modern interdisciplinary schools of information . . . However, the journal honors its (50+ year) heritage by continuing to publish in the areas of library, archival, museum, conservation, and information science history.”2

Target audience: Library historians and other scholars whose interests might relate to the history of information, such as historians of computing, labor, gender, economics, business, and politics; critical theorists, and scholars of cultural studies, science, and technology3

Publisher: University of Texas Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS and history, scholarly6

Medium: Print, with online subscriptions available.7

Content: The journal website states, “In keeping with the spirit of information studies, the work is human centered and explores the interactions of people, organizations, and societies with information and technologies. Social and cultural context of information and information technology, viewed from a historical perspective, is at the heart of the journal’s interests.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles10 and book reviews11 and book reviews

Among the content requirements are that an article be primarily historical in nature, take an interpretative, not merely descriptive approach, and have a clearly stated thesis supported by appropriately cited evidence.12

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email, accompanied by a cover sheet and abstract, in MS Word format. Authors are asked to provide the names of at least two potential reviewers.13 Submission includes an initial review by the editor, and, if accepted, a double blind process by at least two outside reviewers.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors may find that it is a bit more difficult to get articles published in this journal as the acceptance rate is less than half. However, the journal is very prestigious. The editors state that “we do not yet have enough data to make an accurate forecast of acceptance rates. For the period April 2011-March 2012 our acceptance rate was 20.5%. We anticipate that the acceptance rate will stabilize at well below 50 percent of submitted manuscripts.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Exact submission numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is worldwide. However, based on the content of the articles, most readers most likely reside in North America, South America, and Europe. In past issues, there were articles about Mexico, France, and the United States as well as a review of a book in German. This indicates the editorial board expects reader interest to be broader than merely North America.18 The journal publishes articles in English,19 but the topics are wide ranging and are not necessarily limited to the English-speaking world.20

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are generally scholars and professionals in a variety of fields, but especially history and library science. This publication has a broad base of support in a variety of disciplines. Articles could easily fit under history, literature, art, and political science as well as library science.21 The professional interests of the readers of this publication would be generally academic and scholarly. It might fit those working in all manners of libraries, museums, and archives as well as both faculty and students at academic institutions. The journal strongly follows a particular historiography, that of social and cultural history. In this sense, it is far less likely that one would find an article that is based in political history or in reconstructing grand narratives.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS subject matter is very high when it comes to the historical aspects of the profession. Because other academics in other disciplines are actively participating in the creation and use of this journal,  knowledge of current information profession issues might not be as high as it is with other LIS-specific journals.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication are generally highly educated, scholarly, and professional. Potential authors need to be exact and precise and have expertise in the field. The journal, while overwhelmingly about library science topics, is also very rooted in historical study. The editorial staff and the readers are exacting in their quest for solid scholarship.

Last updated: May 6, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  2. “Information & Culture,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org
  3. “Information & Culture,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  4. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  5. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  6. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  7. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  8. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  9. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  10. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  11. “Book Reviews,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/book_reviews
  12.  “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  13. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017,  http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  14. “Peer Review Process,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  15. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  16. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  17.  “Peer Review Process,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  18. “Archive,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/archive
  19. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  20. “Archive,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/archive
  21. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  22. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  23. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
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