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Library Management (LM)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

ISSN: 0143-51241

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”2

Target audience:Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”8

Content: “The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright”9

Frequency of publication: Nine times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews, 3000 to 6000 words in Microsoft Word format.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Management topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13 Also, while the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas,” many articles have a practical tone when addressing individual libraries.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Management is a highly informative publication which explores topics pertaining to libraries all over the world. For instance, in volume 39, issue 3/4, the topics covered include the economic crisis as it pertains to public libraries in Greece, agricultural libraries in Northern India, and a SWOT analysis of Jamaican academic libraries.16 The journal should also be of particular interest to Chinese authors, due to its annual Chinese supplement.17

LIS authors, whether professional librarians or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into current issues in library management and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, however, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English and published in the UK but is international in scope.19 The editor lives in Australia, while the editorial board members live in various countries throughout the world, including the UK, Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and South Africa.20

To ensure international voices have an opportunity to be heard, Emerald offers an editing service, Peerwith, which offers help with “language editing and translation.”21

Also, the aforementioned annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”22 with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”23

Reader characteristics: Most readers are senior managers and academics. Due to the journal’s international scope, its audience will have diverse cultural experiences. However, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because of this publication’s primary focus on LIS managers, readers are likely to have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LM’s audience is a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough, and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience. Ideally, authors should hold LIS managerial positions themselves to enhance their credibility in the eyes of their readers.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  4. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  5. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  6. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  7.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  10. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  13.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  14. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Steve O’Connor, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Management 39, no. 3/4 (2018).
  17.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  18. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  19. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  20. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  21. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  22. “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  23.  “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  24.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  25.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

ISSN: 1052-5726 (print), 1052-5722 (online)

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian “is a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive “discourse and action on library issues.” Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG) members receive a subscription, or individuals can subscribe without joining the guild.2

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, by the editorial board.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online. Full text of complete issues and individual articles are available online.5

Content: Progressive Librarian publishes “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”6 Articles cover topics such as sexual violence, social justice, sustainability, youth empowerment, intellectual freedom, international activism, and a wide variety of progressive critiques and analyses of national and international LIS issues.

Frequency of publication:  Two times a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: A Call for Papers for future issues of Progressive Librarian asks for “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, documents, artwork and poetry that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”8

Submission and review process: All manuscripts submitted to Progressive Librarian are reviewed by each member of the editorial board. Manuscripts outside the expertise of board members are sent to outside reviewers for comment and evaluation. The journal also welcomes prints and digital images. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions before publication. For book reviews, please contact the book review editor.9

Editorial tone: The articles are innovative and present alternative views to those of other LIS publications. The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.

Style guide used: Authors may use their preferred citation style “for in-text (parenthetical) citations, footnotes, and endnotes, as well as a bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian), works cited (MLA), and references (APA & Harvard) sections.” The citation style has to be used consistently throughout the manuscript.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Progressive Librarian is a innovative and welcoming journal for LIS authors who write about any issue related to progressive librarianship or the relationship of library and information science to issues of social justice and responsibility. Articles are international in scope and are often focused on current events and actions. LIS professionals and students may submit artwork and poetry, as well as documents, reports, and bibliographies, on progressive issues.

Prospective authors should read the editorial in issue 45 for an understanding of the journal’s philosophy and perspective,11 as well as the Progressive Librarians Guild Statement of Purpose.12

For LIS graduate students, each year the PLG awards the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize “for the best paper about some aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.” The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian, and the winner receives a $500 stipend toward travel costs to the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, where the award is presented.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal as an international readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, although there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.14 As with any scholarly writing, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.15 The readership is made up of librarians, librarian graduate students, and library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and in how politics informs LIS practices.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals, or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have an understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about news and events in the LIS world, and about national and international politics and current events, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues, or events others may not be familiar with.

 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Broadly speaking, the readers of Progressive Librarian are LIS professionals, scholars, and students who consider themselves socially and politically progressive and who bring their passion for social justice and action to their work in various library and information settings. PLG works against the current idea that “the library is merely a neutral institutional mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society of atomized information consumers.” Rather,  a “progressive librarianship demands the recognition of the idea that libraries for the people has been one of the principal anchors of an extended free public sphere which makes an independent democratic civil society possible, something which must be defended and extended.”16

 

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml.
  2. “Subscription,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_subscribe.shtml.
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml.
  5. “Archive,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml.
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Call for Papers,” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017): verso, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45.pdf.
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. Elaine Harger, “Editorial: Why PLG? Why Paper? Why Bridge Generations?” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017),  http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45/003.pdf.
  12. “Statement of Purpose,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml.
  13. “The Braverman Award,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml.
  14. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  15. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  16. “PLG’s History,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/history.shtml.
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Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

ISSN: 2157-0396 (Print) and 2161-3540 (Online)1

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”2

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,3 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.4

Publisher: Georgia Library Association5

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.6 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.7

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.8 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,9 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online10

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.11

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”12

Frequency of publication: Quarterly13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.14

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”15

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”16

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.17

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.18

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,20 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.22 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,23 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,24 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia25 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.26 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,27 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1.  Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/465320178
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  4. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  7. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  8. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  10. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  11. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  12. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  13. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  14. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  15. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  16. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  17. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  18. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  19. (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  20. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  21. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  22. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  27. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
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Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table 

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Endnotes Committee is part of the ALA’€™s New Members Round Table (NMRT), a which consists of ALA members with fewer than ten years’ membership. The committee’s mission is to provide support for librarians who want or need to publish scholarly articles, and to publish peer-reviewed research by NMRT members and directed at new librarians.1

The committee oversees publication of Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table.2

Target audience: American Library Association new members, specifically those who are part of the New Members Round Table (ALA NMRT)3

Publisher: American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the Endnotes Committee Charge, “Each edition of the journal will contain 2-4 scholarly articles written by members of NMRT, as well as web site reviews and scholarly book reviews of titles relevant to new librarians.”8

Frequency of publication: One issue per year, with the possibility of more issues if there is interest. The editor welcomes suggestions for special themed issues from NMRT members.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-endnotes-committee

Types of contributions accepted: Original research, practitioner-based research, case studies, book and media reviews. Articles range between 2000-4000 words; book and media reviews 300-500.10

Submission and review process: Endnotes accepts article submissions on a rolling basis, but NMRT members are encouraged to contact the editor about proposals to determine if it fits the journal’€™s scope.11

Send typed, double-spaced MS word docs to nmrtendnotesjournal@gmail.com.12

The committee reviews manuscripts via an double-blind peer-review process. Accepted manuscripts will be returned with committee suggestions for edits, and authors will have about a month to revise the manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly, but not too formal. The articles and reviews are almost conversational.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

To submit a manuscript for publication, register with the ALA and then join the NMRT, whose mission is to provide support for librarians with that specific goal. The publication is for NMRT members and directed at new librarians.€“ Endnotes is the perfect place for LIS students and new authors to submit a query to supportive editorial staff and among a group of peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Endnotes is an open-access journal available online for anyone to read, but is primarily for members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALA is based in Chicago, IL, but the website and newsletter are online open access, available to anyone with internet access, or through a library. œA network of affiliates, chapters, and other organizations enables the ALA to reach a broad audience. Although it is written in American English and published by the American Library Association, the ALA does not limit itself to U.S. library concerns.17

Reader characteristics: Most readers of Endnotes, and all authors, are members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.18 ALA members include “librarians, library trustees, and other interested people from every state and many nations. The association serves public, state, school, and academic libraries, as well as special libraries for people working in government, commerce and industry, the arts, and the armed services or in hospitals, prisons, and other institutions.”19 The ALA’€™s mission is “€œto provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this scholarly journal are part of the ALA’€™s New Members Roundtable, so they may be expected to be aware of current LIS trends and terminology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are primarily new members to the ALA, and are interested in reading the most recent LIS scholarly research, news, reviews and updates in order to further their education or careers, and to inspire their own research and writing. This is an ideal publication for new authors to consider, and as it’€™s part of the ALA, has built-in credibility and respect, as well as readership.

Last updated: April 22. 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “About NMRT,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-nmrt
  2. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  3. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  4. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  5. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  6. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  7. American Library Association. (2014). Endnotes Committee. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  8. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  9. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  10. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  11. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  12. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  13. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  14. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  15. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  16. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  17. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  18. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  19. “Membership,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  20. “Mission,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  21. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
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Federal Librarian

Note: The most recent edition of this publication was the Winter/February 2018 issue. This profile is being retired as of June 2019 and will be a candidate for deletion in 2020. At that time, please contact the editor again to verify that the publication is no longer active.

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Federal Librarian

ISSN: 1940-3534(Print) and 0273-1061 (Online)1

Website: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Federal Librarian is the official newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Libraries Round Table (FAFLRT).2 Federal and Armed Forces Libraries represent a wide variety of library types: research, law, school, and public. Librarians working for the U.S. federal government have opportunities that span the library field, from direct services to the public, to in-depth research support for America’€™s military and civilian services.

The Round Table has developed a successful series of programs to inform new and incoming library professionals about careers in federal libraries, and to assist established federal librarians grow their careers. FAFLRT also sponsors awards and recognition for outstanding federal librarians.3

From their site: FAFLRT’s mission is “to promote library and information service and the library and information profession in the federal and armed forces communities; to promote appropriate utilization of federal and armed forces library and information resources and facilities; and to provide an environment for the stimulation of research and development relating to the planning, development, and operation of federal and armed forces libraries.”4

Target audience: Members of the Federal and Armed Forces Round Table. “FAFLRT membership is open to all individual ALA Members interested in issues affecting Federal or Armed Forces libraries.”5

Publisher: American Library Association.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: LIS professional and trade publication.8

Medium: Online.9

Content: Federal Librarian “presents recent developments and events of interest to Federal and Armed Forces library community, including news and reports on international, federal, DoD, state and local government issues.”10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing

Types of contributions accepted: Federal Librarian includes a mix of current events, trends or issues affecting member libraries, tributes, feature articles, award recipients and a message from the FAFLRT president.12

Submission and review process: Send contributions to:

Anne Harrison, interim editor
6200 Wilson Blvd. Apt. 1107
Falls Church, VA 22044
telephone:  202-707-4834
E-mail: harrisonanne57@yahoo.com

The review process is not outlined.13

Editorial tone: Reviewing the latest issue (Vol. 31 #4, 2014) provides a selection of items ranging from an accounting of closures at base libraries, to a lively description of the first “Library Con” held at the JBER Library, to a tribute to a retiring librarian. Articles are written in an informal tone.14

Style guide used: None specified.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Federal Librarian offers the LIS author interested in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries a forum for informal professional discussions of issues and events that are important to this community. As one of the current strategic goals of the FAFLRT is to “establish new and continue existing liaison relationships with relevant ALA committees and round tables”16, one can assume that this journal would also be open to writers from various areas of librarianship to build connections with the FAFLRT through its newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Federal Librarian subscription base is approximately 600.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership of the Federal Librarian covers a wide range of LIS professionals in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries, from all over the U.S. These libraries run the gamut from public, school, military academic or special.18 Bearing in mind the wide variety of issues that are of interest to the reader, but also the overriding cultural umbrella of membership in the FAFLRT, potential authors should tailor their submissions to this group. Articles are written in American English.19

Reader characteristics: Demographics are not given for the readers of Federal Librarian. However, because subscription is included in membership to FAFLRT, readers are among 600 federal and military LIS professionals.20 Readers have a vested interest in matters concerning library and information services in the federal and armed forces communities.21

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Federal Librarian work and live in Federal and Armed Forces communities.22 Authors who also belong to this community would have an interested and supportive audience for their writing. Because the issues examined in the Federal Librarian encourage professional development of their LIS peers, the potential impact on the published author’s career is great. This is a special community who, with their shared interests, would be a knowledgeable and interested audience for the potential author.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Federal Librarian, American Library Association, accessed March 21, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1701525525
  2. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  3.  American Library Association. (2016). Initiatives and Projects. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/initiatives
  4.  American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  5.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  8.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  9.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  10. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  11.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  12.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  13.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  14.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/newsletters/2014_vol.31_4_Federal_Librarian.pdf
  15.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  16. American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  17.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  18. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  19.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  20. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  21.  Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  22.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
Continue Reading

Stanford Social Innovation Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR)

ISSN: 1542-7099 (Print)1

Website: http://www.ssireview.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “To advance, educate, and inspire the field of social innovation by seeking out, cultivating, and disseminating the best in research- and practice-based knowledge.”2 The goal is to bring together academic theory and practice to create ideas for achieving social change, and to inform and inspire new social change.

Target audience: Leaders in nonprofit organizations, foundations, or other philanthropic institutions, along with people working in business, government, academia, and other fields.3

Publisher: Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society at Stanford University.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The website is extensive, and includes links to past issues as well as original content: blogs, webinars, podcasts, SSIR events. The SSIR covers people and organizations whose work has an impact on business, nonprofit, and government sectors, particularly those with cross-sector ideas and solutions to global issues. Subjects include social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, and philanthropic strategies, as well as educational reform, poverty alleviation, and environmental protection.7

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: External authors (anyone outside SSIR’s editorial team) can submit articles under Features, which run 4000-4500 words; 3500-4500 word Case Studies; 1500-word Viewpoint articles; 800-word Books (formerly called Reviews); or blog posts for the website, running between 600-800 words.9 The guidelines list specific details for each submissions category that writers should take into consideration.

Submission and review process: Submissions are sent via a brief email pitch, Word format, to SSIR editors covering the specific section you’re submitting under. Submission guidelines list the current editor of each section and how to contact them, and detail the questions to cover in the pitch.10

You’ll get acknowledgment of your proposal within 1-2 weeks. The review process takes up to two months, as each editor (including managing and academic editors, depending on the proposal) participates in the review, and then sends the proposal to the editorial committee, who makes the final decision. A list of criteria for submissions is found in the guidelines.11

Additionally, SSIR editors and stable freelance journalists write articles under What Works, What Didn’t Work, What’s Next, Reviews of books, Q&A and Research. You can submit pitches for these categories as well, for a particular person, organization, trend or research. The website also details what the editors want to see for ideas for these sections.12

Editorial tone: Easy to read, thoughtful articles chock full of information and interesting ideas, theories, suggestions, and solutions to global challenges.

Style guide used: If the submission is accepted, SSRI editors will work closely with the author on style guides and citations.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Submissions on LIS issues would do well in the SSIR, if approached from an innovative, thought-provoking way, such as describing grass-roots LIS efforts and their outcomes, or discussing LIS in a global setting, or how LIS practices can be used to promote social change. Writers need to make sure the topic submitted would be relevant or interesting to all the SSIR’s readers, so it should not be too LIS specific. Real-world examples described through research or firsthand experience are ideal. LIS efforts on providing information to mass populations, particularly underserved, or information technologies that bridge communities and allow information sharing would most likely do well in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print magazine has a circulation of 13,000, while the website averages 165,000 unique visitors per month.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is published by Stanford University, which is located in Santa Clara County, CA, and the print magazine is sold in newsstands across the United States and Canada. English is the primary language of this Silicon Valley publication, however, in an email to the author on October 5, 2020, Eric Nee, Editor-in-Chief of SSIR indicated that the “SSIR has five partner organizations around the world–Tokyo, Beijing, Seoul, Abu Dhabi, and Monterrey, Mexico) who have a license to produce SSIR in Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Arabic, and Spanish.”

Reader characteristics: Per the submission guidelines: “SSIR’s readers are highly educated, widely read, and well informed about the field of social innovation. They want to be provoked, surprised, and presented with memorable information and rigorous analysis. They don’t want long-winded arguments, insider jargon, or excessively narrow and technical writing.”

Readers are overwhelmingly CEO’s, presidents, or senior executives of their organization. Half work for nonprofits, and a small group are philanthropists or foundation leaders.15

The writing is smart and well researched, and poses interesting questions and theories to readers, assuming that everyone is at the same high level of education and that readers are interested in viewing challenges from a global perspective.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Not a publication specifically aimed at the LIS community, and, per their submission guidelines, readers don’t want “insider jargon.”16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Articles submitted to the SSIR should be timely, forward-thinking, and offer solutions as well as pose questions for readers, who are thought leaders and executives looking for new ways to lead their organizations and foster social change. The LIS field is ripe for this type of exploration, and SSIR readers would most likely benefit from learning about innovations in the LIS world.

Last updated: October 5, 2020


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  Stanford Social Innovation Review, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522204526301/455334
  2. “Overview,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/about/overview
  3. “Submission Guidelines,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines
  4. Overview.”
  5. Submission Guidelines.”
  6. Overview.”
  7. Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “All Issues,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/issue
  9.  “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. Submission Guidelines.”
  11. Submission Guidelines.”
  12. Submission Guidelines.”
  13. Submission Guidelines.”
  14. “Information for Advertisers,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/advertising
  15. Submission Guidelines.”
  16. Submission Guidelines.”
Continue Reading

Government Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Government Information Quarterly

ISSN: 0740-624X (Print) and 1872-9517 (Online)1

Website: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/620202/description#description

Purpose, objective, or mission:Government Information Quarterly is an international journal that examines the intersection of policy, information technology, government, and the public.”2

Target audience: This is a cross-disciplinary journal, seeking submissions from disciplines including information science, public policy, public administration, political science, business, law, geography, information systems, communications, economics, sociology, computer science, and public health. Its purpose is to examine how policy, information technology, government and the public intersect. Articles of the most interest would be those concerning government policies on electronic resources and data.3

Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Public Administration and LIS, scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Government Information Quarterly has its focus on how “policies affect government information flows and the availability of government information; the use of technology to create and provide innovative government services; the impact of information technology on the relationship between the governed and those governing; and the increasing significance of information policies and information technology in relation to democratic practices.”8 The Quarterly includes original research, analytic essays, editorials, teaching cases, and case studies.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/620202/authorinstructions. This information is also available at this site as pdf download titled “Author Information Pack.” There are informative webcasts with advice for prospective authors at https://www.journals.elsevier.com/frontiers-in-neuroendocrinology/policies/publishing-connect-training-webcasts.

Types of contributions accepted: Per the guidelines, submissions that “include original research papers that are theory-driven research; papers that combine theory & practice; reviews & review essays, editorials, teaching cases and case studies”11 are encouraged. This is an international journal so contributions from all parts of the world are welcome; however, papers must be in either American or British English, with spelling consistent. This publication accepts new and revised manuscripts that have not been previously published and does not allow simultaneous submissions. Typical manuscripts are 25-30 pages in length, double-spaced.12

Submission and review process: The submission guidelines are extensive, beginning with a section covering topics such as ethics, copyright, conflict of interest, and the roles of funding sources. All submissions are made electronically online through the publisher’s website. The guidelines detail the expectations of article structure and there is a submission checklist.13

Articles are subject to a double-blind review process, performed by the editorial board and other peer reviewers. “The criterion for acceptance is appropriateness to the field, taking into account the merit of content and presentation.”14 Through the publisher’s online submission process authors are able to track their submission.

Editorial tone: This is a scholarly journal based on theory-driven research and submissions should follow research paper tone and format. The articles tend to take a clear, but formal tone. The writing is scholarly, well organized, and not overly wordy.15

Style guide used: Publication Manual for the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This scholarly journal is a good choice for information professionals interested in publishing research and analysis of government electronic information trends and best practices. They appear to be most interested in practical application and results of information policy, making it a good choice for action research publications. It would be suitable for professors attempting to build up publication credits for tenure, or graduate students interested in being published for the first time.

Journal metrics: Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 2.384; SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 1.049; Impact Factor: 1.910; 5-Year Impact Impact Factor: 2.263.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Unknown; not listed on their website or Ulrichsweb.com, and unavailable from publisher. It is likely that many people have access to this periodical through ScienceDirect, and that most, if not all, government libraries and information technology departments subscribe or access this publication online.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though main audience is within the United States and is national in scope,19 this journal publishes articles on worldwide topics. For example past articles included: “Restructuring Taiwan’s Port State Control Inspection Authority,” and “Modernizing Bangladesh Public Administration Through e-Governance: Benefits and Challenges.”20 Government Information Quarterly is published in English,21 and the article submission guidelines indicate that they use common American or British spelling and grammar.22 The editorial board is international, with members in a variety of countries but mostly represented by the United States.23

Reader characteristics: Reader profiles were not available; however, it appears that this journal is aimed at government and library professionals, public administration professionals, and government information architects. The journal’s target audience includes government officials and policy makers, scientists, journalists, lawyers, researchers, teachers and scholars, students, and librarians. Articles would be of the most interest to those helping to steer government policy toward electronic resources and data.24

The editorial board is a mix of communications, information technology, law, library, and information sciences faculty as well as librarians and government officials.25 The heavy presence of faculty indicates that the journal veers toward more scholarly writing over applied theory (or “how-to” articles). The job titles of the board also tend to indicate they will favor articles on technology’s use in government services. A review of the articles published shows this to be true.26

No demographic information on the readers is available at this time, but it would appear from the selection of articles published that the subscribers would be in similar professional positions to the editors.27 This journal would be most useful to people making practical decisions related to public policy and the dissemination of government information or academics in the same areas, but there is a wide enough variety in the articles that law school staff and librarians (especially government documents librarians) would also be interested in the subject matter.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are a cross section of librarians, information professionals, IT workers, lawyers and government officials. Technical jargon should be avoided and even basic LIS principles should be explained when included in an article.29 Ulrichsweb.com lists the subject area as “public administration.”30

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this journal will accept articles on any topic related to government, the most popular (for publication, and for downloading once published) are on e-government and ways to use technology to further government services. There is room for other articles (for instance, “Standardized American Indians: The “€œNames of Indian tribes and bands”€ list from the Office of Indian Affairs “), but articles combining government services and information technology will be most well received. Information delivery topics, tailored to a government audience, would also be very well received.31

As noted above, subscribers would be reading this publication to keep abreast of current developments in the field of government information, and most articles of interest would deal with how to distribute such information effectively. The readers are primarily academics or government decision-makers. Authors should keep in mind that though scholarly in nature, the core of each article should deal with a practical problem, and offer solutions or at least a detailed analysis of the issue.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 31 footnotes

  1.  Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-2053607882
  2. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  3. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  4. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  5. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  6. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  7. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, https://www.elsevier.com/journals/personal/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X
  8. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  9. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  10. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  11. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  12.  “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  13. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  14. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  15. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  16. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  17. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  18. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  19. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  20. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Science Direct. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  22. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: Guide for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  23. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/editorial-board/
  24. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  25. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/editorial-board/
  26. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Science Direct. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
  27. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Science Direct. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
  28. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  29. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  30. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  31. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
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International Journal of Library Science

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Journal of Library Science

ISSN: 0975-75461

Website: http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the publication website, the goal of the International Journal of Library Science “. . . is to publish refereed, well-written original research articles and studies that describe the latest research and developments in the area of library science and information.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals, instructors, and students.3

Publisher: CESER Publications.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the publication’€™s website, the journal is broad-based, covering all areas of library science, technology, information, and interdisciplinary research.8

Frequency of publication: Three times a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Scholarly research articles covering a wide range of areas including education for librarianship, information policy, information communication technologies, equity of access, sustainability, the Children’s Internet Protection Act, censorship, information literacy, decreased funding for established libraries, intellectual property rights, intellectual freedom, the digital divide, open access publishing, the Patriot Act, public lending rights, and current digital technologies.10

Submission and review process: The journal follows a double blinded peer review process.11 Along with a manuscript submission, authors are asked to submit a cover letter including contact information, an abstract of at most 250 words, the full title and running title of the submission, and up to five keywords. Manuscripts should not exceed 6,000 words.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: No editorial style is specified, though examples of the preferred reference style are provided.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The International Journal of Library Science provides an excellent opportunity for LIS authors desiring publication. The journal publishes in all areas of LIS, as demonstrated by its exhaustive subject list. This is particularly attractive venue for LIS authors wishing to have an international presence.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific circulation information is provided. The journal is available online, and expands its distribution by offering email updates on the release of new issues.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As an online journal published in English, it may be assumed that the International Journal of Library Science has an international readership.16

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide any details on reader characteristics. The authors are LIS and education instructors, students, and professionals throughout the world, so a similar readership may be assumed. The journal appears to be content neutral and objective.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers will likely be aware of current LIS issues, technologies, and jargon.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the International Journal of Library Science is wholly comprised of scholarly articles, potential authors should maintain a formal tone and approach. Potential LIS authors should also be mindful that this journal truly has international circulation and avoid regional jargon or bias.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523477918686/687098
  2. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  3. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  4. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  5. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  6. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  7. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  8. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  9.  International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  10. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=issue&op=archive
  11. “Editorial Policies,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. “Subscriptions,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=subscriptions
  16. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  17.  International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  18. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
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Santa Cruz Sentinel

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Santa Cruz Sentinel or Santa Cruz County Sentinel

ISSN: 1072-446X (Print)1

Website: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: To provide news and information to residents of the Santa Cruz area.

Target audience: Populace of Santa Cruz and surrounding smaller townships.

Publisher: MediaNews Group.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: International, national, state, and local news; sports; entertainment; community notices; reviews; and various other topics of local interest.

Frequency of publication: Daily.3

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/submit-letters

Types of contributions accepted: News, photos or videos, letters to the editors, and op-eds.4

Submission and review process: Submissions for news, photos or videos should be emailed to newsroom [at] santacruzsentinel.com.

Op-eds should be no more than 650 words and should be sent to editorial [at] santacruzsentinel.com.

Letters should be no more than 150 words and should be sent to editorial [at] santacruzsentinel.com. “We do not accept anonymous letters. Letter-writers should include their full name – initials aren’t enough – as well as a street address and telephone number. We don’t publish those details in the newspaper, but need the information for verification purposes.”5

Editorial tone: Informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The first reason for publishing in a local paper is to garner support for the local library, announce upcoming events, or bring issues to the attention of the community. The second reason to publish in the local paper is to begin attaching one’s name and voice to library issues, which may cause the author to be contacted in the future on similar subjects. In other words, become an expert (or at least a contact) for local library issues and events.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Unknown.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers reside in the Santa Cruz area. The Santa Cruz Sentinel is an English language publication.

Reader characteristics: According to the U.S. Census, the population of Santa Cruz County is 50.5% female, 49.5% male, and 87.0% White.6. Additionally, 40% of the population has obtained at least a Bachelor’s degree and the median household income is 78,000 dollars.7

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As this is a lay publication, writers should not assume that readers know and understand LIS jargon, and thus should explain any LIS jargon they use in their work.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing and submitting pieces for publication, authors should be familiar with the area in order to tailor their piece to the concerns and interests of residents.

Last updated: September 27, 2020.


References

Show 7 footnotes

  1.  Santa Cruz Sentinel, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522202408720/552224
  2. “Santa Cruz County Sentinel,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed November 8, 2016,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1416170454282/552224
  3. Santa Cruz County Sentinel.”
  4. “Contact Us,” SantaCruzSentinel.com, accessed September 27, 2020, https://www.santacruzsentinel.com/contact-us/
  5. “Submit letters to the editor,” SantaCruzSentinel.com, accessed September 27th, 2020, https://www.santacruzsentinel.com/submit-letters/
  6. “QuickFacts Santa Cruz County, California,” Census.gov, accessed September 17, 2020, https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/santacruzcountycalifornia
  7. “QuickFacts Santa Cruz County, California.”
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Sacramento Bee

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Sacramento Bee

ISSN: 0890-5738 (Print)1

Website: http://sacbee.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “…to produce a newspaper that serves the needs of its community without becoming subservient to the whims of public opinion or the pressures of the powerful.”2

Target audience: “The Bee’s circulation area covers the Northern Sacramento Valley and surrounding areas: south to Stockton, north to Redding, east to Reno and west to the San Francisco Bay Area.”3

Publisher: The McClatchy Company.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Local, state, and national news, politics, community events calendar, sports, and entertainment.

Frequency of publication: Daily.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/submit-letter/article3351588.html

Types of contributions accepted: The Bee accepts letters to the editor (150 words),7 opinion columns and personal viewpoints of roughly 600 words.8

Submission and review process: Use the separate online forms for submitting a letter or opinion piece, and read the instructions for each.

Editorial tone: None identified.

Style guide used: None mentioned.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

An LIS author who resides in or has personal knowledge of the market served by the publication could write a letter to the editor about a current library funding issue, a longer article on the value of libraries specific to a population within Sacramento, or write in response to a published article in The Bee about the state of library services. There are many possibilities for an LIS author familiar with the market area.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 92,733 paid daily, 164,041 paid Sunday, average monthly online audience of 27,608,000.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: “The Bee’s circulation area covers the Northern Sacramento Valley and surrounding areas: south to Stockton, north to Redding, east to Reno and west to the San Francisco Bay Area.”10 This is an English language publication serving a racially diverse population.

Reader characteristics: Demographic information is not available, but according to the United States Census, Sacramento County is 62.8% white and 23.6% Hispanic or Latino.11 The publication supports community arts and champions environmental causes.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this publication are the general public and would have limited knowledge of LIS matters and terminology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since the readers of The Bee will not be familiar with LIS jargon or library issues, an author needs to keep writing for this publication general and be certain to provide convincing reasons for the reader to care about the library topic of their article.

Last updated: September 14, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1.  Sacramento Bee, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522200710528/552222
  2. “About Us,” Sacbee.com, accessed September 14, 2020, http://www.sacbee.com/customer-service/about-us/
  3. About Us.”
  4. About Us.”
  5. About Us.”
  6. About Us.”
  7. “Submit your letter to the editor,” Sacbee.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/submit-letter/
  8. “Submit viewpoints article,” Sacbee.com, accessed September 14, 2020, http://www.sacbee.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/submit-letter/article3351588.html
  9. “The Sacramento Bee,” mcclatchy.com, accessed September 14, 2020, https://www.mcclatchy.com/our-impact/markets/the-sacramento-bee/
  10. About Us.”
  11. “Sacramento County, California,” Census.gov, accessed September 14, 2020, http://www.census.gov/quickfacts/
  12. About Us.”
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