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Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

ISSN: 2038-1026

Website: https://www.jlis.it/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information (JLIS.it) is an international academic journal that publishes research and theory in library, archives, and information science.1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, academics, and students from around the world who are interested in research and theory in both LIS and archival science.

Publisher: JLIS.it is published by the Università di Firenze Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo and is hosted by the University of Macerata, CSIA.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: JLIS.it publishes research articles, contributions, and reports on various topics of interest to the library, archives, and information science international communities. Regular sections are Essays, Contributions, and Reports & Reviews.4 The journal also publishes conference proceedings, such as EURIG2017,5 and special issues, such as a 2017 issue on classification.6

Frequency of publication: JLIS.it publishes three issues a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JLIS.it publishes innovative research relevant to the library, archives, and information science fields; brief contributions on a variety of related topics; and conference reports and reviews. The 2015 Manifesto states that the journal aims to “emphasize the integration between LIS and Archival science on the level of projects and profession” nationally and internationally and to consider the theoretical and methodological traditions of each discipline.8 The 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal encourages stepping away from the strictly academic and “mixing knowledge, methods, and different scientific and technical languages.” The journal also encourages writing that theorizes beyond the institutional and traditional.9

Submission and review process: JLIS.it uses OJS, an automated web-based system, for manuscript submission, tracking, and review.10 Authors should check that their manuscripts comply with the Submission Preparation Checklist11 and follow the Section Policies.12 Each manuscript is reviewed by an editor and if appropriate is sent to two reviewers for double-blind peer review; authors are usually contacted within nine weeks of submission.13

Editorial tone: The tone is academic, and articles are in Italian or English.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) citations and references.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JLIS.it is a highly regarded international journal that publishes articles in LIS and archival science and in the intersection of the two disciplines; the journal pushes for new and nontraditional approaches to these disciplines in theory, research, and practice. LIS authors that study the international stage of LIS or archives, or who perform research that resonates internationally and pushes traditional boundaries, may find a good fit here. Further, the 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal is an “ideal place” for contributions from those new to the profession, so student writers may have a chance at publishing in a prestigious journal. The journal is “a sort of lab for studying and researching what is new in LIS; a place for militant librarianship, with strong observations on the changes that the digital culture is bringing to cognitive processes and to professional practices.”15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article displays metrics.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JLIS.it publishes articles in Italian and English. It is written for an international audience, so regional terms or practices should be explained. The editors and editorial board members are mostly from Italian universities and institutions, but the Scientific Committee members are from all over the world.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are professionals, scholars, and students in the fields of LIS and archival science.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a solid knowledge of LIS and archival science; however, readers are from all over the world and from many different types of institutions in LIS and archival science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should consider that readers are LIS and archival science professionals and scholars from all over the world who are interested in the latest developments in both fields as well as how the disciplines relate to each other and how they are shaping and responding to profound changes brought on by the new digital culture. The audience probably expects high-level research and interesting, novel approaches to theory and practice.

Last updated: April 7, 2017


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Journal Sponsorship,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/journalSponsorship.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 9, no. 1 (2018), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/787.
  6.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 8, no. 2 (2017), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/775.
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Manifesto” (2015), Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science no. 1 (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.4403/jlis.it-11080.
  9. “Manifesto” (2010), JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/pages/view/manifesto.
  10. “Submissions,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018 https://www.jlis.it/about/submissions.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Editorial Policies.”
  13. “Editorial Policies.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. “Manifesto,” 2010.
  16. “Editorial Team,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/index.php/jlis/about/editorialTeam.
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
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International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleInternational Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

ISSN: 2474-3542

Websitehttp://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol

Purpose, objective, or mission: The International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) “is a peer­-reviewed open access journal dedicated to publishing articles on as broad an array of topics as possible from all aspects of librarianship in all types of libraries.”1

Target audience: IJoL‘s primary audience is members of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that provides a forum for discussion and development among Chinese American librarians and information professionals.2 However, as an international and open-access journal, IJoL‘s scope and reach is worldwide.

Publisher: IJoL is published by CALA, an affiliate of the ALA.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Articles deemed suitable by the editors are double-blind peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: “IJoL publishes original research papers, practical developments, reviews, and commentaries of value to professional practice in librarianship in general. It encourages communication on librarianship within and among relevant professional and academic communities.”5 Regular columns include Featured Articles, Reports from the Field, LIS Education around the World, Commentaries, Reviews, and News.

Frequency of publication: Twice each year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: IJoL accepts Featured Articles, which are original research or comprehensive, in-depth analyses; Reports from the Field, which “describe the implementation and assessment of innovative practices in libraries of all types” and report on distinguished Chinese librarians; Reviews of books, articles, or conference papers; and Commentaries offering perspectives on current topics.7 The journal publishes on all topics related to libraries and librarianship, including “academic, research, public, school and special libraries” and other information institutions; it is focused on, but not limited to, “major development of Chinese librarianship throughout the world.”8

Submission and review process: IJoL uses the Open Journal Systems9 online portal for submissions and offers guidelines and a submission checklist, which authors should follow to ensure that processing and publishing is not delayed.10 Each section has its own policies, so authors should check that their submissions meet these requirements as well. The editor sends suitable articles to two referees for blind review, and articles may be accepted as is, with revisions, or declined.11

Editorial tone: The tone is overall scholarly but also appropriate to each column and topic.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

IJoL‘s first issue was in 2016, so it is a very new scholarly journal. It is the official journal of CALA, which was established in the 1970s.13 In the first editorial, Editor-in-Chief Guoying Liu introduces the journal as “a forum for librarians and other researchers from Canada, China, the UK, the US and other countries to share their research, best practices and perspectives in international librarianship, international collaboration and academic exchange, library spaces and services, library technology and innovation, and other aspects of information science and studies.”14 This journal is a great fit for scholars, professionals, and students whose work or research focuses on Chinese librarianship, but the journal publishes on all topics of library and information science, including all types of libraries and information institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: IJoL statistics show that there are 131 registered users and 113 registered readers in 2018.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: IJoL readership is most likely Chinese and Chinese American librarians and information professionals. However, this is an English-language international journal that publishes on all LIS topics, and its readership is similarly international. Authors should keep in mind this international readership and explain regionalisms and particular terms and practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and information professionals, scholars, and students interested in Chinese librarianship and information communities, as well as broader topics and current trends affecting LIS professionals throughout the world. The editors of IJoL are from universities and libraries in the United States, China, and Canada.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter; however, writers should explain regional or particular terms, concepts, and practices for an international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that the readership for this journal is global but there is a particular interest in Chinese librarianship throughout the United States, Canada, and China. Readers of the journal are LIS scholars, professionals, and graduate students who are interested in developments particular to Chinese user populations and research and practices that can be extended to a similarly global population. As a new, open-access journal, LIS authors can peruse what types of articles are being published and editorials that explain the journal’s direction.17

Last updated: April 6, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Membership,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/membership.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Submissions,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/submissions.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “About This Publishing System,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Editorial Policies.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/about.
  14. Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Message from Editor-in-Chief,” International Journal of Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2016.vol1.1.17.
  15. “Statistics,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/statistics?statisticsYear=2018.
  16. “Editorial Team,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialTeam.
  17.  Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Celebrating One Year Anniversary and Introducing the Third Issue,” International Journal of Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 1-2, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.2.54.
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Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
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Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

ISSN: 0038-3686

Website: http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn) “is the official publication of the Southeastern Library Association (SELA).” The journal publishes “articles, announcements, and news of professional interest to the library community in the southeast”1

Target audience: The library community of the southeastern United States as well as members of SELA.2

Publisher: Southeastern Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: For each volume, SELn publishes four issues that report SELA business, juried articles, book reviews, and state library/personnel news. The journal “represents a significant means for addressing the Association’s research objective.”5 Regular sections include Articles, Book Reviews, and News Articles.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions.

Types of contributions accepted: Manuscripts submitted to SELn “need not be of a scholarly nature but should address professional concerns of the library community. SELn particularly seeks articles that have a broad southeastern scope and/or address topics identified as timely or important by SELA sections, round tables, or committees.” SELn also accepts articles with a broad range of information sources, not limited to the purely scholarly: “News releases, newsletters, clippings, and journals from libraries, state associations, and groups throughout the region.”6 SELn also accepts book reviews for consideration.7

Submission and review process:

For articles, the “manuscript will be acknowledged by the editor. Incoming manuscripts are added to a manuscript bank from which articles are selected for each issue.” The editor assigns manuscripts to at least two reviewers for blind review. Following the review, the author will be notified of the publication decision; articles are usually published within twelve months.8

For book reviews, “submissions will be judged on writing style, content and perceived interest to the readership of the journal.” Those reviews solicited by the editor receive preferential consideration.9

Editorial tone: SELn publishes both juried articles and news and association items. Scholarly articles have an academic tone but a readable style, whereas news articles are more informal. Articles that are not scholarly should “address professional concerns of the library community.”10 A review of the most recent articles reveals well-researched, referenced, and academic writing.11

Style guide used: Latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a good opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and students based in the southeastern United States to publish original research and scholarship. Potential authors should consider joining SELA in order to identify topics of interest to members through the association’s sections, roundtables, and committees.13 LIS authors can also submit book reviews. Further, SELn has issued a call for volunteer reviewers; a reviewer must be a member of SELA and have two years professional experience and two published peer-reviewed articles (or equivalent).14

 

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SELA members are able to access current issues online.15 Back issues one year past are available to all through DigitalCommons.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are based in the southeastern United States. “State library associations of the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to be constituent members of the Association.”17 As this publication focuses on a particular group of states, there will generally be a shared cultural understanding of relevant topics. However, as the SELn covers a fair number of states, specific regional terms should be explained.

Reader characteristics: SELA membership “may include any person, library or other organization . . . interested in the promotion and fostering of library and information services in the southeastern United States.”18 The audience will share a concern for the betterment of libraries in this region.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of SELA, readers will have knowledge of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal will have a variety of interests in LIS issues, especially those whose relevance is demonstrated in the context of the southeastern United States. SELn readers are LIS professionals and students throughout the region, so there is an interest in a wide variety of research and scholarship that will benefit and advance practices in all LIS environments .

Last updated: March 14, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Homepage, The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html.
  2. Homepage.
  3. Homepage.
  4. “Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/guidelines.html.
  5. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  6. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  7. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers,”The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/bookreviewers.html.
  8. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  9. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers.”
  10. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  11. SELn Archives, digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu, accessed March 14, 2018, https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seln/.
  12. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  13. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  14. “Call for Reviewers,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/reviewers.html.
  15. “Homepage.”
  16.  SELn Archives.
  17. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” 2014 edition, p. 9, accessed March 14, 2018, http://selaonline.org/sela//contacts/SELA_Handbook.pdf.
  18. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” p. 7.
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Library and Information Research (LIR)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Library and Information Research

ISSN: 1756-1086 (Online)1

Website: http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir

Purpose, objective, or mission:

“LIR has the following objectives:
– To provide an overview of LIS research activity and developments worldwide;
– To publish research in such a way that it is accessible to, and usable by, the LIS community;
– To publish LIS research (including informal or in-house research) by practitioners;
– To publish practical case studies that illustrate best practice;
– To encourage reflective and evidence-based practice;
– To publish papers resulting from LIRG annual awards and prizes;
– To promote the use and understanding of quality research methods;
– To raise awareness of new tools, books and funding opportunities for research;
– To comment, and provide a forum for comment, on the state of LIS research.

LIR’s strap line is Research Into Practice in Information and Library Services (RIPILS). Any contributions falling within this remit and meeting one or more of the objectives specified above are welcome.”2

Target audience: This publication is written by and for members of the Library and Information Research Group, as well as all parties interested in current research topics in library and information science.3

Publisher: Library and Information Research Group, a Special Interest Group of CILIP.4

Peer reviewed? Only refereed research articles are peer-reviewed.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6 Although most manuscripts submitted to the journal are not peer-reviewed, all submissions involve LIS research of some type.7

Medium or mode of distribution: Online only.8

Content: The journal covers a wide variety of research topics, including the values and ethics within librarianship, institutional ethnography, qualitative research in LIS, etc.9

Frequency of publication: Three times a year. 10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Refereed research articles, opinion pieces, case studies, book reviews, reports on conferences, etc.11

Submission and review process:Length depends on the type of submission, although the maximum word count for any submission is 7,000 words. Manuscripts should be formatted according to a template available at the “Author Guidelines” page.12 Free registration is required for authors who wish to submit articles for consideration.13 All manuscripts must be unpublished and submitted in Microsoft Word or RTF format.14

As for the review process, refereed research articles are reviewed by a minimum of two double-blind peer reviewers.15

Editorial tone: Formal, scholarly, very technical.16

Style guide used: APA-style references.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and Information Research is an excellent publication for LIS researchers, including students. Graduate students who have taken a research methods course, for instance, could adapt one of their papers to meet the journal’s standards. Additionally, as an open-source journal, Library and Information Research has the potential to reach a large audience. Its status as a “research into practice”18 journal allows authors to present both new information and future possibilities through long and short articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is an open-access, online-only journal,19 and thus, circulates daily. An estimate of circulation numbers is unavailable.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is produced in the UK,20 so more likely than not, a large percentage of readers will be British. Readers will be more likely to use British English than American English.21 However, since the journal is open access22 it’s safe to assume it enjoys readership worldwide. Due to its international reach, colloquialisms and unexplained cultural references should be omitted.

Reader characteristics: Readers will likely work in libraries or other research institutions in some capacity. Since Library and Information Research has such a strong focus on research, readers will favor objectivity over opinion, except when a piece is specifically intended to be opinion-based.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers must possess a high level of LIS subject matter knowledge to appreciate all the journal has to offer. Highly technical terms, e.g., phenomenography, are common, so it’s safe to assume that readers have graduate or post-graduate-level knowledge.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Library and Information Research will expect meticulous attention to detail and in-depth knowledge of LIS research. Although not required for publication, readers will appreciate authors with professional and scholarly experience in LIS research, as well as those who have a background in sociological issues, e.g., social equality. Additionally, readers will expect writing to be technical and free of unnecessary fluff.

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  2. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4.  Diane M. Rasmussen Pennington, email message to author, February 28, 2018
  5. “Peer Review Process,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  6. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  7. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  9.  Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library and Information Research 41, no. 125 (2017).
  10.  Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  11. “Section Policies,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  12. “Author Guidelines, Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Online Submissions” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  17. “Attribution Policy,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  18. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  21. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  22. “Open Access Policy,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#openAccessPolicy
  23. “Section Policies,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  24. Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library and Information Research 41, no. 125 (2017).
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Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

ISSN: 1750-59681

Website: https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Information Literacy (JIL) is the professional journal of the CILIP Information Literacy Group. The journal “publishes innovative and challenging research articles and project reports which push the boundaries of information literacy thinking in theory, practice and method, and which aim to develop deep and critical understandings of the role, contribution and impact of information literacies in everyday contexts, education and the workplace.”2

Target audience: The target audience includes members of the UK-based CILIP Information Literacy Group and LIS professionals, scholars, students, and teachers, and those working in any field related to information literacy instruction and scholarship.

Publisher: JIL is published by the CILIP Information Literacy Group and hosted by Loughborough University Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: JIL “aims to investigate information literacy in all its forms to address the interests of diverse IL communities of practice.”5 Regular sections include Peer-Reviewed Articles, Articles from LILAC (Librarians’ Information Literacy Annual Conference), Book Reviews, Conference Updates, Project Reports, and Students’ View of IL.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JIL accepts research articles that are “informed and evidence based, designed around an arguable research question, contextualised with reference to previous and current advances in IL thinking, [and] methodologically robust with a demonstrable research design.8 For the Students’ View of IL section, submissions should be “papers drawn from research (theoretical or applied) undertaken by students as part of a postgraduate course in LIS or other cognate disciplines, such as education or media.”9 Authors may also submit reviews of books, media, websites, and software relevant to information literacy practices; conference updates; and project reports “related to information, digital and learning literacies.10

Submission and review process: JIL‘s Submission page includes a section titled The Route to Publication that provides a helpful overview of the submission, review, and acceptance process. Authors need to format manuscripts according to the journal’s article template and verify that manuscripts conform to each item on the Submission Preparation Checklist. After manuscripts are submitted online, they are peer reviewed with comments on suitability and suggestions for revision; authors receive feedback and may resubmit for review if substantial changes are made.11

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly, and writers should use UK spelling. The journal’s Submission page provides helpful guidelines and templates for expected style, structure, and argument.12

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).13 

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JIL “publishes articles from both established and new authors” in the field of information literacy. Furthermore, JIL “welcomes contributions that push the boundaries of IL beyond the educational setting and examine this phenomenon as a continuum between those involved in its development and delivery and those benefiting from its provision.”14 This journal is a good fit for LIS authors who conduct original research and novel scholarship in any area of information literacy. LIS graduate students and recent graduates have a great opportunity to publish in the journal’s Students’ View of IL section. JIL accepts 44% of articles submitted for publication.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JIL is published by CILIP Information Literacy Group, which “works across the UK and represents a UK workforce of 87,000 information professionals working across the private, public and third sectors to unlock the value of information.”16 Authors should keep in mind that readers are information professionals throughout the UK, but as an open-access journal for a large organization, it can have an international reach.

Reader characteristics: Readers are information professionals throughout the UK. CILIP explains that information professional “is an umbrella term for librarians, information managers, knowledge managers and data professionals.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Based on membership in CILIP, readers are UK information professionals in a wide range of libraries and institutions. Members are interested in staying up-to-date on the most current developments in information literacy and in advancing scholarship of and practice in the field. Authors should keep in mind the journal’s focus on innovative research, scholarship, and practice in the field of information literacy.

Last updated: April 10, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523821255563/626763
  2. Homepage, Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/.
  3. “About the Journal,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about.
  4. “Submissions,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about/submissions.
  5. “About the journal.”
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About the Journal.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “About the Journal.”
  15. “About the Journal.”
  16. “Who We Represent,” cilip.org.uk, accessed April 10, 2018, http://www.cilip.org.uk/page/who_we_represent.
  17. “Who We Represent.”
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LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

ISSN: 1058-6768

Website: https://www.libres-ejournal.info/

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBRES, an international refereed e-journal, publishes research and scholarly articles in library and information science and services (LIS). “It has a particular focus on research in emerging areas of LIS, synthesis of LIS research areas, and on novel perspectives and conceptions that advance theory and practice.”1

Target audience: LIBRES is for information science professionals and librarians interested in all aspects of LIS research and scholarship, but especially in emerging areas, novel perspectives, and new understandings of LIS theory and practice.2

Publisher: LIBRES is jointly published by the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information and the NTU Libraries at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. It was previously published by the Department of Information Studies at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia.3

Peer reviewed? At least two referees blind review each paper.4

Type:  LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: LIBRES is an online, open-access journal.

Content: This journal has three main sections, Research Papers, Synthesis & Perspectives, and Special Sections. The journal publishes research papers on studies that advance LIS, synthesis papers that survey areas of LIS for new or better understandings, and scholarly opinion or perspective papers that explore new conceptions of LIS.5 Each Special Section is devoted to papers from conferences from around the globe, promoting the journal’s commitment to regional LIS scholarship.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year, in June and December.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: LIBRES accepts scholarly research, synthesis, and perspective papers on any aspect of LIS, especially in emerging areas or with novel conceptions that advance theory and practice. 8

Submission and review process: Submissions should be sent in Microsoft Word documents to the editor at LIBRESeditor@ntu.edu.sg. Submissions are usually reviewed within 60 days of receipt. Papers should not be under review or published elsewhere. “The reviews will pay particular attention to whether the papers are interesting, useful, thoughtful, and a significant contribution to knowledge in the LIS field.”9

Editorial tone: The journal uses a formal academic style. The journal’s official language is English, but the editor encourages submissions from developing countries and countries where English is not the native language; revision and editing for readability are part of the publication process.10

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIBRES is focused on new research and novel perspectives from the LIS international academic community. Authors can submit to either the Research Papers section or to the Synthesis & Perspectives section. The journal’s authorship is international, and it publishes articles from developed and developing countries; LIBRES takes “a nurturing attitude towards papers and authors,” and the editorial board provides “substantive guidance to the authors,” especially those who are not native English speakers.12 “In subject coverage, it has a particular strength in library/information service,” and it promotes worldwide regional LIS community scholarship by publishing conference papers.13 It publishes high-quality research, often on technology and service, from a many different countries, pushing LIS regional and international innovation forward.


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  LIBRES is published in English and is international in scope,14 and the editorial board is especially interested in linking up with “regional LIS research communities worldwide.”15

Reader characteristics: The audience of LIBRES is LIS academics and professionals from around the world,16 and papers are published by authors from the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Qatar, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Malaysia, to name a few. The conference papers in the Special Sections expand its international scope in terms of research and readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a professional and scholarly understanding of LIS practice and research.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This scholarly journal’s readers will expect formal research and high-level syntheses. Topics for submission include current and emerging LIS research areas, emerging technology, and library service. For LIS professional and student researchers, LIBRES is a good place to research that investigates practices within library and information science environments and advances in new and emerging technology. For LIS scholars, LIBRES encourages synthesis papers that consider theory and practice in a new light and opinion and perspective pieces that explore new ideas in LIS.

Last updated: January 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About LIBRES,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/about-libres/.
  2. “About LIBRES.”
  3. “About LIBRES.”
  4. “About LIBRES.”
  5. “Author Guidelines,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/author-guidelines/.
  6. For example, Special Section: Digital Curation Projects and Research in Asia, LIBRIS 26, no. 1 (2018), accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/all-issues/volume-26-issue-1/.
  7. “About LIBRES.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 25, no. 1 (2015), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1621/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 24, no. 1 (2014), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1369/.
  13. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  16. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
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Communications in Information Literacy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Communications in Information Literacy

ISSN: 1933-59541

Website: http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php/cil/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Communications in Information Literacy (CIL) is a research-oriented journal that considers knowledge, theory, and practice in the area of information literacy. Its editors seek to advance the “exploration and investigation of the various models of information literacy throughout the world.”2

Target audience: This publication is intended to be read by “professionals in the area of higher education who are committed to advancing information literacy.”3

Publisher: Communications in Information Literacy4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: Primarily research-oriented articles advancing information literacy. The journal also publishes essays and book reviews, but these are not open submission.8

Frequency of publication: Semiannual9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: The editors invite submissions that are  theoretical, research-based, or have a practical focus.10

Submission and review process: Although it is recommended that potential authors send queries before submitting their pieces, this step is not mandatory. Authors submit papers electronically as Word documents after registering on the website. To facilitate the blind review process, the author’s name should be confined to the title page of a submission. The process of review is estimated at 6 to 8 weeks and authors will be informed of decisions. The status of submissions can also be checked after log-on to the website.11 According to the editors of CIL, the manuscript acceptance rate hovers around 35 percent.12

Editorial tone: Academic and formal13

Style guide used: Manual of Style of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CIL offers scholars and those who work in higher education libraries the opportunity to discuss information literacy as well as to share research and knowledge about this growing field. Because this publication is relatively new and is independently published, it is unknown how credible it will prove to be. An indicator of its growth and acceptance is CIL‘s grant from the Digital Humanities Initiative at Buffalo (DHIB) to acquire and assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) to its published works. DOI will be assigned retroactively to articles already published, as well as to articles in future volumes. The DHIB grant is expected to cover the costs of DOI through publication volume nine in the year 2015.15 Due to the fact that it is less established, this journal may present a gateway for those who have not been widely published but who have strong opinions about or knowledge of information literacy.

The journal is indexed in Directory of Open Access Journals, EBSCO, Elsevier Science (SCOPUS), Google Scholar, H.W. Wilson (Library Literature & Information Science Full Text), and Proquest (Library Science). It is also cataloged by OCLC: Worldcat, Public Knowledge Project, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Due to the independent and open access policies of this journal, there are no paid subscribers and no advertising. In 2011 the editors  confirmed over 700 registered users.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the journal is online and open access, readers are located throughout the world.18 As this is an international publication, all potential authors should avoid using certain jargon or cultural references that others may not be able to understand. The CIL editors advise writers, “As we are a journal of information literacy, we assume our readership already has familiarity with the concept of information literacy and its application in library science. Therefore, the manuscript does not need to treat the concept of information literacy as something novel for our readers, particularly in the Introduction or the Literature Review. Unless your institutional definition of information literacy varies significantly from that of the ACRL, there is no need to provide a perfunctory definition of information literacy for our readers.”19

Reader characteristics: Though specific reader demographics are not available, authors may assume that the journal’s readers are international and the majority are employed in libraries at higher education institutions.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The primary readers of this publication are knowledgeable about library and information science issues. As noted above, readers have a clear understanding of information literacy and the issues surrounding the topic. It is likely that most readers have a firm grasp on technology, as this journal is only available online. As individuals interested in information literacy, readers probably work closely with electronic resources. It is clear that the audience of this publication values education and, above all, information literacy. They are interested in ensuring that communities have access to information and the ability to evaluate it adequately.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

It is important to note that because this publication is open access, authors’ work can be viewed for free by anyone searching the Internet, which could be a potential benefit. However, as it has an academic and research emphasis, it is most likely that the audience will be limited to those interested in higher education with a strong background in information literacy. Writers should also keep in mind the growing field of information literacy and recognize the opportunity for new studies in this field, especially those that would be of interest in college libraries and applicable internationally.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523471194802/634315
  2. “Focus and Scope,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  4. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  5. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  6. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  7.  Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  8. “Section Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  10. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017 http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017 http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  13. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  14. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  16. “Editorial Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  18.  “Editorial Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  20. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  21. “Submissions, Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
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Chronicle of Higher Education

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Higher Education

ISSN: 0009-5982(Print) and 1931-1362 (Online)1

Website: http://chronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Chronicle provides information on all facets of higher education in the United States, with international coverage, as well. Along with the general articles, book reviews, and editorials, there are features dealing with the job market as well as extensive classified ads.2

Target audience: Higher education faculty and administration.3

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian; though it does sometimes carry articles of interest to or authored by librarians, it is mainly for the general administration and faculty.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The website contains news, featured stories, opinion pieces, advice columns, job listings, and career-building tools such as online CV management and salary databases. The print magazine features two sections: the first contains news and jobs, while the second is a magazine of the arts.8

Because of its eclectic content, others working in academe will also find something interesting in The Chronicle of Higher Education. While this publication is definitely written for those with careers in higher education, LIS authors with an interest in teaching will find something of interest here as well.

Frequency of publication: The website is updated every weekday, while the print magazine is published weekly during the academic year and less frequently May through August and December, with a total of 43 issues a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Essays; reviews; opinion pieces; reporting; advice columns; and contributions to the “What I’m Reading” feature that answer the question: what have you read lately that is insightful and useful to you as you think about higher education?10 The Chronicle also accepts news pitches, the guidelines of which can be found here.11

Submission and review process: Unsolicited submissions are considered. The decision to accept or reject a manuscript rarely takes more than a week. All accepted essays and articles are rigorously edited and fact-checked. Authors have the opportunity to review and approve a manuscript before it’s published. The editors of The Review will decide where and when the piece is published, with some articles appearing only online.12 Review the submission guide carefully, as different sections have different guidelines.

Editorial tone: Journalistic and conversational.13

Style guide used: None specified. Articles should be written in a clear, informal style free of jargon. Do not use footnotes or citations.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because of the publication frequency and the audience that this newspaper serves, this is a good place for the new author to publish. You don’t necessarily have to work in academe, but it helps. Academic librarians, along with information professionals with an interest in education or pedagogy, would be welcomed here. This publication is an informal counterpart to academic journals, a sort of cocktail hour where academics can mull over or vent about relevant issues within and outside of their field. Interested authors will be intelligent, educated and independent thinkers with something interesting to say.

Also, the wide variety of pieces found in the The Chronicle makes it very easy to find something to write about that, if written in a clear prose style, has a decent chance of being published. Book reviews are a natural, but the longer commentary pieces on some topical tempest occurring in the academy are always a good bet. Because so many write under pen names, the odds of a new author being accepted seem high.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: From the website: The Chronicle‘s is seen by more than 2 million unique visitors a month. “650 organizations across the country make our journalism available to every one of their employees and students.”15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though The Chronicle claims to be the main source of the goings on in higher education, it does tend to concentrate on the English-speaking world of the United States and sometimes Canada and the United Kingdom.16

The audience is well educated and mostly well informed about current events within and outside of academia, but the normal caution of defining extremely specialized or locally used jargon is applicable.17

Other than that, everything seems to go as long as it relates to academe in some way or another. The cosmopolitan affectations of the majority of the readers would allow a more eclectic use of language than would be found in a more mainstream newspaper.

Reader characteristics: As this is a lay publication, the makeup of its readership is somewhat important, but because it is a specialized publication the readership still has many common traits. The average reader tends to be either administration or faculty at a college or university, they can either be relatively new in their profession or at the midpoint, and though once predominately male the percentage of females is on the increase and will probably overtake the male percentage in the next few years. The readers are well educated and very interested in their profession and the culture of academe as a whole.18 Writing for The Chronicle would be an excellent way to increase understanding of library issues (such as information literacy) and market the library’s relevance to other professions. Intellectual and academic freedom, new issues in purchasing and providing content such as e-journals, information literacy, and services to disadvantaged groups would be other issues that would resonate with this readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Over all, the readership is oblivious of the complexities of the LIS profession and is most concerned with those processes that touch them in their own professions such as collection development. Of course, the readership would more than likely not fully understand the meaning of “collection development,” so such technical phrases would have to be defined.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

An LIS professional writing for this audience would not have much additional work to do, so long as he or she has something interesting and informed to write about. This is a publication for opinion pieces and reviews, and readers pick up The Chronicle to be entertained and informed. While this is not the place for scholarly work, readers do enjoy learning about new research or reading critiques of articles they’ve read in an entertaining format. They want to read shop talk, stay informed in their field, and feel connected to issues in the larger world.

This would be a good place to write an opinion piece about an LIS issue that touches on education, society or academe, or review a work that touches on these same issues. Todd Gilman, Librarian for Literature in English at Yale University and a Lecturer at San Jose State University, has published articles about distance education, special collections, research skills and information literacy, and other topics that connect libraries and academe in The Chronicle.

Last updated: September 25, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1601911248
  2. “The Chronicle of Higher Education,” www.chronicle.com, accessed September 18, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/the-chronicle-of-higher/609?cid=cheftr
  3. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  4. “The Chronicle of Higher Education,” Wikipedia, accessed September 20, 2016, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicle_of_Higher_Education
  5. “Submissions,” Chronicle.com, accessed September 19, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/Submissions/638
  6. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  7. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  8. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  9. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  10. Submissions.”
  11. “How to Pitch Us,” Chronicle.com, accessed September 20, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/How-to-Pitch-Us/633/
  12. Submissions.”
  13. Submissions.”
  14. Submissions.”
  15. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  16. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  17. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  18. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
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