Wiki Tags Archives: Book reviews

Salon

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Salon

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.salon.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Salon covers breaking news, politics, entertainment, culture, and technology through investigative reporting, commentary, criticism, and provocative personal essays. Our articles and original videos bring a variety of voices to the discussion and make the conversation smarter.”1

Target audience: Readers interested in thought-provoking coverage of politics and current events.

Publisher: Salon.com LLC. According to the Salon website: “Salon was formerly a publicly-traded company under the name ‘Salon Media Group (SLNM)’. In August 2019, the brand was taken private with the goal of creating a long-term sustainable company in the online news space.”2

Peer reviewed? No.3

Type: Civilian news publication.

Medium: Online.4

Content: Investigative reporting, commentary, criticism, and personal essays.5

Frequency of publication: Content is published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.salon.com/about/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Salon accepts article submissions and letters to the editor. Any newsworthy or opinion pieces are welcomed; however, fiction and poetry are not accepted.6 NOTE: As of September 2020, Salon’s Life Story section is currently CLOSED to submissions.

Submission and review process: Articles and queries should be submitted to the appropriate editor via email with the words “Editorial Submission” in the subject line. Prospective authors should include information about their background as a writer and qualifications for writing a particular story. The review process is expected to last about three weeks, with no response after that period meaning that the editors are likely not interested in using the piece.7

Editorial tone: Although suggestions of tone are not indicated, the submission guidelines suggest that prospective authors consider the articles available on the site prior to emailing their submissions.8 From reviewing the content on the website, it can be assumed that the editors are looking for pieces written in a journalistic tone, with innovative ideas and fresh writing styles.

Style guide used: A specific style guide is not noted.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Salon provides an opportunity for LIS writers to discover a new audience in the lay community. Because this publication does not publish on many library or information science-related topics, an author with a strong story idea that can be angled to appeal to the general population may find that his or her idea is welcomed here. This website may be a good platform for discussing LIS issues that may have been “overdone” or “old news” in other library publications; here they can be written with a fresh scope because there is a different audience in mind.

Two sections of the website that may be suited to potential LIS authors are the Economy & Innovation and Culture sections, respectively. Authors could easily write about economic topics such as library funding, especially in the context of the pandemic. Interesting topics relating to innovation may be electronic advancements being offered by libraries, such as digital reference, e-books, home access to electronic databases, and virtual storytimes or programs. An example of an article in the Culture section regarding reading is the “Comfort reading for the pandemic age” article which talks about reading as a form of comfort in the pandemic. Political issues involving libraries would be a welcome topic as well.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to their media kit, there are 9.2 million unique visitors to the site each month.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The website can be accessed worldwide, though the content is generally US centered. Because most Salon readers come from the United States, language and cultural considerations are not as vital here as they may be in more international publications. However, as it is read by individuals from many different localities throughout the United States, it is important to consider that local issues or library-specific concerns may not be understood.

Reader characteristics: According to their media kit, readers are 60% male and 40% female, with a median age of 36 years old and an average household income of $92,000. Most readers have earned at least a college degree and are “affluent, well-educated, and highly influential.”10  Salon covers politics, the arts, and culture with a liberal bent.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this is a lay publication, most of the readers are probably not familiar with library jargon. It is not even safe to assume that readers are library users or that they would be particularly interested in library issues. Though they may not be knowledgeable of LIS terms or specifics, they are an educated group and therefore it could be assumed that they are comfortable using the Internet and at least doing basic research.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

By studying Salon reader demographics, it is safe to say that this audience is knowledgeable, opinionated, and educated. This publication presents authors with the challenge of producing pieces that will inform the audience about library issues or share educated opinions about changes in the technological world and how these affect information science. Because the audience most likely already has an appreciation for and a knowledge of books, LIS authors may have a head start in getting a lay audience to care about libraries and what they represent.

Last updated: Septemeber 28, 2020


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “About Salon.com,” Salon.com, accessed September 28, 2020, http://www.salon.com/about/
  2. About Salon Media Group.”
  3. “Submissions,” Salon.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.salon.com/about/submissions/
  4. “Ways to get Salon,” Salon.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.salon.com/about/ways_to_get_salon/
  5. About Salon Media Group.”
  6. Submissions.”
  7. Submissions.”
  8. Submissions.”
  9. “Salon Media Kit 2014,” Media.Salon.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://media.salon.com/2014/05/MediaKit5.7.14.pdf
  10. Salon Media Kit 2014.”
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InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies

ISSN: 1548-33201

Website: http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “InterActions is a peer-reviewed, open access journal committed to the promotion of interdisciplinary and inclusive scholarship. The journal brings together senior and emerging scholars, activists, educators, and professionals whose work covers a broad range of theory and practice.”2

This student journal aims to promote scholarship that examines education and information studies through interdisciplinary perspectives. According to the editors, the field of education and information studies is frequently the place where the social sciences and humanities meet. InterActions seeks to be a forum for these meetings, soliciting work that “critiques the inequities and dominant norms within societies, education systems, and academia which perpetuate the marginalization of populations and the exclusion of their knowledge while maintaining unjust policies and systems.”3

Target audience: LIS, education, and other graduate students, professors, emerging and established scholars and professionals, and activists4

Publisher: University of California at Los Angeles Graduate School of Education and Information Studies5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS, social sciences, and education; scholarly7

Medium: Online open access8

Content: Articles, review essays, interviews, and book reviews. Considerations for publication include the “€œadvancement of important and current conversations in education and information studies, their scholarly competence and originality, and their contribution to the journal’€™s goals of informed critique, interdisciplinary dialogue, and social justice.”€9

InterActions is “€œparticularly interested in work that analyzes inequities and links research to larger social and political contexts. InterActions encourages contributions that utilize inclusive and critical frameworks in politically engaged ways.”10

Frequency of publication: Semiannual11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: This publication accepts manuscripts from practitioners, activists, and both established and emerging scholars in all fields of study. Types of contributions sought include:

  • Articles (less than 7,500 words)
  • Literary reviews (less than 5,000 words)
  • Interviews (less than 5,000 words)
  • Book reviews & Exhibition reviews (less than 1,100 words)
  • Research in brief (less than 3,000 words)12

Submission and review process: Manuscripts undergo a double-blind review by editors selected from the editorial advisory board or by graduate students with expertise in the manuscript’€™s topic. The peer review committee decides if a publication will be accepted as is, revised, or rejected.13 InterActions does not accept material that is simultaneously submitted to other journals or has been previously published published elsewhere. All submissions except for book reviews should be submitted with an abstract of 400 words or less.14

Individuals submitting manuscripts need to create an account with Berkeley Electronic Press. The online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages, with title, abstract, and author information entered separately from the main text.€15

Authors retain all rights to their work, but grant the journal the right to make published content available in perpetuity. The California Digital Library also retains the right to display and distribute content published in this journal.16

Editorial tone: Tone is scholarly, but ranges from clear, direct language to the complex and intellectually rigorous syntax of poststructuralism.17

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition18

InterActions also provides tips for reviewing a manuscript before submission.19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

InterActions is unique among LIS journals LIS in that it seeks interdisciplinary articles that advance social justice. Potential contributors might be LIS practitioners, educators, students, or professionals with an interest in LIS and its ability to satisfy a human need or solve a social problem. This publication values unique voices and critical analysis, as well as more liberal-leaning content. Creative applications of LIS theory in unexpected contexts (such as a study of information-seeking behavior within the queue for the Kogi Beef truck, published in the spring 2011 issue), or the application of theory from other disciplines, such as critical theory, to LIS methodology are the norm.20

A review of recent articles indicates a special emphasis on critical theory–particularly in a sociological context–which is a trend among students at UCLA’€™s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. The wide range of topics covered includes classifications systems, linguistics, pedagogy, cultural studies, civil rights, science, and political economy.21 Work submitted to InterActions should be linked to a larger social and political context.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No information available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in Los Angeles,22 and many readers may be located in Southern California or affiliated with the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. However, this journal’s inclusion in the California Digital Library creates opportunities for wider readership. InterActions is published in English, but appears to aim for an international audience. As with all scholarly articles, avoid colloquialisms and explain any region-specific content or terms used.23

Reader characteristics: This publication’€™s readers are likely well educated and interested in how LIS and education can contribute to dialogue and transformation within larger social and political contexts. This publication’s target audience includes graduate students, professors, emerging and established scholars and professionals, and activists in the fields of LIS, education, or elsewhere.24

As a field of study, LIS research can tend to be conservative and insular. InterActions aims to publish papers that challenge this trend, looking critically at the world and applying “€œalternative and liberatory visions, methodologies, and practices”25 to social issues in the fields of information science and education. Readers are likely progressive and liberal-leaning. This publication is committed social justice and critical inquiry, values that likely resonate with readers.26

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter. However, as this is an interdisciplinary publication, authors should explain any specialized terms that a graduate student in another field might not be familiar with.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal appreciate careful research and critical analysis, mixing high and low art, and exploring traditional and nontraditional subjects. They are interested in work that is politically and socially engaged, and has value in contexts outside of academia. Papers that offer critical commentary on current issues and promote perspectives that can serve the cause of social justice will appeal to this audience. All the better if they are provocative.

When considering writing for this student journal, expect a high level of  intellectual engagement from readers, who will be looking for “€œfresh and progressive analyses and research”28 that satisfies a human need or solves a human problem. Prospective authors should consider the advice for publication provided by the InterActions manuscript revision tip sheet.29

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1.  InterActions (Oakland): UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523477354232/585059
  2. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California at Los Angeles Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  3. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  4. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  5. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  6. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  7. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  8. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  9. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  10. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  11. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  12. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  13. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  14. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  15. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  16. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  17. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  18. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  19. “What to Look For When Reviewing a Manuscript–Or, How to Get Your Own Manuscript Published,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/brand/gseis_interactions/Reviewing_a_MS.pdf
  20. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  21. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  22. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  23. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  24. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  25. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  26. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  27. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  28. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  29. “What to Look For When Reviewing a Manuscript–Or, How to Get Your Own Manuscript Published” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/brand/gseis_interactions/Reviewing_a_MS.pdf
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The Atlantic

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Atlantic

ISSN: 1072-7825 (Print) and 2151-9463 (Online).1

Website: http://www.theatlantic.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “We reach thinking people—and make them think harder. The Atlantic’s audience is influential, curious, and eager to leave a lasting mark on the world. Never ones to shy away from change, they seek out new ideas, challenge conventions—including their own—and ultimately aim to foster progress.”2

Target audience: For general audiences interested in current topics and foreign affairs.

Publisher: Atlantic Media Company.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: General interest magazine with varied topics from politics, foreign affairs, and culture.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: News stories, articles, fiction pieces, and interviews.

Frequency of publication: Published 10 times a year.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/categories/360000916494-Editorial-Inquiries

Types of contributions accepted: According to their guidelines, “The Atlantic magazine is always interested in great nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. A general familiarity with what we have published in the past is the best guide to our needs and preferences.” Additionally, “The Atlantic wants to hear what you think. . . Visit our Contact Us form and select Letter to the Editor to send an email directly to the Letters section of The Atlantic.5 If you want to send an email from your personal email to the editors at The Atlantic, include “your full name, your mailing address and a phone number where we can contact you.6

Submission and review process: All manuscripts should be submitted as a Word document or PDF. Succinct pitches may be submitted in the body of an e-mail. Send nonfiction manuscripts or pitches to submissions [at] theatlantic.com; fiction manuscripts to fiction [at] theatlantic.com; poetry to poetry [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about politics to politics [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about culture and books to culture [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about business to business [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about science, technology, and health to science [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about family to family [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about education to education [at] theatlantic.com; pitches or commentaries about global issues to global [at] theatlantic.com; and pitches or commentaries about ideas to ideas [at] theatlantic.com.7 Letters to the Editor are to be sent via the form on the “Contact Us” page. 8

Editorial tone: Writing is sophisticated but easy to read.

Style guide used: None offered.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because The Atlantic welcomes unsolicited manuscripts, there is potential for LIS authors to inform a general audience of library news and events. This is not a scholarly journal, yet there is plenty of prestige in being published here as it is more than 160 years in publication.9 LIS professionals and novice writers have an opportunity to expound on topics of interest and perhaps find ideas for scholarly works. Fiction and poetry submissions are also welcomed; it appears that many LIS professionals find this to be a stimulating outlet for non-scholarly writing. Topics that might be suitable for this venue are technological change in libraries, political and social issues surrounding libraries, and the paperless academic library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 1.9 million print readers and 33.7 million global unique digital visitors.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information regarding audience location is not provided, though international subscriptions are available.11 Content is published in English.

Reader characteristics: No information could be located regarding the specific reader characteristics for readers of The Atlantic.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are not likely to know a lot about LIS subject matter if they are simply reading this magazine. A recent article, “Is Google Making Us Stupid,” published here would indicate that readers have some interest in computers and technology; researching the magazine index could not locate any specific articles on library and information science. As this audience is considered affluent and well educated, they are likely to read other magazines and have formulated opinions on LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Atlantic are interested in smart writing and provocative, thought-provoking conversations. LIS topics and issues that need influential advocates would certainly find them here. Articles should be well written, directed toward an educated audience, limit library jargon (or explain each thoroughly), and provide documented corroboration for their issues. References are not a requirement; however, if the author is seeking advocacy for LIS issues, articles will need facts, not just opinions, and perceptive readers will be able to distinguish between the two. Authors must be determined and resolute in their submission process, as The Atlantic receives too many submissions annually to consider them all.

Last updated: September 20, 2020


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. The Atlantic, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed September 20, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522204779230/42396
  2. “Advertising,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 22, 2018, https://advertising.theatlantic.com/
  3. The Atlantic.
  4. The Atlantic.
  5. “Editorial Inquiries,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/categories/360000916494-Editorial-Inquiries
  6. “Submit a Letter to the Editor,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/articles/360011374674-Submit-a-Letter-To-The-Editor
  7. “Submit a piece for editorial consideration at The Atlantic,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://support.theatlantic.com/hc/en-us/articles/360011374734-Submit-a-piece-for-editorial-consideration-at-The-Atlantic
  8. Submit a Letter to the Editor.
  9. “History”, TheAtlantic.com, accessed September 20, 2020, https://www.theatlantic.com/history/
  10. Advertising.”
  11. “Subscribe,” TheAtlantic.com, accessed November 20, 2016, https://w1.buysub.com/pubs/A5/ATL/cds_forms.jsp?cds_page_id=171695&cds_mag_code=ATL&id=1479664672189&lsid=63251157521048080&vid=1&cds_response_key=I16LAUS
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The Writer Magazine

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Writer Magazine

ISSN: 0043-9517 (Print) and 21663-0046 (Online)1

Website: http://www.writermag.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the online submission guidelines, “The Writer is dedicated to expanding and supporting the work of professional and aspiring writers with a straightforward presentation of industry information, writing instruction and professional and personal motivation. In the pages of our magazine, writers share experiences, expertise, struggles, advice, successes and suggestions.”2

Target audience: Professional and aspiring writers.3

Publisher: Madavor Media.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication for writers.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Features instructive articles on how to improve writing and get work published. Also includes up-to-date market lists for aspiring and experienced writers and book reviews for newly published material in the field.

Frequency of publication: Monthly.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.writermag.com/the-magazine/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: “We are interested in how-to stories, reported pieces, narrative essays, and profiles of writers and others in the field.” 6

Submission and review process: Query first. All queries via email to tweditorial [at] madavor.com along with your name, a short bio, an outline of your story idea, estimated word count, and a brief description of your background. “We receive hundreds of pitches every week and cannot respond to all of them. If you haven’t heard from us in two weeks, please feel free to move your submission to another publication.”7

Editorial tone: Step-by-step how-to instructional advice, written in an easy-to-digest tone. Narrative essays should provide some take-away advice and benefits to a writing audience, but should not be self-promoting. Tone should support aspiring and experienced writers alike, although beginning writers are more likely to read the magazine.8

Style guide used: No style guide or preferences are stated in the submission guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

No matter the field, all writers share the same pitfalls, challenges, and successes. LIS authors can convey their experiences and even review books they found helpful to the craft of writing. One column, entitled “Breakthrough,” publishes first-person narratives as new writers “break through” to publication and all authors are eligible to submit upon publishing their first article (presumably in an LIS publication).9 LIS authors are also great at discovering and organizing resources for writers, which would be great for the how-to instructional features, such as helping authors do research for articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 32,000 print and digital readers; more than 40,000 opt-in e-newsletter subscribers; 51,000 unique monthly website visitors.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in the United States; available by subscription internationally as well.11 Readers are well cultured and interested in literature and writing as an art. Literary and writing jargon can be used.

Reader characteristics: The readers of The Writer are 27% male and 72% female. The average household income is $82,000 and 64% of readers are college graduates12 Readers of The Writer are literary in nature. Readers want informative, how-to advice and stories about how to succeed at the craft and business of writing. There is no place for negativity regarding the profession in this publication. Readers have one important thing in common, they are passionate about the craft of writing. Because writing is mostly a freelance profession, information related to managing a freelance career is also well received and well featured in the magazine. Another important thing to remember is that this publication caters to all types of writers, which does give a broad array of possible types of readers to target.

Readers of The Writer are only interested in reading articles written in a supportive and encouraging tone with the honest intention of helping other writers further their craft. Readers expect The Writer to teach them how to write all types of articles and stories. Readers are generally open to new ideas on the publication’s subject matter and believe they too can become professional writers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this publication have limited knowledge of LIS subject matter, except as it relates to book reviews and literature. Readers can easily digest writing that dissects published works, and also can appreciate labeling materials for certain audiences. Readers will not understand technical LIS jargon, but they will appreciate information that will help them use library and research resources more efficiently.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most obvious characteristic that readers of The Writer have in common is that they are all writers. While it can be assumed readers are literary to a certain degree, their level of technical knowledge when discussing LIS-related issues or services must be presented in a language that is easy for someone unfamiliar to LIS jargon to understand. Readers of this publication could benefit from research instruction, such as how to research a great book or article idea, but it must be presented in layperson terms. Potential authors should consider the level of research skills to be moderate to none among readership, and therefore mimic the publication’s simplified tone when providing advice on these or related topics. Furthermore, potential authors should keep in mind that readers expect articles to be very descriptive, with step-by-step instructions on how to achieve whatever goal the article promises. This style is what keeps readers interested and coming back issue after issue.

Last updated: September 6, 2020


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. The Writer, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed September 6, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1599422891430/55543
  2. “Submission Guidelines,” WriterMag.com, accessed December 9, 2016, http://www.writermag.com/the-magazine/submission-guidelines/
  3. Submission Guidelines.”
  4. Submission Guidelines.”
  5. “Subscriptions,” WriterMag.com, accessed December 9, 2016, http://www.writermag.com/the-magazine/subscriptions/
  6. Submission Guidelines.”
  7. Submission Guidelines.”
  8. Submission Guidelines.”
  9. Submission Guidelines.”
  10. Madover Media. (2020). Media Kit. The Writer. Retrieved from https://cdn.writermag.com/2019/12/TWM-1908-MediaKit-LR-1.pdf
  11. 2020 Media Kit.”
  12. 2020 Media Kit.”
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Publishers Weekly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Publishers Weekly, or PW

ISSN: 0000-0019 (Print) and 2150-4008 (Online)1

Website: http://www.publishersweekly.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weekly news magazine focused on the international book publishing business.”2

Target audience: Publishers, booksellers, librarians, literary agents, authors, and the media.3

Publisher: PWxyz, LLC.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian magazine covering book publishing.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: “It offers feature articles and news on all aspects of the book business, bestsellers lists in a number of categories, and industry statistics, but its best known service is pre-publication book reviews, publishing some 9,000 per year.”6

Frequency of publication: Weekly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/corp/submissionguidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: PW accepts story pitches for features, news, opinion pieces, and the children’s section.8 Letters to the editor are also accepted.9

Submission and review process: Story pitches for news and soapbox ideas should be sent to Editorial Director Jim Milliot at jmilliot [at] publishersweekly.com. Pitches for features should be sent to features [at] publishersweekly.com; for children’s, send pitches to childrensbooks [at] publishersweekly.com.10 Send letters to Jim Milliot, including your name and address.11

Editorial tone: Informative.

Style guide used: None indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishers Weekly is perhaps the most prominent publication in the book publishing industry, and having a book review or article published in the magazine would be a notable accomplishment in the eyes of other LIS professionals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation:Publishers Weekly‘s weekly print edition boasts 68,000 readers–booksellers, publishers, public and academic librarians, wholesalers, distributors, educators, agents and writers,”12 “PublishersWeekly.com had 10 million unique visitors last year and more than 27 million page views…and it’s growing.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Publishers Weekly is published in the United States in English, though it features reviews of books from around the world. According to Publishers Weekly, 71% of readers reside in North America and 29% reside in Europe, Asia, and Australia.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are 53.9% female with the majority of readers (22%) in the 25-34 age range.15 The audience of Publishers Weekly is comprised of 44% book buyers and booksellers, 25% publishers, 25% librarians, 2% public relations/media, 2% agents and rights professionals, and 1% wholesalers/distributors.16 Readers are people who care about books or need/want to know what’s happening in the world of book publishing.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is possible, given the connection between libraries and the publishing industry, that the readers may have a familiarity with LIS jargon, however, it should not be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Publishers Weekly is targeted to publishers, booksellers, librarians, educators, and book lovers. National library news is relevant to the magazine’s content, and readers would be interested in a librarian’s unique perspective on books or publishing trends.

Last updated: September 14, 202o


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  Publishers Weekly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed September 14, 2020, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1600133762655/52201
  2. “About Us,” PublishersWeekly.com, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/corp/aboutus.html
  3. About Us.”
  4. About Us.”
  5. About Us.”
  6. About Us.”
  7. About Us.”
  8. “How do I pitch Publishers Weekly a story idea?,” PublishersWeekly.com, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/corp/faq.html#pitch
  9. “How do I send a letter to the editor?,” PublishersWeekly.com, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/corp/faq.html#letter
  10.  “How do I pitch Publishers Weekly a story idea?”
  11. How do I send a letter to the editor?
  12. “Advertising Information,” PublishersWeekly.com, accessed September 14, 2020, https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/corp/advertisinginfo.html
  13. Advertising Information.”
  14. “Media Planner 2019,” PublishersWeekly.com, accessed September 14, 2020, https://www.publishersweekly.com/binary-data/ARTICLE_ATTACHMENT/file/000/004/4113-1.pdf
  15. Media Planner 2019.”
  16. Media Planner 2019.”
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Senses of Cinema

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Senses of Cinema

ISSN: 1443-4059 (Online)1

Website: http://www.sensesofcinema.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Senses of Cinema describes itself as “an online journal devoted to the serious and eclectic discussion of cinema.” As an Australian-based publication, Senses is also committed to discussing Australian film and film culture.2

Target audience: “People from a wide range of backgrounds, professions, and interests but bound by a single common element: an informed, passionate and serious attitude toward cinema as an art.”3

Publisher: Senses of Cinema, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? Articles can be peer reviewed by request.5

Type: Civilian publication; film journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: Issues typically contain editorials, articles, film festival reports, book reviews, movie reviews, film director profiles, and English-language translations of articles previously published elsewhere. “We are open to a range of critical approaches (auteurist, formalist, psychoanalytic, humanist…) and encourage contributors to experiment with different forms of writing (personal memoir, academic essay, journalistic report, poetic evocation).”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sensesofcinema.com/about/contributors/

Types of contributions accepted: Senses of Cinema accepts article proposals; unsolicited finished articles will not be considered. Their policy is not to republish material freely available online in English. Proposals should not exceed 200 words and should state what your article will be about why it will be of interest to the journal’s readers.9

Submission and review process: Submit proposals via email. If they commission an article based on your proposal, publication is not guaranteed until they see the finished article. Deadline and word count will be negotiated during commissioning, but feature articles should not exceed a maximum of 5,000 words. Once your finished article is submitted, it will be edited and returned to you for final approval. Authors may opt to have their article peer reviewed, if desired.10

Editorial tone: A variety of writing forms are encouraged,11 but tone should be professional and intelligent.

Style guide used: Senses of Cinema uses a house style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because it’s not a library and information science publication, Senses of Cinema‘s potential for LIS authors is limited. That said, the publication’s exceedingly liberal definition of its scope and the wide range of article types and writing styles that it accepts make it an intriguing possibility for LIS scholars and practitioners with a professional (media librarians, film studies librarians, etc.) or personal interest in film. Senses is friendly to first-time authors and employs forms similar to those found in LIS publications (reviews, reports, etc.)12, so it could be a good place for a writer to cut his or her authorial teeth. Senses has a solid reputation in film circles, so it might help the career of a librarian working in a humanities or media setting. Well-written and insightful articles about “librarians in the movies” might be accepted, too.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 216,000 unique users per issue and 450,000 page views per issue.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  No specific information about audience location could be determined but writers can assume that Senses of Cinema readers are comfortable with the English language and should also be respectful of the journal’s potential international readers, for whom English may be a second language.

Reader characteristics: Senses of Cinema “attracts readers from across all age groups, with particular emphasis on the 25-34 age bracket,” and the majority of Senses readers are practicing filmmakers or are involved in film culture and have completed an undergraduate degree.14 According to the journal, the common point linking a diverse readership is “a genuine love of and curiosity about the medium.”15 LIS authors should remember that LIS subjects are of secondary interest to the readers of this publication.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: LIS authors writing for this publication cannot assume that their readers have any knowledge of LIS topics or terminology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Senses of Cinema has a great deal of potential for LIS authors who wish to write about LIS topics as they relate to film. That said, LIS authors need to remember that LIS subjects will always be of secondary importance to these readers; writers should take care to avoid jargon, provide background for any discussion of LIS subjects, and firmly ground their articles in the world of cinema.

Possible topics for LIS authors to write about for this publication include subjects pertaining to library media centers and/or collections; libraries and/or librarians as represented in film or in specific films; information gathering strategies for filmmakers, film studies scholars, or movie lovers; bibliographies for film and/or film studies topics; reviews of books, films, periodicals, movie soundtracks, or other materials that the LIS author might work with as a librarian.

Last updated: September 13, 2020


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1.  Senses of Cinema, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522202577224/347819
  2. “About Senses of Cinema,” SensesOfCinema.com, accessed November 8, 2016, http://sensesofcinema.com/about/
  3. About Senses of Cinema.”
  4. About Senses of Cinema.”
  5. “Proposals,” SensesOfCinema.com, accessed November 8, 2016, http://sensesofcinema.com/about/contributors/
  6. About Senses of Cinema.”
  7. About Senses of Cinema.”
  8. About Senses of Cinema.”
  9. Proposals.”
  10. Proposals.”
  11. About Senses of Cinema.”
  12. Proposals.”
  13. “Advertisers,” SensesOfCinema.com, accessed September 13, 2020, Senses of Cinema. Retrieved from http://sensesofcinema.com/about/advertisers/
  14. Advertisers.”
  15. Advertisers.”
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Information and Learning Science

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information and Learning Science (previously published as Library World and then New Library World and incorporating Asian Libraries)1

ISSN: 2398-5348 (Print) and 1758-6909 (Online)2

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Information and Learning Science advances inter-disciplinary research that explores scholarly intersections shared within 2 key fields: information science and the learning sciences / education sciences. The journal provides a publication venue for work that strengthens our scholarly understanding of human inquiry and learning phenomena, especially as they relate to design and uses of information and e-learning systems innovations.”3

Target audience: The target audience is international in scope, including academics, information professionals, and librarians, along with researchers and teachers involved in the library and information community.

Publisher: Emerald Publishing.

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and Online.

Content: “We invite research that builds upon and advances theories, methods, results, innovation designs, evidence bases and frameworks for action present across both information science, and the learning/education sciences scholarly domains. We especially welcome the submission of papers that directly address, explicate and discuss the inter-disciplinary boundaries and intersections present across these two fields, and that offer new conceptual, empirical and technological syntheses. Such investigations may include but are not limited to:

  • E-learning perspectives on searching, information-seeking, and information uses and practices engaged by a full diversity of youth, adults, elders and specialized populations, in varied contexts including leisure time activities; e-learning at work, in libraries, at school, home, during playtime, in health/wellness settings, etc.
  • Design and use of systems such as MOOCs, social media, learning management systems, search systems, information systems, and other technology design innovations that contribute to human inquiry, formal and informal learning, searching, information-seeking, information uses, knowledge building and sharing, and instruction;
  • HCI, socio-technical systems research, and materiality research perspectives on information and learning systems design; social learning ecologies; and creation and use of physical objects and settings that elicit human inquiry and learning;
  • Ethnographic; emancipatory; social justice-based; feminist; critical race theory; and post-structuralist research involving information, learning, equity, design;
  • Information, communication, and technology (ICT) considerations in computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) contexts;
  • Innovations and e-learning solutions that address digital / information / media / data literacy and/or address the digital divide;
  • Innovations involving problem-, project-, and inquiry-based learning contexts and goods;
  • Learning analytics and/or data science perspectives on measurement and analysis of learning in information / search / e-learning systems;
  • Social and ethical issues in e-learning contexts such as design, measurement, and evaluation — such as privacy and security concerns around student confidentiality, data ownership and ethical data uses by researchers, teachers, institutions, etc.”5

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (six times a year).

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Information and Learning Science accepts articles in the following categories: research paper, viewpoint, technical paper, conceptual paper, case study, literature review, and general review (between 2,500 and 6,000 words). Structured abstracts must be submitted with all articles. The journal also publishes conference reports and book reviews.6

Submission and review process: Authors submit and track manuscripts on ScholarOne Manuscripts. The editor reviews submissions and sends appropriate manuscripts to two referees for double-blind review. Conference reports and book reviews are not peer reviewed.7

Editorial tone: The editorial tone is scholarly and academic.

Style guide used: Information and Learning Science uses Harvard Style and provides examples of references and citations.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information and Learning Science is multidisciplinary and international in scope. It publishes many different types of high-quality articles on a broad range of LIS topics. Further, the journal takes account of “social, cultural, economic, ergonomic, ethical and sectoral issues,” which appeals to LIS authors worldwide.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information and Learning Science is published in English in the United Kingdom; however, its audience is international. Editorial Advisory Board members are from all over the world, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Nigeria, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Hungary,  Greece, and the United Arab Emirates.10

Reader characteristics: Due to the journal’s international reach, Information and Learning Science attracts readers from the LIS professional spectrum, including teachers, librarians, researchers, and students, from a variety of library types and information settings, who are interested in understanding LIS practices from around the world.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader of Information and Learning Science has a broad understanding of LIS subject matters and issues and an understanding of library jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the readership is international, published articles should have a broad level of interest and be applicable to LIS professionals and academics from all over the world. Information and Learning Science is a scholarly journal with a large number of academics in its audience; the articles they would be most interested in would be those based on original and novel scholarship and research.

Last updated: April 14, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Journal History,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  2.  Information and Learning Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/901530879
  3. “Aims & Scope,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ils.
  5. “Aims & Scope.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Aims & Scope.
  10. “Editorial Team,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=ils.
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Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication (GKMC) (formerly Library Review)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication (GKMC) (formerly Library Review). The title change went into effect in January 2018.1

ISSN: 2514-9342.2

Purpose, objective, or mission: GKMC “publishes contemporary research and practice which explores the way that people and organisations interact in the digital information environment.” It’s “concerned with innovation and developments in digital information, as they relate to global knowledge, communication and world memory.  It covers the creation, management, dissemination and use of the full range of information objects.”3

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc

Target audience: Academics, LIS teachers and researchers, all practicing librarians and information professionals, interested library users, and practitioners in related fields.4

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: “Submissions are welcomed on the following major themes:

Global Knowledge and Communication:

  • Social interaction, networking, social media and space
  • Free/open access to information: legal, technical,  social and managerial issues
  • Information and knowledge as agents of and for social, political, cultural and organisational change
  • Connecting the individual: personalised and meta-services
  • Sociological and philosophical aspects of information and knowledge, including service provision

World Memory: Text, Sound, Vision and Artefacts:

  • Information creation, ‘collection’ and curation
  • Information seeking, discovery and use
  • Sustainable preservation, including environmental, social, technical and legal issues
  • Sharing and facilitating individual engagement with archival, cultural and literary heritage: objects and services
  • Memory institutions and organisations: role and purpose, design, delivery, evaluation and cultural issues
  • Professional collaboration – consortia, exchange and sharing.”9

Frequency of publication: Nine times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions should belong to one of the following categories: research paper, viewpoint, technical paper, conceptual paper, case study, literature review, or general review.11

Submission and review process: The journal welcomes original, unpublished manuscripts (between 6000 and 8000 words) which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Submissions should be accompanied by a structured abstract which contains four to seven subheadings (maximum of 250 words). (Please see the How to…Write an Abstract guide here for more details.) Additionally, Emerald Publishing Limited partners with Peerwith, an organization which provides editing, translation, and other useful services. Submissions to GKMC are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts. Information on registering and using the ScholarOne Manuscripts is located here. Per the “Author Guidelines,” “Each paper is reviewed by the editor and, if it is judged suitable for this publication, it is then sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review.”12

Editorial tone: Scholarly, assumes professional industry knowledge of LIS issues.13

Style guide used: Harvard style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication is an excellent choice for authors looking to publish with a respected journal addressing global LIS issues. GKMC dates all the way back to 1927,15 and its recent name change reflects its commitment to memory institutions (e.g., museums, archives, etc.) in addition to libraries.16 Thus, authors interested in publishing with this journal have a wider range of topics to choose from than they do with traditional LIS journals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although specific circulation statistics are unavailable, the journal likely enjoys substantial readership (due to its international focus).17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the U.K. and has readers and subscribers worldwide.18 GKMC‘s international scope is exemplified by its first issue published under its new name, with topics such as “The State of Institutional Repositories and Scholarly Communications in Nigeria,” “Utilisation of Subscribed Electronic Resources by Library Users in Mzumbe Library, Tanzania,” etc.19

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to value cutting-edge research on information-based topics pertaining to libraries and other information organizations. Additionally, readers will expect articles to be meticulously researched and to clearly document all findings, in keeping with the standard current and past articles have set.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Writers can assume that readers have considerable knowledge of LIS issues and terminology, as well as information terminology in general.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

In keeping with the journal’s new name, readers will expect articles on a broad spectrum of information science issues. For instance, a 2018 article entitled “Chinese Female Preference of Cosmetic Products Information Channels” describes Chinese women’s information-seeking behaviors in regards to cosmetics.22 In other words, readers will expect articles to be varied in terms of topic selection but remain grounded in solid LIS theory.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Emerald Journal News,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://smtp.aslib.co.uk/products/journals/news_story.htm?id=7607
  2.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  3. “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  4.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  5.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  6. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  7. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  8. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  9. “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  10.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc
  13. Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=gkmc
  15.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  16. “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  17.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  18.  Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 9, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520607691074/38436
  19. Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication 67, no. 1/2 (2018).
  20.  Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication 67, no. 1/2 (2018).
  21.  “Journal Information,” Emerald Publishing Limited, accessed March 12, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=gkmc
  22.  Yonghe Lu and Xiaohua Liu, “Chinese Female Preference of Cosmetic Products Information Channels,” Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication 67, no. 3 (2018): 180-192, https://doi.org/10.1108/GKMC-04-2017-0042.
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Bright Lights Film Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bright Lights Film Journal

ISSN: 0147-4049 (Print) and 2376-8290 (Online)1

Websitehttp://brightlightsfilm.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Bright Lights is a “popular-academic hybrid of movie analysis, history, and commentary looking at classic and commercial, independent, exploitation, and international film.”2 The goal in creating the magazine was to “feature great photos and combine popular and academic styles, with humor and progressive politics tossed into the mix.”3

“Bright Lights is one of the most widely read, quoted, and respected movie sites on the Web, mixing savvy pop reviews with in-depth analysis of current and classic, edgy and indie, international and experimental cinema – with wit and a political edge.” 4

Target audience: “Amateur film fans to students and professors to Academy members.”5

Publisher: Bright Lights Film Journal.6

Peer reviewed? No. “We do not formally peer-review submissions, though occasionally and informally we send articles to one or more reviewers for reaction. Examples would be pieces that seem promising but are heavily theorized, outside our area of expertise, or written by someone whose native language is not English (to determine if it’s worth being made intelligible).”7

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online. Print magazine was discontinued in 1995.8

Content: Reviews, editorials, think pieces, articles, and film festival reports.

Frequency of publication: Content is updated frequently, with no set schedule.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://brightlightsfilm.com/about/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: “We are interested in short pieces (reviews of single movies, DVDs, books) and more substantial studies of directors and other key production figures (cinematographers and producers, for example), analyses of genres, studios and studio style, and topics like gender and minority contributions to film. We always need overviews of international and minority cinemas, in-depth director interviews, discussions of the impact of multimedia on film, breakthrough technologies, animation, and studies of neglected or misinterpreted figures in film history. We have no set taboos and prefer passionate, opinionated, even ranting pieces that are intelligently and engagingly written. Political, anti-capitalist, pro-sex tirades always welcome. Typically, we have no particular theme, preferring a potpourri made up of what your editor, our regular writers, and other contributors are thinking and writing about.”10

Submission and review process: Submissions are accepted via email and should be in 12-pt Times New Roman (or similar font) and double-spaced. No PDFs, RTFs, Google Docs, or HTML files. “Straightforward reviews (single film, DVD, book) might be in the 1,000-2,000 range; profiles of individuals, production histories, and think pieces can run as long as the material dictates (within reason).”11

Response Time: “For new authors, we try to respond within two to four weeks; could be sooner or later depending on the existing pile. Feel free to nudge us if you think we’re taking too long.” 12

Editorial tone: Smart and educated, but still accessible to a wide audience. “Bright Lights is not an academic ghetto, and looks more for idiosyncratic style, and the ability to make ideas available to the widest possible audience, than bone-dry scholarly analysis. We are most interested in bringing ideas to a readership hungry for information but put off by standard, navel-gazing academic writing. We greatly value wit and look for literary value in submissions.”13

Style guide used: “Footnote/references style can be MLA or any other style as long as it’s consistent. However, a Works Cited approach (avoiding footnotes) is generally preferred, if possible.” 14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is not a LIS publication, so its potential for LIS authors is limited. The wide range of article types and writing styles that it accepts do, however, make it an intriguing possibility for LIS scholars and practitioners with a professional (archivists, media librarians, film studies librarians, etc.) or personal interest in film. Bright Lights is friendly to first-time authors and employs forms similar to those found in LIS publications (reviews, reports, etc.), so it could be a good place for a writer to cut his or her authorial teeth. In addition to not being an LIS publication, this journal isn’t nearly as well established in the field of film and media studies as some other publications, so it might not meet the requirements of all tenure committees. Well-written articles about “librarians in the movies” might be accepted by this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “One of the Web’s most popular film sites, BLFJ averages 2,000 daily visitors and serves over 2,600 pages per day. Over 85% of our page hits are from new visitors.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: “Our readers hail from 190 countries around the world including, most prominently, the US, Canada, the UK, and Australia. We also receive thousands of hits from European, South American, and Asian countries where English is a second language, for example, Germany, India, Turkey, France, Italy, Ireland, the Netherlands, China, Spain, and Brazil.”16 Bright Lights is written in English.

Reader characteristics: No information was available on the individual characteristics of the readers of Bright Lights. Writers can assume that the readers of Bright Lights have a professional or personal interest in academic film studies. They are likely to work in an academic environment. Bright Lights is left leaning and favors progressive, anti-capitalist politics.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: LIS authors writing for this publication cannot assume that their readers have any knowledge of LIS topics, jargon, or terminology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As noted in the “Publication Analysis” section of this entry, Bright Lights Film Journal has potential for LIS authors who wish to write about LIS topics as they relate to film. That said, LIS authors need to remember that LIS subjects will always be of secondary importance to the readers of this publication; writers should take care to avoid jargon, provide background for any discussion of LIS subjects, and firmly ground their articles in the world of cinema.

Possible topics for LIS authors to write about for this publication include subjects pertaining to film archives; library media centers and/or collections; libraries and/or librarians as represented in film or in specific films; information gathering strategies for filmmakers, film studies scholars, or movie lovers; bibliographies for film and/or film studies topics; reviews of books, films, periodicals movie soundtracks, or other materials that the LIS author might work with as a librarian.

Last updated: September 20, 2020


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Bright Lights, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/162922392
  2. “Advertise.”, BrightLightsFilm.com, accessed September 15, 2016, http://brightlightsfilm.com/about/advertise/
  3. “History.”, BrightLightsFilm.com, accessed September 15, 2016, http://brightlightsfilm.com/about/history/
  4. “Submission Guidelines.”, BrightLightsFilm.com, accessed September 20, 2020, http://brightlightsfilm.com/about/submission-guidelines/
  5. “Advertise.”
  6. “Bright Lights Film Journal.”, BrightLightsFilm.com, accessed September 15, 2016, http://brightlightsfilm.com/
  7. “Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “History.”
  9. “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. “Submission Guidelines.”
  11. “Submission Guidelines.”
  12. “Submission Guidelines.”
  13. “Submission Guidelines.”
  14. “Submission Guidelines.”
  15. “Advertise.”
  16. “Advertise.”
  17. “Submission Guidelines.”
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Health and Interprofessional Practice

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Health and Interprofessional Practice

ISSN: 2159-12531

Website: http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “Health and Interprofessional Practice is a peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to increasing the availability of high-quality evidence to inform patient care and practitioner education from an interprofessional perspective.”2

Target audience: HIP is aimed at academics, practitioners and student-practitioners.3

Publisher: Pacific University Libraries4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Health Facilities and Administration, scholarly6

Medium: Online, open access7

Content: HIP publishes original qualitative and quantitative research, reviews, and educational materials addressing practical challenges and opportunities in the healthcare field. Articles published in the journal have immediate, practical applications.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/author.html

Types of contributions accepted: From the submission call: “HIP seeks to publish original research (both quantitative and qualitative), reviews and educational materials that directly address the practical challenges and opportunities of interprofessional care and education. Work published in Health and Interprofessional Practice should have immediate practical application for clinicians and educators who value interprofessional teamwork, evidence-based practice and culturally competent care. Articles that indicate methods of navigating interdisciplinary conflicts/disagreements (e.g. scope of practice issues) in the service of high quality patient care are of particular interest.”10 HIP publishes original theory & research, case-based learning, educational strategies, cross-cultural issues in care, review articles, student experiences, book/EBP resource reviews, and commentaries.11

Submission and review process: All submissions should be original work that has not been submitted to other journals. Authors must obtain written permission from all individuals and institutions mentioned in the acknowledgements. Documents should be in Microsoft Word format, double-spaced and in a 12-point font. Articles can be uploaded digitally through the journal’s online submissions portal; illustrations, figures, tables, and videos should be uploaded separately, not as part of the main document. Manuscripts should not have any identifying information on the main text; submissions should be accompanied by a cover letter describing the value of the manuscript for the body of scholarship and containing all the identifying information of the author. Authors should examine the specific requirements for submissions for each section of the journal.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly and formal13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This new publication has potential for LIS professionals in working in medical environments who have evidence-based practices to share with health professions faculty and other medical librarians. This publication seeks submissions about interprofessional teamwork, evidence-based practice, and culturally competent care, each of which the medical librarian is poised to build. According to Isaac Gilman, HIP‘s Managing Editor, “any work that improves interprofessional practice and education,”15 including pieces authored by LIS professionals, is welcomed by HIP.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No numbers available, but the journal is open access.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is produced in the US at Pacific University,17 but the editorial board comes from universities across the country.18 Publication is in English,19 but can be seen online anywhere in the world. Authors should be sure to avoid jargon or idiom.

Reader characteristics: Readers have a high degree of interest in medical librarianship. Most will have an MLIS or other advanced degree. Most readers will be employed in medical libraries. Readers will be interested in anything related to providing medical information to a lay audience and new advances in medical librarianship. However, they may not have much interest in or knowledge of other types of librarianship.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be well-versed in all aspects of medical librarianship.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although it is a new publication, Health and Interprofessional Practice is a well-respected place for medical library authors, and may be a good place for new authors to get a start in publishing. With an open access policy, the journal will allow research to go out to a large number of readers.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523474016956/727302
  2. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/
  3. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/
  4. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  5. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. accessed April 24, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  6. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  7. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/aimsandscope.html
  9. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/aimsandscope.html
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/aimsandscope.html
  12. “Information for Authors,” Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/author.html
  13. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  14. “Information for Authors,” Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/author.html
  15. I. Gilman, personal communication, 25 March 2011
  16. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/
  17. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  18. “Editorial Board,” Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/editorialboard.html
  19. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405967379038/727302
  20. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/
  21. Health and Interprofessional Practice, Pacific University Libraries, accessed April 26, 2017, http://commons.pacificu.edu/hip/
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