Wiki Tags Archives: Young adults

Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
Continue Reading

Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
Continue Reading

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
Continue Reading

Teacher Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Teacher Librarian: The Journal for School Library Professionals

ISSN: 1481-1782

Website: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Teacher Librarian “is one of the leading journals designed specifically for librarians working with K-12 students” as well as classroom teachers and administrators. “The name Teacher Librarian reflects the journal’s focus on the essential role of the school librarian, or ‘teacher-librarian,’ as educator, a partner and collaborator with classroom teachers, school administrators, and others.”1

Target audience: Librarians and other information professionals, classroom teachers, and administrators working in K-12 schools.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, as appropriate to the article.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Teacher Librarian publishes several major articles in each issue which deal with major topics of current interest as well as articles addressing the very foundation of teacher-librarianship.”6 Articles address a broad spectrum of topics, including Future Ready Libraries, inquiry, equity, leadership, open educational resources, cultural responsiveness, project-based learning, advocacy, digital citizenship, STEM and STEAM, and school library design.7 Regular sections include app and website reviews; advocacy; technology and PC issues; education and library product reviews; library resources management; reviews of new books, videos, and software for children and young adults; and Internet resources.8

Frequency of publication: Five times per year: February, April, June, October, and December.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Teacher Librarian accepts articles on a broad range of topics; among the most popular are “learning commons, digital and multiple literacies, reading, professional collaboration, professional development, teaching and curriculum ideas, and makerspaces” in the context of the K-12 school library. Authors may submit proposals for articles to the editors.10 The journal accepts manuscripts that are based on research, personal experience, and practice; the column Tips & Tactics features “information that can be easily transferred to practice on a daily basis.”11

Submission and review process: Submit manuscripts as an email attachment, preferably in Word, to the editors. As appropriate, proposed articles are blind reviewed “by at least two members of the Teacher Librarian peer review board, all of whom are either scholars or recognized professionals.” The editors make the final decisions on manuscripts and reserve the right “to edit for brevity, clarity and consistency of style.”12

Editorial tone: The tone of the articles ranges from scholarly, but not overly formal, to casual and informative, depending on the article type.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an especially good journal for LIS students interested in K-12 school librarianship and the current topics that affect the field. The journal publishes both research- and practice-based articles, under a wide range of topics that are of interest to those working in the schools, so LIS writers have a choice on the type of articles they would like to submit, as long as the guidelines are followed. Potential writers can also submit proposals to the editors to make sure the topic falls within the journal’s scope.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Teacher Librarian has about 2,750 subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of Teacher Librarian are mostly located in the United States and Canada, and the journal focuses on North American school libraries, although many of the issues discussed can apply to school libraries in other regions. The advisory board is made up of professionals from a range of school types from the United States, Canada, and Australia.15 Authors should not have any problems using cultural references or jargon common in schools, although regional terms and usages may need explanation.

Reader characteristics: This journal is designed specifically for library professionals, school administrators, and classroom teachers working with children and young adults in the K-12 schools. Readers expect both research-based articles and articles that have clear guidelines for immediate, practical implementation in school libraries. Readers also expect helpful reviews on new materials and articles that explore up-and-coming trends in the field of school librarianship. Teacher Librarian does not look like a “typical” scholarly journal in that it is colorful and features photos and graphics.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this journal range from librarians with MLIS degrees, to library professionals without a master’s, to school administrators and classroom teachers.16 Some readers may be less familiar with library jargon, and so explanations may be warranted. Most readers will be familiar with the terminology and concepts of K-12 education.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Teacher Librarian are library professionals who are working with K-12 students. These professionals are looking for articles that present strategies to better manage library resources for students, or articles that review education- and library-related materials. The readers need to be kept up to date on the latest happenings in information technology, as well as resources that can be found on the Internet. Collection development is a large part of the duties of the teacher librarian, so reliable reviews of new books and other media is of great interest. Articles on collaboration, leadership, advocacy, management, or any aspect of information technology in the K-12 schools would also appeal to this group.

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/.
  2. “About.”
  3. Frontpiece, Teacher Librarian 45, no. 3 (February 2018): 6.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/.
  5. “Subscribe,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/subscribe/.
  6. “About.”
  7. “2018 Media Kit,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/TELI2018-mediakit_web.pdf.
  8. “About.”
  9. “Subscribe.”
  10. “Submissions,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Author Guidelines.”
  13. “Author Guidelines.”
  14.  “2018 Media Kit.”
  15. “Advisory Board,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/advisory-board/.
  16. “About.”
Continue Reading

ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
Continue Reading

New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship

ISSN1361-4541 (print), 1740-7885 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcll20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship “is multidisciplinary in nature, providing opportunities for the ‘€˜pure’ discussion of children’s literature, and of issues relating to one of the key places in which to find such literature — €”libraries for young people.”1

Target audience: Those working in the field of children’s and adolescent literature around the world, including public and school librarians, scholars, critics, and teachers.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship is international in scope and publishes articles on a broad range of topics in the field of children’s and adolescent literature and library services, including “the management of library services to children and adolescents; education issues affecting library services; user education and the promotion of services; staff education and training; collection development and management; critical assessments of children’s and adolescent literature; book and media selection; and research in literature and library services for children and adolescents”6

Frequency of publication: Two issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship accepts “original papers of both an experimental and theoretical nature,” as well as those grounded in practical issues in children’s and adolescent literature and library services. The journal publishes original research and scholarship on a broad range of professional issues in children’s and adolescent library services as well as theoretical analyses and discussions of children’s and adolescent literature.8

Submission and review process: Manuscripts and all editorial inquiries should be directed to the editor9 for editorial screening and peer review.10 Taylor & Francis provides a general overview of the publication process.11

Editorial tone: The tone is academic and appropriate for an international audience.

Style guide used: MLA Handbook (8th ed.).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship is an appropriate outlet for LIS scholars, practitioners, and researchers from around the world who are writing about children’s and adolescent literature and library services. The journal publishes high-level research and analyses, as well as theoretical articles and those with practical application.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The New Review of Children’s Literature is international in scope and is published in English. The journal’s editor is based in the United Kingdom, as are many members of the editorial board. In addition, there are editorial board members from Ireland, France, the United States, Canada, Hong Kong, and Thailand.13

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely public and school librarians, as well as researchers in children’s library services and teachers and critics of children’s literature.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As an academic journal, it can be assumed that most readers have a solid professional knowledge of LIS subject matters.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship have a high level of knowledge of the topic and expect to read articles that further their knowledge with well-reasoned analysis and research presented in a straightforward writing style. Readers are also practicing librarians who look to the journal for “informed comment and advice.”15 The journal’s readership is international, and so authors should provide some context for regional practices.

Last updated: February 14, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=rcll20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Journal Information,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rcll20.
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Journal Information.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. “Journal Information.”
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rcll20&page=instructions.
  10. “Aims and Scope.”
  11. “Author Services,” TaylorandFrancis.com, accessed February 14, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Instructions for Authors.”
  13. “Editorial Board,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rcll20.
  14. “Aims and Scope.”
  15. “Aims and Scope.”
Continue Reading

Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (JRLYA)

ISSN: 2157-39801

Website: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official research journal of the Young Adult Library Services Association, JRLYA‘€™s purpose is to “€enhance the development of theory, research, and practices to support young adult library services.”2

As part of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA™,€ a subspecialty of the ALA), JRLYA‘€™s mandate is part of YALSA’€™s National Research Agenda. The 2017-2021 Research Agenda reexamines how libraries can continue to meet the “changing needs” and “information practices” of teens.3

Target audience: “€The primary audience for Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults includes academics, public librarians, school library media specialists, and secondary school educators who advocate for young adults and strive to support their developmental and educational needs.”€4

Publisher: Young Adult Library Services Association5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS Scholarly.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: From the YALSA website: JRLYA “€promotes and publishes high quality original research concerning the informational and developmental needs of young adults; the management, implementation, and evaluation of library services for young adults; and other critical issues relevant to librarians who work with young adults.”9 Articles in the journal also include literary and cultural analysis of writing for young adults.€10

Frequency of publication: Irregularly.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Original, research-based manuscripts. From the Author Guidelines: “€œManuscripts may be based on original qualitative or quantitative research, an innovative conceptual framework, or a substantial literature review that opens new areas of inquiry and investigation.”€12 You may also submit manuscripts from other disciplines focused on “enriching theory, research and practice in young adult library services.”13

Submission and review process: Send the submission as an email attachment (.doc, .txt. or .rft) to Dr. Denise E. Agosto: yalsaresearch@gmail.com. Submissions should be between 4,000 and 7,000 words double spaced.14

The editor will acknowledge all submissions, and the review process generally takes 10 to 12 weeks. The review process includes an initial assessment by the editor: if the submission reflects the journal’€s mission statement and is considered for inclusion, it’€s sent to at least two reviewers for a double-blind review process, where the next step is determined. The manuscript will then be a) accepted for publication, b) accepted pending revisions, c) sent back for major revisions and resubmission, d) rejected, or e) deemed not appropriate for the journal, with other journals suggested.15

Editorial tone: While the articles are stringently peer reviewed and of professional quality, they are extremely readable in tone, friendly, engaging, and concise, and deliver excellent information to the reader.16

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th Edition), for overall formatting. Random House Webster’€™s College Dictionary for spelling & usage. See the Author Guidelines for specifics.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors with even a modicum of interest in working with teens should take a look at this journal and consider submitting an article for publication. It is extremely helpful that, even if your paper is rejected by JRLYA, the editors will suggest alternate publications for you to submit to.

Writing topics cover every aspect of YA/librarianship you can think of. A 2013 article discussed biracial identity in adolescent books, with the author delving into her own ethnic and racial identity to set the tone.18 Another article was about the popular X-Men characters, focusing specifically on  X-Women’€™s sexual objectivity.19 You’€ll find this article alongside a more research-oriented study on South Korean adolescent immigrants,20 or issues in juvenile detention center libraries.21 A more recent article focuses on the ongoing debate surrounding multiculturalism in books, specifically, “Who is or is not
allowed to create multicultural literature?” 22

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is purely online23 and is geared towards anyone interested in YA library services and studies.24€ Written in American English,25with references to all sorts of young adult literature and pop culture subjects.26

Reader characteristics: JRLYA is intended for LIS researchers, faculty, students, and professional librarians interested in young adult library services.27

Per the Author Guidelines, the journal asks authors to consider the following style points when submitting for publication:

  • Choose terms that reflect YALSA’€™s philosophy.
  • Avoid sexist language.
  • Articles should be of a scholarly, research-based nature.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely very familiar with LIS subject matter. However, the journal doesn’t just cater to professional librarians, per their website: “The scope of the journal includes all aspects of library services to young adults at every level and for all types of libraries.”29€€ So, if including LIS jargon in your submission, make sure it’s explained or easily inferred within the context.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Esteemed authors such as Anthony Bernier, Carol C. Kuhlthau, and Virginia Walter have written for and commended the efforts of JRLYA.30€€ Readers can connect with YALSA on Facebook, Twitter, various blogs, and via a special wiki YALSA maintains to facilitate research and discussion of all things young adult. This is a wonderful publication, to read or write for; it is helpful and respectful of authors and takes its content very seriously, while never being dull or stuffy. In short, JRLYA is a great source of YA information.

Last updated: February 5, 2018


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  2.  “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  3. “YALSA National Research Agenda,” American Library Association, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.ala.org/yalsa/guidelines/research/researchagenda
  4. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  5. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  6.  The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  7. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  8. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  9. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, American Library Association, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.ala.org/yalsa/products&publications/yalsapubs/jrlya/journal
  10. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  11. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  12. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  13. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  14. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  15. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  16. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  17. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  18. Sarah Hannah Gomez, “This, That, Both, Neither: The Badging of Biracial Identity in Young Adult Realism,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults 3 (April 2013), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2013/04/this-that-both-neither-the-badging-of-biracial-identity-in-young-adult-realism/
  19. Suzanne M. Stauffer, “Taking a Dip in the Crazy Pool: The Evolution of X-Women from Heroic Subject to Sexual Object,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults 3 (April 2013), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2013/04/taking-a-dip-in-the-crazy-pool-the-evolution-of-x-women-from-heroic-subject-to-sexual-object/
  20. Joung Hwa Koo, “Recent South Korean Immigrant Adolescents’ Every Day Life Information Seeking when Isolated from Peers: A Pilot Study,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults 2, no. 3 (2012), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2012/09/recent-south-korean-immigrant-adolescents-everyday-life-information-seeking-when-isolated-from-peers-a-pilot-study/
  21. Jeanie Austin, “Critical Issues in Juvenile Detention Center Libraries,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (2012), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2012/07/critical-issues-in-juvenile-detention-center-libraries/
  22.  Taraneh Matloob Haghanikar, “Patterns in Multicultural Young Adults Novels about Persian Culture,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Matloob-Haghanikar_Patterns-in-Multicultural-YA-Novels.pdf(2017), accessed February 5, 2018, 
  23. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  24. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  25. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  26. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  27. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  28. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  29. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  30. “All Volumes,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/all-volumes/
Continue Reading

BayViews

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayViews

ISSN: 1045-67241

Website: http://www.bayviews.org/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: BayViews is a publication of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, an “association of people interested in library work with children and young adults”2, with reviews aimed at evaluating new books to identify titles appropriate for library purchase. BayView‘s goals are “to strengthen and maintain work with youth in the libraries of Northern and Central California according to the highest standards of professional librarianship by:

  • Reviewing and evaluating children’s books and other materials produced for young people
  • Working actively to further the cause of library work with children
  • Discussing various phases and problems of this work
  • Cooperating in the solution of problems of mutual concern
  • Encouraging and stimulating the personal friendships of its members”3

Target audience: Members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, including both public librarians and school librarians.4

Publisher: The Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news. BayViews is published by a professional organization with the prime purpose of educating its own members.7

Medium: BayViews is both a print and electronic publication. Additionally, BayViews has a blog, which is updated frequently.8

Content: BayViews is a journal of book reviews and opinions with a “western perspective.”9 The members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California use its pages to review new books in the field of children’s literature (including books for babies, children, and teens), as well as meeting in person to discuss the reviews. Each copy of BayViews also contains a section called “BayNews,” which keeps a calendar of upcoming events and collects news about goings on related to children’s services at libraries within the region.10

Frequency of publication: 11 times per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Online at http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html

Reviews are submitted using an online form on the above page, which also includes sample reviews and a letter from the editors regarding content, voice, and other review considerations.12

Types of contributions accepted: Contributions are accepted by members only, including book reviews of children’s and young adult literature, as well as news about events and services in the Northern California library community.13

Reviewers are now able to choose their own review books at meetings.14

Submission and review process: Contributors must be members of the organization. Reviewers choose their own review books at meetings. Authors wishing to contribute to the BayNews section should contact the editor.15

Editorial tone: Reviews should be concise and critical. Sample reviews and guidelines can be found online in the document “A Guide for BayViews Reviewers, Revised September 2012.”16

Style guide used: Not specified, but extensive style guidelines are provided in the document referenced above, “A Guide for BayViews Reviewers, Revised September 2012.”17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a great opportunity for writers in Northern California who are interested in reviewing children’s and young adult literature. Since authors must be members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, and reviews are presented at the ACL chapter meetings, they would probably want to reside in the area to get the most out of their membership.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The membership of ACL who receive as a membership benefit both the print and electronic copy of the journal.18

Audience location and language or cultural views: Based in Northern and Central California, the publication is published in English with no special considerations.19

Reader characteristics: Children’s librarians with a desire to learn more about books than reviews in the LIS press offer. Readers are interested specifically in children’s and young adult books, and issues related to working in public and school libraries. Written by, and for, the membership.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: General LIS knowledge and possibly expertise in their area of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication for the education of the membership of ACL, authors should be well versed in the subject of children’s and young adult literature and willing to follow the membership guidelines to participate in the ACL community.21

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  BayViews, Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, accessed March 22, 2018, http://www.bayviews.org/members/bayviews/BayViews01-07.pdf
  2. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission.html
  3. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission.html
  4. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission.html
  5. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  6. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  7. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  8. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  9. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  10. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayNews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/baynews.html
  11. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  12. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  13. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  14. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  15. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  16. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  17. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  18. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). Membership. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/membership.html
  19. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  20. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  21. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
Continue Reading

Briefings

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Briefings

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.cla-net.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=261

Purpose, objective, or mission: Briefings is an online newsletter of the California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group, providing information relevant to those who serve children and young adults in the library community.1

Target audience: Members of the California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group, as well as other interested professionals.2

Publisher: The California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news with the prime purpose of educating its members.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: Issues of Briefings typically consist of articles about current events in the organization including professional conferences or programs, information about services and programs at California libraries, reminders about scholarships, events, awards and interviews with children’s authors.7

From the Youth Services Interest Group’s Mission Statement, Briefings “features information on interesting and insightful programs and activities for children, tweens, and teens. It also provides readers with information on CLA and other activities affecting libraries throughout the state.”8

Frequency of publication: Briefings now publishes four times per year (as of 2012), in January, May, and August and October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Each newsletter offers a call for submissions. 10

Types of contributions accepted: Upcoming topics are announced in each issue of the newsletter and in the members’ discussion list. The newsletter generally accepts any articles concerning children’s or young adult services, individual experiences at conferences, or sharing information about programs attended.11

Submission and review process: In most cases, articles are about 500 words. Contributors are usually CLA members but it is not required. Authors are asked to meet specific deadlines, usually two weeks before publication. Authors can send submissions to the editors via email.12

Editorial tone: Informational.13

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A good place to increase visibility in the California LIS community and network with other LIS professionals, especially for CLA members and first time writers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As an online-only publication, no circulation figures are available, according to the editor. The California Library Association has “nearly 3000 Individual, Business, and Institutional members. Individual members include librarians, library employees, library students, friends group members, trustees, retirees as well as members of the general public who wish to support California libraries. CLA Business members represent a wide range of library-supporting businesses, whereas Institutional members include library institutions and systems who support the association’s advocacy programs.”14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As a state professional organization, most members either reside or work in the state of California, or have a vested interest in issues affecting libraries in California.15 Briefings is published in the English language. California is a culturally diverse state, however, and the CLA and the Youth Services Interest Group reflect this diversity with attention paid to issues affecting Latino, African-American, Asian, and gay and lesbian communities, among others.16

Reader characteristics: In the absence of any officially gathered demographic data, information was gleaned from individual issues of Briefings, as well as anecdotal evidence from its past editors. It appears that contributors to the publication are overwhelmingly female,17 and past coeditor Julie Zeoli notes, “It has been my observation that there is a growing trend of young people taking young adult librarian positions.”18 From the large numbers of “20-somethings” she’s met at professional gatherings and conferences, we can surmise that the readership of Briefings is trending younger. Zeoli also notes that their readership seems to be overwhelmingly public librarians, as opposed to school librarians.19 The publication favors state and regional issues faced its membership.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of the CLA, we can assume that most readers have MLIS degrees or are working on MLIS degrees, and have a general knowledge base of LIS issues, and youth services specifically. Also, both the CLA and the Youth Services Interest Group have continuing education as one of its goals, and providing a place for the exchange of new ideas and technology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The characteristic with the largest impact on potential contributors to Briefings, of course, is that they usually will be CLA and Youth Services Interest Group members to contribute. With an audience of mainly public librarians, issues of concern to public libraries would probably take precedent over those concerned specifically with school libraries. And with an audience of many young librarians, the audience may be particularly interested in articles sharing information about how other libraries do things, as well as ones with a hip and trendy voice.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  2. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  3. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  4. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  5. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  6. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  7. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  8. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  9. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  10. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  11. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  12. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  13. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  14. California Library Association (CLA). (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  15. California Library Association (CLA). (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  16. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  17. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  18. J. Zeoli (personal communication, February 21, 2014)
  19. J. Zeoli (personal communication, February 21, 2014)
  20. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  21. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
Continue Reading

ALAN Review, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The ALAN Review

ISSN: 0882-2840 (Print) and 1547-741X (Online)1

Website: http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The ALAN Review, sponsored by the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents (ALAN), a special-interest group of the National Council of Teachers of English, specializes on articles and reviews of literature for adolescents and those teaching literature to adolescents.2

Target audience: Mostly K-12 teachers who use the Review to research titles appropriate for young adults, and librarians, authors, and publishers focusing in the YA area.3

Publisher: Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council of Teachers of English.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly/professional publication focusing on news and reviews of young adult (YA)/adolescent literature. Not affiliated with a specific LIS resource, other than NCTE – but provides information to librarians on how to instruct adolescents in reading literature, and provides book reviews that librarians will find helpful in the workplace.6

Medium: ALAN members get a print copy of each Review with membership.7 Back issues can be found on the DLA website, free of charge.8 (Virginia Tech’s Digital Library and Archives (DLA) project provides many scholarly journals in a digital format to get around the high cost of producing print journals.9)

Content: Reviews of young adult/adolescent literature, and articles on the same, as well as articles on the teaching of literature. This can consist of research papers and studies, literature surveys and critiques, author profiles, comp lit studies, and articles on ways to teach literature to YA/adolescents.10

Frequency of publication: Published three times per year: Fall, Winter, and Spring.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Located in the journal itself. You can check the DLA for back issues.12 Calls for manuscripts can also be found on the ALAN Review home  page.13

Types of contributions accepted: Author reviews and interviews, book reviews, articles on adolescent literature and teaching adolescent literature. The Review has also begun accepting vignettes from librarians and teachers focusing on their experiences and interactions presenting YA material to other teachers, students, parents, etc.14

From Vol. 38 No. 1 (Fall 2010) online: “€œA manuscript submitted for consideration should deal specifically with literature for adolescents and/or the teaching of that literature.”15

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be emailed to alan-review@uconn.edu, with “ALAN manuscript submission” in the subject line, in MS Word, APA format. Authors should submit a manuscript without reference to the author(s), a title pages with names and biographies, and a brief statement of the originality of the article.16

A blind review is done by the editor and at least three members of the editorial-review board. Authors can expect to hear the results in 8 weeks. Articles are judged on: the contribution to the field of adolescent lit; clarity and cohesiveness; and scholarly rigor.17

Editorial tone: The articles are scholarly, and present a thesis, outline the study or observation methods, and present findings, often with charts and graphs and a lots of references. However, the tone is conversational, open, and friendly. The submission guidelines specifically note that research papers and studies should be treated as articles, not formal reports.18

Style guide used: The ALAN Review prefers the use of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Anyone who has read and enjoyed a YA book will most likely think of something that would be appropriate to publish in The ALAN Review. This is a respected, peer-reviewed publication geared towards the very community that LIS students seek to work with. Authors write to their like-minded peers. They are passionate about sharing their experiences in hopes that others can learn from them. The Review is a wonderful outlet for interesting, involved, scholarly articles, reviews or interviews, or for just sharing a story about getting YA novels out to the public-a library event, book club, new way of teaching an old title, a study on readers of YA novels or focus on the reading patterns of a specific subculture (minority students, girls, boys, rural readers, LGBTQ youth)-this is the place for these types of submissions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Review is distributed to all members of the ALAN group, part of the NCTE.20 Ulrich’s currently lists its circulation at around 2,500.21 In 2013, the online catalog received over 271,000 unique visitors.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Review is part of the National Council of Teachers of English, out of Campbell, OH. English is the primary language; however, ALAN has members in all 50 states and internationally, and covers reviews of all sorts of books for adolescents.23 From the submission guidelines: “Stereotyping on the basis of sex, race, age, etc., should be avoided, as should gender-specific terms such as ‘€œchairman.'”24

Reader characteristics: Members of the ALAN are highly interested in youth and young adult literature. Most people receiving this journal through ALAN or NCTE are classroom English teachers in middle or high school, or librarians, researches, authors, publishers specializing in YA literature.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are not expected to be familiar with LIS terminology, although most likely they will as some subscribers are librarians and most are educators. Subscribers to the journal are primarily part of NCTE, teachers in middle and high school as this is a journal for adolescent literature.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is the place to send your manuscript, article, review or story if you’€™re an LIS student with any interest in the YA world. The Alan Review readers are a highly specialized group of professionals teaching and providing reference services to young adults. Sharing your manuscript could potentially influence classrooms around the country—new books to read, new teaching methods, studies and conclusions – this is the place to publish to get your name and ideas out, and to connect with other teaching and library professionals.

Last updated: November 6, 2014


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  The ALAN Review, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/475341233
  2. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  3. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  4. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  5. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  6. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  7. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). Join ALAN. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/join-alan
  8. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  9. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). History of DLA and SCP. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/about/index.html
  10. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  11. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  12. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  13. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  14. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  15. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  16. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  17. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  18. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  19. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  20. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). Join ALAN. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/join-alan
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALAN Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401814141318/86397
  22. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review Online Access Data. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/stats/ejournals/ALAN-current.html
  23. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALAN Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401814141318/86397
  24. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  25. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  26. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
Continue Reading