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EContent

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: EContent

ISSN: 1525-25311

Website: http://www.econtentmag.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From their site, “By covering the latest tools, strategies, and thought-leaders in the digital content ecosystem, EContent magazine and EContentmag.com keep professionals ahead of the curve in order to maximize their investment in digital content strategies while building sustainable, profitable business models.”2

Target audience: Per their site, “decision-makers in the media, publishing, technology, and mobile sectors.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade magazine.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: EContent delivers essential research, reporting, news, and analysis of content related issues. According to the “Writing for EContent” guidelines, “Each issue of EContent offers: news and analysis of what’s happening in the content industry, feature articles covering the latest trends and issues, and regular columns and departments written by industry experts.”8

Frequency of publication: 6 times a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.econtentmag.com/About_Us (See Writing for EContent for Author Guidelines download)10

Types of contributions accepted: Articles are accepted in the following categories: current news stories; reviews of new products; and features (narratives, art, or company profiles). See “Content” entry above for general types of articles that appear in each issue. The Editorial calendar, outlining the focus for each issue, is located in the publication’s media kit.11

Submission and review process: Authors must first send a brief query, links to samples of your work, and a brief bio to the editor. “When submitting, be sure to include particular areas of interest and expertise. If you have a specific idea for an article, submit the idea accompanied by a brief outline of the topics you expect to cover. Unacceptable unsolicited manuscripts will not be returned.”12 Check submissions thoroughly for grammatical and spelling errors. Supporting materials are required for all sources mentioned.13

Editorial tone: Editors expect authors to deliver a well written, thoroughly researched, factually correct, and on-time manuscript. Features are nonacademic in tone and must be written in a narrative style, with a beginning, middle, and an end. New product reviews should be written for a lay audience, not strictly for information professionals, as many business leaders use the magazine for exposure to new products in digital content management.14

Style guide used: No style guide is mentioned, but specific style guidelines are provided in Author Guidelines.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

EContent provides numerous opportunities for authors to publish on a variety of topics related to managing digital content. To the author’s benefit, editorial calendars are posted with specific topics to be featured in upcoming articles, along with deadlines for submission. This allows authors to either find the correct issue for a topic they are writing, or write an original article according to the publication’s editorial needs. Within each topic, the editors are looking for current news stories, new product reviews, and features that give narratives, showcase art, or profile a company.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Purpose circulation: Per their media kit, they have more than 27,000 readers. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States.18 Readers are primarily located in the United States, therefore American colloquialisms can be used. Culturally, EContent readers are very technologically savvy, so a high level of exposure to this aspect of American culture can be assumed.19

Reader characteristics: The most important thing to remember about EContent readers is that they are not IT professionals. Most readers hold executive-level positions, so a larger amount of responsibility can be assumed as far as decisions regarding content management solutions. According to the Author Guidelines, readers are “executives and professionals involved in content creation, acquisition, organization, and distribution in B2B or B2C environments or within their own organizations.” A survey of EContent readers revealed that they work in over 20 different industries, from the entertainment industry to the military, so avoid information or jargon specific to a certain industry. What is important to remember about EContent readers is their similarities: they are all in a position to make decisions over an organization’s digital content management systems. Readers are all familiar with the technical terms and jargon related to digital content and asset management, so in this area authors can use common terminology, yet remember not to provide overly technical information. EContent does convey a progressive stance in the sense that it tries to review the latest products and provide advice on cutting-edge resources for professionals in the position to making decisions regarding content management.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: In a limited sense, EContent readers are familiar with one aspect of library and information science, content management. Their media kit notes, “EContent readers are executives and managers who direct the digital content strategies for their organizations. Subscribers include content executives, content managers, content creators, publishers, content marketers, and anyone who deals with digital content in order to further business objectives. They’re buyers of content and technology solutions and have the power to make purchasing decisions.”21 While this description easily includes information professionals, it also include many other professionals not familiar with LIS jargon or issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of EContent are very diverse. What brings them together is their shared influence over digital content strategies, whether for a business or an information center. It is important to remember that although content management is a technical field, this publication is not geared toward IT professionals, but rather toward executives who make decisions regarding content management systems. The purpose of this publication is to offer resources and advice aimed at successful content management, and to provide information on products in order to help readers make informed decisions. EContent‘s readers do not want to know how digital content management products work, they want to know which ones are best for their needs, and how to best use them.22

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. ProQuest. 2019. “EContent.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521727384219/91047
  2. Information Today Inc. 2019. About EContent. EContent. Retrieved from http://www.econtentmag.com/About_Us
  3. Information Today Inc. 2019. Advertising. EContent. Retrieved from http://www.econtentmag.com/Advertising
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  11. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  12. Information Today Inc.,  About EContent.
  13. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  14. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  15. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  16. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  17. Information Today Inc. 2019. ’19 Media Kit. EContent. Retrieved from http://www.econtentmag.com/downloads/mediakits/2019/EC2019-MediaKit.pdf
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  20. Information Today Inc., About EContent.
  21. Information Today Inc., ’19 Media Kit.
  22. Information Today Inc., Advertising.
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CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Organization. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Home. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Editorial Guidelines. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Outlook Archive. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Outlook Archive.
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Mailing List Information. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Directory. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Directory.
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Organization. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Organization.
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Outlook Archive.
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Information Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Outlook

ISSN: 1091-0808 (Print) and 1938-3819 (Online)1

Website: https://www.sla.org/access-membership-3/io/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information Outlook is the official publication of the Special Libraries Association (SLA). The SLA “promotes and strengthens its members through learning, networking, and community building initiatives.”2

Target audience: Information Outlook is targeted towards their membership of information professionals, specifically those working in special libraries.

Publisher: Special Libraries Association (SLA).3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, the publication contains “articles on timely topics such as data curation, digital asset management, bibliometrics, and value co-creation; columns about technology, copyright law, and other issues of perpetual interest; and interviews with SLA members, offering a close-up look at information professionals in different disciplines, work environments, and countries.”7

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/

Types of contributions accepted: From the “Write for IO,” “Although written primarily by SLA members, articles in Information Outlook also are contributed by futurists, attorneys, academicians, technology professionals, human resources specialists, communications experts–anyone with knowledge or ideas about how information professionals can better serve their clients.”9

Submission and review process: Interested authors should send a query email to the current editor with an outline of your topic along with your qualifications. The editor will forward your query to the advisory council for review. The guidelines encourage illustrated article of approximately 2,000 words in length.10

Editorial tone: Written in an active voice following the SLA style guide provided in the submission guidelines.11

Style guide used: Current edition of Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information Outlook is an excellent forum for LIS authors writing on topics of interest to special libraries. Since there is such a wide variety of special library types, there are a number of topics that can be addressed. Despite differences among particular types of special libraries, many experiences and situations can be generalized and made applicable to all of Information Outlook readers.13

Although this is not a scholarly journal, Information Outlook is a highly respected journal, and LIS authors would benefit from having their work published by the SLA.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 4,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Special Libraries Association has 49 regional chapters. The majority are located in the United States, but there are also chapters in Canada, Africa, the Arabian Gulf, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. In addition to the regional chapters, SLA boasts members in 75 countries.15 Information Outlook is published in English, but circulates to members in other countries as well (as listed above). Issues pertaining to special librarians will be of general interest to all readers, but there may be some regional/cultural specifics that might not be applicable to readers in different countries.16

Reader characteristics: The readers of Information Outlook are individuals who typically hold a library degree. Many have master’s degrees in subject specialties as well. There is gender diversity in the audience, and they range in age, typically from late 20s upwards. They may be brand new to the profession or they may be upper management with many years of experience. All readers of Information Outlook are special librarians, and therefore they have a common mission and values, and much in common within the profession. However, they work in settings that are incredibly varied, both in size and type. Readers might work alone or in large organizations, and might specialize in institutions such as government, medical, legal, and academic libraries.17 The readers of Information Outlook care specifically about issues pertaining to special libraries. According to the publication’s website, its readers are interested in articles about “administration, organization, marketing, and operations.” They value information that will help their organizations stay successful and stay informed of the latest developments and technologies.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Information Outlook are extremely knowledgeable about issues relating to library and information science. They will be at different stages of their careers, of course, with some readers having more experience and expertise than others, but writers can assume a basic level of knowledge and can expect readers to understand LIS jargon.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Outlook‘s readers are hungry for the latest information about issues that impact special libraries. They want to read articles that have practical application in their day-to-day lives and careers. As stated on SLA’s website, “readers want to read articles about new techniques, new ideas, new trends…They’re interested in growing their organizations and in planning their careers…They want to know how to confront problems and how to avoid them.” The profession is comprised of individuals who “strategically use information…to advance the mission of the organization…through the development, deployment, and management of information resources and services.”20

Potential authors can reach this audience effectively by providing case studies and real-world examples, and by focusing on what is new and innovative in the field. Most special librarians are technologically savvy and interested in cutting-edge applications that will help them accomplish their professional goals and serve their patrons. They will also likely have limited time to devote to professional reading, and will only devote that time to articles and reviews that are relevant and timely. Therefore, authors will be best served by submitting writing that is direct and to the point.

Last updated: June 9, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest. 2019. “Information Outlook.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  2. Special Libraries Association. 2019. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  3. ProQuest. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/
  8. Special Libraries Association. 2019. 2019 Editorial and Advertising Calendar. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/editorial-calendar/
  9. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Write for Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  10. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  11. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  12. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  13. Special Libraries Association. 2019. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  14. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Association Finances. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/association-finances/
  15. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Chapters. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/get-involved/chapters/
  16. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  17. Special Libraries Association, About SLA.
  18. Special Libraries Association, Editorial and Advertising Calendar.
  19. Special Libraries Association. 2016. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  20. Special Libraries Association, About SLA.
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Interactions (ACM)

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Interactions

ISSN: 1072-5520 (Print) and 1558-3449 (Online)1

Website: http://interactions.acm.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Interactions is a trade magazine that is interested in the specific locus of culture, communication, and technology. While the magazine is not librarian specific, most of its content is relevant. From the website: “It is a multiplicity of conversations, collaborations, relationships, and new discoveries focusing on how and why we interact with the designed world of technologies.”2

Target audience: Professionals interested in best practices and methodologies regarding communicative interactions. “Each issue reaches thousands of designers, managers, researchers, and product specialists who wield great influence within their own companies and institutions and throughout the computing industries.”3

Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). Read more about the publisher here: http://www.acm.org/publications/.

Peer reviewed? No. Submissions to Interactions are reviewed by an internal review board, and then may be returned for edits and changes before final acceptance.4

Type: Information professional and interface design trade magazine.5

Medium: Electronic and print.6

Content: Practical essays on design, computing, research methods, best practices, etc. as they relate to technology, and more importantly, the interaction between people and technology. “Interactions has a special voice that lies between practice and research with an emphasis on making engaging human-computer interaction research accessible to practitioners and on making practitioners voices heard by researchers.”7

Frequency of publication: Six times a year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:

Interactions guidelines: http://interactions.acm.org/submissions

ACM guidelines: http://www.acm.org/publications/authors/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: From the site:

“Word document (minimally formatted text and graphics) that includes a short, crisp working title or headline, and a standard byline: author name, affiliation, email address.”9

“All articles should contain no more than six endnotes/references.”10

“Brief author biography (50-word maximum) for each author listed in the byline. A bio generally includes the author’s current affiliation and his/her research interests.”11

The submission page also states specific formatting guidelines for images, and asks that writers have permission to use any third-party material in their submission.12

Submission and review process: From the website: “Articles go through several rounds of editing: first with the magazines editors-in-chief and forum editors for relevance, clarity, and groundedness and then with ACM’s managing editor and copy editor for grammar, punctuation, and length. ACM staff will send authors the copyedited version for their review. Once they have approved the copyedited version, authors will not review the copy again. Authors may be asked to review any redrawn figures.”13

Editorial tone: The publication’s tone is direct, inclusive, and conversational. Authors should avoid jargon, academic language, and references.14

Style guide used: The ACM uses a citation style that is detailed here: https://www.acm.org/publications/authors/reference-formatting

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Interactions has great potential for LIS professionals. Looking through the archives, one can see such essay topics as “Bridging the gap between accessibility and usability,” “Digital government information services: the Bureau of Labor statistics case,” “Web 2.0 and beyond,” and “Designing useful and usable questionnaires: you can’t just ‘throw a questionnaire together’.” While the magazine is not specific to librarians and does seem to focus on user interface design, its primary stated theme is the interaction of humans and technology. LIS professionals, whether they are reference librarians, information architects, or database administrators, all have direct experience and knowledge in this subject that can inspire meaningful written work.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No numbers given. According to the section “For Advertisers”: “Each issue reaches thousands of designers, managers, researchers, and product specialists who wield great influence within their own companies and institutions and throughout the computing industries.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International. The members of the Interactions advisory and editorial boards are located throughout the United States and as far as Korea.17 English is the dominant language of Interactions, but because it is both print and electronic the readership is dispersed geographically. As such, area-specific language should be avoided — especially since the specific focus of Interactions is the practices that increase better communication.18

Reader characteristics: Judging from the articles in Interactions archives, the average reader is most likely a professional working in field that utilizes technology as an interface with other patrons, clients, and customers. A quote from the history page and attributed to John Rheinfrank and Bill Hefley states that, “Today a widely distributed diverse community of working professionals is inventing a reality where the use of computing resources will have a profound impact on the quality of everyday life. And so we are practicing in a field where the gradient of change is staggering, the boundaries fuzzy, and the component parts only loosely aggregated.”19 This description very much includes LIS professionals, and as such the language used can be technical, but should not be library-specific.

Judging from the portions of the articles available without a subscription, and correlating this to the magazine’s readership, potential authors can be assured of at least one thing regarding their readership: an interest in innovative ideas relating to the intersections of culture, technology, and interaction. The magazine is certainly not just for LIS professionals, but if a librarian had a piece that was fresh, innovative, and surprising, the piece could easily find a home in Interactions.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader will probably not have both a clear and broad knowledge of LIS subject matter; however, the average reader will probably have a very good understanding of human/technology interactions (user interfaces, information architecture, web 2.0, content management systems). Thus, those LIS professionals interested in writing about this aspect of the profession should have a easy time understanding for whom they are writing.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

After perusing the site, I can easily imagine both upper level managers in software companies looking for potential market edges and 30-something punk-rock designers interested in community development and technology reading this magazine. The two most important elements for potential writers to keep in mind are to display some degree of “lateral thinking” and/or to write on unique and, above all, useful perspectives regarding interaction and technology; these could be reports, analyses, experiments, or original research.

Interactions is a multidisciplinary magazine that overlaps with many topics in which many librarians are interested. Some technical jargon is to be expected, and readers will be well acquainted with terms relating to user-interfaces, web design and aesthetics. Because this publication is published by the Association for Computing Machinery, terminology relating to computers and software is likely to be well understood by the journal’s readership.

Authors should not, however, assume that any piece they have written relating to computers or interfaces will be appropriate for the journal. Interactions is very specifically interested in communication and technology.22 Thus a piece written on the research and production of a clever piece of code would not be appropriate to the journal. A piece talking about how some clever coding affected users’ interactivity with the interface or each other would be, however, perfect.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Association for Computing Memory. 2019. Interactions. Retrieved from https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3190768&dl=ACM&coll=DL
  2. Association for Computing Machinery. 2019. About ACM Interactions. Interactions. Retrieved from  http://interactions.acm.org/about
  3. Association for Computing Machinery. 2019. For Advertisers. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/for-advertisers
  4. Association for Computing Machinery. 2019. Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  5. Association for Computing Machinery, About ACM Interactions.
  6. ProQuest. 2019. “Interactions (New York).” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412282554209/237122
  7. Association for Computing Machinery, About ACM Interactions.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Association for Computing Machinery, Submissions.
  10. Association for Computing Machinery, Submissions.
  11. Association for Computing Machinery, Submissions.
  12. Association for Computing Machinery, Submissions.
  13. Association for Computing Machinery, Submissions.
  14. Association for Computing Machinery, Submissions.
  15. Association for Computing Machinery. 2019. Archives. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/archive
  16. Association for Computing Machinery, For Advertisers.
  17. Association for Computing Machinery, About ACM Interactions.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. Association for Computing Machinery, Archives.
  20. Association for Computing Machinery, Archives.
  21. Association for Computing Machinery, About ACM Interactions.
  22. Association for Computing Machinery, About ACM Interactions.
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Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
Continue Reading

Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Public Library Quarterly (PLQ)

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitlePublic Library Quarterly (PLQ)

ISSN: 0161-6846 (print), 1541-1540 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wplq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission:Public Library Quarterly (PLQ) is addressed to leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends who believe that change is imperative if public libraries are to fulfill their service missions in the twenty-first century.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) “leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends,” especially those working in public libraries.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles undergo editorial screening and peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: PLQ focuses on how public library directors and operating officers affect change. It examines best practices and service improvement models, management case studies, library mythologies that impede development, planning and outcomes, marketing and fundraising, budget and financial management, new technology in practices, and programs for children.4 “Every issue of  Public Library Quarterly contains informative articles written by the directors and staffs of leading public libraries, news of current public library events, and book reviews covering issues of interest to those in public library work.”5

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: PLQ publishes original research, scholarship, and analyses of current issues in public libraries, from theoretical and practical perspectives. The journal “addresses the major administrative challenges and opportunities that face public libraries, providing insight and assistance to all public library workers.” Furthermore, the journal publishes surveys “that can be developed and used as national benchmarks for such administrative concerns as salaries, usage standards, and budget breakdowns.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online via Editorial Manager, a portal that manages the submission, revision, review, and publication process for authors, editors, and reviewers.8 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and peer review.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: PLQ uses the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

PLQ is a long-standing, high-quality LIS journal that publishes scholarship on all aspects of public libraries from around the world. As such, it is a a good fit for LIS authors whose scholarship is focused on public libraries or who study these libraries’ connections with other information organizations or in the realm of public policy. The journal is both practical and scholarly; many articles are written by public library directors or staff members, but the journal also looks to publish research and surveys in this domain. There is a sense that authors are highly experienced in the realm of public libraries, but this does not necessarily exclude graduate student authors with solid scholarship and novel approaches to the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article’s homepage lists number of views, citations, and Altmetric score.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLQ is published in English for a worldwide audience. Editorial board members are from universities, libraries, and information organizations in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Wales, Ireland, and Taiwan.10 Authors should consider readers from around the globe and explain jargon or regional usages.

Reader characteristics: Readers are public library directors and managers, staff members, trustees, and friends, as well as LIS researchers, scholars, professionals, and graduate students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter, but since this journal has a worldwide reach, authors should be careful to explain particular terms and practices.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

PLQ reaches a worldwide audience of public library directors, librarians, staff members, scholars, researchers, and graduate students. Readers are interested in how current events, policy, trends, and changes in the public library landscape will affect their institutions and how other libraries’ experiences and practices may inform their own practices. Readers look for evidence of positive leadership in and responses to a climate of change in the public library realm. Readers expect both theory- and practice-based articles, as well as larger scale surveys and research results.

Last updated: April 30, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wplq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission show=instructions&journalCode=wplq20.
  6. “Journal Information,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wplq20.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Aims and Scope.”
  10. “Editorial Board,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wplq20.
Continue Reading

Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Libraries Journal

ISSN: 2475-8116

Website: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: MLJ is a “peer reviewed, independently published, open access scholarly journal that focuses on innovative marketing activities libraries are engaged in.”1

The journal’s aim is “to publish research and practical examples of library marketing campaigns, library marketing research, public relations campaigns, SWOT analysis, segmentation research, assessment of marketing activities, and tools used for marketing.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals from public, special and academic libraries who work in marketing positions.3

Publisher: MLJ is published independently.

Peer reviewed? Yes. All articles are subjected to a double blind peer review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Two types of articles are published: research-driven work that provides original scholarship, and practical information focusing on best practices and advice.5

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles of 20-25 pages in length and practical articles of 8-10 pages in length. Additionally, practical articles (as columns) under one of the following subjects:

  • Advocacy: articles that focus on developing relationships with stakeholders to help raise awareness and loyalty for library services and resources. This may relate to communicating with government, administration, and the greater community
  • Branding: articles that illustrate how libraries develop their visual identity for their services and resources.
  • From the Trenches: articles that show outcomes of a particular marketing initiative or campaign.
  • Marketing Campaigns: case studies of a marketing campaign and the desired outcomes and objectives sought.
  • Technology: software/apps and web-based technology tools that can be used as part of a marketing campaign.7

Submission and review process: The reviewing process for manuscripts will begin after the call for proposals deadline. Some manuscripts may require substantive revision before they are ready for publication. Once a manuscript has been formally accepted, authors are required to submit a complete electronic copy of the final version, including all figures, charts, tables, appendices, and illustrations.8

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: APA, 6th edition.9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have written about LIS marketing and increasing visibility for libraries, this journal may be a viable publication. Some of the latest articles published are about creating a ‘brand’ for libraries and tips and tricks on video marketing.

Keep in mind that MLJ does not only publish traditional, scholarly articles, but also practical articles on advocacy, branding, case studies of marketing campaigns, technology tools, SWOT analyses and “from the trenches”-type material.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: MLJ is open access, and therefore available for any and all global readers, for free.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Articles are published in English. MLJ states that they are global in scope.10

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely LIS professionals or students who work in or are interested in marketing aspects of librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering the specificity of the journal’s content matter, LIS knowledge may be varied, but strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in a variety of articles, and are seeking out the latest research and information pertaining to LIS marketing. If you have written a scholarly article, a SWOT analysis or have researched a hot topic marketing issue, MLJ readers will be eager to learn about it.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Home,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/
  2. “Home.”
  3. “About,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/about.html
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Home.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 23, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “About.”
Continue Reading

Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA)

About the publication

Title: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA)

ISSN: 1067-5027 (Print) and 1527-974X (Online)1

Website: https://academic.oup.com/jamia

Purpose, objective, or mission: JAMIA is AMIA’s premier peer-reviewed journal for biomedical and health informatics.”2JAMIA articles describe innovative informatics research and systems that help to advance biomedical science and to promote health.”3

Target audience: “Physicians, informaticians, scientists, nurses and other health care professionals,” as well as academic and medical librarians are among this publication’s target audience.4

Publisher: Oxford University Press5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: Academic / Scholarly7

Medium: Print and online8

Content: “Covering the full spectrum of activities in the field, JAMIA includes informatics articles in the areas of clinical care, clinical research, translational science, implementation science, imaging, education, consumer health, public health, and policy. JAMIA‘s articles describe innovative informatics research and systems that help to advance biomedical science and to promote health.”9

Frequency of publication: Monthly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://academic.oup.com/jamia/pages/General_Instructions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts research and applications, reviews, brief communications, case reports, perspectives, correspondence, and editorials and highlights.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be double-spaced and accompanied by a title page, abstract, references, acknowledgements, etc. Additionally, authors should submit their manuscripts in Word format to JAMIA’s submission site. As for the review process, authors must provide details of any conflicts of interests, so that the review can “be handled by ones of the other editors.”12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13

Style guide used: The journal asks authors to use footnotes and format their references according to Medline style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JAMIA is a great publication for LIS authors familiar with informatics, health sciences, etc. It explores topics LIS professionals are familiar with, including social media, the ethics of various information dissemination methods, etc.15 Health informatics professionals, as well as medical librarians with knowledge of these topics will feel right at home with this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation statistics are unavailable, all members of the American Medical Informatics Association receive a subscription to JAMIA.16 AMIA has over 5,400 members,17 though JAMIA‘s readership is likely higher than this figure, since articles are freely available on JAMIA’s website and PubMed Central.18

Audience location: Because this journal is the official journal of the American Medical Informatics Association,19 it stands to reason that the majority of readers will live in the U.S. At the same time, JAMIA is published by the Oxford University Press in the United Kingdom20 and features articles concerning biomedical data sharing as a whole. Thus, the journal has articles of interest to English-speaking biomedical professionals worldwide.

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers will be healthcare professionals with specialized knowledge of bioinformatics.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because JAMIA is first and foremost a medical publication within the highly specialized field of bioinformatics, most readers will be more familiar with medical terminology than LIS terminology. Thus, while medical terms can—and should—be used freely, LIS terms should be used sparingly and defined where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the majority of readers will come from highly technical backgrounds, authors should ground their articles in methodical, well-documented research. Additionally, authors should—at the very least—have taken a class in health informatics. Ideally, however, authors will be healthcare professionals (including medical librarians) with extensive knowledge of bioinformatics.

Last updated: April 18, 2018

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1705920417
  2. “About the Journal,” Oxford University Press, accessed April 18, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/jamia/pages/About
  3.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 18, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  4.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  5.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1705920417
  6.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  7.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  8.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1705920417
  9. “About the Journal,” Oxford University Press, accessed April 17, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/jamia/pages/About
  10.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  11. “Instructions to Authors,” Oxford University Press, accessed April 17, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/jamia/pages/General_Instructions
  12. “Instructions to Authors,” Oxford University Press, accessed April 17, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/jamia/pages/General_Instructions
  13. Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  14.  “Instructions to Authors,” Oxford University Press, accessed April 17, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/jamia/pages/General_Instructions
  15. “Issues,” Oxford University Press, accessed April 18, 2018, https://academic.oup.com/jamia/issue
  16.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  17. “AMIA Membership,” American Medical Informatics Association, accessed April 17, 2018, https://www.amia.org/amia-membership
  18.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  19.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  20.  Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
  21. Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1524013281789/223132
Continue Reading

Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

ISSN: 2038-1026

Website: https://www.jlis.it/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information (JLIS.it) is an international academic journal that publishes research and theory in library, archives, and information science.1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, academics, and students from around the world who are interested in research and theory in both LIS and archival science.

Publisher: JLIS.it is published by the Università di Firenze Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo and is hosted by the University of Macerata, CSIA.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: JLIS.it publishes research articles, contributions, and reports on various topics of interest to the library, archives, and information science international communities. Regular sections are Essays, Contributions, and Reports & Reviews.4 The journal also publishes conference proceedings, such as EURIG2017,5 and special issues, such as a 2017 issue on classification.6

Frequency of publication: JLIS.it publishes three issues a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JLIS.it publishes innovative research relevant to the library, archives, and information science fields; brief contributions on a variety of related topics; and conference reports and reviews. The 2015 Manifesto states that the journal aims to “emphasize the integration between LIS and Archival science on the level of projects and profession” nationally and internationally and to consider the theoretical and methodological traditions of each discipline.8 The 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal encourages stepping away from the strictly academic and “mixing knowledge, methods, and different scientific and technical languages.” The journal also encourages writing that theorizes beyond the institutional and traditional.9

Submission and review process: JLIS.it uses OJS, an automated web-based system, for manuscript submission, tracking, and review.10 Authors should check that their manuscripts comply with the Submission Preparation Checklist11 and follow the Section Policies.12 Each manuscript is reviewed by an editor and if appropriate is sent to two reviewers for double-blind peer review; authors are usually contacted within nine weeks of submission.13

Editorial tone: The tone is academic, and articles are in Italian or English.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) citations and references.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JLIS.it is a highly regarded international journal that publishes articles in LIS and archival science and in the intersection of the two disciplines; the journal pushes for new and nontraditional approaches to these disciplines in theory, research, and practice. LIS authors that study the international stage of LIS or archives, or who perform research that resonates internationally and pushes traditional boundaries, may find a good fit here. Further, the 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal is an “ideal place” for contributions from those new to the profession, so student writers may have a chance at publishing in a prestigious journal. The journal is “a sort of lab for studying and researching what is new in LIS; a place for militant librarianship, with strong observations on the changes that the digital culture is bringing to cognitive processes and to professional practices.”15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article displays metrics.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JLIS.it publishes articles in Italian and English. It is written for an international audience, so regional terms or practices should be explained. The editors and editorial board members are mostly from Italian universities and institutions, but the Scientific Committee members are from all over the world.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are professionals, scholars, and students in the fields of LIS and archival science.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a solid knowledge of LIS and archival science; however, readers are from all over the world and from many different types of institutions in LIS and archival science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should consider that readers are LIS and archival science professionals and scholars from all over the world who are interested in the latest developments in both fields as well as how the disciplines relate to each other and how they are shaping and responding to profound changes brought on by the new digital culture. The audience probably expects high-level research and interesting, novel approaches to theory and practice.

Last updated: April 7, 2017


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Journal Sponsorship,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/journalSponsorship.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 9, no. 1 (2018), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/787.
  6.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 8, no. 2 (2017), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/775.
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Manifesto” (2015), Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science no. 1 (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.4403/jlis.it-11080.
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