Wiki Tags Archives: Technology

The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.1 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”2 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”3

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.4

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.8

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope9

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Rowman & Littlefield

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: http://rowman.com/RLPublishers

Purpose, objective, or mission: Rowman & Littlefield “publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.”1 Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others.2

Target audience: Rowman & Littlefield offers “serious works of scholarship; core textbooks for introductory courses; supplemental, affordable paperbacks for alternative approaches to teaching; and general interest and trade books for the curious reader.”3 LIS books are targeted toward practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars.

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group4 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN).5 The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, Globe Pequot, Falcon Guides, TwoDot, Taylor Trade, and Down East Books.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal.6

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.7

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.8 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.9

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.10 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.11

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).12 The number of LIS titles published per year is unknown.

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes13

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for publication should be submitted to the appropriate acquisitions editor,14 and include a prospectus, outline (annotated table of contents), author’s CV or resume, one to two brief writing samples, and a list of potential peer reviewers.15 Full book manuscripts are not accepted unless requested by the acquisitions editor. See the publisher’s website for detailed submission guidelines.

Submission and review process: The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.16

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. Formal book proposals require a detailed description, author qualifications, previously published works, writing samples, competitive analysis, and potential markets for a book.17 The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences and conventions.18 Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A 2015 catalog listed approximately 150 LIS books geared toward students, professionals, and academics.19 Print runs for titles are not publicly available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material.20 However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: September 3, 2015


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  2. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Subjects. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  4. Publishers Global. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  5. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  6. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  7. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  8. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  9. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  10. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  11. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  12. Net Galley. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/pub_id/29645
  13. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  14. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Editors. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  15. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  16. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  17. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  18. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Conventions schedule. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/ConventionsSchedule
  19. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  20. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  21. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  22. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
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Information Discovery and Delivery

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Discovery and Delivery, formerly Interlending and Document Supply

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal “covers information discovery and access for digital information researchers.”1

Target audience: Information Discovery and Delivery is read by “educators, knowledge professionals in education and cultural organizations, knowledge managers in media, health care, and government, as well as librarians.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: This journal investigates the transport, flow, tracking, exchange, and sharing of information within and between libraries. It also covers digital information capture, packaging, and storage by repositories of all kinds.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles, opinion pieces, product and service reviews, theoretical works, case studies, literature reviews, and descriptive or instructional papers9

Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 4,000 and 6,000 words in length, including references and appendices.10

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. Individuals submitting manuscripts are invited to register, create an account, and go through a submission process to upload an article.11 Emerald Publishing offers and editing service for non-native English-speaking authors.12 Authors should also consult the Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that  submissions are complete.13 According to the author guidelines, “each paper is reviewed by the editor and, if it is judged suitable for this publication, it is then sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review.”14 Submissions are welcome at any time, though authors may wish to consult the schedule of submission deadlines for upcoming issues of the journal.15

Editorial tone: Though the guidelines for submission do not discuss tone, the writing is in an academic style and often technical.

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.16 References should be written in Harvard style.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS practitioners who are responsible the discovery and transmission of digital information, this journal offers an excellent opportunity to share knowledge. As Information Discovery and Delivery emphasizes the sharing of information within and between repositories the world over,18 there is a strong international component to the content of this publication. Authors published in this journal will also have an excellent opportunity to draw attention to practices unique to their geographical area in this specialized field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information Discovery and Delivery is written in English.19 Given that the editorial advisory board represents countries as diverse as the United Kingdom, France, Turkey, Denmark, Lebanon, Australia, Taiwan, Saudi Arabia, and the United States, an international readership may be assumed.20

Reader characteristics: As this journal’s focus is in the specific field of information retrieval and transmission, readers will share an interest in this topic. 21 Representing countries worldwide, articles in this journal will be read by a global audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior librarians. 22 They will also have specific knowledge about document lending and supply, and will be comfortable with terminology from this field of library and information science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Discovery and Delivery is read by a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Subscribers will expect thorough and professional research on digital information issues in libraries. Being international in scope, readers will be open to cultural differences in approaching this topic, and will welcome innovative ideas.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  3. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  4. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  5. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  6. “Purchase Information,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  7. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  8. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  9. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  13. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  17. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  19. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  20. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Group Publishing,  accessed May 13, 2017 http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=idd
  21. Emerald Group Publishing, Ltd. (2015). Journal Information. Interlending and Document Supply. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=ilds
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
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Collection Building

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Building

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/cb

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection Building provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”1

Target audience: LIS academics and professionals2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system.10 To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Building is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal.15 As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development. The Book Review section of each issue offers an alternative to the research article for publication.

Collection Building is indexed in Academic Search Alumni Edition, Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier, Current Abstracts, Current Awareness Abstracts, Education Full Text, Emerald Management Reviews, Information Management & Technology Abstracts, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, INSPEC, Library & Information Science Abstracts, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts, Library Literature and Information Science, Library Literature and Information Science Full Text, OmniFile Full Text Mega, OmniFile Full Text Select, The Informed Librarian, Scopus, zetoc.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.17 This is a primarily North American publication, with the majority of the Editorial Team based in the United States.18

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development and management. Many of the readers are collection managers with purchasing responsibilities.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are library and information science academics, students, and professionals who study or work in access services, interlibrary loan, special collections, and collection services. They all have a knowledge of LIS subjects and jargon. This audience is looking for specialized information about collection development, and will expect technical language.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  2. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  3. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  4. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  5. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  6. “Features of an Emerald Subscription” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/subs/index.htm
  7. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  8. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  9. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  11.  “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017 http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  13. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  15. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  16. “Collection Building/Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  17.  Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  18. “Editorial Team,” http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=cb
  19. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  20. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
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Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Strategic Library

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

Website: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Strategic Library assists administrators and managers in all types of libraries as they deal with day-to-day and strategic challenges”1 by focusing on “innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape.”2

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.3

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: As per their website, Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.8

An “Editorial Forecast” is accessible through their website that includes topics to “spark ideas”9 for possible submission. Broad topic areas include: Collections/Circulation, Community Leadership, Emerging Technologies, Fundraising/Budgeting, Legal Issues, and Strategic Planning.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly, from January to October.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/Write-for-Strategic-Library

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.12

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Use the Editorial Forecast as a guide.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.13

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.14

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, madavidson@charter.net15

According to the writer’s guidleines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”16

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional. Editors are looking for professional stories that “cover concepts, strategies, and technologies”17 that are important to the writers and their colleagues.18

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape. A recent issue (Issue 17, May 15, 2015) features articles written by public librarians, academic librarians, a private consultant, and representatives of a technology integration company.20

Examples of possible topics for the potential author are:

  • Has your library completed a five-year strategic plan in a new format?
  • Does that plan include renovations, new construction, or consolidations?
  • Have you embarked on an outreach program to the communities you serve?
  • How are you positioning next year’s library fundraising campaign based on what you learned last time?21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.23 Because the majority of the readership spans North America, regional colloquialisms should be avoided.

Reader characteristics: Readers are “executive decision makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty.”24 As such, readers are “experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”25

Strategic Library strives to offer a forum for the sharing of information and experience among the decision makers in LIS settings.26 Authoritative, instructive and innovative ideas and practice will appeal to this particular audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS jargon and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using a first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or others’ experiences with best practices are another option for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are motivated, experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). About Us. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775992
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Editorial Forecast. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Editorial-Forecast.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  13. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  14. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  15. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  16. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  17. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  18. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  19. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  20. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Issue 17. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://user-94545020520.cld.bz/SL-May15-1#9/z
  21. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  22. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  23. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Contact. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775945
  24. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  25. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  26. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  27. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
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Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

Website: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Library and Information Science aims to serve as a forum for discussion of problems common to librarians and information scientist; to introduce new concepts, systems and technology; to report leading events worldwide; and to promote the development of Chinese library and information services.1

Target audience:
• Chinese and Chinese-American information professionals
• Information professionals interested in Chinese library and information services
• Those interested in problems common to librarians and information scientists, especially in the areas of new technologies and concepts.2

Publisher: Graduate Institute of Library & Information Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Republic of China and the Chinese American Librarians Association, U.S.A.3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts undergo a double-blind review, and the editor and associate editor are responsible for the final selection of content.4

Type: LIS scholarly.5

Medium: Web-based.6

Content: The journal contains articles that discuss problems common to librarians and information scientist; introduce new concepts, systems and technology; report leading events worldwide; and promote the development of Chinese library and information services.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually in April and October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts manuscripts of original research and reviews of monographs, books, and reports about library and information science. Manuscripts may not exceed 10,000 words (not including notes, tables, and forms of data) and those in English must be typed in MS Word.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must have a title page including the name of the article, author name, title, affiliation, email address, and postal address. Author information may not appear on the manuscript itself, as JLIS engages in double-blind review of manuscripts. Articles presented at a conference must include the name, place, and date of the conference.10

The body of a manuscript must be preceded by a 100-150-word abstract and 3-8 keywords, and followed by references and bibliographies. Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese. Each illustration or table should be numbered and have a brief caption.11

Editorial tone: Formal, academic.12

Style guide used: Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an authoritative and credible journal that would be an appropriate publishing avenue for practitioners and student authors. The journal is indexed or abstracted in Index of Chinese Periodicals, Library Literature, PAIS, Information Science Abstracts, Library & Information Science Abstracts.14

 

Audience Analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not provided, but the journal is available online.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers are mostly located in the United States and China. Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese.16

Reader characteristics: Readers will have the same characteristics as most librarians, but there will be a higher emphasis on services, technologies and innovations for Chinese speakers. Readers will expect to find information that is immediately relevant to Chinese communities.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with LIS subjects, and may be expected to understand jargon in the field.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal appear to be information and library science researchers and practitioners. Contributors can expect the readers to be well versed in LIS knowledge and terminology.

Last updated: September 6, 2015


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  2. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  3. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  4. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  5. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  6. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  7. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  8. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  9. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  10. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  11. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  12. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  13. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  14. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  15. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  16. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  17. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  18. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
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Huron Street Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Huron Street Press

Website: http://www.ipgbook.com/huron-street-press-publisher-HUS.php

Purpose, objective, or mission: A new (as of 2012) imprint of the ALA, Huron Street Press: “will publish a variety of titles designed to appeal to a broad consumer and library market. Its publications will harness the expertise of the Association, while encouraging library use among the public, joining other initiatives such as @ your library and ILoveLibraries.”1

Target audience: With Huron Street, ALA seeks to appeal to a more broad audience of information seekers and those in need of professional development. This is not just for LIS professionals.2

Owner: American Library Association; ALA Editions.3

Are published books peer reviewed? Not certain, but most likely, if Huron Street follows ALA Edition’s guidelines.4

Types of books published: LIS reference and professional development.5

Medium: Print and online.6 Huron Street press titles are available through Independent Publishers Group as well as traditional retail outlets.7

Topics covered:  The imprint is new, and aims to reach a wider audience.8 In 2012 the titles released include:

Number of titles published per year: 5 in 2012, the first year of the imprint.10

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: See ALA Editions.11

Types of submissions accepted: The imprint strives to encourage library use among the public, and seems to aim to educate the layperson rather than just provide information to LIS professionals.12  Titles are geared towards high school students and provide information on alternatives to college; books for pre-schoolers, which can be used by educators or parents; advice on building your own app; and searching for family genealogical roots.13

Submission and review process: See ALA Editions.14

Editorial tone: Educational and easygoing. Books are geared towards high school age students, entrepreneurs, professionals and educators, so the tone will vary based on the subject matter and audience.15

Style guide used: See ALA Editions.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Huron Street Press is backed by the ALA17; which has a huge built-in LIS audience. However, this imprint is marketed towards all sorts of people seeking information on a wide variety of subjects18, which gives authors an even bigger reading base to reach. If your topic is not specific to LIS professionals – if you have a proposal that is appropriate to those not studying or working in the LIS fields, people who are just regular information-seekers, this is a great publisher to work with, most likely discriminating in what it publishes, based on the small number of titles so far.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Small, with 12 titles published since 2012.19 But again, part of ALA Editions, which is a large ALA publishing house.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based out of Chicago, IL.20 American English, and seemingly geared primarily towards an US based audience.

Reader characteristics: ALA Editions holds itself to high standards21 and expects the same of authors.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varying; this is an imprint of the ALA and will be marketed to that group, however, this imprint seeks to reach an audience outside of just librarians and information professionals22, so do not assume they will understand LIS terms and history.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers seeking ALA, and by extension, Huron Street Press books might be associated with the LIS world, but not necessarily. Huron Street is still too new to know specifics about its readership (as compared to ALA Editions, for example).

Last updated: November 27, 2014


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  2. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  3. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  4. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  5. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  6. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  7. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  8. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  9. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  10. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  11. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  12. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  13. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  14. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  15. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  16. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  17. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  18. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  19. Chicago Review Press. (2014). Huron Street Press. IPG. Retrieved from http://www.ipgbook.com/huron-street-press-publisher-HUS.php
  20. Chicago Review Press. (2014). Huron Street Press. IPG. Retrieved from http://www.ipgbook.com/huron-street-press-publisher-HUS.php
  21. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  22. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
Continue Reading

Routledge

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Routledge. Haworth Press was acquired by Taylor & Francis Group, and books are now published by Routledge, a Taylor & Francis Group imprint.

Website: http://www.routledge.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Global publisher of quality academic books, journals, and online reference materials. Routledge is an older imprint, founded in 1836, and prides itself on publishing “many of the greatest thinkers and scholars,”1 including Einstein, Jung, and Sartre.2

Target audience: Teachers, librarians, educators, those seeking reference materials.3 Routledge has a specific Resources for Librarians page detailing catalogs, e-products and online references specifically for libraries, research series, and out of print titles.4

Owner: Taylor & Francis Group.5

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Each proposal is examined by a subject editor, and then given to independent, academic field specialists to determine if the final book, based on the proposal, has market potential. The process takes 6-8 weeks or longer.6

Types of books published : LIS reference. From the Guidelines for Authors: “Routledge is keen to consider proposals for new books at all levels from introductory and modular textbooks to supplemental texts and scholarly research monographs.”7

Medium: Print and online.8

Topics covered: Annuals, Yearbooks, Periodicals & AlmanacsBiographical ReferenceDictionariesDirectoriesEncyclopediasGeneral ReferenceHandbooksLibrary & Information ScienceMajor Works, and Regional Surveys.9

Number of titles published per year: Thousands of new books published each year.10

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals, between 3-6 pages, supplemented by sample chapters if applicable. Do not send an unsolicited manuscript as the initial contact!11

Submission and review process: Send the proposal and supplemental materials by email to the appropriate subject editor.12 After reviewing the proposal, an editor will decide if they would like a full manuscript.13

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly, but readable.14 The books potentially cover a wide audience including a variety of readers. Routledge also publishes under a wide variety of LIS subjects, with titles ranging from The Social Media Handbook, a slim volume at 194 pages, to International Encyclopedia of Information and Library Science, at 724 pages, significantly updating the last edition from 1996.15

Style guide used: U.S. authors: For US spelling use Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary or Webster’s Third New International Dictionary. There are different style preferences for different subject areas, such as Chicago or APA. Your Editorial Assistant will advise which style (Chicago, APA) you should follow – just be consistent throughout the submission and confirm the style you have used when submitting your final manuscript.16

For UK authors: Refer to Butcher’s Copy-editing: The Cambridge Handbook for Editors, Copy-editors and Proofreader and the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors: The Essential A-Z Guide to the Written Word. For British spelling use Concise Oxford English Dictionary; alternatives are accepted as long as they are consistent. For referencing, use the Harvard referencing system.17

For more details, please see Instructions for Authors and Proposal Guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Routledge is now owned by Taylor & Francis, which has a huge LIS audience and is where you can find a lot of print and online reference materials and publications targeted to students, LIS professionals, and academics.18 This is a prestigious publishing house that puts writers through a rigorous process just to get to publication; and once you’re there, there is the support of editors and the brand behind your finished book.19 This is an excellent group to consider proposing for an LIS specific book idea, as ideas can range from the very scholarly studies to more everyday topics that librarians or information professionals should be aware of.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Large, and international.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Offices for the US are based in New York21; office for the UK and the rest of the world are based in Oxford, England.22 The publisher notes that a majority of sales come from outside the UK, in the US and elsewhere around the world.23

Reader characteristics: Readers seeking high quality reference works specifically for an educational or library setting, or simply for their own personal and professional development. These are sophisticated readers expecting the same in their reading material. Routledge’s customer database covers over “1,000,000 academics worldwide”24, and these subjects are the publishing house’s primary bread and butter. Routledge considers itself (and is) very prestigious, one of the world’s leading academic publishers with a reputation for cutting-edge and ground breaking books.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varying. Most people seeking out Routledge books will most likely be academics, but whether in the LIS field specifically is not a given. However, Routledge readers are knowledgeable and educated, so assume a degree of understanding, and a quick learning curve, when referencing LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The primary readership of Routledge materials includes academics, librarians, and educators interested in new titles pertaining to LIS. This is a group that eagerly awaits new publications, and is notified through a variety of resources when new topics are published.  Routledge’s marketing team “is dedicated to making sure that clear, compelling information about your book reaches all parts of its intended audience wherever they are.”26The team also utilizes accounts on TwitterFacebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and Wikipedia to market new books, and will work with authors to support personal social media undertakings on behalf of their books.27 This is an excellent group to publish with for support, marketing, and built-in, interested readership.

Last updated: November 27, 2014


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  2. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  3. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/
  4. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/resources/librarians/
  5. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  6. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Submitting a Proposal. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/subprop.pdf
  7. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Submitting a Proposal. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/subprop.pdf
  8. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  9. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/
  10. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/
  11. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  12. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Contacts. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/contacts/
  13. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  14. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  15. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Books. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/books/
  16. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/tf_authorguidelines_2013.pdf
  17. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/tf_authorguidelines_2013.pdf
  18. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  19. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/tf_authorguidelines_2013.pdf
  20. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  21. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  22. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  23. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  24. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Online Marketing. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/online/
  25. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). The History of Routledge. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/history/
  26. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Global Reach. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/reach/
  27. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Social Media Marketing. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/social/
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian provides “€œa forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS).”1 It publishes critical perspectives in librarianship that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive issues within the profession.3

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly. This journal aims to provide critically relevant information in an academic setting.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Full text of articles are available online, previous to and including the Winter/Spring 2009 issue.8

Content: From the website: “€œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice yearly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”11

Submission and review process: Submit electronic files only via e-mail in rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word (.doc). Prints and digital images are welcome; if digital, provide 300 dpi grayscale TIFF (.tiff) files no larger than 5X7 inches. The editors reserve the right to edit all manuscript submissions before publication.12

Submit manuscripts to Kathleen de la Peña McCook at klmccook@gmail.com or Susan Maret at iecologie@yahoo.com.13

To submit a book review contact:

Michael Matthews
Watson Memorial Library, Room 311-D
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
Natchitoches, LA 71497
318-357-441914

Papers are published under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives 2.0 license, which places work in the public domain.15

Editorial tone: The articles are both innovative and present alternative views to typical librarian publications. Social justice, racism and other topics that may be considered controversial are published.The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.16

Style guide used: Submissions in your favorite citation style such as Chicago, MLA, APA, Harvard, Turabian are accepted. The style of choice has to be used consistently throughout the paper.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

According to the Progressive Librarians Guild, every library issue embodies a political value choice–and its publication, Progressive Librarian, aims to unearth those propositions and discuss them openly.18 Progressive Librarian rejects the proposition that contemporary libraries are value-neutral information markets, embracing the older idea that librarianship is a profession firmly for the people,€ a democratic force that promotes intellectual inquiry and an informed citizenry.19 It aims to publish articles and promote discussion that defend and extend the library as a free public sphere that makes independent democratic civil society possible.€ Accordingly,the Progressive Librarians Guild is opposed to commercial and business interests that threaten the free flow of information.20 If you are interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and how politics informs professional practice, consider writing for this publication.

A survey of past articles included cultivating freedom of expression within the workplace, Mexican libraries, the internet, and titles such as, “€œCataloging the Path to a New Dark Age: a taxonomy of the Bush administration’s pervasive crusade against scientific communication.” Papers that tie LIS issues, concepts, practices or history to women’s, workers’€™ or civil rights; education; culture; environmental protection; social welfare or insurance; and supporting the public sector in general will be welcomed here. For LIS students, the Progressive Librarian’€™s Guild presents the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize, which annually awards the best student paper about an aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are approximately 400 subscribers, 25% being libraries. Accordingly, it is difficult to gauge total readership–but certainly over 400.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is international in readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, though there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.23 As with any scholarly article, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.24

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.25 The readership is made up almost entirely of librarians, librarian graduate students, or library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice, and how politics informs LIS practices.26 Readers are probably liberal. They are interested in activism, the struggle for social justice, and how politics can inform LIS practices.27

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have a basic understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about commonplace news and events in the LIS world, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues or events others may not be familiar with.28

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication and its readers stand within the American Progressive tradition, hearkening back to FDR’€™s New Deal and representing a spectrum of views that moves left from New Deal-type reformism to much more radical positions and approaches.29 In late February of 2011 the Progressive Librarians Guild issued a statement in support of the Wisconsin employees who protested against proposed cuts to union benefits and health care.30 Progressive Librarian is one of the only journals in the LIS field to report on and document labor activism within the library profession.

This readership values the working class and the public sector, and is concerned with how the LIS profession can support and advance these causes. The journal is characterized by an interest in and/or commitment to socialism, anti-capitalism, feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism, labor advocacy, cultural democracy, ideology-criticism, radical social movements, anti-imperialism and holds skeptical/critical views of technological issues.

Papers that view library and information issues in this framework will be welcomed—whether they offer collection development practices for sex education materials, suggestions for communicating with right-wing colleagues or patrons, or advocate international library rights.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  2. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  3. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  8. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  9. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  11. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  12. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  13. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  14. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  15. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  16. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  17. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  18. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  19. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  20. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  21. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). 2014 Braverman Award Winner Announced. Retrieved from http://progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml
  22. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  23. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  24. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  25. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  26. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  27. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  28. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  29. Progressivism in the United States. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressivism_in_the_United_States
  30. Davey, M. & Greenhouse, S. (2011, February 16). Angry demonstrations in Wisconsin as cuts loom. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/17/us/17wisconsin.html?_r=0
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