Wiki Tags Archives: Student publications

Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Faculty of Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Faculty of Information Quarterly (*Publication currently on hiatus.*)

Website: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Faculty of Information Quarterly (FIQ) is a student-led, peer reviewed journal and provides immediate open access to its content by publishing online, on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Edited by graduate students at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information, the journal seeks to provide an environment for the voices of emerging and established scholars and practitioners in diverse Information fields, including but not limited to the following: archival science, accessibility studies, book history and print culture, communication theory, critical theory, cultural informatics, health informatics, information studies, information systems and technology, knowledge theory, library science, management science, media theory, museum studies, semiotics, and technology studies.”1

Target audience: University of Toronto LIS students, faculty and global LIS community2

Publisher: University of Toronto, Faculty of Information3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: Research articles covering any topic relevant to LIS community. Recent article titles include Research as a Social Process: Considerations for Academic Libraries, Applying Concepts of Bug-Tracking Software to e-Resource Management in Academic Libraries, and The Rare e-Vent: Concepts of Rarity and Scarcity in e-Books.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8 *The last edition published was Volume 3, Number 4, in 2011.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles from the LIS and related academic communities. Per the publication website, “While there is an emphasis on encouraging student work in FIQ we certainly support submissions from all members of the Information community. Masters and PhD students and faculty of all disciplines, practitioners and Information professionals with an interest in scholarly work, and interested members of the Information community in its broadest sense are all welcome to submit works to this publication.”10 “We encourage students to submit articles they think are of an academic calibre, which can include conference papers, reworked course papers, personal research projects, reflections on the scholarly and practical elements of Information, or other communications of excellent quality.”11

Submission and review process: All work is submitted online through the publication  website. Detailed instructions provided for authors including a checklist to ensure all requirements are met. FIQ is peer-reviewed and publication is subject to approval and review by the Editorial Staff.12

Editorial tone: Formal13

Style guide used: For Canadian English spelling, authors should consult the latest edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary; for citations and references authors should use the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although FIQ was founded in part to promote publication of student research and writing, all members of the information community are invited to submit manuscripts.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. As an open access, online publication of a leading information school, FIQ is freely accessible to academic and professional members of the information community the world over.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Toronto, Canada.17 While its target audience is the global information community, the publication requires its authors to use Canadian spellings and to ensure the relevance of articles to Canadian culture.18

Reader characteristics: Though FIQ is an open-access publication with an international reach, it is likely, given its editorial bias,19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers would have an LIS background or education; however, since FIQ strives for a global reach and LIS education varies around the global, writers should consider this when writing.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication run by graduate students and primarily for graduate students and academics in the the LIS community, fellow graduate student authors would seem to have a better chance of publication in FIQ.

Last updated: April 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  4. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  5. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  6. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  7. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  8. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  9. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  10. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  14. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  18. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  19.  “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines that the majority of its readers are Canadian or North American. Readers of this student-run journal will have a keen interest in the latest developments in the LIS field. The journal does state a preference for publishing the student work, so this is an ideal venue for a first publication.[20. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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Student Research Journal (SRJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Student Research Journal (SRJ). Pronounced “€œsurge.”€ ISSN: 2160-77531

Website: http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “The School of Information’s Student Research Journal, formerly known as SLIS Student Research Journal, is a peer-reviewed publication of San José State University School of Information that promotes graduate scholarship and intellectual inquiry in the fields of library and information science, archives and records management, and museum studies..2

Target audience: Library and Information Science (LIS) students, the larger LIS community.3

Publisher: San José State University (SJSU).4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5 Accepted manuscripts are sent to at least two peer reviewers in a double-blind review system. The managing editor coordinates the process and the editor-in-chief is responsible for contacting the authors as to the decision.6
The following criteria is used for review:

  • Conceptualization
  • Execution
  • References (APA citation style, 6th Ed.)
  • Value7

Reviewers return manuscripts to the editor-in-chief or managing editor with a recommendation to accept, reject, or accept with major or minor corrections.8

Type: LIS scholarly.9

Medium: Online. SRJ is hosted at SJSU’s institutional repository Scholar Works, part of the Digital Commons initiative powered by Berkeley Electronic Press.10

Content: From the Policies page: SRJ “accepts manuscripts of original research, critical reviews, critical essays, and evidence summaries covering topics in all fields of information science theory, policy, application, or practice that advances intellectual inquiry in the field.”11

Frequency of publication: This journal publishes two issues annually.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: This publication accepts original, unpublished scholarly articles written by current graduate students provided that “that he/she owns the copyright to the work being submitted or is authorized by the copyright owner or owners to submit the article.”13 Manuscripts cannot be simultaneously under review with other publications. Manuscripts can be submitted at any time.14

Submission and review process: See the Submission Guidelines for more details.

This journal receives submissions on a rolling basis. The submission process is entirely digital, and prospective authors will need to register with SRJ in order to submit a manuscript.15

Manuscripts should include an abstract of 250 words or less, a cover letter that states the manuscript’€™s purpose and its contribution to SRJ, and 5–8 keywords that describe your manuscript. Manuscripts should follow APA formatting guidelines and be submitted as MS Word documents.16

Initially, manuscripts are reviewed to ensure that they follow the submission guidelines. Members of the Editorial Advisory Board may be consulted during this process. Approved manuscripts are sent to the managing editor, who coordinates peer review. The editor-in-chief advises authors of all manuscript decisions.17

By consent to publish, the authors assign copyright to SJSU ScholarWorks. More information can be found here.18

Editorial tone:  Recent articles indicate a scholarly tone in which material presented offers in-depth analysis of current topics of interest to the library profession as well as ways to further research and suggestions to solve current issues within the profession.19

Style guide used:  Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed.20

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

SRJ features a robust editorial board that includes prominent SJSU faculty. As the editorial board reviews all manuscripts, submitting to SRJ offers an opportunity to broadcast your best work to LIS community leaders, to market yourself as an emerging LIS professional, and to begin forging professional relationships. SRJ offers a prime opportunity for first publishing among LIS students interested in archives and records management or museum studies, as it publishes articles in these areas as well as in library and information science.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to Vicki Robison, student services coordinator at San Jose State University’s School of Information (SJSU iSchool), in May 2011 there were 2,500 SLIS students.21 While SRJ is aimed at both LIS students and the larger LIS community, it is safe to say that this publication is at this time best known among SJSU iSchool students. As the last issue in 2012 featured submissions from three universities including SJSU iSchool, the audience outside of SJSU is growing.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: In 2013, 29% of students lived outside of California and 5% lived outside of the United States, including 4% who live in Canada.23 Readership and submissions are expanding to other universities.24 SRJ is published in American English,25 but aims for a national or international audience. Avoid regionalisms, as you would with any scholarly article.26

Reader characteristics: According to an ALA Member Demographics Study, librarians are predominantly white females, and many are baby boomers. The number of racial and ethnic minorities represented within the profession is growing, but this still represents a small percentage of the LIS community. Readers of the publication may be library students who are new to the profession. LIS professionals live and work in a wide variety of settings, but a significant portion (45%) work in public libraries or universities.27 An ethos of intellectual freedom, critical inquiry and support of education pervades the profession. SRJ publishes original research and critical reviews and essays, so intellectual rigor will be paramount. The rapidly changing technology and its relevance to libraries of today is reflected in recent articles.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this publication accepts submissions about virtually all areas of information science and targets LIS professionals in all stages of the profession, it would be wise to briefly introduce concepts and explain any specialized terminology for the benefit of those outside of one’s area of expertise.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS students and professionals are a diverse group, with interdisciplinary workplaces and interests. SRJ publishes papers on virtually any topic related to LIS, making this publication a possibility for students writing on many subjects. When considering submitting to SRJ, a scholarly bent will be critical. Evaluate your manuscript’s contribution to graduate research and its promotion of intellectual inquiry. Critical pieces and original studies of emerging issues such as open-source LIS models, collection development, information literacy, information-seeking behavior, user experience, issues in electronic records and digital asset management, or a host of other areas would be welcome here. Recent articles were on subjects such as digital preservation, social media and using technology to connect libraries with teenagers.

Last updated: December 1, 2014


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal:About This Journal. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/about.html
  2. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/
  3. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). SLIS Student Research Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403632092865/724776
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). SLIS Student Research Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403632092865/724776
  6. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  7. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  8. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). SLIS Student Research Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403632092865/724776
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). SLIS Student Research Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403632092865/724776
  11. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  12. SerialsSolutions. (2014). SLIS Student Research Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403632092865/724776
  13. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  14. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  15. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  16. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  17. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  18. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  19. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  20. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  21. V. Robison, personal communication, May 2011.
  22. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal:About This Journal. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/about.html
  23. San José State University. (2013). MLIS student profiles. School of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/prospective-students/meet-our-students/mlis-student-profiles
  24. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal:About This Journal. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/about.html
  25. SerialsSolutions. (2014). SLIS Student Research Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403632092865/724776
  26. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal:About This Journal. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/about.html
  27. American Library Association. (2013). ALA Demographics Studies. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/research/sites/ala.org.research/files/content/July13report.pdf
  28. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
  29. San José State University. (2014). Student Research Journal: Policies. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html
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Spartan Daily

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Spartan Daily

Website: http://www.sjsunews.com/spartan_daily/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The student newspaper for San Jose State University, covering news, sports, arts and entertainment, tech, and opinion relating to the campus and its students.1

Target audience: San José State University students and faculty.

Publisher: San José State University.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication; student newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: Articles on recent campus news and issues, opinions, sports, and student life.

Frequency of publication: Three times a week.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sjsunews.com/site/forms/

Types of contributions accepted: Letters to the editor (opinion pieces) and news.5

Submission and review process: Use the designated form to submit a news piece or letter to the editor.

Editorial tone: Informal.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Writers interested in reaching this audience can use this publication. While an opinion piece in a school paper would not increase your chances of tenure, it would increase your reputation within the university community, and could be used to promote library issues or garner support for the library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Daily is read by over 25,000 students and faculty.6

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in San José, California, it is safe to assume the readers (faculty, staff, and students of SJSU) are located there too. This is an English language publication and the audience, as part of an institution that requires English language skills, likely reads and speaks English.

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 Media Kit, SJSU students are 46% male and 54% female, with 57% between the ages of 20 and 24. The SJSU student population is a diverse mixture of 30% Asian, 4% African-American, 8% Foreign National, 17% Hispanic, 29% White, and 11% Other.7 As this is the publication of an educational institution, readers are likely interested in education and improving themselves. Other than possibly sharing an interest in their school, any biases, values, and attitudes would vary widely.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Slightly better than the general public given the readers’ affiliation with the university. LIS jargon would still need to be avoided or defined if used in your writing.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readership of this publication would expect writing that concerns them or their school written with a youthful approach.

Last updated: November 16, 2016.


References

Show 7 footnotes

  1. “Spartan Daily,” Scholarworks.SJSU.edu, accessed November 16, 2016, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/spartandaily/
  2. “Spartan Daily,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed November 16, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1416273937072/556930
  3. “Spartan Daily Media Kit,” SJSUNews.com, accessed November 16, 2016, http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/sjsunews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/41/e411e276-bf00-11e5-9427-b7fbe6066c67/56a2ab8951bb5.pdf.pdf
  4. Spartan Daily.”
  5. “Site Forms,” SJSUNews.com, accessed November 16, 2916, http://www.sjsunews.com/site/forms/
  6. Spartan Daily Media Kit.”
  7. Spartan Daily Media Kit.”
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Sonoma State Star

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Sonoma State Star

Website: http://www.sonomastatestar.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: This publication is the student-run newspaper of Sonoma State University. Its purpose is to provide students with information about the university and the community, as well as local, national and international news.

Target audience: Students, faculty, staff, and community members.

Publisher: Sonoma State University.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian; school newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.1

Content: This paper includes campus news, as well as news from the larger community of Sonoma County, the state, the nation, and the world. The focus tends to be on issues that will be of interest to, and have impact upon, students of Sonoma State University. There are sections on arts and entertainment, sports, news, opinion, and general features.

Frequency of publication: Weekly during the fall and spring semesters.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sonomastatestar.com/aboutus/

Types of contributions accepted: The paper only states specifically that it accepts letters to the editor, to be published in the op-ed section.3 However, a number of articles in any given edition are written by students or members of faculty, which would seem to indicate some flexibility.

Submission and review process: There is no formal submission and review process beyond that for letters to the editor. “Letters of up to 500 words will be allowed and must be submitted no later than the Friday before the publication date.”4

Editorial tone: The tone tends to be casual and conversational in nature.

Style guide used: There is no specific style guide indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For writers interested in reaching this specific community, there seems to be opportunities to connect and communicate about LIS issues.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not provided.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Residents of the area, Sonoma State University students, staff and faculty. English language publication.

Reader characteristics: Would vary widely; however, their connection with the school would be a common factor. Possibly more progressive than the general public given it is a publication of an educational institution.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Possibly higher than the general public due to university affiliation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers, with their affiliation to the school and area, will expect articles that pertain to their life at the university. A review of the publication will provide authors with a sense of the interests of the community.

Last updated: November 15, 2016


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “Digital Issue,” SonomaStateStar.com, accessed November 15, 2016, http://www.sonomastatestar.com/digitalissue
  2. “About Us,” SonomaStateStar.com, accessed November 15, 2016, http://www.sonomastatestar.com/aboutus/
  3. About Us.”
  4. About Us.”
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InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies

Website: http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “InterActions is a peer-reviewed, open access journal committed to the promotion of interdisciplinary and inclusive scholarship. The journal brings together senior and emerging scholars, activists, educators, and professionals whose work covers a broad range of theory and practice.”1

This student journal aims to promote scholarship that examines education and information studies through interdisciplinary perspectives. According to the editors, the field of education and information studies is frequently the place where the social sciences and humanities meet. InterActions seeks to be a forum for these meetings, soliciting work that “critiques the inequities and dominant norms within societies, education systems, and academia which perpetuate the marginalization of populations and the exclusion of their knowledge while maintaining unjust policies and systems.”2

Target audience: LIS, education, and other graduate students, professors, emerging and established scholars and professionals, and activists3

Publisher: University of California at Los Angeles Graduate School of Education and Information Studies4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS, social sciences, and education; scholarly6

Medium: Online open access7

Content: Articles, review essays, interviews, and book reviews. Considerations for publication include the “€œadvancement of important and current conversations in education and information studies, their scholarly competence and originality, and their contribution to the journal’€™s goals of informed critique, interdisciplinary dialogue, and social justice.”€8

InterActions is “€œparticularly interested in work that analyzes inequities and links research to larger social and political contexts. InterActions encourages contributions that utilize inclusive and critical frameworks in politically engaged ways.”9

Frequency of publication: Semiannual10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: This publication accepts manuscripts from practitioners, activists, and both established and emerging scholars in all fields of study. Types of contributions sought include:

  • Articles (less than 7,500 words)
  • Literary reviews (less than 5,000 words)
  • Interviews (less than 5,000 words)
  • Book reviews & Exhibition reviews (less than 1,100 words)
  • Research in brief (less than 3,000 words)11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts undergo a double-blind review by editors selected from the editorial advisory board or by graduate students with expertise in the manuscript’€™s topic. The peer review committee decides if a publication will be accepted as is, revised, or rejected.12 InterActions does not accept material that is simultaneously submitted to other journals or has been previously published published elsewhere. All submissions except for book reviews should be submitted with an abstract of 400 words or less.13

Individuals submitting manuscripts need to create an account with Berkeley Electronic Press. The online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages, with title, abstract, and author information entered separately from the main text.€14

Authors retain all rights to their work, but grant the journal the right to make published content available in perpetuity. The California Digital Library also retains the right to display and distribute content published in this journal.15

Editorial tone: Tone is scholarly, but ranges from clear, direct language to the complex and intellectually rigorous syntax of poststructuralism.16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition17

InterActions also provides tips for reviewing a manuscript before submission.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

InterActions is unique among LIS journals LIS in that it seeks interdisciplinary articles that advance social justice. Potential contributors might be LIS practitioners, educators, students, or professionals with an interest in LIS and its ability to satisfy a human need or solve a social problem. This publication values unique voices and critical analysis, as well as more liberal-leaning content. Creative applications of LIS theory in unexpected contexts (such as a study of information-seeking behavior within the queue for the Kogi Beef truck, published in the spring 2011 issue), or the application of theory from other disciplines, such as critical theory, to LIS methodology are the norm.19

A review of recent articles indicates a special emphasis on critical theory–particularly in a sociological context–which is a trend among students at UCLA’€™s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. The wide range of topics covered includes classifications systems, linguistics, pedagogy, cultural studies, civil rights, science, and political economy.20 Work submitted to InterActions should be linked to a larger social and political context.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No information available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in Los Angeles,21 and many readers may be located in Southern California or affiliated with the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. However, this journal’s inclusion in the California Digital Library creates opportunities for wider readership. InterActions is published in English, but appears to aim for an international audience. As with all scholarly articles, avoid colloquialisms and explain any region-specific content or terms used.22

Reader characteristics: This publication’€™s readers are likely well educated and interested in how LIS and education can contribute to dialogue and transformation within larger social and political contexts. This publication’s target audience includes graduate students, professors, emerging and established scholars and professionals, and activists in the fields of LIS, education, or elsewhere.23

As a field of study, LIS research can tend to be conservative and insular. InterActions aims to publish papers that challenge this trend, looking critically at the world and applying “€œalternative and liberatory visions, methodologies, and practices”24 to social issues in the fields of information science and education. Readers are likely progressive and liberal-leaning. This publication is committed social justice and critical inquiry, values that likely resonate with readers.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter. However, as this is an interdisciplinary publication, authors should explain any specialized terms that a graduate student in another field might not be familiar with.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal appreciate careful research and critical analysis, mixing high and low art, and exploring traditional and nontraditional subjects. They are interested in work that is politically and socially engaged, and has value in contexts outside of academia. Papers that offer critical commentary on current issues and promote perspectives that can serve the cause of social justice will appeal to this audience. All the better if they are provocative.

When considering writing for this student journal, expect a high level of  intellectual engagement from readers, who will be looking for “€œfresh and progressive analyses and research”27 that satisfies a human need or solves a human problem. Prospective authors should consider the advice for publication provided by the InterActions manuscript revision tip sheet.28

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 28 footnotes

  1. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California at Los Angeles Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  2. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  3. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  4. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  5. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  6. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  7. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  8. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  9. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  10. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  11. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  12. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  13. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  14. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  15. “Policies,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=policies
  16. “Mission, Aims, and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  17. “Guidelines for Submissions to InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=submissionguidelines
  18. “What to Look For When Reviewing a Manuscript–Or, How to Get Your Own Manuscript Published,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, http://escholarship.org/brand/gseis_interactions/Reviewing_a_MS.pdf
  19. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  20. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  21. InterActions, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405640290105/585059
  22. InterActions,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/gseis_interactions
  23. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  24. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  25. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  26. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  27. “Mission, Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=gseis_interactions;view=mission
  28. “What to Look For When Reviewing a Manuscript–Or, How to Get Your Own Manuscript Published” University of California eScholarship, accessed May 13, 2017, http://escholarship.org/brand/gseis_interactions/Reviewing_a_MS.pdf
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Library Student Journal

*As of July 1, 2014, no links associated with this journal were working. Information on this wiki page could not be verified and the journal itself may be discontinued. If you have updated information on the journal, please feel free to edit.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Student Journal

Website: http://www.librarystudentjournal.org/index.php/lsj

Purpose, objective, or mission:Library Student Journal (LSJ) is an international Open Access publication for students in the Library and Information Science field. We have an international staff and accept submissions from current and future LIS practitioners around the world.”1

Target audience: Primary audience: Library and Information Science (LIS) students. Secondary audience: LIS professionals and professors2

Publisher: Eli Guinnee, University at Buffalo3

Peer reviewed? Articles undergo triple-blind peer review; submissions to other sections do not.4

Type: Scholarly. Library Student Journal publishes original, peer-reviewed research.5

Medium: Online, open access. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory indicates that this journal is also published in print format, but this is not indicated on LSJ‘s website.6

Content: Library Student Journal publishes essays, articles, opinions, and reviews from library and information science students around the world. It also provides a forum for LIS students to discuss their education, training, career paths, and future trends. Topics covered vary, but students are encouraged to submit articles relating to future trends and new technology in light of the field’€™s rapid evolution.7

Frequency of publication: Library Student Journal publishes on a continuous basis as material becomes available, and strives to publish approximately one paper per week, or around 50 per year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, essays, reviews and opinion pieces:

  • Articles: Original scholarly research or literature surveys that contribute original ideas to the existing literature. (Peer-reviewed.)
  • Essays: Less formal papers of an informational or personal nature. Fiction and humor pieces are accepted. (Reviewed by editors alone.)
  • Reviews: Of recently published LIS books, textbooks being used in an LIS course, or websites of interest to LIS students
  • Opinion: Of any length or topic relevant to the LIS field are accepted9

Submission and review process: Scholarly articles are peer-reviewed; informational or personal essays are reviewed by the editors alone.10

You must register with Open Journal Systems and log in in order to manage submissions at Library Student Journal, and complete a Submission Preparation Checklist as part of the submission process. Published authors agree to licensing their work under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.11

Editorial tone: A survey of recently published articles suggests that authors should observe the formalities of scholarly literature, but strive for simple and straightforward sentences whenever possible.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication covers a wide range of topics, and seeks interdisciplinary articles that advance the discussion of LIS topics. For instance, articles that draw on the application of semantics or socio-linguistics on cataloging practices or the reference interview would be welcome here.

Library Student Journal is unique among student journals in that it publishes essays, reviews, and opinion pieces in addition to academic articles. An essay written for a course could easily be submitted here, and reviews and opinion pieces are less time-intensive ways to begin publishing within the field. Students who blog regularly might consider submitting a piece for the opinion section to increase their blog’€™s profile, or those with an interest in creative writing might submit to the essay section.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Because this journal is freely available online, circulation is difficult to determine.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Claire Gross, LSJ‘€™s Editor-in-Chief, most readers are located in the U.S., Canada, and India. This publication is read by an international audience, so avoid regionalisms and explain any cultural references.14

Reader characteristics: LIS students are a diverse group with interdisciplinary workplaces and interests. Many students begin their MLIS early in their career, while others come to it as a second or third profession. This publication encourages submissions that address emerging issues and rapid changes in the field, and the relevance of a research article’€™s relevance within the existing body of literature. Readers likely share a concern for a contribution’€™s relevance to the field’€™s advancement.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this publication is written for LIS students, authors can assume a working knowledge of LIS concepts among readers. Because areas of expertise will vary among students, introduce and briefly explain any discipline-specific terms or LIS jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Very little information about LSJ‘€™s audience is available at this time. Its international readership is significant; publishing here creates the opportunity for your work to reach LIS students, professionals, and professors across the globe, and to contribute to the international LIS community. Library Student Journal publishes papers on virtually any topic related to LIS, making it a consideration for students writing on many subjects.

Last updated: October 31, 2014


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  2. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  3. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  4. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  5. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Student Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404225452560/615282
  7. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  8. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  9. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  10. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  11. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  12. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  13. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  14. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  15. C. Gross, editor-in-chief, personal communication, 4 May 2011
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