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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.1 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.6

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.9

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.10

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members12; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  13.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Collection Building

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Building

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/cb

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection Building provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”1

Target audience: LIS academics and professionals2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system.10 To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Building is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal.15 As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development. The Book Review section of each issue offers an alternative to the research article for publication.

Collection Building is indexed in Academic Search Alumni Edition, Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier, Current Abstracts, Current Awareness Abstracts, Education Full Text, Emerald Management Reviews, Information Management & Technology Abstracts, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, INSPEC, Library & Information Science Abstracts, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts, Library Literature and Information Science, Library Literature and Information Science Full Text, OmniFile Full Text Mega, OmniFile Full Text Select, The Informed Librarian, Scopus, zetoc.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.17 This is a primarily North American publication, with the majority of the Editorial Team based in the United States.18

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development and management. Many of the readers are collection managers with purchasing responsibilities.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are library and information science academics, students, and professionals who study or work in access services, interlibrary loan, special collections, and collection services. They all have a knowledge of LIS subjects and jargon. This audience is looking for specialized information about collection development, and will expect technical language.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  2. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  3. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  4. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  5. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  6. “Features of an Emerald Subscription” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/subs/index.htm
  7. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  8. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  9. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  11.  “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017 http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  13. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  15. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  16. “Collection Building/Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  17.  Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  18. “Editorial Team,” http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=cb
  19. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  20. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
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Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
Continue Reading

Letters to a Young Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Letters to a Young Librarian

Website: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This blog offers “advice to those who are new (or even not so new) to librarianship from someone who has been doing this work for a while now.”1 The objective is to “break down the barriers between library schools & students and professional librarians.”2

Target audience: Library science graduate students and new professional librarians.3

Publisher: Jessica Olin.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Articles (ideas! advice! pep talks!) on all areas of librarianship. Examples from the last two months (March and April, 2015) include: a discussion of management vs. leadership, a reminder about patron privacy, and a description of and tips for whiteboard polling.8 Interspersed with the professional advice are “just for fun” posts.9 Guest posts are also included and welcomed.10

Frequency of publication: Very frequent, averaging 7-9 posts per month.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html

Types of contributions accepted: Olin poses this question to potential contributors: “Is there something you wish you’d known when you were a graduate student and/or a brand new to libraries?”12 “In some posts, you see the author’s philosophy of an aspect of librarianship. In others, the piece is about developing job skills. So long as it answers that basic question, pretty much everything is germane to this blog.”13

Writing on exactly the same topics that have already been covered, or approaching topics in the same way, will not be published.14

Submission and review process: Casual tone is required (no footnotes allowed). Posts should be between 500-750 words. Submissions will be edited by Jessica Olin. Send topic ideas to librarianjessica@gmail.com15

Editorial tone: Tone is casual and welcoming.16 “This isn’t an academic, refereed publication. It’s a conversation. That means personal pronouns are encouraged and footnotes/endnotes/etc. are not allowed.”17

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If this is your first foray into writing for your peers, this blog is an excellent place to start. As this is a blog specifically written for new librarians and library school students, you will be writing for peers and like-minded individuals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016, this blog has 254 followers.18 In addition, Olin has 2,222 followers on Twitter.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This blog is written in American English for a mostly North American audience.20

Reader characteristics: Readers seem to be mostly students or recent graduates with many and varied interests in the LIS world. As per the guest post guidelines, “this is a conversation.”21 Readers will expect informative and thoughtful posts written in an informal manner. As “posts need to be geared toward a general audience”22, readers represent all areas of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS issues could range from the first year LIS graduate student, to a professional librarian starting a career in the field. Don’t assume that the reader will understand LIS-speak; keep jargon to a minimum.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Letters to a Young Librarian want to learn about the profession in a way that is not taught at their graduate schools. They want first-hand accounts of first-time librarians. They are interested in everything from your philosophy of librarianship, to tips on networking. The possible topics are as varied as the profession.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  2. Olin, J. (2016). Why I Decided to Start a Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2011/06/why-i-decided-to-start-blog.html
  3.  Olin, J. (2016). About This Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-this-blog.html
  4.  Olin, J. (2016). About Me. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-me-with-contact-information.html
  5.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  6.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  7.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  8. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  9.  Olin, J. (2016). Just for Fun: Big Hero 6. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2015/04/just-for-fun-big-hero-6.html
  10. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  11. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  12.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  13. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  14. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  15. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  16. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  17. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  18.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  19. Twitter. (2016). Jessica Olin. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/olinj
  20. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  21. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  22. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  23. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
Continue Reading

Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian provides “€œa forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS).”1 It publishes critical perspectives in librarianship that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive issues within the profession.3

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly. This journal aims to provide critically relevant information in an academic setting.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Full text of articles are available online, previous to and including the Winter/Spring 2009 issue.8

Content: From the website: “€œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice yearly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”11

Submission and review process: Submit electronic files only via e-mail in rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word (.doc). Prints and digital images are welcome; if digital, provide 300 dpi grayscale TIFF (.tiff) files no larger than 5X7 inches. The editors reserve the right to edit all manuscript submissions before publication.12

Submit manuscripts to Kathleen de la Peña McCook at klmccook@gmail.com or Susan Maret at iecologie@yahoo.com.13

To submit a book review contact:

Michael Matthews
Watson Memorial Library, Room 311-D
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
Natchitoches, LA 71497
318-357-441914

Papers are published under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives 2.0 license, which places work in the public domain.15

Editorial tone: The articles are both innovative and present alternative views to typical librarian publications. Social justice, racism and other topics that may be considered controversial are published.The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.16

Style guide used: Submissions in your favorite citation style such as Chicago, MLA, APA, Harvard, Turabian are accepted. The style of choice has to be used consistently throughout the paper.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

According to the Progressive Librarians Guild, every library issue embodies a political value choice–and its publication, Progressive Librarian, aims to unearth those propositions and discuss them openly.18 Progressive Librarian rejects the proposition that contemporary libraries are value-neutral information markets, embracing the older idea that librarianship is a profession firmly for the people,€ a democratic force that promotes intellectual inquiry and an informed citizenry.19 It aims to publish articles and promote discussion that defend and extend the library as a free public sphere that makes independent democratic civil society possible.€ Accordingly,the Progressive Librarians Guild is opposed to commercial and business interests that threaten the free flow of information.20 If you are interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and how politics informs professional practice, consider writing for this publication.

A survey of past articles included cultivating freedom of expression within the workplace, Mexican libraries, the internet, and titles such as, “€œCataloging the Path to a New Dark Age: a taxonomy of the Bush administration’s pervasive crusade against scientific communication.” Papers that tie LIS issues, concepts, practices or history to women’s, workers’€™ or civil rights; education; culture; environmental protection; social welfare or insurance; and supporting the public sector in general will be welcomed here. For LIS students, the Progressive Librarian’€™s Guild presents the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize, which annually awards the best student paper about an aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are approximately 400 subscribers, 25% being libraries. Accordingly, it is difficult to gauge total readership–but certainly over 400.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is international in readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, though there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.23 As with any scholarly article, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.24

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.25 The readership is made up almost entirely of librarians, librarian graduate students, or library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice, and how politics informs LIS practices.26 Readers are probably liberal. They are interested in activism, the struggle for social justice, and how politics can inform LIS practices.27

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have a basic understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about commonplace news and events in the LIS world, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues or events others may not be familiar with.28

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication and its readers stand within the American Progressive tradition, hearkening back to FDR’€™s New Deal and representing a spectrum of views that moves left from New Deal-type reformism to much more radical positions and approaches.29 In late February of 2011 the Progressive Librarians Guild issued a statement in support of the Wisconsin employees who protested against proposed cuts to union benefits and health care.30 Progressive Librarian is one of the only journals in the LIS field to report on and document labor activism within the library profession.

This readership values the working class and the public sector, and is concerned with how the LIS profession can support and advance these causes. The journal is characterized by an interest in and/or commitment to socialism, anti-capitalism, feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism, labor advocacy, cultural democracy, ideology-criticism, radical social movements, anti-imperialism and holds skeptical/critical views of technological issues.

Papers that view library and information issues in this framework will be welcomed—whether they offer collection development practices for sex education materials, suggestions for communicating with right-wing colleagues or patrons, or advocate international library rights.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  2. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  3. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  8. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  9. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  11. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  12. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  13. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  14. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  15. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  16. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  17. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  18. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  19. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  20. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  21. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). 2014 Braverman Award Winner Announced. Retrieved from http://progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml
  22. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  23. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  24. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  25. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  26. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  27. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  28. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  29. Progressivism in the United States. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressivism_in_the_United_States
  30. Davey, M. & Greenhouse, S. (2011, February 16). Angry demonstrations in Wisconsin as cuts loom. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/17/us/17wisconsin.html?_r=0
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Computers in Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, the publication’s mission “is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs.”1

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.2

Publisher: Information Today Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”7

Frequency of publication: 10 times a year: monthly with combined Jul/Aug and Jan/Feb issues.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”9

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.10

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.11

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via online Query Form.12  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’€™ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’€™ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”13

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”14

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author: Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professional’€™s only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’€™s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”16 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 5,000 plus subscribers with another 3-4 readers acquired when each issue is passed along. Over 2,000 copies are distributed throughout the year at major library shows, including SLA and ALA, as well as Information Today, Inc.’€™s library shows: ”Computers in Libraries, Internet Librarian, and Internet Librarian International. The parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to WorldCat there are 2,153 libraries around the world that have Computers in Libraries on their shelves. These readers are spread all over the world: USA, Canada, Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, South Africa, and United Kingdom. Computers in Libraries focus on worldwide community of librarians who are interested in emerging technologies and their implementation.18 Computers in Libraries is published in English. Since its content is devoted to discussion of impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems, there is no cultural labels attached and author’€™s language wouldn’€™t be affected.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only “€œtechies”€ but also library managers, system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries does not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. From the mission statement of CIL: “CIL‘s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs. CIL does this through articles that are written by library professionals for library professionals, with a friendly, personal voice. These general technical articles are practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment: corporate, special, academic, public, and K-12. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries does not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead it devotes its pages to entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “€œdo not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is month by month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, the technical writing should be geared toward general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  4. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  5. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  7. Information Today Inc. (2016). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  9. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. OCLC WorldCat. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/title/computers-in-libraries/oclc/18848244&referer=brief_results
  19. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
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Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table 

Website: http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Endnotes Committee is part of the ALA’€™s New Members Round Table (NMRT), a which consists of ALA members with fewer than ten years’ membership. The committee’s mission is to provide support for librarians who want or need to publish scholarly articles, and to publish peer-reviewed research by NMRT members and directed at new librarians.1

The committee oversees publication of Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table.2

Target audience: American Library Association new members, specifically those who are part of the New Members Round Table (ALA NMRT)3

Publisher: American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the Endnotes Committee Charge, “Each edition of the journal will contain 2-4 scholarly articles written by members of NMRT, as well as web site reviews and scholarly book reviews of titles relevant to new librarians.”8

Frequency of publication: One issue per year, with the possibility of more issues if there is interest. The editor welcomes suggestions for special themed issues from NMRT members.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-endnotes-committee

Types of contributions accepted: Original research, practitioner-based research, case studies, book and media reviews. Articles range between 2000-4000 words; book and media reviews 300-500.10

Submission and review process: Endnotes accepts article submissions on a rolling basis, but NMRT members are encouraged to contact the editor about proposals to determine if it fits the journal’€™s scope.11

Send typed, double-spaced MS word docs to nmrtendnotesjournal@gmail.com.12

The committee reviews manuscripts via an double-blind peer-review process. Accepted manuscripts will be returned with committee suggestions for edits, and authors will have about a month to revise the manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly, but not too formal. The articles and reviews are almost conversational.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

To submit a manuscript for publication, register with the ALA and then join the NMRT, whose mission is to provide support for librarians with that specific goal. The publication is for NMRT members and directed at new librarians.€“ Endnotes is the perfect place for LIS students and new authors to submit a query to supportive editorial staff and among a group of peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Endnotes is an open-access journal available online for anyone to read, but is primarily for members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALA is based in Chicago, IL, but the website and newsletter are online open access, available to anyone with internet access, or through a library. œA network of affiliates, chapters, and other organizations enables the ALA to reach a broad audience. Although it is written in American English and published by the American Library Association, the ALA does not limit itself to U.S. library concerns.17

Reader characteristics: Most readers of Endnotes, and all authors, are members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.18 ALA members include “librarians, library trustees, and other interested people from every state and many nations. The association serves public, state, school, and academic libraries, as well as special libraries for people working in government, commerce and industry, the arts, and the armed services or in hospitals, prisons, and other institutions.”19 The ALA’€™s mission is “€œto provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this scholarly journal are part of the ALA’€™s New Members Roundtable, so they may be expected to be aware of current LIS trends and terminology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are primarily new members to the ALA, and are interested in reading the most recent LIS scholarly research, news, reviews and updates in order to further their education or careers, and to inspire their own research and writing. This is an ideal publication for new authors to consider, and as it’€™s part of the ALA, has built-in credibility and respect, as well as readership.

Last updated: April 22. 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “About NMRT,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-nmrt
  2. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  3. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  4. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  5. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  6. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  7. American Library Association. (2014). Endnotes Committee. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  8. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  9. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  10. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  11. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  12. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  13. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  14. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  15. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  16. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  17. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  18. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  19. “Membership,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  20. “Mission,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  21. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
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Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

Website: http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap

Purpose, objective, or mission: To provide opportunities to Pennsylvania librarians to share their knowledge on all areas of librarianship to other librarians in the state and beyond.1

Target audience: LIS professionals in Pennsylvania and internationally especially in the academic library field.2

Publisher: PALA College & Research Division/University of Pittsburgh University Library System.3

Peer reviewed? Research and Practice articles are subject to double-blind peer review. News and Commentary items are not peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Online and open access.6

Content: News, commentary and peer-reviewed journal articles on best practice of interest to academic libraries in Pennsylvania.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually. (Note: this is a new journal and the 2013 issue is the first one.)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions. Registration and login is required.

Types of contributions accepted: Items that have already been published or are under consideration for publication, either in print or online, will not be accepted. The journal focus and scope page states it will “consider all submissions that report original research (research articles), highlight innovative initiatives (practice articles), or discuss current trends/challenges (editorial/commentary). Each issue will also feature news items (collections, services, awards, events, etc.) from Pennsylvania’€™s libraries.”9

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted in 12-point font and use italics rather than underlining. The journal can accept articles in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF format.10 Specific formatting and submission requirements for each type of article can be found here: Submissions. Research and Practice articles are subjected to blind peer review and should have no identifying names or terms and include a 100 to 150 word abstract and a completed Submission Preparation Checklist. News articles do not have to follow peer review guidelines.11

Editorial tone: The publisher’s intent is to provide articles on a wide range of subject with a focus on academic libraries.12 A review of Research and Practice articles issue indicates there is a definite scholarly tone.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a place for Pennsylvania librarians to publish, in particular, in the academic field. As this is a new journal, it is an especially excellent place for new writers to submit articles and news items. As it’s open-access and online, the audience will not be limited to Pennsylvania readers. For example, one article published in the first issue addressed the topic of “Using Social Media to Promote International Collaboration.”

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is a new online open-access journal directed specifically to librarians in Pennsylvania librarians. No numbers have yet been determined.15

Audience location and location or cultural considerations: Pennsylvania, USA with an expected international audience.16 American English and American practices will probably be the focus; although, the editors do intend it to be read internationally.17

Reader characteristics: Readers will most likely be academic librarians in Pennsylvania. Biased towards research and articles written about academic libraries in Pennsylvania.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have LIS subject matter knowledge.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this publication is intended for academic and other librarians in the state of Pennsylvania only, the editors anticipate a wider audience including global interest. Therefore, authors should keep in mind that there is a potentially much wider audience than just a local one.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  2. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  4. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  7. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  10. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  11. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  12. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  13. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap
  14. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  15. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  16. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  17. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  18. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  19. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
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