Wiki Tags Archives: Student authors

Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
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The Conversation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Conversation

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://theconversation.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Begun as a project in 2014, The Conversation publishes articles written by Ph.D candidates and university-affiliated researchers. Their aim is to promote access to high quality information and to strive for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues.1

For more in depth information, take a look at their charter.

This wiki profile is for The Conversation’s U.S.-based website, but there are additional sites specific to audiences all around the globe.

Target audience: Members of the general public interested in reading high quality, academic articles who may not otherwise have access to them.

Publisher: The Conversation US, Inc.

Peer reviewed? Yes.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Academic articles of varying topics–arts, culture, science, technology, medicine and many more.

Frequency of publication: New articles published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://theconversation.com/us/pitches

Types of contributions accepted: The Conversation focuses on three priority areas:

  • “Timely, evidence-based analysis of issues making the news
  • Articles explaining new research and its significance for a non-expert audience
  • Timeless, plain English ‘explainers’ of complex issues”2

Submission and review process: There are three steps to becoming published: verification of institute, educational history/qualifications and the creation of a website account.3

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This could be a great outlet for publishing scholarly articles and research, granted that authors are researchers affiliated with an institution. MLIS students should keep in mind that they do not qualify for publication. The Conversation asks that you do a keyword search to see what has already been published on your topic.4

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This profile is geared towards readers of the U.S.-based site, but The Conversation has websites for readers in Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Indonesia, as well as an additional “global perspectives” site.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Conversation has a global audience.

Reader characteristics: All published articles feature a comments section with lively debates among readers. Thoughtful, well developed comments are the norm. Anyone can sign up to comment on articles, but full names are required to help maintain a transparent forum. Click here to read about The Conversation’s community standards for readers and commenters.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

From glancing over the reader characteristics mentioned above, you can guarantee that, if published by The Conversation, your article could very well feature a lively debate among commenters from all over the world. Authors will find a higher level of engagement with readers, and will be able to see how their audience responds to their work–a feature not usually seen with publication of scholarly articles.

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 14, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/who-we-are
  2. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  3. “Become an author,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 29, 2018, https://theconversation.com/become-an-author
  4. “Pitch an article.”
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School of Information Student Research Journal (SRJ)

Image courtesy of Student Research Journal


 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School of Information Student Research Journal (SRJ)

ISSN: 2575-2499

Website: http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The School of Information Student Research Journal (SRJ) “aims to showcase excellent graduate student scholarship in library and information science, archival studies, and records management. Adhering to a rigorous double-blind peer review process, SRJ upholds critical standards of scholarship in regards to the conceptualization, execution, references, and overall value of published manuscripts.”1 The journal’s former title was SLIS Student Research Journal (2010-2017).2

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) students and the larger LIS community.

Publisher: San José State University (SJSU).3

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access. SRJ is hosted by SJSU ScholarWorks.5

Content: SRJ publishes research-oriented manuscripts, critical essays, and academic book reviews. Published articles cover a wide range of LIS and related topics, such as “archives, or records management theory, policy, application, or practice which advance intellectual inquiry in the field.”6

Frequency of publication: SRJ is published biannually.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Policies.

Types of contributions accepted: SRJ accepts manuscripts from graduate students enrolled at the time of submission.8 “Research manuscripts should investigate an original idea or set of ideas or circumstance, and may be empirical, critical, or theoretical in nature. Critical essays should analyze and contribute an interpretation, or analytical perspective, or new theme or concept to a theory or body of work, and may address a collection of published scholarship.” For book reviews, writers should contact the editor-in-chief to ensure the book fits the journal’s scope and is available for reviewing. There is also a list of suggested titles.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are accepted on a rolling basis through electronic submission. The editor-in-chief reviews manuscripts, consulting with the editorial advisory board as warranted. If approved, the manuscript is submitted to at least two peer reviewers for double-blind review. The editor-in-chief contacts the author, advising if the manuscript is accepted, needs minor or major revisions, or is rejected. Most manuscripts require revision before final acceptance.10

Editorial tone: The tone of SRJ is scholarly, and the journal follows the “conventions of scholarly discourse.”11

Style guide used:  Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

SRJ is an ideal peer-reviewed journal for LIS graduate students to submit their work. The journal is produced by a team of SJSU graduate students and a faculty advisory board, which includes prominent SJSU faculty. Submitting to SRJ offers an opportunity for students to share their best work with LIS community leaders, to market themselves as emerging LIS professionals, and to begin forging professional relationships. SRJ offers a prime opportunity for LIS students writing about archives and records management or museum studies, as it publishes articles in these areas as well as in library and information science. Potential authors should watch this brief informational video created by the SRJ team.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Specific data are not available, but the journal’s website does indicate the number of full-text downloads for each article.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SRJ is aimed at both LIS students and the larger LIS community, and since its inception in 2011, it has attracted student authors from a wide variety of other LIS graduate schools. SRJ has a worldwide reach because it is an open-access journal and because the SJSU School of Information attracts U.S. and international students.15

Reader characteristics: Readers of the publication are graduate students studying a wide variety of LIS and related subjects and professionals from all types of libraries and institutions. SRJ publishes original research and critical reviews and essays, so readers will expect intellectual rigor and fresh perspectives on issues in library and information sciences, archives, museums, records management, and technology.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this publication accepts submissions about virtually all areas of information science and targets LIS professionals in all stages and settings of the profession, it would be wise to briefly introduce concepts and explain any specialized terminology for the benefit of those outside of one’s area of expertise.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS students and professionals are a diverse group, with interdisciplinary workplaces and interests. SRJ publishes papers on virtually any topic related to LIS, making this publication a possibility for students writing on many subjects. Submissions to SRJ should be scholarly and critical, with a clear contribution to graduate research and its promotion of intellectual inquiry. Critical pieces and original studies of emerging and ongoing issues such as open-source LIS models, collection development, information literacy, information-seeking behavior, user experience, electronic records and digital asset management, or a host of other areas are welcome here.

Last updated: March 16, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Aims & Scope,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/aimsandscope.html.
  2. Journal Home, Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/.
  3. Journal Home.
  4.  “Policies,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html.
  5. Home, scholarworks.sjsu.edu, accessed March 16, 2018.
  6. “Aims & Scopes.”
  7. “About This Journal,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/about.html.
  8. “Policies.”
  9. “Aims & Scope.”
  10. “Policies.”
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Style Guide & Formatting Requirements,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/styleguide.html.
  13. “Journal Home.”
  14. “Most Popular Articles,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/topdownloads.html.
  15. “MLIS Student Profiles,” SJSU School of Information, accessed March 16, 2018, http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/mlis/student-profiles.
  16. “Policies.”
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School Libraries Worldwide

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Libraries Worldwide

ISSN: 1023-9391

Website: https://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official research journal of the International Association of School Librarianship, School Libraries Worldwide publishes professional, current research and scholarship on all aspects of school librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic researchers and public school librarians worldwide.2

Publisher: International Association of School Librarianship (IASL).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online with an IASL subscription; some articles have public access.4

Content: School Libraries Worldwide publishes new scholarly works and current research on all aspects of school librarianship from around the world. Most issues include a theme section with an editorial and several articles.5

Frequency of publication: Two times per year, January and July.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines for Contributors and Current Call for Papers (downloadable Word document).

Types of contributions accepted: School Libraries Worldwide invites new scholarly works, including research reports and reviews of research, on any aspect of school librarianship. Issues usually include a theme section; theme editors will occasionally call for submissions of personal narrative, commentary, and opinion papers.7

Submission and review process: Manuscript are submitted to the online journal system, where authors can track their papers through the review process. “The average turnaround time to first decision is about 60 days, with an approximate acceptance rate of 50%.” Submissions that are considered appropriate for the journal are blind reviewed by at least two members of the Editorial Board.8

The current Call for Papers should be consulted to note the theme and content of the upcoming issues, but content on school librarianship in general is always accepted.9

Editorial tone: Professional and accessible, with an understanding of the worldwide audience.10

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an ideal journal to submit different types of scholarship on school librarianship: practice, research study findings, reviews of studies, and personal experience (of the author or of students), in general or as the current theme allows. It is particularly fascinating to read accounts of triumphs and difficulties faced by those in school library positions in other countries and current onformation on programs, technologies, and practices that will be helpful in a variety of settings (rural, urban, university, grade school, etc.). Students are encouraged to submit work, and the open-access article per issue, one that covers a popular, engaging topic, is an exciting goal to reach for.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the official journal of IASL, School Libraries Worldwide is an English-language publication for an international audience. The submission guidelines firmly note that “authors need to be mindful of the international audience of the journal. In most cases, authors can use the library terminology that is used in their locale. However, when writing about schools and students, it is important to state the age of the students being educated in those schools.” The guidelines indicate that authors should explain terminology used to identify schools: lycee, high school, compulsory school, etc.12

Reader characteristics: Readers of the journal are interested in school librarianship and emerging thoughts and trends in the field. This is a positive journal exploring best practices and techniques that can benefit anyone working or studying school librarianship. Members of IASL include people who are concerned about school library media programs and services — librarians, school library media specialists, educators, publishers, and lay people. IASL is a worldwide organization that, in addition to providing an international forum for discussing school librarianship issues, works with other professional associations to provide guidance and development for school library programs. The overall goal is creating effective programs: this is a very professional, respected, positive publication that strongly believes in its mission and uses the journal to spread the education.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but as with the caution on explaining the age of students in the articles, authors should consider explaining any technical LIS jargon or regional terms.14

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in what you have to share concerning school librarianship. Articles range from international standards for school librarianship, to profiles of teacher librarians, to connecting teacher librarians and classrooms around the world. There is certain to be a topic that LIS students who are studying school librarianship will be able to research or write about for this publication of open, interested peers.

Last updated: March 7, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Guidelines for Contributors,” School Libraries Worldwide, accessed March 7, 2018, https://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/contributors.html.
  2. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  3. Homepage, School Libraries Worldwide, accessed March 7, 2018, https://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/index.html.
  4. Homepage.
  5. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  6. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  7. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  8. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  9. Homepage.
  10. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  11. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  12. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  13. “Handbook of Organization,” iasl-online.org, accessed March 7, 2018, https://iasl-online.org/about/organization/index.html.
  14. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
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Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Library Quarterly

ISSN: 0024-2519 (Print) and 1549-652X.1

Website: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/LQ

Purpose, objective, or mission: The mission of Library Quarterly, per their website, is “to engage researchers, educators, professionals, and students interested in the roles of the libraries in the lives of individuals, communities, and nations.”2

Target audience: Library Quarterly is geared towards librarians, as well as anyone interested in libraries in general.3

Publisher: University of Chicago Press.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Library Quarterly features empirical articles on topics of interest to information professionals, “such as digital libraries, diversity in LIS, information literacy training, and information-seeking behavior.”8 Content promotes discussion and dialogue between the scholarly and practitioner communities and addresses the value of libraries as cultural, community, and learning institutions.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/instruct

Types of contributions accepted: Library Quarterly “publishes cutting-edge articles, essays, editorials, and reviews that:

INFORM by providing insights into the collection of, access to, and dissemination of information; analyzing planning and evaluation of information services, resources, and technologies; and examining the development, education, pedagogy, theory, and practice of the information professions

ENABLE by investigating the interactions between cultural spaces and users of information; study the impact of information and communication technologies on libraries and their communities; and examining users and information behavior

EQUALIZE by analyzing the multiple uses that diverse groups make of libraries and exploring the roles of information in human rights and social justice discourse

LEAD by providing an understanding of libraries as institutions of culture and education; addressing the impacts of information and telecommunication policy on libraries and their communities; describing empirically the value that that libraries contribute to the communities they serve; and promoting discussion and collaboration between the scholarly and practitioner communities.”11

Submission and review process: Original, unpublished manuscripts are submitted electronically through the journal’s Editorial Manager here, which requires authors to create an account. All manuscripts are subject to a double-blind peer review.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Due to its broad scope, The Library Quarterly is an excellent publication for seasoned scholarly authors and budding MLIS students alike. Additionally, The Library Quarterly is a respected publication with a lengthy history which dates back to 1931. Finally, the journal is marketed towards “all areas of librarianship,”15 so contributions from librarians of all types are welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No information is available.

Audience location: Library Quarterly is published in the U.S. (in English only) but is indexed in international databases16. Thus, writers should keep specific cultural references to a minimum.

Reader characteristics: Readers likely have (or are currently working towards) a master’s degree in library and information science, and many may have post-graduate degrees as well. Additionally, readers are interested in research-based scholarship, demonstrating that they take their profession very seriously and are committed to staying informed and educated.17

Since Library Quarterly is geared towards librarians and information professionals as a whole, its audience includes professionals in public libraries, special libraries, academic libraries, and other information-based organizations.18 Their interests within the profession will be varied, as will their experience levels.

Information professionals in general are eager to learn and keep apprised of the latest research. They value education and tend to be lifelong learners. Their personal and political views are, for purposes of this journal, irrelevant. In reading Library Quarterly, they will be concerned only with the relevance of articles to their work.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Due to their aforementioned characteristics, readers are likely to have in-depth knowledge of LIS subject matter, trends, and jargon.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Library Quarterly expect evidence-based research which builds on existing scholarship to present compelling, new findings. Additionally, even though The Library Quarterly appeals to a broad scope of readers, authors should avoid making sweeping assumptions about any particular group. Similarly, due to the journal’s focus on quality research, authorial opinion should be omitted in most pieces. Even book reviews should use objective facts to frame the author’s opinion.

Last updated: March 7, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 6, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/about
  2. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 6, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/about
  3.  “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 6, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/about
  4.  The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 6, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  5. The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 6, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  6.  The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 6, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  7.  The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 6, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  8.  The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 6, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  9. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 6, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/about
  10.  The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 6, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  11. “Editorial Manager,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 6, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/lq/default.aspx
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 6, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/instruct
  13. The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 6, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 6, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/instruct
  15.  The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  16. The Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 7, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404342970350/48843
  17. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 7, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/about
  18.  “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 7, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/about
  19. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed March 7, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/lq/about
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Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

ISSN: 1522-02221

Website: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, this journal “publishes articles exploring the connection between library practice and the philosophy and theory behind it. These include explorations of current, past, and emerging theories of librarianship and library practice, as well as reports of successful, innovative, or experimental library procedures, methods, or projects in all areas of librarianship, set in the context of applied research.”2

Target audience: Library professionals (primarily employees working in academic libraries) interested in exploring the philosophy of librarianship.3

Publisher: University of Nebraska, Lincoln Libraries; University of Idaho Library4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: LPP includes research-based articles covering all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship. Some of the many topics the journal has covered over the years include extended library-hour service, the information-seeking behaviors of journalists, information ethics, the information needs of women in prison, the creativity of public librarians, gaming theory, the role of academic libraries in developing countries as access points to print and electronic resources, and many more.8

Frequency of publication: Annually.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/instructions.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers on all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship.10

Submission and review process: Authors should email their articles (in .doc, .rtf, or html format) to the editors. The editors encourage authors to query them prior to submitting an article.  The journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Lastly, authors should be aware that “all manuscripts are checked using Safe Assignment software before they are sent for peer review.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.12

Style guide used: “Use MLA, APA, or any other style that embeds citations in the article, e.g., (Bolin, 2005), with a list of works cited at the end of the article. Do not use footnote or endnote citations. Please include links to any web resources that are mentioned.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Each issue of LPP covers an extensive variety of topics pertaining to applied research and the theory behind it. The sheer breadth of topics beneath the umbrella of applied LIS research, combined with the journal’s international scope (please see the “Audience analysis” section below) make this publication an excellent choice for new and seasoned LIS authors alike. Additionally, the journal’s flexibility regarding the style used (MLA, APA, etc.) make it an appealing choice for authors in both the humanities and scientific professions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although circulation figures are unavailable, LPP’s papers have been downloaded almost three million times. Nearly 700,000 of these downloads occurred within the past year.14

Audience location: Although LPP is published in the U.S.15, it covers topics pertaining to specific libraries and information organizations all over the world. The map on the journal’s homepage shows that readers live in New Zealand, the U.S., Jamaica, and numerous countries in between.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are educated, have an MLIS, a PhD, or are currently studying in an information and library science program. They may be students yet to work in an information organization, librarians, directors of information organizations, researchers, etc.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: In general, it’s safe to assume that most readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter. However, as mentioned above, the articles vary widely, both in terms of content and complexity. Some articles are written in a less formal style while others are very scholarly, containing advanced language and foreign concepts that even a professional librarian might have trouble deciphering.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Due to the broad scope of this journal, authors should write to a specific group of people, rather than trying to please every reader. Articles tend to address very specific topics (e.g., “Information Seeking Behaviors of Journalists in North India”),19 so readers will expect authors to be experts on their chosen topic. Additionally, authors shouldn’t shy away from technical terms or library jargon, since they can safely assume that at least some of their readers will be familiar with it.

 

Last updated: March 5, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  2.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  3.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  4. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018, http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/~mbolin/lpp.htm
  5. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  6.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  7.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  8. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  9. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  10. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  11. Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  12.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  13.  “Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  14.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  15. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  16.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  17. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  18. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  19.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
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Public Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Public Services Quarterly

ISSN: 1522-8959 (print), 1522-9114 (online)

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wpsq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Public Services Quarterly “covers a broad spectrum of public service issues in academic libraries, presenting practical strategies for implementing new initiatives and research-based insights into effective practices.”1 The journal was formerly known as Public & Access Services Quarterly (1995-2001).2

Target audience: Academic librarians, professors, and LIS graduate students.3

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Public Services Quarterly publishes research- and practice-based articles, theoretical articles, and case studies.6 Further, the journal publishes regular columns that keep academic librarians up to date in the field of public service with reviews, essays, reports, and commentaries: Internet Resources, Professional Reading, Best of the Literature, Technology, Marketing, Future Voices in Public Services, and Special Libraries, Special Challenges.7

Frequency of publication: 4 issues per year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Public Services Quarterly accepts “research-based and theoretical articles as well as case studies that advance the understanding of public services, including reference and research assistance, information literacy instruction, access and delivery services, and other services to patrons,” as well as those that “examine creative ways to use technology to assist students and faculty.” The journal also accepts practice-based articles, which “should be thoroughly grounded in the literature and should situate the work done in one library into the larger context of the situation.”9

Submission and review process: Public Services Quarterly uses ScholarOne Manuscripts for the submission, revision, and peer-review process. All published articles go though an anonymous double-blind peer review; thematic issues are reviewed at the discretion of the special issue editor.10 Taylor & Francis provides a guide for authors that covers the entire publication process,11 including directions for using ScholarOne Manuscripts12 and an American Psychological Association (APA) reference guide.13

Editorial tone: Published articles are scholarly in tone; the columns are academic but less formal, depending on the content.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Public Services Quarterly has an established reputation for quality, scholarly writing about public service issues in academic libraries. The journal values scholarship and research that is practical and applicable in academic libraries, so LIS writers should highlight these aspects in their manuscripts. Aside from scholarly research articles, LIS students could contribute to columns specifically seeking the viewpoint of LIS students or provide updates on the latest professional books, websites, and themes in the field.

The Future Voices in Public Services column provides a forum for students in graduate LIS programs “to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to tell us of their visions for the profession, or to tell us of research that is going on in library schools.”15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Public Services Quarterly is a North American English-language journal for an international audience. The editorial board includes librarians from from U.S. and Canadian colleges,16 but the publication aims to cover worldwide issues confronting academic librarians.

Reader characteristics: Public Services Quarterly primarily serves academic librarians, professors, and graduate students.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter is strong, especially as it relates to academic public services. However, the journal is also read by students who may still be developing their LIS knowledge. Further, there is a column written by LIS graduate students that offers fresh perspectives and insights to the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers expect high-level research and scholarship that advances the theory and practice of public service librarianship in the academic setting. They also expect to read regular columns that keep them up to date in a field that is perpetually advancing. Writers need to remember that readers are established academic librarians and graduate students from North America and around the world. The Future Voices in Public Services column is a great way for LIS graduate students to experience the publication process of a highly esteemed journal.

Last updated: March 4, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wpsq20.
  2. “Journal Information,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wpsq20.
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Aims and Scope.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. See, for example, Public Services Quarterly 14, 1(2017), https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wpsq20/14/1?nav=tocList.
  8. “Journal Information.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wpsq20&page=instructions.
  10. “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 4, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Making Your Submission,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 4, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/category/making-your-submission/.
  13. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” tandf.co.uk, accessed March 4, 2018, http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. Nancy Dewald, “2015-16 LIS Student Publishing Opportunity,” ALA ILI-L Discussion List, September 22, 2015, http://lists.ala.org/sympa/arc/ili-l/2015-09/msg00123.html.
  16. “Editorial Board,” Public Services Quarterly, accessed March 4, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wpsq20.
  17. “Aims and Scope.”
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Library Hi Tech (LHT)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech

ISSN: 0737-88311

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Hi Tech (LHT) is concerned with technology-assisted information systems that support libraries & cultural memory, education & the academy, health & medicine, and government & citizenship. LHT covers the IT-enabled creation, curation, representation, communication, storage, retrieval, analysis, and use of records, documents, files, data, and learning objects.” 2

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/lht

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals, LIS researchers and lecturers, library senior management, as well as LIS students and academics.3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online,7 with access available as part of a paid subscription to Emerald Library Studies eJournals.8

Content: From their website, topics covered in the journal include articles about system quality and reliability, integrated library systems, networking, strategic planning, policy implementation, security, automation systems, the role of consortia, resource access initiatives, architecture and technology, electronic publishing, library tech in specific countries, user perspectives on technology, how technology can help disabled library users, and library-related websites.9

Frequency of publication: 14 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht

Types of contributions accepted: Original manuscripts/articles (research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews), 4000-8000 words, submitted in MS Word.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Hi Tech topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

According to a 2013 editorial, a Library Hi Tech manuscript takes up to 30 days to go through peer review, though authors can speed up the process by following the guidelines detailed within the editorial.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly/technical.14

Style guide used: Harvard style guide.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech is a wonderful resource for staying abreast of the latest tech developments in the LIS world (sometimes even before these technologies become mainstream). LHT also has the distinction of being a journal affiliated with the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE),16 a respected organization which promotes “the integrity of the scholarly record through policies and practices that reflect the current best principles of transparency and integrity.”17 Additionally, the journal supports all of its findings with systematic research. For instance, a 2017 article on Apple and non-Apple smartwatches administered an online survey and found that “perceived product attributes” are an important factor in selecting one watch over the other.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Unavailable. Per the Library Hi Tech co-editor, the publication has “a worldwide audience with a strong focus in North America.”19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although written in English,20 the journal is international in scope, with members of the Editorial Board hailing from Germany, Australia, Canada, Ireland, the UK, South Korea, Spain, South Africa, and the USA.21 Submissions need to adhere to Worldwide English language rights.22

Reader characteristics: Subscribers, writers, and editorial staff are primarily LIS professional academics working in universities and are interested in LIS-based technology trends.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will likely be very knowledgeable about LIS subject matter in general, as well as LIS technologies specifically.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are passionate about technology in the LIS workplace. They expect articles to present all findings objectively and methodically, in keeping with the journal’s strong research focus. Readers are likely to welcome articles about emerging technologies from an LIS student point of view, as well as case studies/examples of how technologies are used in classrooms (virtual or not), and in library communities.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  3. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  4.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  5. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  6. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  7. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  10. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  13. Elke Greifeneder, “30 Days to First Decision: Time Span in Library Hi Tech from Submission to First Decision,” Library Hi Tech 31, no. 1 (2013): 5-7, accessed March 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1108/07378831311310338
  14.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  15.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  16.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  17. “Core Practices,” Committee on Publication Ethics, accessed March 2, 2018, https://publicationethics.org/core-practices
  18.  Kuo-Lun Hsiao, “What Drives Smartwatch Adoption Intention? Comparing Apple and Non-Apple Watches,” Library Hi Tech 35, no. 1(2017): 186-206, accessed March 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1108/LHT-09-2016-0105
  19. Elke Greifeneder, email message to author, 2013.
  20. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  21. “Editorial team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lht&
  22. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  23.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  24. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
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