Wiki Tags Archives: Special libraries

International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleInternational Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

ISSN: 2474-3542

Websitehttp://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol

Purpose, objective, or mission: The International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) “is a peer­-reviewed open access journal dedicated to publishing articles on as broad an array of topics as possible from all aspects of librarianship in all types of libraries.”1

Target audience: IJoL‘s primary audience is members of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that provides a forum for discussion and development among Chinese American librarians and information professionals.2 However, as an international and open-access journal, IJoL‘s scope and reach is worldwide.

Publisher: IJoL is published by CALA, an affiliate of the ALA.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Articles deemed suitable by the editors are double-blind peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: “IJoL publishes original research papers, practical developments, reviews, and commentaries of value to professional practice in librarianship in general. It encourages communication on librarianship within and among relevant professional and academic communities.”5 Regular columns include Featured Articles, Reports from the Field, LIS Education around the World, Commentaries, Reviews, and News.

Frequency of publication: Twice each year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: IJoL accepts Featured Articles, which are original research or comprehensive, in-depth analyses; Reports from the Field, which “describe the implementation and assessment of innovative practices in libraries of all types” and report on distinguished Chinese librarians; Reviews of books, articles, or conference papers; and Commentaries offering perspectives on current topics.7 The journal publishes on all topics related to libraries and librarianship, including “academic, research, public, school and special libraries” and other information institutions; it is focused on, but not limited to, “major development of Chinese librarianship throughout the world.”8

Submission and review process: IJoL uses the Open Journal Systems9 online portal for submissions and offers guidelines and a submission checklist, which authors should follow to ensure that processing and publishing is not delayed.10 Each section has its own policies, so authors should check that their submissions meet these requirements as well. The editor sends suitable articles to two referees for blind review, and articles may be accepted as is, with revisions, or declined.11

Editorial tone: The tone is overall scholarly but also appropriate to each column and topic.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

IJoL‘s first issue was in 2016, so it is a very new scholarly journal. It is the official journal of CALA, which was established in the 1970s.13 In the first editorial, Editor-in-Chief Guoying Liu introduces the journal as “a forum for librarians and other researchers from Canada, China, the UK, the US and other countries to share their research, best practices and perspectives in international librarianship, international collaboration and academic exchange, library spaces and services, library technology and innovation, and other aspects of information science and studies.”14 This journal is a great fit for scholars, professionals, and students whose work or research focuses on Chinese librarianship, but the journal publishes on all topics of library and information science, including all types of libraries and information institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: IJoL statistics show that there are 131 registered users and 113 registered readers in 2018.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: IJoL readership is most likely Chinese and Chinese American librarians and information professionals. However, this is an English-language international journal that publishes on all LIS topics, and its readership is similarly international. Authors should keep in mind this international readership and explain regionalisms and particular terms and practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and information professionals, scholars, and students interested in Chinese librarianship and information communities, as well as broader topics and current trends affecting LIS professionals throughout the world. The editors of IJoL are from universities and libraries in the United States, China, and Canada.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter; however, writers should explain regional or particular terms, concepts, and practices for an international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that the readership for this journal is global but there is a particular interest in Chinese librarianship throughout the United States, Canada, and China. Readers of the journal are LIS scholars, professionals, and graduate students who are interested in developments particular to Chinese user populations and research and practices that can be extended to a similarly global population. As a new, open-access journal, LIS authors can peruse what types of articles are being published and editorials that explain the journal’s direction.17

Last updated: April 6, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Membership,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/membership.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Submissions,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/submissions.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “About This Publishing System,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Editorial Policies.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/about.
  14. Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Message from Editor-in-Chief,” International Journal of Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2016.vol1.1.17.
  15. “Statistics,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/statistics?statisticsYear=2018.
  16. “Editorial Team,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialTeam.
  17.  Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Celebrating One Year Anniversary and Introducing the Third Issue,” International Journal of Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 1-2, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.2.54.
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Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
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Chandos Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Chandos Publishing

Website: https://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals/chandos-publishing

Purpose, objective, or mission: Chandos is “an international leading publisher in contemporary library and information science, and social science”1 with a global perspective. They are an imprint of the publishing house Elsevier, founded in 1880.

Target audience: LIS professionals and those in the social sciences fields.

Owner: Elsevier

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Elsevier’s book proposal form asks potential authors to list three experts in the field who could provide input as part of the book’s review panel. All proposals are read by Elsevier editorial staff and selected external reviewers.2

Check out Elsevier’s How to get published guide for more information on the publishing process.

Types of books published: Reference, textbooks, research books.

Medium: Print and digital.

Topics covered: Contemporary issues within the library and information sciences, including legal aspects, library acquisitions, bibliometrics and digital libraries.3

Number of titles published per year: In 2017, Chandos published twenty three books in the LIS field.4

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.elsevier.com/authors/book-authors

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for both books and journals.

Information that needs to be included in your proposal:

  • Title
  • Author(s) and/or editors(s)
  • Aims and scope/Background and purpose
  • Your intended audience and its needs
  • Competing resources
  • Table of contents
  • Sample chapter
  • Qualified reviewers
  • Clarity and discoverability
  • Optional: multimedia content

For more information, consult the Authors and Book Editors page.

Submission and review process: After sending a proposal to the proposal mailbox (linked on this page), further questions about the process can be answered by sending an email to an acquisitions editor at the same proposal mailbox. Be sure the subject line of the email reads: “Question for [subject area] acquisitions editor.” All proposals are considered by Elsevier editorial staff and selected external reviewers.5

Editorial tone: Professional. The home page for Chandos Publishing states that they produce books for researchers, academics and practitioners.6

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Though Elsevier is a large publishing house that is heavy on journals, LIS book authors could possibly find a good fit with Chandos. In 2017, some of their published book titles included Emerging Library Technologies, Social Justice and Library Work and Taking Your Library Career to the Next Level. Elsevier is especially supportive of less experienced researchers and authors. Their website Researcher Academy offers in depth teaching modules to help authors learn about getting their works published and promoted.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Chandos is a sizable LIS publisher. Their online catalog shows 384 books currently in print within the library and information science subject area.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though Elsevier’s headquarters is in the Netherlands, Chandos states that they are an international publisher for the global LIS community. They feature a book series entitled the Asian Studies series, producing titles such as China’s Publishing Industry and Scholarly Communication in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. Chandos also publishes international titles such as Succession Planning in Canadian Academic Libraries and Australian Library Supervision and Management.

Reader characteristics: Readers of works published by Chandos will likely be LIS academics and professionals seeking out books on specific subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The home page for Chandos publishing states that they publish for “researchers, academics and practitioners,” so authors can assume that readers could potentially have an expert knowledge in the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of works published by Chandos are LIS professionals located all over the world. With works such as Disaster Planning for Special Libraries and The Impact of Print-On-Demand on Academic Books, it’s clear that readers come to Chandos with well defined information needs that pertain to specific areas within the LIS field.

Last updated: February 22, 2018


References

Show 6 footnotes

  1. “About,” Elsevier.com, accessed February 20, 2018, https://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals/chandos-publishing
  2. “Book Authors,” Elsevier.com, accessed February 22, 2018, https://www.elsevier.com/authors/book-authors
  3. “About.”
  4. “Catalog,” Elsevier.com, accessed February 20, 2018, https://www.elsevier.com/catalog?producttype=book&cat0=27390&cat1=28072&cat2=&imprintname=Chandos+Publishing&categoryrestriction=&author=&publicationyear=2017&q=&sort=datedesc
  5. “Book Authors.”
  6. “About.”
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Facet Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Facet Publishing

Website: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Facet Publishing is “the commercial and publishing and bookselling arm of CILIP: the Library and Information Association,” with a focus on global business and attention to detail.1

Target audience: LIS professionals.

Owner: CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: LIS professional books, textbooks, series and ebooks.

Medium: Print and electronic, though not all titles are available in both formats.

Topics covered: Over thirty LIS subjects are published by Facet, ranging from academic libraries to website & intranet management.2

Number of titles published per year: Exact number unknown, though Facet’s ‘Recently published’ page lists thirty books published between April 2017 and January 2018.3

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php

Types of submissions accepted: Facets asks potential authors to “think carefully about the intended market, the competition and the unique selling points”4 before sending in a proposal. They are looking for “a mixture of content: practice oriented books for working professionals, textbooks that particularly dovetail with the iSchools curriculum and emerging developments and thinking in research for a scholarly audience.”5 Book proposals should contain sections regarding the book’s content, market, and competition, as well as information about yourself.

The content:

  • “A synopsis of the book, including a detailed outline of the work with intended chapter headings, together with a description of each chapter and its estimated length
  • An estimate of the total length of the book
  • A rationale describing why the book is needed, what it hopes to achieve and how, and any new ideas and developments you intend to cover, or new approaches that you intend to use. Notes on additional features such as case studies, checklists, diagrams, photographs, software, etc.
  • Sample material (one or two chapters), if possible
  • An estimated date of manuscript completion”6

The market:

  • “Who is the intended reader?
  • How large do you estimate the potential readership to be?
  • A description of the potential readers (e.g., students, practising library and information professionals/managers, policy makers) with specific details about why they need this book:
    • what sectors/organizations they are working in
    • the required level of professional expertise
    • courses
  • Are there any potential secondary audiences and markets? (e.g., museums, archives, publishers, record managers)
  • Is there international potential? Where? Why?”7

The competition: “Does this book fill a gap in the market? What evidence is there for this gap? Provide a list of any competing books with price, publisher, year of publication, and any other useful information, together with a comment as to how your book differs, what makes it superior and how it will compete.”8

Yourself: “Details of yourself, your experience, related activities, and any other previous publications (whether articles, reports or books).”9

Submission and review process: All proposals should be submitted to the Commissioning Editor. If a proposal is accepted, the author and commissioning editors will work together on a realistic schedule for the book’s publication.10 Facet prides themselves on timeliness and detail, and are quick to market new publications.11

Editorial tone: None listed, but consider that Facet publishes for students and professionals already well versed in the LIS field.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Facet publishes across a wide array of LIS topics, making them a publisher to strongly consider no matter what your subject field may be. Potential authors should keep in mind that Facet requests very detailed information from each book proposal, so authors should have a clear idea of their marketability and relevance. Authors should be sure to carefully read the book submission guidelines to ensure that all questions have been addressed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s readers

Publication circulation: Based in the United Kingdom, but Facet has agents and representatives around the world.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Facet is the bookseller for CILIP, a library and science information association in the U.K., though they emphasize that their publications extend into the international LIS world. They have representatives and agents in countries all over the world, making publications available to a world wide audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Facet publications are information professionals, though there may be a secondary audience in fields such as archives and museums. Facet’s bestselling publications include titles such as Managing Records: A handbook of principles and practice and Practical Cataloging, so it can be assumed that their readers have more than a casual knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics and professionals with a strong knowledge or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Facet publishes for an audience in and outside of the United Kingdom. Their works range from LIS textbooks to simple ‘No-nonsense’ guides about topics such as archives and legal issues in Web 2.0, showing that Facet’s readers vary in their knowledge on contemporary LIS topics. This span in readership could make Facet a viable publisher for potential authors across many different subjects.

Last updated: February 26, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/
  2. “Home,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/index.php/a>
  3. “Recently published,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/category.php?category_code=38
  4. “Book proposal guidelines,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php
  5. “Write for us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/write_for_us.php
  6. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  7. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  8. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  9. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  10. “The publishing process,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February, 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/Guidance_for_Existing_Authors/04%20The%20publishing%20process%20Jan%202012.pdf
  11. “About us.”
  12. “About Us.”
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International Information & Library Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Information & Library Review

ISSN: Print ISSN: 1057-2317, Online ISSN: 1095-9297

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ulbr20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The overall mission of the International Information & Library Review is the provision of knowledge that will assist in the success of libraries and information-related institutions around the world.”1

Target audience: The target audience for International Information & Library Review is “library and information professionals and paraprofessionals in public, academic, special, government, and corporate environments” from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All papers in International Information & Library Review have undergone editorial screening and peer review.”4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: With a global perspective and articles written by scholars and professionals from many different countries and institutions, the International Information & Library Review “focuses on three broad areas: policy and ethical issues, including digital values, around the world; the ways in which information technologies and policies are used to help in decision-making, problem solving and improving the quality of people’s lives; and designing and implementing information systems and services in libraries and other organizations around the world.”5

Besides original articles, regular columns include Digital Trends and the Global Library Community, Advances in Library Data and Access, The Library Workforce, Perspectives on Public Services, Global Postcards: Research, Projects, and Experiences from the Field, and Digital Heritage: Spotlight on Europe.6

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors and Invitation for Column Contributions.

Types of contributions accepted: International Information & Library Review publishes “current and anecdotal information” with an emphasis on “research, current developments, and trends related to library and information leadership and management; marketing, advancement, and development; collaborative projects and insights; scholarly communication and publication; collection development and management; technology and digitization; public and technical services; physical and virtual environments, and organizational behavior.”8 Besides original articles, the journal welcomes proposals and articles for its regular columns.9

Submission and review process: International Information & Library Review uses an online submission system for manuscript management and the peer-review process.10 The Taylor & Francis Authors Services website offers an overview of the publishing process and detailed instructions for authors.11 The journal uses Editorial Manager for the peer-review process, with detailed guidelines for authors.12

Editorial tone: The overall editorial tone is scholarly, especially for the original articles. Each column has its own guidelines and topics, so authors should read these and sample articles carefully if submitting an article or proposal to a particular column.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.14 Taylor & Francis provides a document outlining APA style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

International Information & Library Review is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the worldwide library and information science (LIS) community. LIS scholars and professionals who are conducting original research that appeals to a worldwide audience and who can contribute to the journal’s regular columns are a good fit for this journal. The journal’s authorship is from within and beyond the LIS community: “Contributions to the journal have come from staff or members of many different international organizations, including the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL, and from library and information scientists in academia, government, industry, and other organizations.”16 The journal does not court student authors, and contributors seem to be well-established professionals in LIS and related organizations, but column editors do invite proposals, which may be a way for LIS students to explore publishing in this high-level journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International Information & Library Review has a worldwide scope and reach. Its audience includes “information scientists, librarians and other scholars and practitioners all over the world.”17 The journal is written in English for an international audience. Regional terms and practices should be explained.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS scholars, professionals, and practitioners from around the world, as well as stakeholders in international organizations, such as the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL,18 who may not be in the LIS field but who are interested in international information-sharing practices and standards.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Overall, readers will have an advanced understanding of LIS subject matter, but because readers are from all over the world and sometimes from outside of the field, jargon, regionalisms, and novel practices should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the International Information & Library Review are writing for an international readership. Readers expect “timely articles on research and development in international and comparative librarianship, information sciences, information policy and information ethics, digital values and digital libraries.”19 They are interested in how LIS practice and theory are evolving around the world–on the international stage and in particular regions–and how this might have an impact on their own policies and practices.

Last updated: April 2, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ulbr20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Invitation for Column Contributions,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/iilr-columns.
  6. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  7. “Journal Information,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=ulbr20.
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ulbr20&page=instructions.
  11. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Editorial Manager: Tutorial for Authors,” version 14.1-Q4/2017, www.ariessys.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.ariessys.com/wp-content/uploads/EM-Author-English.pdf.
  13. See “Invitation for Column Contributions,” for links to each column’s guidelines.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” tandf.co.uk, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandf.co.uk//journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  17. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  18.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  19.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
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Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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I Need a Library Job (INALJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: I Need A Library Job (INALJ)

ISSN: Not applicable.

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its seventh year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Information on guest blogging: http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207

Types of contributions accepted: Articles or interviews of any length (but at least 550 words) on all sorts of topics—archives, volunteering, diversity, resumes etc.5

Submission and review process: You must provide proof of identity in order to post an article or blog—use a professional work email address or have a LinkedIn connection or colleague vouch for you. A landscape orientation jpeg photo is required, as well as a personal bio. The bio can also be a link to your own site.

Submit photos, Word document of your article, bio and proof of identity to: articles@inalj.com.6

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: No style guide is used.7

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing. Naomi states that she does not publish any articles that are holiday related, since she has a back log to work through.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published in the past year span a broad range of topics–networking for reluctant networkers, the importance of saying “no” in the workplace and a q & a with Dr. Sandra Hirsch from SJSU’s iSchool. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. “Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed March 13, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. “About INALJ”
  4. “Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ is usually updated Monday-Friday.[4. “About INALJ.”

  5. “Write for INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207
  6. “Write for INALJ.”
  7. “Write for INALJ.”
  8. Write for INALJ.”
  9. “About INALJ.”
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BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: Not applicable.

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
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Collection Building

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Building

ISSN: 0160-4953 (Print) and 2054-5592 (Online)1

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/cb

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection Building provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”2

Target audience: LIS academics and professionals3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.10

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system.11 To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.12 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”13

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”14

Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Building is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal.16 As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development. The Book Review section of each issue offers an alternative to the research article for publication.

Collection Building is indexed in Academic Search Alumni Edition, Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier, Current Abstracts, Current Awareness Abstracts, Education Full Text, Emerald Management Reviews, Information Management & Technology Abstracts, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, INSPEC, Library & Information Science Abstracts, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts, Library Literature and Information Science, Library Literature and Information Science Full Text, OmniFile Full Text Mega, OmniFile Full Text Select, The Informed Librarian, Scopus, zetoc.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.18 This is a primarily North American publication, with the majority of the Editorial Team based in the United States.19

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development and management. Many of the readers are collection managers with purchasing responsibilities.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are library and information science academics, students, and professionals who study or work in access services, interlibrary loan, special collections, and collection services. They all have a knowledge of LIS subjects and jargon. This audience is looking for specialized information about collection development, and will expect technical language.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-1226189322
  2. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  3. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  4. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  5. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  6. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  7. “Features of an Emerald Subscription” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/subs/index.htm
  8. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  9. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12.  “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017 http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  13. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  14. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  16. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  17. “Collection Building/Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  18.  Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  19. “Editorial Team,” http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=cb
  20. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  21. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
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Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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