Wiki Tags Archives: Special libraries

AIIP Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AIIP Blog (formerly AIIP Connections until March 2019)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://blog.aiip.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Association of Independent Information Professionals created the AIIP blog in order “to showcase our members’ expertise, to highlight AIIP’s generous culture of knowledge-sharing, and to inspire the info-entrepreneurs of tomorrow.”1 The blog serves as a resource for independent business owners who provide information-related services.2

Target audience: Independent (not-employed) information professionals, individuals considering becoming independent information professionals, businesses or individuals seeking the services of independent information professionals, and business or individuals who work in any field of the information profession.3

Publisher: Association of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Blog posts on professional development and business management tend to be the most sought-after pieces. Other common content topics include AIIP news, getting started in the profession, case studies and success stories, tips and strategies on growing IIP businesses, tech trends, and professional development tips.8

Frequency of publication: Continuously.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://blog.aiip.org/contribute/

Types of contributions accepted: Original posts of 500-750 words in length on any specific topic within the subjects of research, information management and technology, marketing and communications, training and consulting, and writing and editing.10

Submission and review process: Content should be submitted in Google Docs or Microsoft Word format via email. The blog editors may make minor revisions without notification before posting.11

Editorial tone: Concise writing free of complex vocabulary is preferred. The use of bullet-points to make content more “scannable” to online readers is encouraged. The submissions guidelines page offers some helpful notes and resources on making online writing appealing and easy to read.12

Style guide used: No particular style is indicated. Read the submissions guidelines thoroughly for notes on preferred style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The AIIP Blog provides an excellent forum for the LIS author who has interest in exploring a career as an independent information professional (or who is already engaged in the practice). This publication could also serve LIS authors who have specialized knowledge in research techniques which would cater to the needs of the independent information professional. While LIS authors may have specialized research knowledge on research techniques, potential works should be written with a focus on how such research techniques may impact on independent information professionals from a practical perspective.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available. However, the blog links to many social media platforms that may increase readership of any particular post.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The subject matter and readership of the blog is international in scope. Simple, clear, and concise English should be used to make material accessible to the wide audience.14

Reader characteristics: Readers consist primarily of independent information professionals engaged as specialized business owners. Readers share a collaborative approach in €œsharing ideas, experiences, and observations as independent information professionals.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter; however,  authors should refrain from using overly technical and elaborate language, and err on the side of simple explanation.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should be aware that the readers are primarily professionals who are engaged as entrepreneurs in the information field. Readers will expect articles specifically tailored to this field. While articles should be professionally written, readers will expect an approach which has practical applications or implications. LIS authors with specific knowledge in emerging techniques in the acquisition/management/distribution of information could use this publication as a forum if specifically tailored to the independent information professional.

Last updated: July 5, 2019


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org/about/.
  2. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Who We Are,” AIIP, accessed July 5, 2019, https://www.aiip.org/Discover/WhoWeAre/
  3. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  4. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  5. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org/contribute/
  6. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  7. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  8. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  9. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “AIIP Blog,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org
  10. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  11. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  12. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  13. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  14. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  15. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  16. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
Continue Reading

Archival Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archival Outlook

ISSN: 1520-33791

Website: http://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook

Purpose, objective, or mission: A newsletter €œmembership benefit€ for members of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) that updates readers on the work of the Society and its many component groups and reports on regional, national, and international news of relevance to members of the profession.2

Target audience: Those interested in or specializing in the archival profession or one of its allied fields.3

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA)4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Print issues are mailed exclusively to members, but digital versions are available to the general public on the SAA website.8

Content: Features often cover best-practice and how-to articles on timely archival topics; notable collections, projects, or advocacy work; how archives are used by the public; and profiles of archives or archivists at work. SAA aims to nurture both new voices and established writers; the content is primarily written by the organization’s members and those in the profession.9

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly: January/February, Marcy/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook

Types of contributions accepted: A range of relevant topics will be considered, but articles typically focus on best practices, unique collections, notable achievements by an archivist or archives, and updates on the Society and its component groups. Articles should include “some kernel of information that will enlighten the reader professionally.”11 Illustrations are encouraged. Articles should run 700 words for a one-page story or 1,200 words for a double-page spread.12

Submission and review process: Send queries and article ideas to the current Editorial and Production Coordinator via email. This position is currently held by Abigail Christian.13

Editorial tone: This is the member newsletter, not the official journal. While the articles are highly relevant to the archival profession, the tone is more friendly and laid back.14

Style guide used: No style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newsletter is a perfect place for students in the archive sector to share short articles or feature stories on news, information, special projects or advocacy, or profiles of SAA members. It is neither peer reviewed nor the official SAA scholarly journal, so it is most likely not an avenue for publishing in efforts to gain tenure, but it would be an excellent place to start writing about all things archives, explore different topics within the archives world, or share information about relevant individuals, organizations, and conferences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 6,200+ members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Society is based in Chicago and is North America’s oldest and largest national archival professional association.16 Outlook is written in English.17 The newsletter accepts international updates and news, but is a North American publication.18

Reader characteristics: The newsletter can have a very insider, quirky tone because it is directed at SAA community members. A unique feature is the use of visuals (mostly archival photos) to tell a story or as stand-alone pieces.19 If a LIS student came across an interesting visual, this would be the place to share it. The publication’s articles are largely written by members and those in the archives profession. The newsletter is strictly for those in the archival profession, or those interested in it. This does not just mean those in library-specific archives: professionals from all sectors within the profession are profiled and encouraged to share news and updates.20 Readers are positively archival advocates. This is a newsletter that is very proud of being all about archives and celebrating archival and library professionals.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the readership is comprised of professional archivists, LIS knowledge and language is encouraged, though education level and degrees may vary.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication have one crucial aspect in common: their love of archives. Articles need to focus on positive aspects of the profession -€“ this is not the venue to share negative comments or criticisms, although critiques might be accepted, and definitely reviews of new exhibits, books, or professionals would be fine. The level of LIS knowledge is high -€“ this is not a newsletter for neophytes but is directed toward professionals. However, its tone is friendly, open, and welcoming to anyone with an interest in archives. This would be a fun, interesting place to publish with the aim to keep readers up to date as well as entertained.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook
  2. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership,” accessed June 30, 2019, http://www2.archivists.org/membership
  3. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  4. ProQuest, “Archival Outlook,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402338917688/244199
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  8. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  9. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  10. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  11. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  12. Society of American Archivists, “Submit an Article,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/archival-outlook/submitanarticle
  13. Society of American Archivists, “Submit an Article.”
  14. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  15. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook Display Ad Information,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/advertising/archival-outlook
  16. Society of American Archivists, “Who We Are,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/aboutsaa
  17. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  18. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  19. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook: Back Issues by Year,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook/back-issues
  20. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  21. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook: Back Issues by Year.”
  22. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
Continue Reading

Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Journal (LJ)

ISSN: 0363-02771

Website: http://www.libraryjournal.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal is produced as a trade publication with the intent to provide library news and related information. Although the emphasis of the journal is on public libraries, the journal contains information pertinent to a wide variety of professionals in the library world. Library Journal also provides reviews of books, ebooks, audiobooks, DVDs/videos, and other media annual to assist library professionals in purchasing for their institution. The mission of the journal is to provide feature articles and news stories which inform library professionals about current issues in a readable style.2

Target audience: The target audience is composed of librarians in public, academic, and special libraries, as well as library administrators, staff, and directors.3

Publisher:  Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news. Library Journal is a non-research-oriented LIS professional news journal that includes advertising, bibliographies, illustrations, and book reviews.6

Medium: Library Journal is a print publication with free online content. Online archives are free, though they do not necessarily contain everything that is in the print edition.7 You can also subscribe to LJ’s RSS feeds and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.8 The online version of Library Journal also includes blogs, podcasts and message boards, links to affiliated newsletters, and tools to assist in collection development and other areas of library administration.9

Content: Library Journal content includes news, reviews, LJ bestsellers, commentary, departments, info-tech, special reports, letters to the editor, upcoming events, classified ads, and photos.10 Library Journal evaluates over 8,000 books annually and also provides reviews of library-related equipment and materials.11

Frequency of publication: The print publication is issued 12 times a year.12 Online content is updated continuously.13 Reviews are also welcomed, though review contributors are expected to regularly write, rather than simply submitting one review.14

Submission and review process: Submissions to the Features and Columns sections should be 2 to 4 pages in a magazine, or 1800 to 2700 words. Finalized drafts can be sent as an attachment along with a query describing the coverage and approach of the article as well as the writer’€™s connection to the subject and his or her expertise. The query can be a paragraph or several paragraphs in length. Response to queries may take between 4 to 6 weeks. LJ also accepts opinion pieces and rants about topics and concerns in the library profession for its “BackTalk” . Pieces should be in the range of 900 words. Be sure to email the appropriate editor for the type of content being submitted.15

Book reviewer guidelines for contracted and unpaid review writers can be found here.16

Editorial tone: As this publication is aimed at the general librarian population, the tone of articles should be objective as well as thought-provoking while providing topical and useful information. Articles should be written in an “accessible and readable style.”17

Style guide used: No particular style guide is indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A trusted and respected publication for the library community, Library Journal certainly has the potential for an LIS author to reach a wide audience. Since the journal reaches out to public, academic, and special libraries, there are a multitude of articles that could possibly be written for this publication.

Library Journal is open to ideas for articles and columns, and also encourages “opinion pieces and rants.”18 Library Journal prefers an approach that is widely accessible by its readers.19 There is therefore great potential for newer writers who are not necessarily comfortable with a more scholarly voice. There is also a market here for librarians to offer insight and advice on practical issues facing contemporary libraries. This is a wonderful opportunity for librarians (including those who may not consider themselves to be professional authors) to share their real-world experience with others.

Library Journal Reviews+ is a popular selection tool used in public and academic libraries, and an ongoing opportunity exists here to publish reviews in a wide range of disciplines. Reviewers are not required to have previously published reviews.20 This would be an excellent opportunity for library students with graduate degrees in other areas to review books in their specialty and begin to publish in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Library Journal is distributed to 43,000 print subscribers, and its online equivalent registers over 91,000 monthly visits. The publication is also popular on social media, with over half a million followers across various social media platforms, on which journal content is shared.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LJ is printed in English, and most articles focus on topics affecting libraries in the United States. A scan of recent article titles reveals an editorial comfort with acronyms specific to the American context, such as CIA, ALA, and NYPL.22 However, authors should remain sensitive to the possibility of diverse readership, since cultural diversity and international issues are embraced by the publication, as demonstrated by recent articles on Indigenous Academic Libraries, Spanish-language collection development, and inclusion in scholarly publishing.23

Reader characteristics: Because the audience largely consists of librarians and library staff, readers are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship.24 The readership is large,25 however, and likely diverse in their particular perspectives on library issues.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:  Library Journal is read by people all across the library profession, so a working knowledge of library terms can be assumed, but authors should be aware that members of their audience may not have MLIS degrees.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Library Journal include library directors, administrators, and staff in all types of libraries. An article written for this publication has the potential to reach and influence people across the library field, nationally and even internationally. Authors should remain aware that their readers are familiar with both the current highest standards of librarianship, yet also the practical difficulties that come with working in the field. It is recommended to aim for a broad reach, even when writing about an issue specific to one kind of library, so that readers from all types of libraries can gather ideas or inspiration from each article.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521665093762/48829
  2. Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=About-Us.
  3. Library Journals, “About Us.”
  4. Media Source, Inc., “Media Source Inc.,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://mediasourceinc.com/
  5. Library Journal, “Submissions,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news.
  6. Library Journal, “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com
  7. Library Journal, “Reviews+,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=Reviews%2B
  8. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  9. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  10. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  11. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://media.libraryjournal.com/library-journal/.
  12. Library Journal, “Subscribe to Library Journal, accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=subscribe.
  13. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”

    About the publication’s submission guidelines

    Location of submission guidelines: For articles: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news. For reviews: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ

    Types of contributions accepted: Feature articles that are broad in scope and/or offer useful information and ideas. The journal also accepts news pieces, announcements, photos of library-related news and events, letters to the editor, and opinion pieces.[14. Library Journal, “Submissions.”

  14. Library Journal, “Review for LJ,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ.
  15. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  16. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  17. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  18. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  19. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  20. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  21. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  22. Library Journal, “News,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=News
  23. Library Journal, “News.”
  24. Library Journal, “About Us.”
  25. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  26. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
Continue Reading

MLAConnect

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: MLAConnect

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://www.mlanet.org/mlanews

Purpose, objective, or mission:MLAConnect is MLA’s online newsletter, featuring the latest resources, professional advice, and association news.” 1

Target audience: Members of the Medical Library Association (MLA).2

Publisher: Medical Library Association (MLA)3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online. The print MLA News publication transitioned to the new all-digital format in 2017. 6

Content: Professional notices of importance to the membership, articles of practical matters of interest, letters to the editor, classifieds, etc.7

Frequency of publication: Continuously.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=154

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions must be emailed to the editor. Any timely newsworthy piece that would be of interest to the membership including letters to the editor and reviews of conferences. Authors should take care to avoid content that overlaps with the subject areas of regular column writers listed on the editorial team.9

Submission and review process: Articles no more than 700 words, no more than 5 references allowed. All submissions subject to editing and abridgement. Submissions required 6 weeks in advance of publication.10

Editorial tone: Informational.11

Style guide used: The publication uses its own MLA Style Manual.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Writers with expertise in the medical library field and interest in reaching the members of this organization would find this publication a good place to submit work.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Most articles are restricted to MLA members.13 The most recent media kit places membership at over 3,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Most readers are located in the US, but articles should remain culturally neutral in consideration of possible international audiences.15

Reader characteristics: MLA member and readers are generally hoping to connect with colleagues and expand their professional skills and knowledge.16 Readers work in a variety of medical organizations, but share an interest in their association’s mission to promote excellence in health sciences librarianship.17 They will likely have a specific interest in their field, their medical specialty, with less interest in general LIS topics.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a familiarity with LIS subject matter but may not have a MLIS degree.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors considering submitting work to this publication will be best served by reviewing the past issues of the publication and remembering that readers are expecting to learn how to better perform and understand their work. While MLAConnect is not a peer-reviewed journal, readers are articles that represent the forefront of new developments in the field.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Medical Library Association, “MLA: Publications: MLA Publications,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=65
  2. Medical Library Association, “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLAConnect,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/page/submitting-articles-for-mla-news
  3. Medical Library Association, “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLAConnect.”
  4. Medical Library Association, “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLAConnect.”
  5. Medical Library Association, “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLAConnect.”
  6. Medical Library Association, “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLAConnect.”
  7. Medical Library Association, “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLA Connect.”
  8. Medical Library Association, “MLA: MLA News: Latest News,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=1138
  9. Medical Library Association. “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLA Connect.”
  10. Medical Library Association. “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLA Connect.”
  11. Medical Library Association. “Publications: Submitting Articles for MLA Connect.”
  12. Medical Library Association, “Publications: MLA Style Manual,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=198
  13. Medical Library Association, MLA: MLA News: Latest News.
  14. Medical Library Association, “Advertising and Sponsorships: Advertise in MLA News,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=173
  15. Medical Library Association, “MLA: About: International Programs,”  June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=23
  16. Medical Library Association, “MLA: About: MLA Individual. Membership: Connect…Learn…Lead…JOIN!” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/join
  17. Medical Library Association,  “About,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.mlanet.org/p/cm/ld/fid=21
  18. Medical Library Association. “MLA: MLA News: Latest News.”
  19. Medical Library Association. “MLA: About: MLA Individual. Membership: Connect…Learn…Lead…JOIN!”
Continue Reading

Library Worklife

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Worklife

ISSN: 1550-35341

Website: http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The purpose of this newsletter is to inform those working in the library field about Human Resource (HR) related issues such as career advancement, pay equity, recruitment, work/life balance, and certification.2

Target audience: Members of the target audience include members of American Library Association-Allied Professional Association (ALA-APA). 3

Publisher: American Library Association-Allied Professional Association (ALA-APA).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news journal.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: The newsletter covers ALA-APA news, career advancement, certification, HR law, HR practice, career advancement salaries and pay equity, recruitment, spotlight, support staff, and work/life balance.8

Frequency of publication: Issued the second Tuesday of each month.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/call-for-submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: The newsletter accepts shorter length articles, anywhere from 200 to 1200 words. Longer articles may be submitted upon previous arrangement. Articles may be based on news, trends, research, scholarly articles, noteworthy events, and individual profiles.10

“Factual articles must be inviting and readable, with all statements backed by responsible research and interviews.”11

The website has a specific section, Write for Library Worklife that lists upcoming themes and suggested topics to consider writing about.12

Submission and review process: Submissions are accepted by e-mail to bcalvin@ala.org and/or info@ala-apa.org, with the article pasted in plain text in the body of the email, or as a MS Word attachment. Articles are reviewed by the editors and they make the decision whether or not an article should be published. They may also choose to make changes if the article is accepted.13

The submission guidelines also include a list of topics to consider writing about and an Editorial Calendar with writing deadlines and distribution days per monthly issue.14

Writers are encouraged to commit to submitting three articles for a twelve-month period; one-time submissions are also accepted.15

Editorial tone: The tone of the articles is informative, and can even be humorous in the right situation. They can also be written in either first person or third person.16

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style; however the submission guidelines advise against the use of extensive footnotes.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newsletter offers opportunities for those interested in writing about the details involved in the working life of librarians, especially authors willing to share their success or concerns on the publication topic. As a part of ALA it has the potential to reach a wide audience. Authors interested in writing for this publication are best served by reading past issues of the publication to gain a clear understanding for their focus.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Submission guidelines note that Library Worklife is received by thousands of ALA institutional members and individual subscribers.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As a part of the ALA-APA this journal is North American based as is its readership. The headquarters for the journal are located in Chicago, Illinois.19 Library Worklife is written in English,20 however authors need to avoid specific or regional references.

Reader characteristics: The readers are mostly part of the ALA-APA, which is an organization which endeavors “to enable the certification of individuals in specializations beyond the initial professional degree.”21 This mission was broadened after the organization’s foundation to include advocacy for the “mutual professional interests of librarians and other library workers€.”22 The readers of this journal work in all types of library environments. They are concerned with employment issues such as pay rates and human resources issues rather than advice on day to day issues that face librarians.23 One issue that readers are likely to have a strong opinion about is that of pay equity. According to the website, one of the main goals of ALA-APA is “direct support of comparable worth and pay equity initiatives, and other activities designed to improve the salaries and status of librarians and other library workers.”24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since this is a publication put out by ALA, with a large number of subscribers who are ALA members, the readers would likely have a thorough understanding of LIS subject matter as well as jargon.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers are largely associated with ALA-APA. One of the important issues for such readers is the fair treatment of library workers and the status of library workers within the public’s eye. This would be a helpful issue to keep in mind when considering article ideas. The most important characteristic of the readers to remember is that they are interested primarily in the pay equity and the status of librarians in the workplace. The articles these readers would have the most interest in reading would have these issues as a central theme.

Last updated: June 24, 2019


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Library Worklife,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/
  2. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Library Worklife.”
  3. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Library Worklife.”
  4. ProQuest, “Library Worklife,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1407435724102/575494
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “LW FAQ,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/lw-frequently-asked-questions/
  9.  American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “LW FAQ.”
  10. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/call-for-submissions/
  11. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  12. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association. n.d. “Write for Library Worklife,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/write-for-library-worklife/
  13. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  14. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  15. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  16. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  17. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  18. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  19. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  20. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  21. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “About ALA-APA,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/about-ala-apa/.
  22. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “About ALA-APA.”
  23. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  24. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “About ALA-APA.”
  25. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
Continue Reading

Southern California Association of Law Libraries Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Southern California Association of Law Libraries (SCALL) Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://scallnet.org/newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SCALL Newsletter is the official association newsletter of the Southern California Association of Law Libraries, which aims to keep members up-to-date with goings on in the society.1

Target audience: Law librarians and other information professionals working in the legal industry in the Southern California area, especially those who are members of SCALL.2

Publisher: Southern California Association of Law Libraries, a division of the greater organization, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL).3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Professional LIS newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: SCALL Newsletter contains many reviews and discussions of programs and conferences, both those sponsored by SCALL and others of interest in the community. It also publishes articles about new technologies or issues in the legal profession.7

Frequency of publication: Five times per year. The issues are September/October, November/December, January/February, March/April, and May/June.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://scallnet.org/newsletter/

Types of contributions accepted: The publication is interested in a broad range of articles and submissions, as long as they are of interest to the law library community.9

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted to the newsletter editor via email. Deadlines for submission are published on the website and are also included in each issue along with current editor’s contact information.10

Editorial tone: Though not specifically stated, the tone seems to be informal. Many of the articles are divided into shorter sections, so the reader can quickly and easily decipher the most important points or see an outline of the ideas presented in a conference.11

Style guide used: There is no mention of a specific style guide requirement however, none of the articles in recently archived issues contained bibliographies or footnotes.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is useful for information professionals in the legal industry, especially those who are based in Southern California. It provides up-to-date information on events held by the SCALL as well as discussions of other local law conferences and programs. Also, this newsletter is very effective in keeping the members of SCALL informed as to what is taking place within the association, especially with regards to its officers and upcoming events.

This publication seems to be very receptive to author contributions. Most likely those who are members of the association would be especially welcomed to contribute. It seems that it would be a promising publication for an information professional who may not yet be comfortable writing academic research papers, but who is interested in discussing a presentation or conference he or she attended.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This newsletter is a benefit of SCALL membership and according to their call for advertisers, there are over 400 SCALL members.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of this publication are primarily in the Southern California area. Many of the events discussed in the newsletter are specific to this locale.14 However, there is a separate division, San Diego Area Law Libraries, or SANDALL, for the San Diego area members of AALL, so SCALL may be said to include only Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Because this is not an international publication, authors do not have to be concerned with language or cultural discrepancies. As the readers are concentrated in a limited area and work in a specific field, it is likely that they will have a similar understanding of library issues and the words used to describe them.15

Reader characteristics: Individual characteristics of SCALL members are not available, but members of SCALL work in academic, professional, private, state, and county law libraries.16 It can be assumed that the statistics for SCALL readers are close to those of the wider association, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL). According to the AALL 2018-2019 Media Kit, the most common workplaces for members are private or corporate law libraries (35%). A  smaller, but still significant portion, 13.9 percent, work in government or other types of law libraries. The highest percentage of members (36%) are still in law school. 17 Information professionals who are likely to read SCALL Newsletter are interested in the legal field, and judging by the scope of the articles, they seem to have an interest in technology as well.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It can be assumed that readers of the SCALL newsletter are very familiar with LIS related subjects. According to the information about AALL, which all SCALL members are a part of, 38% of readers work in positions that involve high-level decision making and direction of law library services.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of this audience is their common interest in the legal profession. Because this is not a scholarly publication and it is intended to spread news and share information, potential authors should keep in mind that their pieces can be more casual in nature but should still be informative and thought-provoking in their viewpoints. Writers should remember that readers of this publication are interested in law libraries and the specific technological issues and advancements that affect their work. While many readers have years of experience working with legal materials, electronic resources are being introduced frequently which change the way many SCALL members are doing their jobs. These changes in the field present opportunities for authors to explain new developments, discuss up-and-coming technologies, and educate the readers.

Last updated: June 24, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, Newsletter,” accessed June 24, 2019, https://scallnet.org/newsletter/
  2. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  3. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  4. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  5. ProQuest, “SCALL Newsletter,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 24, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406774838598/217965
  6. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  7. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 43 no. 3 (March/April 2016), http://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/SCALL_newsletter2016MarApr-1.pdf.
  8. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  9. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  10. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  11. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 46 no. 5 (May/June 2019), https://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/SCALL_newsletter2019MayJun.pdf.
  12. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  13. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  14. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 46 no. 2 (November/December 2018), https://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/SCALL_newsletter2018NovDec.pdf
  15. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  16. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “SCALL,” accessed June 24, 2019, https://scallnet.org.
  17. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Media Kit,” AALL Spectrum, accessed June 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/AALL-Media-Kit-_2018-2019_FINAL_070318.pdf
  18. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 41 no. 5 (July/August 2014), https://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  19. American Association of Law Libraries. “AALL Media Kit.”
Continue Reading

Library Leadership and Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Leadership and Management (formerly Library Administration and Management)

ISSN: 1945-8851 (Print) and 1945-886X (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) is the official journal of the Library Leadership and Management Association. LL&M focuses on assisting library administrators and managers at all levels as they deal with day-to-day challenges. In-depth articles address a wide variety of management issues and highlight examples of successful management methods used in libraries. Features include interviews with prominent practitioners in libraries and related fields, and columns with practical advice on managing libraries.”2

Website: http://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm

Target audience: The publication is directed toward library administrators and managers in all sectors, including public, special and academic libraries.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Hybrid journal: “LL&M offers both formal peer review and editorial review options depending on the author’s preference.”5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Research-based articles, interviews, new developments and success stories related to managing libraries. Specific topics relate to management, leadership, and administration.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Per guidelines, “Recognizing the LLAMA is a diverse organization, Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) welcomes articles that correspond to the interests of the membership. This includes manuscripts that relate to leadership, management, and administration, as well as manuscripts that mirror the topical interests of the sections and discussion groups.”10

“The journal accepts both longer, in-depth manuscripts of 4,000 to 6,000 words and briefer practice-based articles of 1,000 to 2,500 words. Manuscripts longer than 6,000 words should be discussed with the Editor(s) prior to submission as there may be interest in converting it into a series of articles.”11

Submission and review process: Article submission is through their online portal. Review process depends on author’s preference: editorial or peer review.12

Editorial tone: Informative.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style and Random House Webster’s College Dictionary are listed as resources for writers.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Authors able to write on the topics associated with library administration and management would be a good fit for this publication. Recent articles focused on job satisfaction and employee turnover, diversity, innovative space planning, award winners, and customer satisfaction.15 The editors will consider articles presented at conferences, making this publication a possibility for LIS graduate students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is an online publication with Open Access Policy providing unrestricted access to published content indicating a larger audience beyond the LLAMA membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although headquartered in Chicago as part of the American Library Association,17 LLAMA and its membership is national in scope. The articles are domestic in nature, and the LLAMA Board of Directors all are from U.S. institutions.18 The publication is printed in English.19 Despite the fact that many LLAMA members manage libraries in ethnically diverse communities, the articles in the journal focus on general management issues that all administrators face, such as strategic planning, fundraising, library boards, and internet ethics, not community-specific issues.20

Reader characteristics: The commonality of LLAMA members is that they are at a managerial level within a library organization. It can be assumed that the majority of LLAMA members have been in the library business for a number of years, however no demographics are available. Unless they are a one-person operation (which could be the case for a school librarian), they hold supervisory roles within their organizations. Their interests are based on financial, human resource, building, and legal and ethical issues as they affect the success of their particular organizations. They are concerned with strategic planning, disaster planning, and facility planning.21 In looking over the editorials from recent issues, the overall value that can be attached to this journal would be one of empowerment. The content seeks to provide library managers with the tools needed to develop successful organizations out of preparedness rather than reactionary responses to a crisis.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Despite the fact that these are library managers, they may or may not have MLIS degrees, as some library managers followed business, not library, career tracks.23 Recent articles did not contain overly technical topics or LIS jargon, veering more toward business concepts.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience is more specific than €™American Libraries€™, which is directed toward all library personnel. In contrast, LL&M is designed for library managers and administrators. This could be an opportunity or a challenge for a writer. Things such as negotiating with a vendor, ergonomic work stations, and staff development are matters of concern to nearly any organization manager. Topics such as working with a library board, dealing with book challenges, and internet filters are problems that are specific to library management. But both categories have a place in this publication and therefore open up a host of possibilities for articles. However, these readers, as organization managers, most likely have very limited time to pursue professional reading. Authors for the journal need to be on top of the issues at the forefront of the managers’€™ daily lives in order to offer something new to say that is of value.

Last updated: June 12, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Leadership and Management,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 12, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560362802779/67509
  2. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm
  3. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management.”
  4. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management.”
  5. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Information for Authors,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/information/authors
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Information for Authors.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions,” accessed June 12, 2019 https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  12. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  13. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  14. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  15. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/issue/archive
  16. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
  17. Library Leadership and Management Association, Library Leadership & Management.
  18. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA,” accessed June 12, 2019, http://www.ala.org/llama/about
  19. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  20. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
  21. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA.”
  22. American Library Association, “Archives.”
  23. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA.”
  24. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
Continue Reading

AALL Spectrum

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AALL Spectrum

ISSN: 1089-86891

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Spectrum is the professional magazine for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and is included in association membership. This publication “provides informative and engaging articles of interest to AALL members. The magazine informs readers about the ever-changing, multifaceted world of legal information professionals on areas including the transformation of law, career and leadership development, accessibility, education, information technology, and best practices. The magazine also keeps members apprised of Association events and activities.”2

Target audience: Members of AALL are the target audience: members are law librarians in a variety of settings, including academic law school libraries, private firms libraries, judicial and government libraries, and public law libraries for counties and states, as well as other legal information professionals.3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. This is an informal publication of AALL, primarily for association news and short practical pieces that would be of interest to practicing law librarians.6 Though it is not a scholarly journal, it is very well respected and has a high profile in its field.

Medium: Spectrum is a print publication sent free to all AALL members.7 The archives are available online back to mid-1998 at the Spectrum website.8

Content: Spectrum includes articles on subjects of interest to law librarians, especially practical pieces on marketing the library and management tips. The scholarly journal for AALL is titled Law Library Journal;  Spectrum publishes informational pieces more informally written but still of practical use to law librarians.9

Frequency of publication: Spectrum is published six times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/editorial-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Spectrum includes a mix of trend or feature stories, news briefs, regular columns, and opinion pieces about issues that affect legal information and law librarianship as well as Association events and activities.11

Submission and review process: The publishing guidelines indicate that “Spectrum prefers a thorough, detailed proposal letter that fully outlines the article topic.”12

Regarding article length, they note that “Feature articles should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words. News and department articles are typically between 800 and 1,200 words. Shorter or longer articles will be considered. “13

After submitting a query letter, the author should submit the requested article electronically, with any graphics in a separate file. “All submissions will be edited for clarity, grammar, and length.” “Whenever possible, the author will be contacted by either the AALL Spectrum editorial director or AALL publications manager to discuss questions of intention and interpretation.”14

Editorial tone: Reviewing the articles themselves, it appears that Spectrum attempts to include articles that will be of interest to firm, academic, and government librarians rather than focusing on just one type of library. The submission guidelines request “authoritative, well-researched articles about legal information and the profession.  Articles that inform, inspire, provoke, influence, or help improve practices are welcome additions to AALL Spectrum. Each submission should be an original, educational piece.”15

Style guide used: Spectrum follows The Chicago Manual of Style Seventeenth Edition and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition for style and usage, as well as an AALL Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AALL Spectrum is the best place to engage in the informal professional conversation surrounding law librarianship. Though it is not as high profile or scholarly as Law Library Journal, it may be more widely read, and will help any law librarian make a name for him or herself. The quality of writing is very high, as are the editorial standards. However, it is not appropriate for professors seeking tenure to boost publications, as it is not a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Spectrum is sent free to all AALL members. The archives for this publication are available online at the AALL website,17 and Ulrich’s Periodical Directory indicates that they are also searchable on various LIS databases (including EBSCOhost, H.W. Wilson products, and Thomson Gale databases).18 It is possible the articles will reach non-law librarian readers through these sources.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The main circulation of this magazine is within the United States, but AALL does have some international members. Unfortunately, international demographics were not available on the Spectrum site, advertising materials, AALL Salary Survey, or AALL member information.19 Spectrum is written in American English, and is primarily interested in legal librarianship relevant to the United States.20 If international subjects are covered, the legal systems will require more explanation. An example of international coverage is “Beyond the Spectrum,” by Shaikh Mohamed Noordin, available for download.21

Reader characteristics: AALL reports over 4,000 members, roughly half of whom work in an academic or law school setting. The most populated Special Interest Sections of AALL members are Academic Law Libraries and Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals.22  All librarians in AALL are either law librarians or are interested in the organization of legal information.  This publication is run by, written by, and edited by law librarians, and as such tends to reflect the dominant views of the profession. It’s analytical; fairly negative towards vendors, but strives to be fair; focuses primarily on academic and firm librarian concerns (such as training law students or new attorneys) and to a lesser extent of government librarianship.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed. However, specialized information from non-law library disciplines or terms specific to certain jobs (such as cataloging or database administration) require explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in publishing in Spectrum are advised to list their qualifications in their cover letters, as this audience respects degrees and library experience. Though the publication is focused entirely on law librarianship, general subjects of interest to LIS professionals will overlap in this field — for instance, information on Web 2.0 is of great interest to law librarians, and recent articles have dealt with how Second Life can be used in libraries. It is best, even with general topics, to make it evident how the subject could be useful to a law librarian.24

Last updated: March 24, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521387398626/111034
  2. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy,” accessed March 24, 2019, http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/spectrum/policy-spectrum.html
  3. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  6. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  7. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum.”
  8. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/spectrum_issue/
  9. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  10. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  11. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  12. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  13. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  14. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  15. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  16. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  17. American Association of Law Libraries,  “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive.”
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Association of Law Libraries, “Meet Our Members,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/meet-our-members/
  20. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  21. Noordin, Shaikh Mohamed, “Perspective: Beyond the Spectrum,” Spectrum 10, no. 6: 12-13, 17, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/_mediavault/2017/11/pub_sp0604_Persp.pdf
  22. American Association of Law Libraries, “By the Numbers,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/
  23. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  24. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
Continue Reading

Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
Continue Reading

Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
Continue Reading