Wiki Tags Archives: Special libraries

Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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Collection Building

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Building

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/cb

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection Building provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”1

Target audience: LIS academics and professionals2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system.10 To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Building is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal.15 As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development. The Book Review section of each issue offers an alternative to the research article for publication.

Collection Building is indexed in Academic Search Alumni Edition, Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier, Current Abstracts, Current Awareness Abstracts, Education Full Text, Emerald Management Reviews, Information Management & Technology Abstracts, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, INSPEC, Library & Information Science Abstracts, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts, Library Literature and Information Science, Library Literature and Information Science Full Text, OmniFile Full Text Mega, OmniFile Full Text Select, The Informed Librarian, Scopus, zetoc.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.17 This is a primarily North American publication, with the majority of the Editorial Team based in the United States.18

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development and management. Many of the readers are collection managers with purchasing responsibilities.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are library and information science academics, students, and professionals who study or work in access services, interlibrary loan, special collections, and collection services. They all have a knowledge of LIS subjects and jargon. This audience is looking for specialized information about collection development, and will expect technical language.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  2. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  3. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  4. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  5. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  6. “Features of an Emerald Subscription” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/subs/index.htm
  7. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  8. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  9. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  11.  “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017 http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  13. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  15. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  16. “Collection Building/Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  17.  Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  18. “Editorial Team,” http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=cb
  19. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  20. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
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Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/werm20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the publication website: “The Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries is a peer-reviewed professional journal devoted to the access, evaluation, and management of electronic resources in the medical library environment.”1

Target audience: Users of libraries in medical schools, hospitals, and other health sciences libraries2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor & Francis3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and medical sciences, scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: “The material in the Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries will complement articles published in Medical Reference Services Quarterly, which highlights the reference and bibliographic instruction aspects of electronic resources.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks articles with “practical, up-to-date information about important developments and issues related to the provision, selection, and use of electronic resources in health sciences libraries.”9

“Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Collection development and selection of electronic resources
  • Electronic document delivery in medicine and health care
  • Enhancing electronic resource user services
  • Print versus electronic or combination formats
  • Site licensing-what librarians need to know
  • Delegating work that involves electronic/digital acquisitions
  • Cataloging-e-books, e-journals, and other electronic formats
  • The merger of serial and book formats in the electronic library
  • Coping with electronic misinformation, fraudulence, and shams on the Internet
  • “E-core” lists in medicine, allied health, nursing, pharmaceutical science, mental health, and other health care fields
  • The role of medical libraries with Electronic Health Records
  • Cost analyses of digital resources”10

Submission and review process: Submissions are uploaded using the ScholarOne Manuscripts site located at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jerml.”11 Any other requests should be directed to Justin Robertson, editor-in-chief, at justincrobertson@gmail.com.12 Detailed submission instructions are included at the submission guidelines link provided above.

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As this is a journal “aimed at the practicing librarian,”15 and is described as a “source for practical, up-to-date information,”16 any librarian with knowledge of current issues and developments in electronic resources in the broader LIS field would be a welcome contributor to JERML.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JERML is published in English in the United States.17

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely well-educated and work in “academic medical school libraries, hospital libraries, and other health sciences libraries.”18 Readers expect well-researched, academic articles19 that provide practical knowledge that will inform the service they provide.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be well-versed in LIS subject matter, specializing in the medical LIS field, with a special interest in electronic resources.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As the readership for this journal is specialized, potential contributors should tailor their articles to an academic, knowledgeable audience. Readers will be looking for rigorously researched papers that provide new information on access, evaluation and management of electronic sources.21 This is a go-to journal for medical librarians to obtain up-to-date information about electronic resource management for their libraries. The potential LIS authors to reach a extensive and engaged audience it great.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  2.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  3. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  4.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  5.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  6.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  7.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  8.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  10.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  17.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  18. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20#.VRahFeEYFZI
  19.  ProQuest. (2015). Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  20.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  21.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
Continue Reading

Computers in Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, the publication’s mission “is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs.”1

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.2

Publisher: Information Today Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”7

Frequency of publication: 10 times a year: monthly with combined Jul/Aug and Jan/Feb issues.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”9

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.10

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.11

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via online Query Form.12  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’€™ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’€™ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”13

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”14

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author: Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professional’€™s only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’€™s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”16 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 5,000 plus subscribers with another 3-4 readers acquired when each issue is passed along. Over 2,000 copies are distributed throughout the year at major library shows, including SLA and ALA, as well as Information Today, Inc.’€™s library shows: ”Computers in Libraries, Internet Librarian, and Internet Librarian International. The parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to WorldCat there are 2,153 libraries around the world that have Computers in Libraries on their shelves. These readers are spread all over the world: USA, Canada, Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, South Africa, and United Kingdom. Computers in Libraries focus on worldwide community of librarians who are interested in emerging technologies and their implementation.18 Computers in Libraries is published in English. Since its content is devoted to discussion of impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems, there is no cultural labels attached and author’€™s language wouldn’€™t be affected.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only “€œtechies”€ but also library managers, system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries does not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. From the mission statement of CIL: “CIL‘s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs. CIL does this through articles that are written by library professionals for library professionals, with a friendly, personal voice. These general technical articles are practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment: corporate, special, academic, public, and K-12. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries does not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead it devotes its pages to entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “€œdo not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is month by month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, the technical writing should be geared toward general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  4. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  5. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  7. Information Today Inc. (2016). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  9. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. OCLC WorldCat. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/title/computers-in-libraries/oclc/18848244&referer=brief_results
  19. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
Continue Reading

Bottom Line, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Bottom Line

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0888-045X

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly a journal on library finances subject to editor review only, The Bottom Line has “broadened its scope to become a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal . . . mainly focusing on the trading of information, information economics, and the business of information.”1

Target audience: The journal is “not only for library and information researchers, but also for micro-economists and education researchers, marketers and knowledge professionals in information organisations, the media, health care, and government.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS Scholarly5

Medium: Online; author has the option to receive print copies6

ContentThe Bottom Line publishes research and case studies on the financial and economic aspects of information and information practice, mainly focusing on the trading of information, information economics, and the business of information. Information is widely defined including, but not limited to: records, documents, files, learning objects, visual and sound files, data and metadata, and user-generated content.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl

Types of contributions accepted: The journal focuses less on the management of information than on the trading of it. The website lists the following areas of special interest:

  • The socio-legal, cultural, and technological aspects of the environment in which information is traded
  • The articulation and development of new information theories and models
  • The relationships between society and business, technology, knowledge categorisation and metadata; and individual, group and collective memory
  • The grey or black market and those who would exploit it, such as foreign government intelligence agencies, unscrupulous businesses, and cybercriminals.9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made online using the submission and peer review system ScholarOne Manuscripts. Emerald Group Publishing has a support center offering guidance on using the system.10.

Editorial tone: Scholarly11

Style guide used: Harvard citation style12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This interdisciplinary journal has a target audience of LIS professionals as well as marketers in information organizations, the media, government employees, and health care professionals. LIS authors whose professional and research interests include the social or legal issues that arise when members of these disparate fields share information will find a venue for their work in The Bottom Line.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Emerald Group Publishing is located in West Yorkshire, England. Its journals are written in British English for a worldwide audience.14

Reader characteristics: Reader demographics are not available. The content is targeted at LIS professionals, micro-economists and education researchers, marketers and knowledge professionals in information organisations, the media, health care, and government.15 Authors should assume a high level of education, but not necessarily in the LIS field.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the interdisciplinary nature of this journal, authors should assume a high level of education, but not necessarily in the LIS field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writers for The Bottom Line will impact a broad audience that extends beyond the LIS community to “micro-economists and education researchers, marketers and knowledge professionals in information organisations, the media, health care and government.”16 LIS authors whose work concerns information economics and how information is traded and monetized will reach a targeted audience through publication in this journal. For such authors, The Bottom Line offers an opportunity to add to the body of knowledge in the new cross-disciplinary field of information economics.

Last updated: November 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  2. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  3. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  4. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  5. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  6.  “Emerald Publishing Services,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/services/publishing/index.htm
  7.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  8. “The Bottom Line: Volume List” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/bl
  9.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  10.  “The Bottom Line: Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl
  11.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl

    The publisher of this journal offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, for non-native English-speaking authors.[12. “The Bottom Line: Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl

  12. “The Bottom Line: Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl
  13.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  14. “About Emerald,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/index.htm
  15.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  16.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
Continue Reading

base line

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: base line

Website: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: base line is the official publication of the Map and Geospatial Information Round Table (MAGIRT). MAGIRT “leads and inspires information professionals at all levels of expertise in their work with map and geospatial information resources, collections and technologies in all formats, through community, education and advocacy.”1 “The purpose of base line is to provide current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”2

Target audience: As per MAGIRT’s site: “People interested or involved in any aspect of map or geospatial librarianship.”3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Each issue “provide(s) current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: On the first page of each issue: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Types of contributions accepted: base line calls itself “a medium of communication for members of MAGIRT and information of interest is welcome.”10 Articles related to cartography, geography, “related governmental activities, and map librarianship ” would be welcome.11

Submission and review process: Depending on article content, contributions can be sent to one of four editors: Editor, John Olson, jaolson@syr.edu; Cataloging Editor, Tammy Wong, twon@loc.gov; Electronic Mapping Editor, Carol McAuliffe, carolmc@uflib.ufl.edu; or New Maps and Books Editor, David Bertuca, dbertuca@buffalo.edu12

Editorial tone: Articles tend towards an informal, but professional voice.13

Style guide used: Not specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although there is an informality in tone to this publication, there is still room for a more professional article related to geospatial information. This publication offers a good opportunity for a writer with experience in this field of librarianship to be published.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As a benefit of membership in MAGIRT, base line reaches 319 people.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in the U.S. and is written in American English.15 As members hail from across North America, authors should avoid using local terminologies or dialects, and should be tailored to a national audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers are members of MAGIRT. As such, one can assume that the majority of readers are “involved in the geospatial librarianship world.”16

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized LIS knowledge can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of base line are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to MAGIRT committee work and topics related to geospatial librarianship. Members of MAGIRT seem eager to “connect with like-minded people, to learn, or to impart…knowledge.”17 Although the pool of readers is relatively small, the LIS author who is interested in geospatial information will find a supportive and interested readership in base line.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2016). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  2. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  3. American Library Association. (2016). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  4. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  5. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  6. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  7. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  8. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  9. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  10.  American Library Association. (2015). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  11. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  12. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  13. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  14. American Library Association. (2016). MAGIRT Map & Geospatial Resources: About MAGIRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://magirt.ala.libguides.com/resources
  15.  ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  16. American Library Association. (2016). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
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Federal Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Federal Librarian

Website: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Federal Librarian is the official newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Libraries Round Table (FAFLRT).1 Federal and Armed Forces Libraries represent a wide variety of library types: research, law, school, and public. Librarians working for the Federal government have opportunities that span the library field, from direct services to the public, to in-depth research support for America’€™s military and civilian services.

The Round Table has developed a successful series of programs to inform new and incoming library professionals about careers in federal libraries, and to assist established federal librarians grow their careers. FAFLRT also sponsors awards and recognition for outstanding federal librarians.2

From their site: FAFLRT’s mission is “to promote library and information service and the library and information profession in the federal and armed forces communities; to promote appropriate utilization of federal and armed forces library and information resources and facilities; and to provide an environment for the stimulation of research and development relating to the planning, development, and operation of federal and armed forces libraries.”3

Target audience: Members of the Federal and Armed Forces Round Table. “FAFLRT membership is open to all individual ALA Members interested in issues affecting Federal or Armed Forces libraries.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional and trade publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Federal Librarian “presents recent developments and events of interest to Federal and Armed Forces library community, including news and reports on international, federal, DoD, state and local government issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing

Types of contributions accepted: Federal Librarian includes a mix of current events, trends or issues affecting member libraries, tributes, feature articles, award recipients and a message from the FAFLRT president.11

Submission and review process: Send contributions to:

Anne Harrison, interim editor
6200 Wilson Blvd. Apt. 1107
Falls Church, VA 22044
telephone:  202-707-4834
E-mail: harrisonanne57@yahoo.com

The review process is not outlined.12

Editorial tone: Reviewing the latest issue (Vol. 31 #4, 2014) provides a selection of items ranging from an accounting of closures at base libraries, to a lively description of the first “Library Con” held at the JBER Library, to a tribute to a retiring librarian. Articles are written in an informal tone.13

Style guide used: None specified.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Federal Librarian offers the LIS author interested in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries a forum for informal professional discussions of issues and events that are important to this community. As one of the current strategic goals of the FAFLRT is to “establish new and continue existing liaison relationships with relevant ALA committees and round tables”15, one can assume that this journal would also be open to writers from various areas of librarianship to build connections with the FAFLRT through its newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Federal Librarian subscription base is approximately 600.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership of the Federal Librarian covers a wide range of LIS professionals in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries, from all over the U.S. These libraries run the gamut from public, school, military academic or special.17 Bearing in mind the wide variety of issues that are of interest to the reader, but also the overriding cultural umbrella of membership in the FAFLRT, potential authors should tailor their submissions to this group. Articles are written in American English.18

Reader characteristics: Demographics are not given for the readers of Federal Librarian. However, because subscription is included in membership to FAFLRT, readers are among 600 federal and military LIS professionals.19 Readers have a vested interest in matters concerning library and information services in the federal and armed forces communities.20

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Federal Librarian work and live in Federal and Armed Forces communities.21 Authors who also belong to this community would have an interested and supportive audience for their writing. Because the issues examined in the Federal Librarian encourage professional development of their LIS peers, the potential impact on the published author’s career is great. This is a special community who, with their shared interests, would be a knowledgeable and interested audience for the potential author.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  2.  American Library Association. (2016). Initiatives and Projects. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/initiatives
  3.  American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  4.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  6.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  7.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  8.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  9. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  10.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  11.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  12.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  13.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/newsletters/2014_vol.31_4_Federal_Librarian.pdf
  14.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  15. American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  16.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  17. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  18.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  19.  Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  20.  Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  21.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
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Technical Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Technical Services Quarterly

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wtsq20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, Technical Services Quarterly is “dedicated to providing a forum for the presentation of current developments and future trends concerning the technical operations of libraries and information centers.”1 Its purpose is to keep on top of developments and research and “practical implementation of systems and applications of traditional and non-traditional technical services and the public operations they influence and sustain.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals, particularly those who are in technical operations of libraries and information centers. Given the technical and industry-specific nature and language of the articles, it is doubtful that readers outside of LIS would be interested. The journal features articles about “technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies,cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management”3 are written by highly regarded professionals who are on the cutting edge of these subjects.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc. 325 Chestnut Street, Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5 This publication requires submitted manuscripts to undergo editorial screening and anonymous peer review.6

Type: LIS Scholarly7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: From the Aims & Scope page: “The journal accepts original research, theoretical, and implementation articles pertaining to technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies, cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management.”9 Every issue has four regular columns: Technical Services Report, Tech Services on the Web, Reviews and Trending Tech Services.10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.UY6vSD3nYms

Types of contributions accepted: Original, unpublished manuscripts are accepted for consideration. According to the website, Technical Services Quarterly features articles on “technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies, cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management.”12

Submission and review process: Refer to submission guidelines listed under Aims and Scope for specific requirements. The preferred method of submission is electronically via email to the Editor-in-Chief, with a message specifying that it is being submitted for consideration for Technical Services Quarterly. Manuscripts must be in Microsoft Word format and include an abstract of less than 100 words and a list of keywords.13

Editorial tone: This is a scholarly journal dealing with technical aspects of LIS geared towards the professional technical operations of a library. As such, articles are technical and scholarly in tone written in American English. LIS specific terms are used with the underlying assumption that the reader is familiar with such.14 Past articles featured titles such as “Developing Tools to Calculate Space Availability, Establish Collection Distribution, and Determine Growth Rates: A Case Study” and “Using Microsoft Access 2007’s ‘Lending Library’ Template to Create a Circulation Module for Microform Materials”.15 While the language and tone are technical and scholarly, it must also be interesting and readable.16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association – 6th edition.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Technical Services Quarterly is geared towards LIS professionals, especially those whose interests lie within the technical operations of libraries. For authors and researchers whose manuscripts are geared towards current and future trends in collection methods, technical services, OCLC, metadata, document delivery among other subjects, this journal is ideal for submission. The submission guidelines are detailed but not overwhelmingly so. Previous articles have addressed concerns specific to law librarians and map librarians as well as cataloging for children’s books so there is a wide variety of librarian roles represented.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific information given.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a print and online journal published in the United States. Although it does have appeal for international librarians due to its technical nature, Technical Services Quarterly is geared towards American libraries and uses American English.18 All the listed editors and board members are American.19

Reader characteristics: This journal is geared toward LIS professionals in the technical field who are interested in the latest trends.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are most likely to be LIS professionals and given the technical nature of this journal, will be highly knowledgeable of LIS terminology and practice.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Technical Services Quarterly are LIS professionals who are highly interested in the latest technical information available. Writers for this publication should gear their articles towards this type of reader. According to the website, cutting edge technology is what their readers look for from the journal. Writers who follow trends and understand technical concepts would be the best bet for this journal.

Last updated: October 28, 2014


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  2. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  3. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  6. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  9. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  10. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  11. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  12. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  13. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  14. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  15. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wtsq20#.U6xED7GdROg
  16. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  17. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  19. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6xGZrGdROg
  20. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  21. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
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