Wiki Tags Archives: Science

Boing Boing

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Boing Boing

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://boingboing.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “A Website devoted to technology and culture. We publish feature articles, links to things we find interesting online, podcasts, videos and comics created by the Boing Boing editorial team and other invited contributors. We also provide a discussion forum so you can participate in the conversation; and sell merchandise in the Boing Boing Shop.”1 Boing Boing allows users to submit interesting, cool, newsworthy links to articles, videos, and any minutia you find interesting.

Target audience: If you’re interested in anything outside the mainstream, this would be the place to look. The website is hailed as a bastion of free speech and imagine sharing; it was founded by an editor of Make Magazine, which is dedicated to all things DIY, and the four primary editors have all written for Wired Magazine.2

Publisher: Happy Mutants, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication / online forum.5

Medium: Online

Content: A blog that shares member-reader links of all sorts -informational, fun, noteworthy.

Frequency of publication: Blog updated with at least several new posts per day.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://boingboing.net/sub/

Types of contributions accepted: Any kinds. (Of note to LIS writers: a team from the American Library Association ran a Boing Boing member interest group called Library Boing Boing from 2012 to 2014. See Library Boing Boing, and their first Boing Boing post; the full collection is tagged LIBRARYLAB. To learn more, see the LibraryLab community on the ALA Connect website.)

Submission and review process:

“Find something interesting, write an informative blurb about it, and send it along.”6 Submit links via the form, never by email, and provide an explanation of what the link is and why it would interest readers. Be clear and concise in your description; don’t obscure it with humor or irrelevant information, and don’t submit content without a link.7

Editorial tone: As informal, but informative, as possible. Headlines and pictures are purposely titillating or attention grabbing. Example: under the “Science” category is the headline: “Anne of Green Gables Had Herpes (and you probably do, too),”an article about herpes. Or “The Librarian and the Hot Rod Shop,” a post about a mobile initiative that provides library resources to people who are unaware of the library, or can’t make it to the local branch.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have any little library related tidbit to share, this is a great website on which to post it. These are non-reviewed blog posts, so it’s not a site that will help towards your tenured work or that you should cite in a scholarly article, but it’s a great source for getting and sending information to a curious, intelligent, and supportive audience. It would be a great first start for book reviews, for example, or just to write about or re-post some interesting library-related news.

Creative Commons License: non-commercial sharing, with attribution. Just make sure you say where your link/review/article originated.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: In an article in Fast Company, according to Quantcast data, it gets about 2.5 million unique visitors a month. The article also states that, in 2004-2005, it “had become one of the most-read and linked-to blogs in the world.”9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Quantcast data, Boing Boing reaches an international audience, though 63% of its readers are in the United States.10 English is the primary language, but as the site also links to websites, videos, etc., as long as you explain the reason for submitting your article/website/repost, the language of the thing itself isn’t too strict. Culture is progressive and friendly, hacker-ish and non-mainstream.

Reader characteristics: Quantcast data reports that the majority of readers are white, male, and highly educated.11 Hackers, DIY-ers, those who like to stay current on news/gadgets/things, and anyone with an eye on web culture and interesting news of all kinds will gravitate towards the blog. The blog’s bias lies on the side of being, for the most part, uncensored and relishing in re-posting links that test freedom of speech and censorship in the online community. They are very much an “anything goes” site, as long as “anything” is interesting to readers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: More civilian than professional; LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum, use layman’s terms and just get your point across in the least scholarly tone possible. The readership comprises a savvy group of people, but they are not all LIS aficionados, so use regular, everyday terms when describing your link and why you find it interesting.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Boing Boing would be a great place to post information relevant to the library community: its readers, while very much an online-loving group, seem to enjoy hearing about LIS-related news, particularly if it has to do with free speech, public access, or challenges to the LIS community. They are well-read, spoken, and intelligent, and, with the inclusion of the LIS-specific posting group, would appreciate links coming from the Library world. Although not scholarly in tone, the links posted can be of scholarly caliber, and the blog has garnered attention and awards, and holds a certain status in the blogosphere; posts here are likely to be reposted elsewhere and shared.

Last updated: October 10, 2018


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “Boing Boing Terms of Service,” BoingBoing.net, accessed September 10, 2016, http://boingboing.net/tos
  2. “Boing Boing,” Wikipedia, accessed October 24, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boing_Boing
  3. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  4. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  5. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  6. “How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing,” Peter Shankman blog, August 15, 2007, http://shankman.com/how-to-get-   

    something-posted-to-boing-boing/

  7. How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing
  8. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  9. “10 Tips from Boing Boing on Making Online Content Sing,” FastCompany.com, accessed September 10, 2016, http://www.fastcompany.com/3005636/10-tips-boing-boing-making-online-content-sing
  10. “boingboing.net,” Quantcast.com, accessed September 10, 2016, https://www.quantcast.com/boingboing.net
  11. boingboing.net
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Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

ISSN: 0748-5786 (Print) and 2328-2967 (Online)1

Website: http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445

Purpose, objective, or mission: “JELIS supports scholarly inquiry in library and information science (LIS) education by serving as the primary venue for the publication of research articles, reviews, and brief communications about issues of interest to LIS educators.”2

Target audience: LIS faculty and educators, and more specifically, ALISE members3

Publisher: Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS and education scholarly6 JELIS is a peer-reviewed journal that features scholarly papers, original research, reports, and studies. Although the journal does also publish brief communications, reader comments, and guest editorials, its primary purpose is the presentation of scholarly research.7

Medium: Online8

Content: JELIS publishes peer-reviewed research articles that contribute to scholarship in the field of education in library and information science and brief communications on topics important to the field. The later is not subject to peer review, but editorial approval only.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458

Types of contributions accepted: JELIS accepts submission of major articles of up to 7,000 words and more reflective, brief communications of up to 1,500 words.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted via the online submission widget. The publication acknowledges the receipt of all submissions. Major articles go through a double-blind review process.12

Editorial tone: Formal and academic.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Additional information on style and formatting guidelines is included in the guidelines.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal in the field of LIS education, JELIS would be a suitable publication venue for those involved in academic librarianship or graduate-level teaching. Although its readership may be relatively small, publication in JELIS would definitely help in the process of building tenure and establishing professional credibility. Ulrichsweb notes that “(JELIS) Authors are most often professors in schools of library and information science.”15 However, information professionals, LIS faculty, and even LIS students with relevant experience and strong academic writing skills should consider submitting work to JELIS.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Actual numbers are not available, but JELIS is made available to all ALISE members, both individual and institutional, as a benefit of membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although detailed geographic information is not available, the ALISE mission specifically mentions serving faculty in North America.17 JELIS is published solely in English, 18 and its North American base would suggest that most readers are comfortable communicating in English. Due to the prominent Canadian reader contingent, authors would definitely want to avoid colloquialisms and cultural references that are specific to the United States.19

Reader characteristics: Though demographic information on readership is not available, ALISE does note that its members are generally faculty in library and information science graduate programs.20 It is difficult to make blanket characterizations in terms of age, gender, and ethnicity, as readers range from LIS students to deans. No detailed breakdown of reader workplaces is provided by JELIS or ALISE. The ALISE membership brochure notes that its members include “All levels of faculty, administration, students, librarians, researchers, educational institutions, and others interested in library and information science education.”21 Readers likely share a high level of education and a professional interest in LIS education and graduate-level teaching.

JELIS readers, particularly LIS faculty members, are likely to have established opinions based on their area of expertise.22 They are also likely to share the core values of librarianship and view the profession as highly important and relevant in both the academic and professional spheres. Yet JELIS does also feature divergent viewpoints and constructive criticism in its reader comments and guest editorials.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JELIS readers are extremely knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and well-versed in library jargon, particularly that which relates to education.24 Authors will want to focus their submissions on the most relevant topics for LIS educators, as this publication is quite specialized and readers might not be interested in more general or overarching library concepts.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a scholarly publication that features specialized content geared towards a relatively small audience of LIS educators and students. Successful submissions will exhibit a professional and academic tone, and should specifically address emerging issues and trends in LIS education in the United States and Canada, or internationally. Appropriate topics might include technological advances in distance learning, course management systems such as Blackboard or WebCT, the use of Web 2.0 applications (i.e., blogs, wikis, podcasts) in teaching, or a comparative analysis of international LIS education. Additionally, authors might consider including original research to more effectively connect with JELIS readers.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/738510419
  2. Journal for Library and Information Science Education, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  3. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  4. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  5.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  6.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  7.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  8.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  9.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  10.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  11. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  12.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  13.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  14.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  15.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  16. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  17. “ALISE Strategic Plan 2017-2020,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/alise-strategic-plan-2017-2020
  18.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  19. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  20. Association for Library and Information Science Education. (2013). About ALISE. Retrieved from http://www.alise.org/about-alise
  21. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  22. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  23. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  24. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  25. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
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Slashdot

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Slashdot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://slashdot.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Slashdot is an online forum that provides “News for Nerds. Stuff that Matters.” This “stuff” includes stories on various aspects of technology, from discussing user’s rights online, to sharing ideas and news on various IT subjects. Content is submitted by readers, who can also assist editors in the selection of material by utilizing the site’s collaborative moderation system called “Firehose,” which contains RSS Feeds, story submissions, and journals which have color-coding to indicate popularity. Using the color spectrum scale, “Red is hot, violet is not,” users can tag and vote on entries, in addition to providing feedback.

Target audience: “Knowledgeable and tech savvy users.”1

Publisher: BIZX, LLC.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication. This is an online forum that publishes reader’s articles on various aspects of technology, in addition to providing an interactive networking environment. Although it is likely to appeal to techie librarians, the primary target audience is not librarians; thus, it would be considered a lay publication rather than an LIS publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Story sections are self-explanatory, with some exceptions: “Apache” (news about the Apache web server); “Apple” (news on all things Mac); “Ask Slashdot” (ask the readership any questions about software problems, hardware, jobs, etc.); “BSD” (news about “modern UNIXes derived from Berkeley’s distribution [like Free, Open and NetBSD]”); “Developers” (news that affects any aspect of programming, such as language, licensing, or techniques); “Features,” “Games,” “Geeks in Space” (not currently open for submissions, this was an audio broadcast provided by the editors); “Interviews”; “IT;” “Linux;” “Politics;” “Polls” (submit “thought-provoking 4-6 question polls to share); “Science;” and “Your Rights Online” (news and information on spam, privacy, and other issues affecting our rights online). Archived articles, book reviews, and job listings complete the content.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “The closer a submission is to featuring all the “perfect” characteristics, the better the chances are that it will run. While we will sometimes tweak submitters’ grammar, spelling and punctuation, attempt to fix broken links, and even edit with brackets and ellipses (in the interest of brevity, clarity and good taste), the nicer a submission starts out, the less tempted we are to hit “delete.” Not every Slashdot post is perfect — but the better they are, the better it is for everyone.”3 “A perfect Slashdot submission is: interesting, informative, clear, snappy, presented neutrally, submitted with appropriate topics, usually based on text and still images, labelled with an understandable, concise headline, well-linked, and grammatically correct.”4

Submission and review process: Use the Submit link located at the top right of website’s home page. Creation of an account is required first. This is a moderated site allowing administrators and editors to approve or remove posts.5

Editorial tone: Informal.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors with a technical bent will find the latest news, stories, and feeds on technology informative. This forum is an informal way to get stories submitted without a formal publishing process and allows for feedback from the target audience. Authors can pitch ideas and ask questions6, perhaps opening the discussion for more library and information science issues.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 3.2 million monthly unique visitors.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this publication is only available online, there is no central geographic location. It is likely that users are international. The publication is written in English and no information is provided on the possible cultural considerations of the audience. This matter could be important, as different countries may have varying technical standards that would need to be further investigated and considered, perhaps by reading further into archives and different sections to find out if any stories on international issues are submitted.

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers work in IT.8  The general audience of Slashdot may not seem the ideal audience for an LIS writing, as they have concerns that would not necessarily reflect the ethics, interests, or issues of LIS. However, with the future of LIS moving quickly with new technology, this audience could be a great source of objective information. The technical aspects of the profession could be introduced into this forum with a group who might have new ideas or strategies unknown to an LIS author.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This forum does not actively promote LIS subject matter, unless there is a newsworthy story to share. However, with the influx of technology influences on LIS, this would be an interesting forum to share LIS information and get feedback that might be more objective on emerging technology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writing and participating for this website would certainly not be a project for the light-hearted “LIS techie.” LIS authors with an avid interest in technology might be able to find middle ground with this publication on issues such as privacy concerns. The ability to collaborate with an audience with general technical backgrounds might open a dialog on the various ways that technology affects libraries.

Last updated: September 18, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “2016 Media Kit,” SlashdotMedia.com, accessed November 14, 2016, https://slashdotmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Slashdot-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  2. “Frequently Asked Questions,” Slashdot.org, accessed November 14, 2016, http://slashdot.org/faq/index.shtml
  3. “Submissions,” Slashdot.org, accessed November 14, 2016, http://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml?source=autorefresh
  4. Submissions.”
  5. Submissions.”
  6. Frequently Asked Questions.”
  7. 2016 Media Kit.”
  8. 2016 Media Kit.”
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