Wiki Tags Archives: School libraries

Rowman & Littlefield

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: http://rowman.com/RLPublishers

Purpose, objective, or mission: Rowman & Littlefield “publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.”1 Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others.2

Target audience: Rowman & Littlefield offers “serious works of scholarship; core textbooks for introductory courses; supplemental, affordable paperbacks for alternative approaches to teaching; and general interest and trade books for the curious reader.”3 LIS books are targeted toward practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars.

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group4 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN).5 The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, Globe Pequot, Falcon Guides, TwoDot, Taylor Trade, and Down East Books.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal.6

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.7

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.8 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.9

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.10 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.11

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).12 The number of LIS titles published per year is unknown.

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes13

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for publication should be submitted to the appropriate acquisitions editor,14 and include a prospectus, outline (annotated table of contents), author’s CV or resume, one to two brief writing samples, and a list of potential peer reviewers.15 Full book manuscripts are not accepted unless requested by the acquisitions editor. See the publisher’s website for detailed submission guidelines.

Submission and review process: The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.16

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. Formal book proposals require a detailed description, author qualifications, previously published works, writing samples, competitive analysis, and potential markets for a book.17 The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences and conventions.18 Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A 2015 catalog listed approximately 150 LIS books geared toward students, professionals, and academics.19 Print runs for titles are not publicly available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material.20 However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: September 3, 2015


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  2. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Subjects. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  4. Publishers Global. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  5. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  6. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  7. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  8. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  9. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  10. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  11. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  12. Net Galley. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/pub_id/29645
  13. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  14. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Editors. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  15. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  16. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  17. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  18. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Conventions schedule. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/ConventionsSchedule
  19. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  20. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  21. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  22. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
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Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
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Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (JRLYA)

Website: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official research journal of the Young Adult Library Services Association, JRLYA‘€™s purpose is to “€œenhance the development of theory, research, and practices to support young adult library services.”1€ As part of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA,€“ a subspecialty of the ALA), their mandate is part of YALSA’€™s National Research Agenda. Specifically to reach the mission’€™s goals, YALSA “Evaluates and promotes materials of interest to adolescents through special services, programs and publications, except for those materials designed specifically for curriculum use.”€2€

Target audience: “€œThe primary audience for Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults includes academics, public librarians, school library media specialists, and secondary school educators who advocate for young adults and strive to support their developmental and educational needs.”€3€

Publisher: Young Adult Library Services Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: From the YALSA website: JRLYA “€œpromotes and publishes high quality original research concerning the informational and developmental needs of young adults; the management, implementation, and evaluation of library services for young adults; and other critical issues relevant to librarians who work with young adults.”8

Articles in the journal also include literary and cultural analysis of writing for young adults.€9€

Frequency of publication: Irregularly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Original, research-based manuscripts. From the Author Guidelines: “€œManuscripts may be based on original qualitative or quantitative research, an innovative conceptual framework, or a substantial literature review that opens new areas of inquiry and investigation.”€11€€ You may also submit manuscripts from other disciplines focused on “enriching theory, research and practice in young adult library services.”12€€

As of 2013, new editor Denise Agosto notes that: “We are still actively searching for good research manuscripts and welcome them from students and librarians as well as more seasoned researchers.”13

Submission and review process: Send the submission as an email attachment (.doc, .txt. or .rft) to editor Denise E. Agosto: yalsaresearch@gmail.com. Submissions should average between 4000-7000 words double spaced.14€€

The editor will acknowledge all submissions, and the review process generally takes 10-12 weeks. The review process includes an initial assessment by the editor: if the submission reflects the journal’€™s mission statement and is considered for inclusion, it’€™s sent to at least two reviewers for a double-blind review process, where the next step is determined. Manuscripts will either be accepted for publication; accepted pending revisions; sent back for major revisions and resubmission; rejected, or deemed not appropriate for the journal, with other journals suggested.15€€

Editorial tone: While the articles are stringently peer reviewed and of professional quality, they are extremely readable in tone; friendly, engaging, concise, while delivering excellent information to the reader.16€€

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th Edition), for overall formatting. Random House Webster’€™s College Dictionary for spelling & usage. See the Author Guidelines for specifics.17€€

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors with even a modicum of interest in working with young adults should take a look at this journal and consider submitting an article for publication. It is extremely helpful that, even if your paper is rejected by JRLYA, the editors will attempt to give you alternate publications to submit to.

Writing topics cover every aspect of YA/librarianship you can think of. A 2013 article discussed bi-racial identity in young adult books, with the author delving into her own ethnic and racial identity as a basis for setting the tone.18 Another was about the popular X-Men characters, focusing specifically on  X-Women’€™s sexual objectivity.19 You’€™ll find this type of article alongside a more research oriented study on South Korean adolescent immigrants,20 or issues in juvenile detention center libraries.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is purely online,22 and intended to reach anyone interested in YA library services and studies.23€ Written in American English,24 with references to all sorts of young adult literature and pop culture subjects.25€

Reader characteristics: JRLYA is intended for LIS researchers, faculty, students, and professional librarians interested in young adult library services.26€

Per the Author Guidelines, the journal asks authors to consider the following style points when submitting for publication:

  • Choose terms that reflect YALSA’€™s philosophy.
  • Avoid sexist language.
  • Articles should be of a scholarly, research-based nature.27€€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most likely very strong, but the journal doesn’€™t just cater to professionals librarians, per their website: “The scope of the journal includes all aspects of library services to young adults at every level and for all types of libraries.”28€€ So if including LIS jargon in your submission, make sure it’s explained or easily inferred within the context.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Esteemed authors such as Anthony Bernier, Carol C. Kuhlthau and Virginia Walter have written for and commended the efforts of JRYLA.29€€ Readers can connect through YALSA on Facebook, Twitter, various blogs and via a special wiki YALSA maintains to facilitate research and discussion on all things young adult. This is a wonderful publication, to read or write for; it is helpful and respectful of authors and takes its content very seriously, while never being dull or stuffy. A highly valued source of YA information.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). About JRLYA. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  2. American Library Association. (2014). YALSA national research ageda. Young Adult Library Services Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/yalsa/guidelines/research/researchagenda
  3. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). About JRLYA. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  8. American Library Association. (2014). Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Young Adult Library Services Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/yalsa/products&publications/yalsapubs/jrlya/journal
  9. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). About JRLYA. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  11. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  12. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  13. D. Agosto, personal communication, 8 May 2013
  14. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  15. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  16. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  17. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  18. Gomez, S.H. (2013). This, that, both, neither: The badging of biracial identity in young adult realism. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2013/04/this-that-both-neither-the-badging-of-biracial-identity-in-young-adult-realism/
  19. Stauffer, S.M. (2013). Taking a dip in the crazy pool: The evolution of X-Women from heroic subject to sexual object. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2013/04/taking-a-dip-in-the-crazy-pool-the-evolution-of-x-women-from-heroic-subject-to-sexual-object/
  20. Koo, J.H. (2012). Recent South Korean immigrant adolescents’ every day life information seeking when isolated from peers: A pilot study. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2012/09/recent-south-korean-immigrant-adolescents-everyday-life-information-seeking-when-isolated-from-peers-a-pilot-study/
  21. Austin, J. (2012). Critical issues in juvenile detention center libraries. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2012/07/critical-issues-in-juvenile-detention-center-libraries/
  22. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  23. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). About JRLYA. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  24. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  25. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). About JRLYA. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  26. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). About JRLYA. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  27. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  28. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). About JRLYA. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  29. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults. (2014). All Volumes. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/all-volumes/
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Computers in Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, the publication’s mission “is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs.”1

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.2

Publisher: Information Today Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”7

Frequency of publication: 10 times a year: monthly with combined Jul/Aug and Jan/Feb issues.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”9

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.10

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.11

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via online Query Form.12  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’€™ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’€™ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”13

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”14

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author: Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professional’€™s only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’€™s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”16 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 5,000 plus subscribers with another 3-4 readers acquired when each issue is passed along. Over 2,000 copies are distributed throughout the year at major library shows, including SLA and ALA, as well as Information Today, Inc.’€™s library shows: ”Computers in Libraries, Internet Librarian, and Internet Librarian International. The parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to WorldCat there are 2,153 libraries around the world that have Computers in Libraries on their shelves. These readers are spread all over the world: USA, Canada, Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, South Africa, and United Kingdom. Computers in Libraries focus on worldwide community of librarians who are interested in emerging technologies and their implementation.18 Computers in Libraries is published in English. Since its content is devoted to discussion of impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems, there is no cultural labels attached and author’€™s language wouldn’€™t be affected.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only “€œtechies”€ but also library managers, system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries does not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. From the mission statement of CIL: “CIL‘s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs. CIL does this through articles that are written by library professionals for library professionals, with a friendly, personal voice. These general technical articles are practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment: corporate, special, academic, public, and K-12. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries does not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead it devotes its pages to entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “€œdo not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is month by month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, the technical writing should be geared toward general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  4. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  5. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  7. Information Today Inc. (2016). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  9. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. OCLC WorldCat. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/title/computers-in-libraries/oclc/18848244&referer=brief_results
  19. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
Continue Reading

Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table 

Website: http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Endnotes Committee is part of the ALA’€™s New Members Round Table (NMRT), a which consists of ALA members with fewer than ten years’ membership. The committee’s mission is to provide support for librarians who want or need to publish scholarly articles, and to publish peer-reviewed research by NMRT members and directed at new librarians.1

The committee oversees publication of Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table.2

Target audience: American Library Association new members, specifically those who are part of the New Members Round Table (ALA NMRT)3

Publisher: American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the Endnotes Committee Charge, “Each edition of the journal will contain 2-4 scholarly articles written by members of NMRT, as well as web site reviews and scholarly book reviews of titles relevant to new librarians.”8

Frequency of publication: One issue per year, with the possibility of more issues if there is interest. The editor welcomes suggestions for special themed issues from NMRT members.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-endnotes-committee

Types of contributions accepted: Original research, practitioner-based research, case studies, book and media reviews. Articles range between 2000-4000 words; book and media reviews 300-500.10

Submission and review process: Endnotes accepts article submissions on a rolling basis, but NMRT members are encouraged to contact the editor about proposals to determine if it fits the journal’€™s scope.11

Send typed, double-spaced MS word docs to nmrtendnotesjournal@gmail.com.12

The committee reviews manuscripts via an double-blind peer-review process. Accepted manuscripts will be returned with committee suggestions for edits, and authors will have about a month to revise the manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly, but not too formal. The articles and reviews are almost conversational.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

To submit a manuscript for publication, register with the ALA and then join the NMRT, whose mission is to provide support for librarians with that specific goal. The publication is for NMRT members and directed at new librarians.€“ Endnotes is the perfect place for LIS students and new authors to submit a query to supportive editorial staff and among a group of peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Endnotes is an open-access journal available online for anyone to read, but is primarily for members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALA is based in Chicago, IL, but the website and newsletter are online open access, available to anyone with internet access, or through a library. œA network of affiliates, chapters, and other organizations enables the ALA to reach a broad audience. Although it is written in American English and published by the American Library Association, the ALA does not limit itself to U.S. library concerns.17

Reader characteristics: Most readers of Endnotes, and all authors, are members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.18 ALA members include “librarians, library trustees, and other interested people from every state and many nations. The association serves public, state, school, and academic libraries, as well as special libraries for people working in government, commerce and industry, the arts, and the armed services or in hospitals, prisons, and other institutions.”19 The ALA’€™s mission is “€œto provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this scholarly journal are part of the ALA’€™s New Members Roundtable, so they may be expected to be aware of current LIS trends and terminology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are primarily new members to the ALA, and are interested in reading the most recent LIS scholarly research, news, reviews and updates in order to further their education or careers, and to inspire their own research and writing. This is an ideal publication for new authors to consider, and as it’€™s part of the ALA, has built-in credibility and respect, as well as readership.

Last updated: April 22. 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “About NMRT,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-nmrt
  2. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  3. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  4. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  5. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  6. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  7. American Library Association. (2014). Endnotes Committee. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  8. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  9. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  10. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  11. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  12. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  13. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  14. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  15. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  16. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  17. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  18. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  19. “Membership,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  20. “Mission,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  21. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
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Federal Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Federal Librarian

Website: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Federal Librarian is the official newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Libraries Round Table (FAFLRT).1 Federal and Armed Forces Libraries represent a wide variety of library types: research, law, school, and public. Librarians working for the Federal government have opportunities that span the library field, from direct services to the public, to in-depth research support for America’€™s military and civilian services.

The Round Table has developed a successful series of programs to inform new and incoming library professionals about careers in federal libraries, and to assist established federal librarians grow their careers. FAFLRT also sponsors awards and recognition for outstanding federal librarians.2

From their site: FAFLRT’s mission is “to promote library and information service and the library and information profession in the federal and armed forces communities; to promote appropriate utilization of federal and armed forces library and information resources and facilities; and to provide an environment for the stimulation of research and development relating to the planning, development, and operation of federal and armed forces libraries.”3

Target audience: Members of the Federal and Armed Forces Round Table. “FAFLRT membership is open to all individual ALA Members interested in issues affecting Federal or Armed Forces libraries.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional and trade publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Federal Librarian “presents recent developments and events of interest to Federal and Armed Forces library community, including news and reports on international, federal, DoD, state and local government issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing

Types of contributions accepted: Federal Librarian includes a mix of current events, trends or issues affecting member libraries, tributes, feature articles, award recipients and a message from the FAFLRT president.11

Submission and review process: Send contributions to:

Anne Harrison, interim editor
6200 Wilson Blvd. Apt. 1107
Falls Church, VA 22044
telephone:  202-707-4834
E-mail: harrisonanne57@yahoo.com

The review process is not outlined.12

Editorial tone: Reviewing the latest issue (Vol. 31 #4, 2014) provides a selection of items ranging from an accounting of closures at base libraries, to a lively description of the first “Library Con” held at the JBER Library, to a tribute to a retiring librarian. Articles are written in an informal tone.13

Style guide used: None specified.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Federal Librarian offers the LIS author interested in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries a forum for informal professional discussions of issues and events that are important to this community. As one of the current strategic goals of the FAFLRT is to “establish new and continue existing liaison relationships with relevant ALA committees and round tables”15, one can assume that this journal would also be open to writers from various areas of librarianship to build connections with the FAFLRT through its newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Federal Librarian subscription base is approximately 600.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership of the Federal Librarian covers a wide range of LIS professionals in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries, from all over the U.S. These libraries run the gamut from public, school, military academic or special.17 Bearing in mind the wide variety of issues that are of interest to the reader, but also the overriding cultural umbrella of membership in the FAFLRT, potential authors should tailor their submissions to this group. Articles are written in American English.18

Reader characteristics: Demographics are not given for the readers of Federal Librarian. However, because subscription is included in membership to FAFLRT, readers are among 600 federal and military LIS professionals.19 Readers have a vested interest in matters concerning library and information services in the federal and armed forces communities.20

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Federal Librarian work and live in Federal and Armed Forces communities.21 Authors who also belong to this community would have an interested and supportive audience for their writing. Because the issues examined in the Federal Librarian encourage professional development of their LIS peers, the potential impact on the published author’s career is great. This is a special community who, with their shared interests, would be a knowledgeable and interested audience for the potential author.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  2.  American Library Association. (2016). Initiatives and Projects. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/initiatives
  3.  American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  4.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  6.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  7.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  8.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  9. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  10.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  11.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  12.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  13.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/newsletters/2014_vol.31_4_Federal_Librarian.pdf
  14.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  15. American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  16.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  17. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  18.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  19.  Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  20.  Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  21.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
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Internet@Schools

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Internet@Schools

The original publication, Multimedia & Internet @ Schools, is no longer in print; it’€™s now Internet@Schools: An Educator’€™s Guide to Technology and the Web€™. Archives of the original, from 2000–2003, can be found here. Archives prior to 2000 can be found here.

Website: http://www.internetatschools.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A practical guide for educators on how to get high-performance learning from internet-based school products, services, and resources.1

Per the 2015 Media Kit: Internet@Schools is aimed at “tech-savvy and tech-curious K–12 educators of all stripes.”2 “Our mission is to keep these educators informed on internet-related ed tech news, products, services, trends, and tacticsthey need to accomplish their mission of preparing today’s students to become productive citizens in our increasingly technology-impacted world”3

€œTarget audience: €œEducators, including school librarians, technology specialists, teachers, and K-12 administrators. From their website: “€œfor our internet-savvy, information-hungry, technology-minded educator readers.”4

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional/Trade publication that provides information and news for LIS school librarians.7

Medium: Print & online.8

Content: Features, columns, and product reviews. Columns include Victor Rivero’s Tools for Learning Roundup, Stephen Abram’s Pipelines, Johanna Riddle’s Tech Effect, Mary Alice Anderson’s New Media Center, and Mary Ann Bell’s Belltones.9

Recent articles look at specific digital-textbooks; tools that help educators navigate the Common Core State Standards; a column on teacher-librarian instruction in LIS programs (pros and cons); online learning experiences; and Makerspaces -€“ open community labs where members gather to share resources, knowledge, networking, etc.10

Frequency of publication: Five times per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs

Types of contributions accepted: Letters to the editor, case studies, white papers and product reviews.12

Submission and review process: Contact the editor, David Hoffman: 10000 NE 7th Ave, Suite 330G, Vancouver, WA 98685
Phone: (360) 882-0988
Fax: (360) 882-9174
Email: hoffmand@infotoday.com13

Editorial tone: “€œThe magazine is written in plain talk by and for K-12 educators.”14

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Internet@Schools is particularly relevant for LIS authors studying or working in a school library setting, or for teacher-librarians. The publication covers a broad range of internet-based teaching tools, technologies and topics, and is a very informational and engaging publication that reaches educators, administrators, and decision makers in schools and school districts across the country.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Approximately 15,000 people per issue. From the Media Kit: “€œThe typical Internet@Schools subscriber shares his/her copy with at least two other educators.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not specific to any one location: articles cover all sorts of internet-based education topics, and reference U.S. and Canadian universities and LIS programs, as well as technology from other countries. Written in Standard English, easily readable.17

Reader characteristics: Subscribers of this publication are highly influential in the purchasing process, for schools and districts that plan to include technology-related products in their budgets. Internet@Schools readers are drawn from the whole spectrum of K-12 education and include state, district, and school level administrators; tech coordinators; media specialists; and classroom teachers. Directed towards educators and decision makers in their schools; content is written by practicing educators who have hands-on experience with the technologies they write about. Additional sponsored content is provided via case studies, white papers and product reviews that are also advertisements for specific companies or products.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A good number of readers will have LIS-specific knowledge as librarians and teacher librarians, but the educator/administrative/tech component might not be up on all the specifics. In any case, this is not a publication to flaunt LIS terminology -“ just make articles easily understood by any educator or administrator, and use “plain talk.”19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Internet@Schools is a valuable resource of the latest “internet-based” technologies for a variety of educators including, “directors/teachers, department chairs, district/school administrators, directors of A/V media service, directors of technology/technology coordinators, [and] library media specialists.”20 Authors will need to steer clear of LIS terminology by using “plain talk” that can be easily understood by the wide range of professions represented in the readership.21

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  4. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  9. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  11. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  18. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  19. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  20. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
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School Libraries Worldwide

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Libraries Worldwide

Website: http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official research journal of the International Association of School Librarianship, School Libraries Worldwide publishes professional, current research and scholarship on all aspects of school librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic and public school librarians worldwide.2

Publisher: International Association of School Librarianship (IASL).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly.5

Medium: Online via paid subscription to IASL. Abstract and contents pages available online for free.6

Content: Anything relating to school librarianship, with a worldwide angle. 7

Frequency of publication: Two times per year, January and July.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html

Types of contributions accepted: New scholarly works, including research and reviews, on any aspect of school librarianship. Issues normally include a theme section, which occasionally call for personal narrative, commentary and option papers.9

Submission and review process: Submissions should be typed, double-spaced, and not exceed 6000 words, including references. Submit your manuscript online at http://slw.cci.fsu.edu.10

Submissions are blind reviewed by at least two members of the School Libraries Worldwide editorial board.11

Editors, as of 2013, are Dr. Nancy Everhart and Dr. Marcia Mardis, School of Library and Information Science, College of Communication & Information, Florida State University, email: slw@cci.fsu.edu. 12

A current call for papers should be consulted to note the theme and content of the upcoming issue, but content on school librarianship in general is always accepted.13

Editorial tone: Professional, with an accessible focus. Articles in this journal are interesting, and will appeal to school librarians and those studying school librarianship, across the globe.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an ideal journal to submit any and all papers discussing school librarianship: practice, research study findings, reviews of studies, personal experience (of the author, or students) as the current theme allows. It’€™s particularly fascinating to read accounts of triumphs and difficulties faced by others in school library positions in other countries, and present information on programs/technologies/practices that will be helpful in a variety of settings (rural, urban, university, grade school, etc.) Students are encouraged to submit work, and the open-access article per issue, one that covers a popular, engaging topic, is an exciting goal to reach for.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal editors hail from Florida16 and IASL is headquartered in Australia,17 but the journal is written by, aimed towards, and reaches a worldwide audience. The submission guidelines firmly note that “€œAuthors need to be mindful of the international audience of the journal. In most cases, authors can use the library terminology that is used in their locale. However, when writing about schools and students, it is important to state the age of the students being educated in those schools.” It’€™s also urged to explain terminology used to identify schools: lycee, high school, compulsory school, etc.18

Reader characteristics: Readers of the journal are interested in school librarianship and emerging thought/trends in the field. This is a positive journal exploring best practices and techniques that can benefit anyone working or studying school librarianship. Members of IASL include people who are concerned about school library media programs and services – librarians, school library media specialists, educators, publishers, and lay people. IASL is a worldwide organization that, in addition to providing an international forum for discussing school librarianship issues, works with other professional association to provide guidance and development for school library programs. The overall goal is creating effective programs: this is a very professional, respected, positive publication that strongly believes in its mission and uses the journal to spread the education.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but, as with the caution on explaining the age of students you’€™re writing about, authors should consider explaining any technical LIS jargon, as it might be used differently in other countries.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in what you have to share concerning school librarianship. Articles range from international standards for school librarianship, to profiles of teacher librarians, to connecting teacher librarians and classrooms around the world. There is certain to be a topic that LIS students, particularly with a focus on school librarianship, will be able to research or write about from personal experience for this publication of open, interested peers.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/
  2. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). School Libraries Worldwide. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403570216578/238845
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). School Libraries Worldwide. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403570216578/238845
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). School Libraries Worldwide. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403570216578/238845
  6. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/
  7. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/
  8. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Call for Papers. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_call.html
  9. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  10. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  11. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  12. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  13. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Call for Papers. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_call.html
  14. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  15. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  16. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  17. SerialsSolutions. (2014). School Libraries Worldwide. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403570216578/238845
  18. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
  19. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/
  20. International Association of School Librarianship. (2013). School Libraries Worldwide: Guidelines for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slw_guidecontrib.html
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The Crab

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Crab

Website: http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/ecrab.asp

Purpose, objective, or mission: This is the official publication of the Maryland Library Association (MLA). The Crab is published quarterly and is the official Maryland Library Association publication. On the MLA Website, the association’s purpose is given as, “[to provide] leadership for those who are committed to libraries by providing opportunities for professional development and communication and by advocating principles and issues related to librarianship and library service.”1

Target audience: The primary target audience is the association’s membership, which includes “library staff and trustees, library school students, libraries, and friends of libraries representing the full spectrum of librarianship in Maryland.”2 The library staff component includes members from public, school, academic, and special libraries. Public librarians are the largest constituency.

Publisher: Maryland Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Coverage of the MLA annual conference; program and workshop reports; news about Maryland libraries and library people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials with local or state interest; letters to the editor.7

Frequency of publication: Four times per year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp

Types of contributions accepted: From the submission guidelines, The Crab seeks coverage of the following topics: MLA conference; MLA division, committee or interest group news; reports on programs and workshops of interest to librarians in Maryland; news about Maryland libraries and people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials, based on their local and state interest will be considered for publication; letters to the editor – these must be signed, although names may be withheld from publications upon request.9

Advertising will be accepted for The Crab – priority will be given to library-related services or products.10

Articles accompanied by photos are strongly encouraged.11

Submission and review process: Submissions should be via e-mail to editor Annette Haldeman, Legislative Librarian, Maryland General Assembly Department of Legislative Services, Office of Policy Analysis, at: Annette.Haldeman@mlis.state.md.us.12
Articles may be keyed into the body of the e-mail or may be sent as attachments. Photos should be in .GIF or .JPG formats and should not exceed 200K. Submission deadlines for each issue available on website.13

Editorial tone: Varies somewhat by author, but tone is generally newsy, chatty, and friendly. Even the short fact-based items often attempt to convey some sense of excitement.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication, as indicated by the their mission, focuses on local Maryland library organizations, people and events.14 An author with local knowledge or connections will find it easier to place a variety of material than an out of the area author. On the other hand, there are examples of articles that address larger LIS sector trends and activities. There are publishing opportunities for an author who can can write in an accessible manner with a local connection to the Maryland audience. As with any publication, reviewing the past issues will provide a solid sense of what type of article the editor and readers would find interesting. Another source of information on the associations focus is the MLA’s Strategic Plan that is posted on their website.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print publication is available for a subscription fee from the MLA (membership numbers not available) and is also available online for any visitor to read.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Primarily the State of Maryland, with additional reach to members in the vendor community that are not located in Maryland.17 Articles are written in English. The vocabulary is light on jargon, perhaps partly due to the wide variety of background of potential readers (see below).18

Reader characteristics: Association members include professionals, paraprofessionals, LIS students, and a large number of non-librarian staff members. Members/readers come from the full variety of library types and the full variety of jobs in those institutions. Some LIS vendors are included. It may be assumed that most readers will be sympathetic to libraries, understand their various missions, and will view themselves as important to their organizations and the achievement of their organizations’ goals.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A significant portion of the MLA membership is within the paraprofessional category, so while most readers will be well-informed about their local issues and practices, some will not have the perspective gained from professional study and work.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the diversity of background, skills, professional duties, missions, and interests of the readers, authors should consider presenting material that is practical, general in scope, accessible in tone and language, and appealing to the interests of readers in the Maryland area.21

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Maryland Library Association. (2014). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  2. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  3. ProQuest. (2016). The Crab. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411937604570/56713
  4. ProQuest. (2016). The Crab. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411937604570/56713
  5. ProQuest. (2016). The Crab. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411937604570/56713
  6. Maryland Library Association. (2016). The Crab Home. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/ecrab.asp
  7. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  8. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  9. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  10. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  11. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  12. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  13. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  14. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  15. Maryland Library Association. (2016). MLA Strategic Plan. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/splan.asp
  16. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Join MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/join.asp
  17. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About The Crab. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/about.asp
  18. Maryland Library Association. (2016). The Crab Home. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/ecrab.asp
  19. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  20. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  21. Maryland Library Association. (2014). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
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