Wiki Tags Archives: School libraries

School Library Connection

 

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Connection 

ISSN: 2380-98411

Website: https://schoollibraryconnection.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “School Library Connection (SLC) is an extensive learning resource center for school library professionals. As the combined evolution of School Library Monthly and Library Media Connection magazines, SLC maintains their commitment to providing those in the school library field with practical insights and inspiration while also advancing the scope and mission of its predecessors.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in school libraries and educators.3

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Articles on “Organization & Management, Instructional Leadership, and Perspectives & Partners.” Reviews are also featured in a searchable database.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (print); continuously (online.)9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: Queries for proposed articles should be addressed to the appropriate editor found on their submissions page. Articles on day-to-day operations and best practices of school librarianship should be discussed with the Organization & Management editor. Articles on instructional practice should be discussed with the Instructional Leadership editor. Articles on school libraries in the broader context of education should be discussed with the Perspectives & Partners editor. Experienced and new writers are welcomed.10

Reviews are also accepted in the form of “concise descriptions and evaluations of the contents, quality, and curricular applications of books and other media available for school library purchase.”11

Submission and review process: Authors must send a query to the appropriate editor to develop their idea and article before submission. The final article must then be sent to that same editor.12 There is an editorial calendar available to guide author submissions.13 Articles are typically published four months after the article deadlines.14

All book and material reviews should be emailed to the reviews editor.15

Editorial tone: Informative and conversational.16

Style guide used: An in-house guide based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Excellent opportunity for LIS professionals involved with school libraries, with the ability to convey they first hand experiences with an active voice and in a clear, conversational style. Talented first-time authors are welcomed, so this would be a great place to start building a writing portfolio for a respected and widely-read publication. While not a peer-reviewed publication that would support tenure, work in this magazine reaches a very large audience and will increase the visibility of any contributing author.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has over 5,000 readers. The website reports an average of 4,250 visitors.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is based in North America, with a corresponding readership.19 Readers would be familiar with LIS jargon, gained through practice or education, and the issues facing school libraries. Given the practical focus of the publication, readers most likely approach their work with a positive attitude, interested in bettering themselves and the service they provide.20

Reader characteristics: Readers will have experience with libraries, especially school libraries, and the majority work directly with students.21 The 2019 editorial calendar indicates audience interest in OER, collection development, primary resources, collaborating with other school departments, makerspaces, cultural competence, and political literacy, all within the K-12 school library context.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While a reader may have obtained their LIS knowledge through an undergraduate program for media specialists or through a LIS graduate program, depending on their position, it can be assumed all will have a clear understanding of the working of the school library and the responsibilities of the LIS professionals in K-12 libraries. Acronyms and terms common in education and school librarianship would be acceptable to use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication expect articles that support their efforts to improve the LIS services they provide. They want information from colleagues about their successes and efforts they can replicate in their own libraries. To be successful writers will need to meet their collaborating editor’s expectations and submit articles written in an active voice, from personal experience or observation.

Last updated: July 5, 2019


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Connection,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed July 5, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1562358591408/826729
  2. Libraries Unlimited, “About,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About
  3. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com.
  8. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  9. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  10. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About/Write
  11. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/Home/reviews?tab=5
  12. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_FAQ.pdf
  13. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  14. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions.”
  15. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+.”
  16. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  17. Libraries Unlimited, “Article Submission Guidelines,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2o19, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf
  18. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/mediaserver/SLC/1981/1981090.pdf
  19. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019.”
  20. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  21. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  22. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  23. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
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American Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Libraries

ISSN: 0002-9769 (Print) and 2163-5129 (Online)1

Website: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: American Libraries is “the flagship publication of the American Library Association,” dedicated to publishing news “about all matters of import to libraries and librarians.”2 Per the Editorial Policy, part of the ALA Policy Manual section 10.2: the editor is charged with “a particular responsibility to convey to the membership and other readers full and accurate information about the activities, purposes, and goals of the Association.”3

Target audience: ALA members, the majority of whom are professional librarians in the United States.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news magazine.7

Medium: American Libraries is a print publication, with occasional digital supplements. American Libraries Online is the online edition.8

Content: American Libraries “features articles on professional concerns and developments, along with news of the Association, library-related legislation, and libraries around the country and the world. Expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.” 9

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published 6 times per year, with a digital-only July/August issue and occasional digital supplements.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: American Libraries solicits contributions of 600-1,500-word articles, including book reviews, features and opinion pieces on topics of general interest to members of the American Library Association. Letters to the editor are also accepted.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email to americanlibraries@ala.org. Hard copies may be mailed to American Libraries, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611. After submission, there may be “editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that in their opinion support the article’s focus. Editors will make every possible effort to review copy with the author prior to publication, especially regarding any proposed substantive changes.” Authors should hear back about their manuscripts within 4-8 weeks.12

Editorial tone: “Informal, but informative. Factual articles must be inviting and readable, with all statements backed by responsible research and interviews with several expert sources.” The editor encourages the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues.”13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.).14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This 100+-year-old magazine is a well-respected publication with a wide audience. It would not be scholarly enough in tone to carry much weight for someone building up publications for tenure, but it is a credible, professional publication that provides a forum for practical information sharing among members of the LIS community. American Libraries publishes feature stories and opinion pieces as well as letters to the editor, and occasionally opportunities for columnists arise. Strong writers with appropriate story ideas should be encouraged to submit work here, whether they are LIS practitioners, educators, or students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 62,000 member organizations, individual members, and paid subscribers.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A geographic breakdown could not be found, though American Libraries does offer rates for the US, Canada, and International subscriptions.16 It is probably safe to assume that the majority of ALA members reside and work in the United States. American Libraries is published in English, and readers are likely to be completely comfortable communicating in English. However, overuse of regionalisms should be avoided to appeal to the diverse and widespread American audience.17

Reader characteristics: Because readers are usually members of the ALA, the vast majority work in a variety of libraries and have a high level of education.18 As librarians, these readers are likely to be interested in library topics and sympathetic to library issues. However, it is not safe to assume that readers are homogeneous in terms of how they believe problems should be solved. Letters to the editor and point-of-view pieces indicate that readers can be highly opinionated. The editorial policy states that the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.”19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to know a lot about general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors would want to avoid highly specialized topics and language. For example, public librarians may not be familiar with (or interested in) the particular jargon and issues of military librarians, and technology specialists may not be familiar with the jargon of catalogers.[19. American Libraries, “About.”

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because this is a professional rather than a scholarly publication, appropriate submissions would be practical rather than theoretical. Possibilities might include current topics in librarianship, or unique twists on topics of general interest to the broad LIS community such as management, advocacy, and general-interest technologies. American Libraries readers have in common a professional or personal interest in libraries, but the audience is large, and readers’ specialized interests will be quite diverse. For this magazine, general library topics would be appropriate — articles on things like library technology, marketing, or management, the kinds of topics that would be relevant to all librarians, no matter what kinds of libraries they worked in.

Authors could assume that American Libraries readers would understand general library language and that basic terms would not need to be explained (the editors of American Libraries, for example, assume that readers will understand ALA’s common acronyms, such as ACRL). However, authors should try to avoid the kinds of topics or jargon that might be related to a specific library environment or aspect of librarianship, such as academic libraries or cataloging. Articles on highly specific topics or for particular ALA subgroups would be better directed toward the publications of the related ALA divisions, such as College and Research Libraries News or Children and Libraries.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “American Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561931025099/41722
  2. American Library Association, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/about/
  3. American Libraries, “About.”
  4. American Libraries, “Advertising,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/advertising-2/
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Libraries, “About.”
  9. American Libraries, “Submissions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/ 
  10. American Libraries, “About.”
  11. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  12. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  13. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  14. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  15. American Libraries, “Advertising.”
  16. American Libraries, “Subscriptions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/subscriptions/
  17. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  18. American Libraries, “About.”
  19. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
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School Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Journal (SLJ)

ISSN: 0362-89301

Website: https://www.slj.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “School Library Journal is the premiere publication for librarians and information specialists who work with children and teens. A source of quality journalism and reviews for more than 60 years, SLJ produces award-winning features and news coverage on: literacy, best practices, technology, education policy and other issues of interest to the school library and greater educator community.”2

Target audience: Any librarians and information professionals working with children and teens, including librarians in K-12 schools as well as those in public libraries.3

Publisher: Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Professional.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Claims to be one of the most authoritative reviewers of children’s and young adult materials. It mainly focuses on books, but also includes reviews on audio and video items. The journal also contains columns, news, and feature articles.8

Frequency of publication: Monthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Items of interest to librarians and educators who work with children: feature articles, news articles, and specialty columns.10 Articles from the last few years include topics such as rural public libraries, fundraising, app reviews, bloggers, LGBTQ+ Pride, diversity, and tips for school librarians preparing for the first day of school.11

Submission and review process: Send brief article proposals to the appropriate editor before submitting any complete articles. Feature articles are generally less than 2,500 words, while opinion pieces are around 600-700 words. News articles can vary in length, depending on the topic.12

Editorial tone: Informative, but not academic.13

Style guide used: None indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a successful and popular publication that, while encouraging of submissions, may be difficult to break into as a writer. A thorough study of the publication with attention to the authors published in their pages will give a writer a better idea if this is a good match for them.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: School Library Journal has a circulation of 23,000 in the print edition with an estimated reach of 92,000 readers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: There is no specific breakdown on the nationality of the readers available, but the history of the journal reveals that it is entirely geared toward schools in the United States and Canada.15 Most of the readers of this journal would be those who work with youth in libraries in the United States, so there should not be any problems with cultural references, LIS jargon, or terminology particular to education.16

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal would be those who work with K-12 students, either in schools or public libraries. They have a shared interest in promoting literacy and welcome resources that inspire student achievement.17 Articles openly and positively discuss diversity and inclusivity in library services, with article topics ranging from combating systematic racism in schools to selecting LGBTQ+ books for pre-teen collections. More articles and reviews touching on these topics would be welcome.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this journal would not be limited to those with teaching credentials or MLS degrees. Some may be library media technicians who may not have an advanced degree, but would have enough education or professional training in order to understand the subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of School Library Journal have a common interest in children’€™s literature and issues regarding school libraries. Many of the readers are library technicians, so some articles are geared toward encouraging collaboration with teachers and librarians. Authors should recognize that there is an education gap as well as a wage gap between the professionals and the paraprofessionals and should refrain from using an excess of technical terms in their articles. Readers of SLJ maintain a great interest in information literacy and how this can be integrated into the curriculum, as well as increasing the technology available to the students. Introducing ideas that are on the cutting edge of technology yet are not restricted by financial or time constraints would be a way of effectively reaching the intended audience.

Last updated: June 26, 2019.


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399134773/52981
  2. School Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=About-Us
  3. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  7. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions.
  8. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  11. School Library Journal, “News & Features,” accessed June 29, 2019. https://www.slj.com/?subpage=News%20%26%20Features
  12. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  13. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  14. Library Journals, LLC., “Print,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://media.libraryjournal.com/print/#schoollibraryjournalmag.
  15. School Library Journal, “News & Features.”
  16. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  17. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  18. School Library Journal, “News & Articles.”
  19. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
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Knowledge Quest

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Knowledge Quest

ISSN: 1094-9046 (Print) and 2163-5234 (Online)1

Website: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Knowledge Quest supports the American Association of School Librarians’ mission to empower leaders “to transform teaching and learning.”2 The journal is devoted to offering substantive information to assist building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school libraries and school library services.3

Target audience: “Building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school library programs and services.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: Per their site, “Articles address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.”9 Emerging trends, literacy, co-teaching, leadership, and makerspaces are some encouraged topics.10

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly, September through June.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/ (Scroll down to the link to the PDF Author Guidelines.)

Types of contributions accepted: Knowledge Quest seeks “original, unpublished manuscripts that address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.” The editors are not interested in “basic primers” on the role of school librarians or press releases and vendor news.12 Articles should be 2500 words or less.13

Submission and review process: Articles may be emailed to the editor14 or through an online submission form.15 “Unsolicited manuscripts undergo blind review by the Knowledge Quest editorial advisory board. The process takes approximately 3-4 weeks. When the review is completed, the author will be notified of the outcome.”16

Editorial tone: Professional. Through well-written articles, the journal provides information in a helpful and supportive manner.17

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.).18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although this publication has numerous readers, over half of its readership is comprised of elementary school, middle school, and high school librarians.19 The fact that its content does not apply to all aspects of library science limits the reader base and therefore, the scope of articles covered. Professionals working in school libraries are encouraged to submit their work for review. Knowledge Quest desires to be part of the library community and provide support for members of this community through its articles and reviews. Publishing in this journal represents the authors’ dedication to the school library community.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is distributed to 7,000 members and and additional 150 readers. The online component reports over 1,200 visits per day.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This magazine is a publication of the American Association of School Librarians. The material provided in the magazine is designed to support the curriculum in United States public and private schools. The print version of the magazine can be shipped anywhere, but the typical readers reside and work in the United States. Readers can also access the journal via the online component KQ Web and this website can be accessed world wide over the internet.22 This magazine is presented in English and uses terminology relevant to elementary and secondary school librarians. As a publication of the AASL, the magazine has the same vision statement as the organization. This vision statement highlights the magazine’s and the association’s goal to support and embrace cultural and ethnic diversity.23

Reader characteristics: The readers of the magazine are comprised of professionals and supervisors working in library media centers. Readers can be expected to embrace and be familiar with the ethics and values present in school library programs today. By subscribing to the magazine, readers are demonstrating their stance as advocates of literacy and supporters of intellectual freedom. Media specialists are closely related to teachers as they are active members of the learning community. These individuals are well aware of the resources available to them and are always working towards learning new ways to use these resources in better and more productive ways. Most of the readers work in elementary and secondary school libraries both public and nonpublic schools, and will be interested in issues and programs such as library funding, student achievement, student internet use, literacy, intellectual freedom, and technology that effect or involve the readers. Knowledge Quest is interested in producing a quality publication that presents ideas in a friendly and inclusive manner.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With 87% of readers reporting possession of a Master’s degree, it is probable that many have LIS degrees. Readers can be expected to know about school curriculum and are knowledgeable about the technologies and issues relevant to school media centers today.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since Knowledge Quest is a publication of the AASL, the readers expect that the publication will have the same guidelines and requirements characterized by an AASL publication. The readers expect the magazine to publish works which are balanced, relevant to the field, accurate, and up-to-date on issues pertinent to school libraries. 78% of readers report that Knowledge Quest is “essential professional reading,” so authors should expect to produce content that meets that description. 26

Last updated: June 21, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Knowledge Quest,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 19, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560951075174/52980
  2. American Library Association, “About AASL,” accessed June 19, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/about
  3. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ,” accessed June 19,  2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/about-kq/
  4. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/KQ_mediakit_201920_WEB.pdf
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  10. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  11. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  12. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  13. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines,” accessed June 20, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/Author%20Guidelines%20REVISED.pdf
  14. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  15. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  16. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  17. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  18. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  19. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  20. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  21. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  22. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  23. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  24. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  25. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  26. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
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Voice of Youth Advocates

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

ISSN: 0160-4201

Website: http://www.voyamagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Focuses on library services to/with young adults (aka “teenagers” “adolescents,” typically youth of middle and high school ages). VOYA‘s policy is based on the following principles: specialize in young adult library service; intellectual freedom and equal access; and youth advocacy and youth participation.1

Target audience: Public librarians, school librarians and educators serving youth ages 12 to 18, paraprofessionals serving youth, publishers, authors of young adult books, and other young adult advocates.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The journal includes book reviews on fiction, nonfiction, and genre titles, as well as articles about YA services, programming, space design, and lists of award winners.7

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly publication.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Literary analysis, author interviews, research, practical project ideas, controversies, and new YA space redesigns or makeover profiles are accepted. Booklists and columns are usually planned by the editor, but new content suggestions are accepted as queries.9

Submission and review process: Short articles should be between 800 to 1,700 words and up to 3,500 words for longer pieces. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Information for specific column requirements is available on the website. Authors should query the editor before submitting manuscripts, to ensure the piece is suitable for the journal.10

Editorial tone: VOYA solicits articles written in an approachable style for practitioners serving YA users. The goal is to publish articles by authors who express enthusiasm in working with YA and who can speak from experience about YA services.11

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VOYA is a well-respected journal in the field of library and information services for young adults. The journal is written in an approachable style which may not meet tenure requirements for academic faculty. Also, this journal is intended for public and school librarians who work with YA and not academic librarians. Those interested in tenure may not want to submit manuscripts for publication to this journal.

The journal welcomes articles about new, progressive, informative, and controversial issues as they relate to youth culture. Authors who have experience in working with YAs and who can demonstrate enthusiasm for working with them through their writing are encouraged to submit manuscripts. VOYA‘s wide range of readers provides authors with a large audience which will provide them wide recognition in the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: VOYA has 6,000 subscribers. According to the last reader’€™s survey, each subscriber circulates the journal to 3.5 colleagues which means that the journal experiences a readership of 21,000 people.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published within the United States,13 but there is a possibility that there are subscribers outside of the country. The journal is printed in English.14 Due to wide readership, it is important that language remain clear of local jargon. This also means that all acronyms should be spelled out. Cultural consideration should also be taken into account. Pop culture references should be explained so that all readers will understand. This is very important for this journal since it focuses on young adults, who are very interested in pop culture.15

Reader characteristics: There is no statistical breakdown on the readers of this journal. However, the journal does say that the readers of this journal are public and school librarians, educators, authors of young adult books, publishers, and other youth advocates. The common interest among this group is young adults. However, they may not all be interested in this age group in the same way. School librarians may be more interested in the book review section and have marginal interest in programming, which public librarians are keen on. Publishers and authors might also be interested in the book review sections and the interviews with authors. The journal does not profess itself to be liberal or conservative, however, it does value intellectual freedom, young adults, literature for this group, and advocacy for YA resources, all of which lean more towards a progressive attitude. The journal often features articles about controversial topics, books, or authors.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the breadth of professions represented in this readership community, it is suggested that authors avoid using LIS specific jargon which may not be understood or interesting to lay readers.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal are a very diverse group in terms of language, geographic location, profession, and educational attainment. Authors should consider writing articles about new and interesting topics in the field of library services. However, the topics should not be scholarly in tone or esoteric. Authors should remember that the readers have different backgrounds and interests in young people.

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About,” accessed June May 6, 2019, http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  2. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  3. ProQuest, “Voice of Youth Advocates,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions,” accessed May 8, 2019, http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  10. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  11. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  12. Voice of Youth Advocates, 2018, Media Kit, http://voyamagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/VOYA2018-mediakit_web.pdf
  13. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  14. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  15. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  16. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  17.  Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
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Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

ISSN: 0030-8188

Website: http://www.pnla.org/quarterly

Purpose, objective, or mission: Pacific Northwest Library Association promotes increased communication, joint advocacy, open debate, networking and support and information sharing through its many special projects and initiatives including an annual conference, leadership institute, quarterly journal, job board, and a Young Readers Choice Award.1

The PNLA’s journal, published since 1936, focuses on regional content, open access and discoverability.2

Target audience: PNLA members are anyone with an interest in the library and information profession primarily from Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, and Washington.3

Publisher: Pacific Northwest Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: PNLA Quarterly is “a combination of peer-reviewed and editor-reviewed articles, focused on the region and its librarianship. The Fall issue is a conference issue.6

Articles are 1,000 to 6,000 words.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: PNLA Quarterly welcomes submissions in four out of five sections: articles, peer-reviewed articles, conference program (each Fall) and announcements.9

Submission and review process: Authors should check the Author Guidelines to ensure correct formatting and to read through the submission preparation checklist. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions for ensuring a blind review should be followed. Send your submissions to pqeditors@gmail.com10

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: 6th edition of the Manual of Style of the American Psychological Association (APA).11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The PNLA Quarterly provides a unique regional and multinational perspective to the issues of intellectual freedom, literacy, continuing education, and library leadership. Articles may be theoretical, research-based, or practice-focused. If your topic could be relevant beyond the Pacific Northwest, another journal to consider might include the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Science.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though readers are focused in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. and Canada, the journal is open access for anyone to read.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PNLA Quarterly’s audience is primarily U.S. and Canadian. Readers will mostly be English and French speaking.

Reader characteristics: Readership is varied—according to PNLA’s Membership page, the association is open to “anyone with an interest in the library and information profession.”12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–readers are LIS professionals from all different areas of the profession.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of PNLA Quarterly come from across the LIS spectrum, but are united by a regional focus and a passion for librarianship. If you have a well researched article with a scholarly bend that focuses on this region of North America, PNLA Quarterly readers will be an eager audience.

Last updated: May 2, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org
  2. “Journal History,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history
  3. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/.
  4. “Journal Sponsorship,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship
  5. “Editorial Policies,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Guidelines for Submission,” PNLA.org, accessed April 27, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/guidelines-for-submission
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Submissions,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines, accessed April 27, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/membership
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Journal of Radical Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Radical Librarianship

ISSN: 2399-956X

Website: http://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Radical Librarianship “is an open access journal publishing high quality, rigorously reviewed and innovative scholarly work in the field of radical librarianship….The scope of the journal is any work that contributes to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”1

Target audience: Librarians and library and information science (LIS) practitioners, managers, scholars, and students who are interested in “radical librarianship,” loosely defined for the purposes of the journal as “the ethical roots of librarianship.”2

Publisher: The journal is self-published by the editors.3 Its platform and workflow are supported by OJS/PKP.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, the journal has a policy for manuscripts to undergo either open or double-blind review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online and open access.

Content: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes LIS articles on a broad range of topics but emphasizes that articles should contribute “to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”6 Sections include Research Articles, Editorials and Commentary, and Reviews. The journal’s Announcements page issues calls for proposals and papers on specified topics; a 2018 call was for proposals offering a “structural critique of race and power in LIS.” 7

Frequency of publication: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is published on a continual basis: articles are published as soon as they are ready under the year’s volume number.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes research and scholarly articles that offer critical analyses of “the influence of neoliberal policy on the profession.”9 With this basis in critical LIS theory and practice, the journal covers many “traditional” topics, such as information literacy, digital rights, cataloging, and technology, but also brings nondominant discourses to the field, with topics including including politics and social justice; anti-racist theory, critical race analysis, anti-colonial studies; equity, diversity, and inclusion; gender variance, queer theory, and phenomenology; the political economy of information and knowledge; critical pedagogy; and sustainability and environmentalism.10 The editors will also consider nontextual formats.11

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online and must ensure compliance with the Submission Preparation Checklist. “Prospective authors are welcome to send outlines or drafts to the editor in advance of making a formal submission. Submissions can be sent throughout the year. Revisions may be required before a decision is made to accept or reject the paper.”12 The journal gives authors and reviewers the option of open or double-blind peer review. The authors and reviewers must all agree to an open review; if not, the manuscript undergoes double-blind review.13

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly but appropriate for the topic and type of submission.

Style guide used: “Manuscripts should be prepared according to any consistent bibliographic style.”14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Radical Librarianship is a fairly new journal (first published in 2015) that is based in the UK but has an international scope and seeks contributions from “library and information workers, researchers, and academics from anywhere in the world.”15 LIS authors, including graduate students, who are writing critically about LIS theory, research, and practices, especially in ways that engage in nondominant discourses, consider a progressive point of view, and disrupt neoliberal library policy, will find encouraging and supportive editors and a high-quality, relevant journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is based in the UK and North America and is written in English, but the journal’s scope is international and the editors hope to find “editors and authors from beyond the English-speaking world” as the journal grows and evolves.16 Authors should consider an international audience for their articles and explain jargon or region-specific practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and LIS professionals, scholars, researchers, and students from around the world in all types of libraries and information organizations. Further, readers may be members of the Radical Librarianship Collective, which is an organization “building solidarity for those critical of the marketization of libraries and commodification of information.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid academic and practical knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should keep in mind that readers expect authors to approach LIS scholarship with a consideration of critical, radical, and nonhegemonic analyses. Readers will expect traditional LIS topics to be analysed and critiqued from new, radical, or nondominant points of view, and they expect writing on newer topics crucial to the profession’s progressive advancement and a disruption of its neoliberal and market-based practices.

Last updated: April 20, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about.
  2. Stuart Lawson, “Editorial,” Journal of Radical Librarianship 1 (2015): 1, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/article/view/1.
  3. “About the Journal” lists the editors and their subject areas.
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. “About the Journal.”
  7. “Announcements,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/announcement.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  10. “About the Journal.”
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions.
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About the Journal.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  16. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  17. “Home,” Radical Librarians Collective, accessed April 20, 2018, https://rlc.radicallibrarianship.org/.
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
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