Wiki Tags Archives: Regional scope

CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Organization. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Home. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Editorial Guidelines. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Outlook Archive. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Outlook Archive.
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Editorial Guidelines.
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Home.
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Mailing List Information. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Directory. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Directory.
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. 2019. Organization. Retrieved from https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Organization.
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, Outlook Archive.
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CARL Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CARL Newsletter

ISSN: 1090-99821

Website: http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: CARL is the official publication of California Academic & Research Libraries.2 The goal of California Academic & Research Libraries is to support professional growth opportunities for its members.3

Target audience: The newsletter is a benefit of membership and per their website, membership is open to “any person interested in academic or research librarianship or in academic or research libraries in California.”4

Publisher: California Academic and Research Libraries.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: News related to professional workshops and CARL business.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/

Types of contributions accepted: Per their website, “Announcements of awards, publications, presentations, retirements and relevant professional accomplishments are limited to CARL members. News of professional appointments are welcome from any member library.”11

Submission and review process: E-mail the editor or send column information to the campus liaison coordinator.12

Editorial tone: Informational.13

Style guide used: No particular style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing opportunities for first time LIS contributors are excellent if you are willing to network and attend workshops of interest to California academic librarians. The editor requests that “interest group” coordinators designate a notetaker during its programs. The newsletter will then publish the workshop or program notes. An “interest group” is one of many associations which are members of CARL and who promote through the newsletter when they sponsor a professional growth opportunity workshop.14

The SJSU SLIS Administration listserv often posts calls for volunteers for such events. The contact person designated in these postings can then be contacted. An arrangement can then be made regarding what volunteer contributions are needed. Workshop attendance also can be arranged. A volunteer may offer to create program announcements for the CARL Newsletter as well a volunteering to be the notetaker for the workshop; the story built from those notes is likely to be published in the newsletter.15

Some of the associations listed in the interest groups include: Academic Librarians’ Interest Group North (ALIGN); Collection Development Interest Group (CDIG); Diversity in Academic Libraries (DIAL);  Southern California Instruction Librarians (SCIL); Science and Engineering Academic Librarians (SEAL); and Scholarly Communication and Open Resources for Education (SCORE).16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: About 700 members receive the newsletter with membership.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is based in California and written in English.18 California is a diverse state with strong multicultural values.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians or those interested in academic libraries, usually based in college or university libraries, especially those based in California. There is a strong focus on multicultural values.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Academic.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with their professional community, interested in improving their professional skills and maintaining strong ties with their peers in the field.

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest. 2019. “CARL Newsletter (Online).” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560283718353/665033
  2. California Academic & Research Libraries Association. 2019. Newsletter. California Academic & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/index.html
  3. California Academic & Research Libraries Association. 2019. Mission. California Academic & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.carl-acrl.org/about/mission.html
  4. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Mission.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Newsletter.
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Newsletter.
  12. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Newsletter.
  13. California Academic & Research Libraries Association. 2014. July 2014 Newsletter (Volume 37, Issue 2). California Academic & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/2014jul.html
  14. California Academic & Research Libraries Association. 2019. About CARL Interest Groups. California Academic & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.carl-acrl.org/leadership/ig/about.html
  15.  California Academic & Research Libraries Association, About CARL Interest Groups.
  16. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, About CARL Interest Groups.
  17. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Mission.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Mission.
  20. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Mission.
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American Indian Library Association Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Indian Library Association Newsletter

ISSN: 2152-35251

Website: https://www.ailanet.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Their website states, “An affiliate of the American Library Association, the American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.”2 “The American Indian Libraries Newsletter is an official publication of the American Indian Library Association. It includes information about decisions, goals, activities, and business meetings of AILA, as well as articles on programs, projects, grants, and resources relating to American Indian culture and library and information services. A column by the current president is a regular feature. In addition, you will find books reviews, interviews, and other information that furthers the goals of the association. “3

Target audience: Individuals and institutions interested in working to improve library services to American Indians and Alaska Natives in every type of library.4

Publisher: The American Indian Library Association (AILA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: This is the official publication of the American Indian Library Association. Per their website, it includes “committee and member updates and events; interviews with indigenous authors; scholarly articles; and conference program details.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines are not listed online, but you can contact the newsletter editor, George Gottschalk, for more information about submitting work to the newsletter.11

Types of contributions accepted: Their website states that the newsletter “contains information of professional interest to AILA’s members.” Contributions include updates, events, scholarly articles, author interviews, and conference program details. Book and media reviews are published on the AILA website. 12

Submission and review process: All inquiries should be directed to the current editor.13

Editorial tone: An overview of recent, archived issues suggests that articles should be informative and engaging for library professionals without relying on technical jargon.14

Style guide used: No style guidelines are listed for the newsletter.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are interested in submitting articles should consider contacting the editor, whose information appears on the AILA Publications website. Even though there are no submission guidelines listed, many of the articles are written by members. Interested authors can see the types of articles accepted by looking at previous submissions to the newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: While membership and circulation numbers are unavailable, the newsletter is mailed to all AILA members and digital copies are available to those without memberships.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Members are located throughout the United States and Canada.17 The newsletter is written in English18 and contains library terminology. Readers are aware of the different tribes and expect articles to identify specific tribes and/or bands. Some cultural considerations that authors need to consider may be using the correct term to identify American Indian people. Some readers may object to the term American Indian or Native American. This publication uses the term American Indian in their articles.19

Reader characteristics: “Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve Indian library, cultural, and informational services in school, public, and research libraries on reservations.” Readers are tribal librarians, are associated with tribal libraries or have an interest in issues that affect library and information services for American Indian people. Some readers may be educators in a Native community, or public librarians working with Native people. It is assumed that many readers have LIS degrees. Readers value respect of American Indian communities and their drive to be self sufficient. Factors that aid in independence, such as programs to assist under served American Indian tribal members located on the reservation are important issues and a conduit for receiving that information is the American Indian Library Association Newsletter.20€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with library terminology and the use of LIS jargon is present but does not dominate in the publication. Articles are written for a professional, educated audience.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The American Indian Library Association Newsletter is a respected publication read by librarians and other interested individuals who provide services to American Indian people. Authors writing for this publication will gain recognition within the American Indian LIS community. If published, authors will have a small but concentrated audience of American Indian library professionals. Authors have a good chance of being published if they involve tribal colleges and library-related issues in some way. When writing for this newsletter, it is suggested that authors include tribal affiliation of American Indian people.

Authors that are interested in submitting articles may consider topics such as the future for tribal libraries, improving services for traditionally underserved populations, or articles regarding reading and American Indian children.

Last updated: April 12, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest. 2019.”American Indian Library Association Newsletter.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521736632647/124732
  2. American Indian Library Association. 2019. About. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/about-aila/
  3. American Indian Library Association. 2019. Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/frequently-asked-questions/#q5
  4. American Indian Library Association, About.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Indian Library Association. 2019. Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  9. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  12. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  13. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  14. American Indian Library Association. 2019. Newsletters. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/newsletter/
  15. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  16. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  17. American Indian Library Association, About.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Indian Library Association, About.
  20. American Indian Library Association, About.
  21. American Indian Library Association, About.
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Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

ISSN: 0030-8188

Website: http://www.pnla.org/quarterly

Purpose, objective, or mission: Pacific Northwest Library Association promotes increased communication, joint advocacy, open debate, networking and support and information sharing through its many special projects and initiatives including an annual conference, leadership institute, quarterly journal, job board, and a Young Readers Choice Award.1

The PNLA’s journal, published since 1936, focuses on regional content, open access and discoverability.2

Target audience: PNLA members are anyone with an interest in the library and information profession primarily from Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, and Washington.3

Publisher: Pacific Northwest Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: PNLA Quarterly is “a combination of peer-reviewed and editor-reviewed articles, focused on the region and its librarianship. The Fall issue is a conference issue.6

Articles are 1,000 to 6,000 words.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: PNLA Quarterly welcomes submissions in four out of five sections: articles, peer-reviewed articles, conference program (each Fall) and announcements.9

Submission and review process: Authors should check the Author Guidelines to ensure correct formatting and to read through the submission preparation checklist. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions for ensuring a blind review should be followed. Send your submissions to pqeditors@gmail.com10

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: 6th edition of the Manual of Style of the American Psychological Association (APA).11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The PNLA Quarterly provides a unique regional and multinational perspective to the issues of intellectual freedom, literacy, continuing education, and library leadership. Articles may be theoretical, research-based, or practice-focused. If your topic could be relevant beyond the Pacific Northwest, another journal to consider might include the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Science.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though readers are focused in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. and Canada, the journal is open access for anyone to read.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PNLA Quarterly’s audience is primarily U.S. and Canadian. Readers will mostly be English and French speaking.

Reader characteristics: Readership is varied—according to PNLA’s Membership page, the association is open to “anyone with an interest in the library and information profession.”12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–readers are LIS professionals from all different areas of the profession.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of PNLA Quarterly come from across the LIS spectrum, but are united by a regional focus and a passion for librarianship. If you have a well researched article with a scholarly bend that focuses on this region of North America, PNLA Quarterly readers will be an eager audience.

Last updated: May 2, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org
  2. “Journal History,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history
  3. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/.
  4. “Journal Sponsorship,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship
  5. “Editorial Policies,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Guidelines for Submission,” PNLA.org, accessed April 27, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/guidelines-for-submission
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Submissions,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines, accessed April 27, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/membership
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Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

ISSN: 2369-937X

Website: http://www.cjal.ca

Purpose, objective, or mission: Published by the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL), the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship seeks to publish articles that are relevant to academic librarians and the profession of academic librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic librarians, both within and outside of Canada.

Publisher: The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL).2

Peer reviewed? Yes. However, book reviews and review essays are not.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles that address academic librarianship from diverse perspectives. “Submissions must present substantive analysis of a topic. Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”4

Check the journal’s calls for papers and reviews for the latest information on special issues.

Frequency of publication: “Articles and book reviews are published on a continuous basis and combined into one volume at the end of each calendar year.”5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal welcomes submissions for book reviews and articles and review essays. Book reviews should be about 1,000 words in length, whereas articles should be 3,000 to 6,000 words, and no more than 10,000.6

Submission and review process: First, create a username and password for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. You can register here.

Once you are ready to submit, be sure to read through the Author Guidelines to make sure you have formatted your work properly and included all necessary information.

“Submissions are reviewed first by an editor to confirm that the submission is appropriate for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. This step typically occurs within two weeks of submission. This editorial review considers questions such as:

  • Is the submission within the Aims and Scope?
  • Is the submission readable and within the desired word count?
  • Has the submission been published elsewhere?
  • Has the submission document been anonymized?”

“When the editor has determined that the submission is appropriate to be considered for publication, he/she contacts potential reviewers. Editors do not also serve as reviewers. Each submission is normally reviewed by two reviewers. Reviewers are asked to submit their reviews within four weeks.”

Finally, the editor will consider any recommendations and comments made by the reviewer, and will confer with the author.7

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: The most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Keep in mind that publication submissions are not limited to Canadian librarians, but articles relevant to the country’s LIS field are encouraged and welcomed. According to the journal’s Focus and Scope section, “Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”9 Recently published articles are on topics such as the recent trend of libraries hiring consultants and 20th century postwar Canadian libraries.

The CJAL could also be a good outlet for reviews on LIS books written in the last three years. Look at the Book Review Guidelines section of the Editorial Policies for more information.
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is open access, so anyone can read current and archived issues.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: All articles are published in both English and French.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians who are members of the Canadian Association of Academic Librarians. Therefore, readers are likely well versed in current LIS topics, especially how they relate to the field of academic librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors who are interested in publishing in this journal should look into CAPAL to learn more about the journal’s readership. The association’s About page states that they differ from other library associations in that CAPAL “is an advocacy group focused on the individual and the profession.”10

Readers are librarians who are well versed in LIS topics, particularly as they relate to academic librarianship. If you have a book review or well researched LIS article that is relevant for academic librarians (particularly in Canada), then this may be a good venue for your writing.

Last updated: April 21, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Editorial policies,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial policies.”
  3. “Editorial policies.”
  4. “Editorial policies.”
  5. “Editorial policies.”
  6. “Submissions,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 17, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  7. “Editorial policies.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “About,” CAPALibrarians.org, accessed April 20, 2018, http://capalibrarians.org/contact-us/
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The Conversation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Conversation

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://theconversation.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Begun as a project in 2014, The Conversation publishes articles written by PhD candidates and university-affiliated researchers. Their aim is to promote access to high-quality information and to strive for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues.1

For more in depth information, take a look at their charter.

While this wiki profile is for The Conversation‘s U.S.-based website, there are additional sites specific to audiences all around the globe.

Target audience: Members of the general public interested in reading high-quality based on academic research. Much of this research may not otherwise be accessible to the general public because it may be published in scholarly journals with limited circulation.

Publisher: The Conversation US, Inc.

Peer reviewed? No. Authors work with editors, who are professional journalists, to craft their articles.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles based on academic studies of varying topics—arts, culture, science, technology, medicine, and many more.

Frequency of publication: New articles published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://theconversation.com/us/pitches

Types of contributions accepted: The Conversation focuses on three priority areas:

  • “Timely, evidence-based analysis of issues making the news
  • Articles explaining new research and its significance for a non-expert audience
  • Timeless, plain English ‘explainers’ of complex issues”2

Submission and review process: There are three steps to becoming published: verification of institute, educational history/qualifications and the creation of a website account.3

Editorial tone:  “Plain English” (for “a non-expert audience”) and “evidence based.” 4

The writing style must be professional yet accessible to general readers who are not subject matter experts. A scholarly or academic tone could be off-putting for lay readers.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors who are are LIS researchers affiliated with an academic institution (MLIS students should keep in mind that they do not qualify), this could be a great outlet for translating scholarly work research for lay audiences and for providing well-informed content on current issues in libraries, online privacy, intellectual freedom, the digital divide, media literacy, and other LIS-oriented topics that would be significant to a nonexpert audience. A four-minute video on the benefits of writing for The Conversation is available here.

Before proposing an article, The Conversation‘s editors ask that you do a keyword search to see what has already been published on your topic.5 (Of course this is good advice for any publication you might hope to write for!) A list of articles on libraries can be found here.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This profile is geared towards readers of the U.S.-based site, but The Conversation has websites for readers in Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Indonesia, as well as an additional “global perspectives” site.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Conversation has a global audience. Specific editions are geared toward readers in specific geographies, but all editions are accessible worldwide.

Reader characteristics: All published articles feature a comments section with lively debates among readers. Thoughtful, well developed comments are the norm. Anyone can sign up to comment on articles, but full names are required to help maintain a transparent forum. Click here to read about The Conversation’s community standards for readers and commenters.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. Authors would need to assume that readers would not be part of the LIS world and would not be familiar with LIS jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

From glancing over the reader characteristics mentioned above, you can guarantee that, if published by The Conversation, your article could very well invite a lively debate among commenters from all over the world. Authors will find a higher level of engagement with readers, and will be able to see how their audience responds to their work–a feature not usually seen with publication of scholarly articles.

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 14, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/who-we-are
  2. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  3. “Become an author,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 29, 2018, https://theconversation.com/become-an-author
  4. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  5. “Pitch an article.”
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BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
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Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

ISSN: 0038-3686

Website: http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn) “is the official publication of the Southeastern Library Association (SELA).” The journal publishes “articles, announcements, and news of professional interest to the library community in the southeast”1

Target audience: The library community of the southeastern United States as well as members of SELA.2

Publisher: Southeastern Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: For each volume, SELn publishes four issues that report SELA business, juried articles, book reviews, and state library/personnel news. The journal “represents a significant means for addressing the Association’s research objective.”5 Regular sections include Articles, Book Reviews, and News Articles.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions.

Types of contributions accepted: Manuscripts submitted to SELn “need not be of a scholarly nature but should address professional concerns of the library community. SELn particularly seeks articles that have a broad southeastern scope and/or address topics identified as timely or important by SELA sections, round tables, or committees.” SELn also accepts articles with a broad range of information sources, not limited to the purely scholarly: “News releases, newsletters, clippings, and journals from libraries, state associations, and groups throughout the region.”6 SELn also accepts book reviews for consideration.7

Submission and review process:

For articles, the “manuscript will be acknowledged by the editor. Incoming manuscripts are added to a manuscript bank from which articles are selected for each issue.” The editor assigns manuscripts to at least two reviewers for blind review. Following the review, the author will be notified of the publication decision; articles are usually published within twelve months.8

For book reviews, “submissions will be judged on writing style, content and perceived interest to the readership of the journal.” Those reviews solicited by the editor receive preferential consideration.9

Editorial tone: SELn publishes both juried articles and news and association items. Scholarly articles have an academic tone but a readable style, whereas news articles are more informal. Articles that are not scholarly should “address professional concerns of the library community.”10 A review of the most recent articles reveals well-researched, referenced, and academic writing.11

Style guide used: Latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a good opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and students based in the southeastern United States to publish original research and scholarship. Potential authors should consider joining SELA in order to identify topics of interest to members through the association’s sections, roundtables, and committees.13 LIS authors can also submit book reviews. Further, SELn has issued a call for volunteer reviewers; a reviewer must be a member of SELA and have two years professional experience and two published peer-reviewed articles (or equivalent).14

 

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SELA members are able to access current issues online.15 Back issues one year past are available to all through DigitalCommons.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are based in the southeastern United States. “State library associations of the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to be constituent members of the Association.”17 As this publication focuses on a particular group of states, there will generally be a shared cultural understanding of relevant topics. However, as the SELn covers a fair number of states, specific regional terms should be explained.

Reader characteristics: SELA membership “may include any person, library or other organization . . . interested in the promotion and fostering of library and information services in the southeastern United States.”18 The audience will share a concern for the betterment of libraries in this region.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of SELA, readers will have knowledge of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal will have a variety of interests in LIS issues, especially those whose relevance is demonstrated in the context of the southeastern United States. SELn readers are LIS professionals and students throughout the region, so there is an interest in a wide variety of research and scholarship that will benefit and advance practices in all LIS environments .

Last updated: March 14, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Homepage, The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html.
  2. Homepage.
  3. Homepage.
  4. “Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/guidelines.html.
  5. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  6. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  7. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers,”The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/bookreviewers.html.
  8. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  9. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers.”
  10. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  11. SELn Archives, digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu, accessed March 14, 2018, https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seln/.
  12. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  13. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  14. “Call for Reviewers,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/reviewers.html.
  15. “Homepage.”
  16.  SELn Archives.
  17. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” 2014 edition, p. 9, accessed March 14, 2018, http://selaonline.org/sela//contacts/SELA_Handbook.pdf.
  18. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” p. 7.
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Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice (PaLRaP)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice (PaLRaP)

ISSN: 2324-7878 (online)

Website: www.palrap.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice provides (PaLRaP) provides opportunities for Pennsylvania librarians to share their knowledge and experience in all areas of librarianship with other librarians in the state and beyond.1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals in Pennsylvania, as well as those in other states and countries.2

Publisher: The journal is published by the University Library System, University of Pittsburgh, and cosponsored by the College and Research Division of the Pennsylvania Library Association and the University of Pittsburgh Press.3

Peer reviewed? Articles in the Research and Practice section are double-blind peer reviewed. Essay and Commentary articles are not peer reviewed but are edited and fact checked. News, features, and letters  are not peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online and open access.5

Content: Sections appearing regularly in PaLRaP are Editorial, Letter, Commentary, Feature, Interview, Practice, Research, and News.6 Although the journal emphasizes scholarship from Pennsylvania libraries, the Research and Practice articles are original, current, and applicable to public and academic libraries outside of the state.

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: The journal is a forum for the “unique and valuable work of librarians in Pennsylvania.” PaLRaP “includes articles from all areas of librarianship, and from all types of libraries in Pennsylvania,” including original research, innovative initiatives and practices, and current trends and challenges.8 Each section of the journal has its own editorial guidelines, scope, and style.

Submission and review process: PaLRaP uses an online submission system. Registration as an author on the PaLRaP website is required to submit and check the status of manuscripts. Authors should read the section policies for editorial guidelines and to determine the correct category for manuscripts. Articles submitted to the Research and the Practice sections are submitted to blind peer review.9 The website provides a flowchart of the Open Journal Systems software, which is a helpful overview of the publishing process.10

Editorial tone: The Research and Practice articles are scholarly; the tone of other sections is less formal but appropriate for a scholarly journal.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition,11 and the journal’s own “Additional Manuscript Guidelines for Authors.”12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors writing from and about Pennsylvania will find an excellent outlet in PaLRaP. The journal welcomes submissions from all types of libraries and all areas of librarianship. The journal’s focus on Pennsylvania may limit the ability of LIS authors from out of state to get published; however, LIS authors whose research and practice is in Pennsylvania have a great opportunity for publishing in a high-quality LIS journal whose content is relevant to academic and public libraries beyond Pennsylvania’s boarders.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is a five-year-old online open-access journal directed specifically to librarians and LIS professionals in Pennsylvania.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PaLRaP‘s focus is on libraries in Pennsylvania, and its primary audience is in Pennsylvania; however, it is an open-access journal, so it can reach audiences worldwide. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers will most likely be librarians in Pennsylvania who expect to read about research and practice from within their state. Readers will expect “to be exposed to the unique and valuable work of librarians in Pennsylvania that may not be published elsewhere in the library literature.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have LIS subject matter knowledge.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this publication focuses on library research and practice from the state of Pennsylvania, this is an open-access journal whose content is relevant outside of the state as well. Authors should keep in mind that there is potentially a much wider audience than just a local one.

Last updated: February 21, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, accessed February 21, 2018, http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope.
  2. “Editorial Policies.”
  3. “Journal Sponsorship,” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, accessed February 21, 2018, http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/journalSponsorship.
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. Homepage, Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, accessed February 21, 2018, www.palrap.org.
  6. Tom Reinsfelder and Anne Behler, “Editors’ Note: Five Years of PaLRap,” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice 5, no. 2 (Fall 2017), https://doi.org/10.5195/palrap.2017.169.
  7. “Archives,” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, accessed February 21, 2018, http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/issue/archive.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “Submissions,” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, accessed February 21, 2018, http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions.
  10. “About This Publishing System,” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, accessed February 21, 2018, http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12.  “Additional Manuscript Guidelines for Authors,” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, accessed February 21, 2018, http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/pages/view/manuscriptguide.
  13. “Editorial Policies.”
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

ISSN: 1931-54731

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.2 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”3

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.4

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.7

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.10

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.11

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members13; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  SCA Newsletter, Society of California Archivists (SCA), accessed March 18, 2018, http://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  3.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  4. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  5.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  13. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  14.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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