Wiki Tags Archives: Public libraries

School Library Connection

 

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Connection 

ISSN: 2380-98411

Website: https://schoollibraryconnection.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “School Library Connection (SLC) is an extensive learning resource center for school library professionals. As the combined evolution of School Library Monthly and Library Media Connection magazines, SLC maintains their commitment to providing those in the school library field with practical insights and inspiration while also advancing the scope and mission of its predecessors.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in school libraries and educators.3

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Articles on “Organization & Management, Instructional Leadership, and Perspectives & Partners.” Reviews are also featured in a searchable database.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (print); continuously (online.)9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: Queries for proposed articles should be addressed to the appropriate editor found on their submissions page. Articles on day-to-day operations and best practices of school librarianship should be discussed with the Organization & Management editor. Articles on instructional practice should be discussed with the Instructional Leadership editor. Articles on school libraries in the broader context of education should be discussed with the Perspectives & Partners editor. Experienced and new writers are welcomed.10

Reviews are also accepted in the form of “concise descriptions and evaluations of the contents, quality, and curricular applications of books and other media available for school library purchase.”11

Submission and review process: Authors must send a query to the appropriate editor to develop their idea and article before submission. The final article must then be sent to that same editor.12 There is an editorial calendar available to guide author submissions.13 Articles are typically published four months after the article deadlines.14

All book and material reviews should be emailed to the reviews editor.15

Editorial tone: Informative and conversational.16

Style guide used: An in-house guide based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Excellent opportunity for LIS professionals involved with school libraries, with the ability to convey they first hand experiences with an active voice and in a clear, conversational style. Talented first-time authors are welcomed, so this would be a great place to start building a writing portfolio for a respected and widely-read publication. While not a peer-reviewed publication that would support tenure, work in this magazine reaches a very large audience and will increase the visibility of any contributing author.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has over 5,000 readers. The website reports an average of 4,250 visitors.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is based in North America, with a corresponding readership.19 Readers would be familiar with LIS jargon, gained through practice or education, and the issues facing school libraries. Given the practical focus of the publication, readers most likely approach their work with a positive attitude, interested in bettering themselves and the service they provide.20

Reader characteristics: Readers will have experience with libraries, especially school libraries, and the majority work directly with students.21 The 2019 editorial calendar indicates audience interest in OER, collection development, primary resources, collaborating with other school departments, makerspaces, cultural competence, and political literacy, all within the K-12 school library context.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While a reader may have obtained their LIS knowledge through an undergraduate program for media specialists or through a LIS graduate program, depending on their position, it can be assumed all will have a clear understanding of the working of the school library and the responsibilities of the LIS professionals in K-12 libraries. Acronyms and terms common in education and school librarianship would be acceptable to use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication expect articles that support their efforts to improve the LIS services they provide. They want information from colleagues about their successes and efforts they can replicate in their own libraries. To be successful writers will need to meet their collaborating editor’s expectations and submit articles written in an active voice, from personal experience or observation.

Last updated: July 5, 2019


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Connection,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed July 5, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1562358591408/826729
  2. Libraries Unlimited, “About,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About
  3. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com.
  8. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  9. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  10. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About/Write
  11. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/Home/reviews?tab=5
  12. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_FAQ.pdf
  13. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  14. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions.”
  15. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+.”
  16. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  17. Libraries Unlimited, “Article Submission Guidelines,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2o19, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf
  18. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/mediaserver/SLC/1981/1981090.pdf
  19. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019.”
  20. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  21. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  22. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  23. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
Continue Reading

American Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Libraries

ISSN: 0002-9769 (Print) and 2163-5129 (Online)1

Website: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: American Libraries is “the flagship publication of the American Library Association,” dedicated to publishing news “about all matters of import to libraries and librarians.”2 Per the Editorial Policy, part of the ALA Policy Manual section 10.2: the editor is charged with “a particular responsibility to convey to the membership and other readers full and accurate information about the activities, purposes, and goals of the Association.”3

Target audience: ALA members, the majority of whom are professional librarians in the United States.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news magazine.7

Medium: American Libraries is a print publication, with occasional digital supplements. American Libraries Online is the online edition.8

Content: American Libraries “features articles on professional concerns and developments, along with news of the Association, library-related legislation, and libraries around the country and the world. Expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.” 9

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published 6 times per year, with a digital-only July/August issue and occasional digital supplements.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: American Libraries solicits contributions of 600-1,500-word articles, including book reviews, features and opinion pieces on topics of general interest to members of the American Library Association. Letters to the editor are also accepted.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email to americanlibraries@ala.org. Hard copies may be mailed to American Libraries, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611. After submission, there may be “editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that in their opinion support the article’s focus. Editors will make every possible effort to review copy with the author prior to publication, especially regarding any proposed substantive changes.” Authors should hear back about their manuscripts within 4-8 weeks.12

Editorial tone: “Informal, but informative. Factual articles must be inviting and readable, with all statements backed by responsible research and interviews with several expert sources.” The editor encourages the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues.”13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.).14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This 100+-year-old magazine is a well-respected publication with a wide audience. It would not be scholarly enough in tone to carry much weight for someone building up publications for tenure, but it is a credible, professional publication that provides a forum for practical information sharing among members of the LIS community. American Libraries publishes feature stories and opinion pieces as well as letters to the editor, and occasionally opportunities for columnists arise. Strong writers with appropriate story ideas should be encouraged to submit work here, whether they are LIS practitioners, educators, or students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 62,000 member organizations, individual members, and paid subscribers.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A geographic breakdown could not be found, though American Libraries does offer rates for the US, Canada, and International subscriptions.16 It is probably safe to assume that the majority of ALA members reside and work in the United States. American Libraries is published in English, and readers are likely to be completely comfortable communicating in English. However, overuse of regionalisms should be avoided to appeal to the diverse and widespread American audience.17

Reader characteristics: Because readers are usually members of the ALA, the vast majority work in a variety of libraries and have a high level of education.18 As librarians, these readers are likely to be interested in library topics and sympathetic to library issues. However, it is not safe to assume that readers are homogeneous in terms of how they believe problems should be solved. Letters to the editor and point-of-view pieces indicate that readers can be highly opinionated. The editorial policy states that the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.”19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to know a lot about general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors would want to avoid highly specialized topics and language. For example, public librarians may not be familiar with (or interested in) the particular jargon and issues of military librarians, and technology specialists may not be familiar with the jargon of catalogers.[19. American Libraries, “About.”

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because this is a professional rather than a scholarly publication, appropriate submissions would be practical rather than theoretical. Possibilities might include current topics in librarianship, or unique twists on topics of general interest to the broad LIS community such as management, advocacy, and general-interest technologies. American Libraries readers have in common a professional or personal interest in libraries, but the audience is large, and readers’ specialized interests will be quite diverse. For this magazine, general library topics would be appropriate — articles on things like library technology, marketing, or management, the kinds of topics that would be relevant to all librarians, no matter what kinds of libraries they worked in.

Authors could assume that American Libraries readers would understand general library language and that basic terms would not need to be explained (the editors of American Libraries, for example, assume that readers will understand ALA’s common acronyms, such as ACRL). However, authors should try to avoid the kinds of topics or jargon that might be related to a specific library environment or aspect of librarianship, such as academic libraries or cataloging. Articles on highly specific topics or for particular ALA subgroups would be better directed toward the publications of the related ALA divisions, such as College and Research Libraries News or Children and Libraries.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “American Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561931025099/41722
  2. American Library Association, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/about/
  3. American Libraries, “About.”
  4. American Libraries, “Advertising,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/advertising-2/
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Libraries, “About.”
  9. American Libraries, “Submissions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/ 
  10. American Libraries, “About.”
  11. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  12. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  13. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  14. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  15. American Libraries, “Advertising.”
  16. American Libraries, “Subscriptions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/subscriptions/
  17. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  18. American Libraries, “About.”
  19. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
Continue Reading

Marketing Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Library Services

ISSN: 0896-39081

Website: www.MarketingLibraryServices.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Marketing Library Services (MLS) emerged in 1987 and is the longest-running publication that regularly delivers how-to articles and case studies for marketers in all types of libraries. They’re written by practitioners from around the world and curated by a respected expert who has 25+ years in the field. These detailed, vetted articles deliver more value than the brief ideas and advice offered via social media.2

Target audience: Information professionals in any type of library who need to learn to do better marketing, promotion, and advocacy.3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: MLS covers strategies and tactics for all marketing-related topics: advocacy, outreach, branding, segmentation, social media, funding initiatives, long-term campaigns, assessment, ROI, partnerships, promotional materials, program publicity, communications, PR, advertising, etc. Subscribers will also benefit from interviews with marketing masters, conference coverage, book reviews, and news.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December).9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: The editor of Marketing Library Services, Kathy Dempsey, does not accept blind submissions; instead, it is preferable to email her first (see Editor below) with an article idea, so that she can see if it fits in with upcoming issues, or whether or not something similar has already been published. In a personal correspondence she asserts that if the topic is something useful to Marketing Library Services readership, she will send the author a desired length and deadline. Writers will be sent guidelines, and all graphics (photos, charts, etc.) must be in color and high resolution.10

The site itself says very little about submissions. Editorial communications should be directed to the editor, Kathy Dempsey, at kdempsey@infotoday.com.11

Types of contributions accepted: From a correspondence with the editor: “Marketing Library Services covers a wide range of marketing-related topics, including these: advocacy, outreach, programming, fundraising, event planning, dealing with the media, getting votes for library issues, proving your value, making good promotional materials, community promotion, online promotion, winning related awards, studying demographics for target marketing, innovations, surveys and focus groups, strategic communication, etc. And, of course, true marketing (plans for full campaigns).” Also, “in addition to the case studies, Marketing Library Services carries news, reviews of books and videos, conference coverage, and links to library articles and culture.” 12

Submission and review process: Authors first should send correspondence to Kathy Dempsey stating their idea. Because Marketing Library Services is published often, timely articles are strongly recommended. Also, authors must have been directly involved in the projects they are writing about, and must write in the first person. Ms. Dempsey states that authors’ specific titles do not matter.13

Editorial tone: Marketing Library Services should not be written in third-person or academic tones. The newsletter’s tone is conversational, professional, and should inspire readers. According to the editor, “Articles should be written as if you’€™re sitting down with a colleague and explaining your project over lunch.”14

The editor will correspond with the author about this after the author’s idea has been accepted.15

Style guide used: Associated Press.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Marketing Library Services is a very good resource for LIS authors interested in writing on community outreach and marketing of library services. Many topics can fall under this umbrella, so it is important for potential authors to be creative and open in how they frame their content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Marketing Library Services has 700 subscribers. Most of these are in North America, but some are in Europe and in other English-speaking countries.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the content of the newsletter is in English and about a broad topic (marketing), the geographic location of the newsletter’s readership is assumed to reside across the United States. There are some readers from outside the United States, but because marketing can be culturally specific, those readers are likely already doing the work of cultural translation. English is used entirely throughout Marketing Library Services and, for the most part, readers are American or from Europe.18 Because of this spread, colloquialisms should be avoided (as in most professional writing).

Reader characteristics: According to Kathy Dempsey, the editor, most of the readership is comprised of librarians who market for their organization, while others are managers and directors. She also states that some are professors specializing in marketing. Because Marketing Library Services readership is comprised of professionals directly involved in marketing, it may be safely assumed that jargon specific to marketing is fine. As well, because this is a trade journal, readers will be interested in practical information. Kathy Dempsey states from a personal correspondence that, “MLS is written for a wide horizontal market that covers all types of libraries: public, academic, special (medical, gov’€™t, etc.), corporate, and to a lesser extent, K-12 school. It welcomes article queries from all of these librarians. What they all have in common is the need to promote their services. Many case studies about how one lib accomplished a goal can be used as models to doing similar things in other types of libraries. Articles on projects that have this ability to be widely replicated are especially valuable.”19

Readers of Marketing Library Services work in many types of libraries, so it may be safely assumed that they all value libraries’ continuing prosperity. That said, this does not mean that their values are identical. However, the newsletter’s tone is conversational, not argumentative. Articles written arguing strongly for one thing or another probably will not fit in Marketing Library Services.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Marketing Library Services is a newsletter informing LIS professionals the best practices and valuable ideas regarding LIS marketing. Professionals reading this newsletter are looking for good ideas and solidly practical plans and instances of good marketing. Marketing Library Services is not a dry tome of theoretical research written in an hermetic tone. Nonetheless, most of the readers are deeply engaged with marketing their organization, and are working professionals whose time and attention is valuable. Writers should consider their readers as interested colleagues who are deeply interested in successful programs and campaigns, and how they may learn from writers’ experiences and implement similar strategies in their own organizations.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Proquest, “MLS: Marketing Library Services,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521418800307/153039
  2. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Marketing Library Services,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/
  3. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  8. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  9. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  10. Dempsey, K., 27 June 2019, personal communication.
  11. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Subscription & Editorial Info,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mls-subs.shtml
  12. Dempsey, personal communication.
  13. Dempsey, personal communication.
  14. Dempsey, personal communication.
  15. Dempsey, personal communication.
  16. Dempsey, personal communication.
  17. Dempsey, personal communication.
  18. Dempsey, personal communication.
  19. Dempsey, personal communication.
  20. Dempsey, personal communication.

    Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this newsletter have a high degree of LIS subject matter. Marketing Library Services caters to the LIS profession, so references to library specific trends, ideas, and concepts will be well received and will not require a high degree of explanation. However, because the readership is broadly based across the LIS professional spectrum some terms and knowledge specific to one group may not be appropriate for all readers.[21. Dempsey, personal communication.

Continue Reading

Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Journal (LJ)

ISSN: 0363-02771

Website: http://www.libraryjournal.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal is produced as a trade publication with the intent to provide library news and related information. Although the emphasis of the journal is on public libraries, the journal contains information pertinent to a wide variety of professionals in the library world. Library Journal also provides reviews of books, ebooks, audiobooks, DVDs/videos, and other media annual to assist library professionals in purchasing for their institution. The mission of the journal is to provide feature articles and news stories which inform library professionals about current issues in a readable style.2

Target audience: The target audience is composed of librarians in public, academic, and special libraries, as well as library administrators, staff, and directors.3

Publisher:  Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news. Library Journal is a non-research-oriented LIS professional news journal that includes advertising, bibliographies, illustrations, and book reviews.6

Medium: Library Journal is a print publication with free online content. Online archives are free, though they do not necessarily contain everything that is in the print edition.7 You can also subscribe to LJ’s RSS feeds and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.8 The online version of Library Journal also includes blogs, podcasts and message boards, links to affiliated newsletters, and tools to assist in collection development and other areas of library administration.9

Content: Library Journal content includes news, reviews, LJ bestsellers, commentary, departments, info-tech, special reports, letters to the editor, upcoming events, classified ads, and photos.10 Library Journal evaluates over 8,000 books annually and also provides reviews of library-related equipment and materials.11

Frequency of publication: The print publication is issued 12 times a year.12 Online content is updated continuously.13 Reviews are also welcomed, though review contributors are expected to regularly write, rather than simply submitting one review.14

Submission and review process: Submissions to the Features and Columns sections should be 2 to 4 pages in a magazine, or 1800 to 2700 words. Finalized drafts can be sent as an attachment along with a query describing the coverage and approach of the article as well as the writer’€™s connection to the subject and his or her expertise. The query can be a paragraph or several paragraphs in length. Response to queries may take between 4 to 6 weeks. LJ also accepts opinion pieces and rants about topics and concerns in the library profession for its “BackTalk” . Pieces should be in the range of 900 words. Be sure to email the appropriate editor for the type of content being submitted.15

Book reviewer guidelines for contracted and unpaid review writers can be found here.16

Editorial tone: As this publication is aimed at the general librarian population, the tone of articles should be objective as well as thought-provoking while providing topical and useful information. Articles should be written in an “accessible and readable style.”17

Style guide used: No particular style guide is indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A trusted and respected publication for the library community, Library Journal certainly has the potential for an LIS author to reach a wide audience. Since the journal reaches out to public, academic, and special libraries, there are a multitude of articles that could possibly be written for this publication.

Library Journal is open to ideas for articles and columns, and also encourages “opinion pieces and rants.”18 Library Journal prefers an approach that is widely accessible by its readers.19 There is therefore great potential for newer writers who are not necessarily comfortable with a more scholarly voice. There is also a market here for librarians to offer insight and advice on practical issues facing contemporary libraries. This is a wonderful opportunity for librarians (including those who may not consider themselves to be professional authors) to share their real-world experience with others.

Library Journal Reviews+ is a popular selection tool used in public and academic libraries, and an ongoing opportunity exists here to publish reviews in a wide range of disciplines. Reviewers are not required to have previously published reviews.20 This would be an excellent opportunity for library students with graduate degrees in other areas to review books in their specialty and begin to publish in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Library Journal is distributed to 43,000 print subscribers, and its online equivalent registers over 91,000 monthly visits. The publication is also popular on social media, with over half a million followers across various social media platforms, on which journal content is shared.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LJ is printed in English, and most articles focus on topics affecting libraries in the United States. A scan of recent article titles reveals an editorial comfort with acronyms specific to the American context, such as CIA, ALA, and NYPL.22 However, authors should remain sensitive to the possibility of diverse readership, since cultural diversity and international issues are embraced by the publication, as demonstrated by recent articles on Indigenous Academic Libraries, Spanish-language collection development, and inclusion in scholarly publishing.23

Reader characteristics: Because the audience largely consists of librarians and library staff, readers are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship.24 The readership is large,25 however, and likely diverse in their particular perspectives on library issues.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:  Library Journal is read by people all across the library profession, so a working knowledge of library terms can be assumed, but authors should be aware that members of their audience may not have MLIS degrees.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Library Journal include library directors, administrators, and staff in all types of libraries. An article written for this publication has the potential to reach and influence people across the library field, nationally and even internationally. Authors should remain aware that their readers are familiar with both the current highest standards of librarianship, yet also the practical difficulties that come with working in the field. It is recommended to aim for a broad reach, even when writing about an issue specific to one kind of library, so that readers from all types of libraries can gather ideas or inspiration from each article.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521665093762/48829
  2. Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=About-Us.
  3. Library Journals, “About Us.”
  4. Media Source, Inc., “Media Source Inc.,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://mediasourceinc.com/
  5. Library Journal, “Submissions,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news.
  6. Library Journal, “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com
  7. Library Journal, “Reviews+,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=Reviews%2B
  8. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  9. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  10. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  11. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://media.libraryjournal.com/library-journal/.
  12. Library Journal, “Subscribe to Library Journal, accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=subscribe.
  13. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”

    About the publication’s submission guidelines

    Location of submission guidelines: For articles: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news. For reviews: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ

    Types of contributions accepted: Feature articles that are broad in scope and/or offer useful information and ideas. The journal also accepts news pieces, announcements, photos of library-related news and events, letters to the editor, and opinion pieces.[14. Library Journal, “Submissions.”

  14. Library Journal, “Review for LJ,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ.
  15. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  16. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  17. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  18. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  19. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  20. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  21. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  22. Library Journal, “News,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=News
  23. Library Journal, “News.”
  24. Library Journal, “About Us.”
  25. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  26. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
Continue Reading

School Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Journal (SLJ)

ISSN: 0362-89301

Website: https://www.slj.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “School Library Journal is the premiere publication for librarians and information specialists who work with children and teens. A source of quality journalism and reviews for more than 60 years, SLJ produces award-winning features and news coverage on: literacy, best practices, technology, education policy and other issues of interest to the school library and greater educator community.”2

Target audience: Any librarians and information professionals working with children and teens, including librarians in K-12 schools as well as those in public libraries.3

Publisher: Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Professional.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Claims to be one of the most authoritative reviewers of children’s and young adult materials. It mainly focuses on books, but also includes reviews on audio and video items. The journal also contains columns, news, and feature articles.8

Frequency of publication: Monthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Items of interest to librarians and educators who work with children: feature articles, news articles, and specialty columns.10 Articles from the last few years include topics such as rural public libraries, fundraising, app reviews, bloggers, LGBTQ+ Pride, diversity, and tips for school librarians preparing for the first day of school.11

Submission and review process: Send brief article proposals to the appropriate editor before submitting any complete articles. Feature articles are generally less than 2,500 words, while opinion pieces are around 600-700 words. News articles can vary in length, depending on the topic.12

Editorial tone: Informative, but not academic.13

Style guide used: None indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a successful and popular publication that, while encouraging of submissions, may be difficult to break into as a writer. A thorough study of the publication with attention to the authors published in their pages will give a writer a better idea if this is a good match for them.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: School Library Journal has a circulation of 23,000 in the print edition with an estimated reach of 92,000 readers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: There is no specific breakdown on the nationality of the readers available, but the history of the journal reveals that it is entirely geared toward schools in the United States and Canada.15 Most of the readers of this journal would be those who work with youth in libraries in the United States, so there should not be any problems with cultural references, LIS jargon, or terminology particular to education.16

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal would be those who work with K-12 students, either in schools or public libraries. They have a shared interest in promoting literacy and welcome resources that inspire student achievement.17 Articles openly and positively discuss diversity and inclusivity in library services, with article topics ranging from combating systematic racism in schools to selecting LGBTQ+ books for pre-teen collections. More articles and reviews touching on these topics would be welcome.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this journal would not be limited to those with teaching credentials or MLS degrees. Some may be library media technicians who may not have an advanced degree, but would have enough education or professional training in order to understand the subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of School Library Journal have a common interest in children’€™s literature and issues regarding school libraries. Many of the readers are library technicians, so some articles are geared toward encouraging collaboration with teachers and librarians. Authors should recognize that there is an education gap as well as a wage gap between the professionals and the paraprofessionals and should refrain from using an excess of technical terms in their articles. Readers of SLJ maintain a great interest in information literacy and how this can be integrated into the curriculum, as well as increasing the technology available to the students. Introducing ideas that are on the cutting edge of technology yet are not restricted by financial or time constraints would be a way of effectively reaching the intended audience.

Last updated: June 26, 2019.


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399134773/52981
  2. School Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=About-Us
  3. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  7. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions.
  8. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  11. School Library Journal, “News & Features,” accessed June 29, 2019. https://www.slj.com/?subpage=News%20%26%20Features
  12. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  13. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  14. Library Journals, LLC., “Print,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://media.libraryjournal.com/print/#schoollibraryjournalmag.
  15. School Library Journal, “News & Features.”
  16. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  17. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  18. School Library Journal, “News & Articles.”
  19. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
Continue Reading

Library Leadership and Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Leadership and Management (formerly Library Administration and Management)

ISSN: 1945-8851 (Print) and 1945-886X (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) is the official journal of the Library Leadership and Management Association. LL&M focuses on assisting library administrators and managers at all levels as they deal with day-to-day challenges. In-depth articles address a wide variety of management issues and highlight examples of successful management methods used in libraries. Features include interviews with prominent practitioners in libraries and related fields, and columns with practical advice on managing libraries.”2

Website: http://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm

Target audience: The publication is directed toward library administrators and managers in all sectors, including public, special and academic libraries.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Hybrid journal: “LL&M offers both formal peer review and editorial review options depending on the author’s preference.”5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Research-based articles, interviews, new developments and success stories related to managing libraries. Specific topics relate to management, leadership, and administration.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Per guidelines, “Recognizing the LLAMA is a diverse organization, Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) welcomes articles that correspond to the interests of the membership. This includes manuscripts that relate to leadership, management, and administration, as well as manuscripts that mirror the topical interests of the sections and discussion groups.”10

“The journal accepts both longer, in-depth manuscripts of 4,000 to 6,000 words and briefer practice-based articles of 1,000 to 2,500 words. Manuscripts longer than 6,000 words should be discussed with the Editor(s) prior to submission as there may be interest in converting it into a series of articles.”11

Submission and review process: Article submission is through their online portal. Review process depends on author’s preference: editorial or peer review.12

Editorial tone: Informative.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style and Random House Webster’s College Dictionary are listed as resources for writers.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Authors able to write on the topics associated with library administration and management would be a good fit for this publication. Recent articles focused on job satisfaction and employee turnover, diversity, innovative space planning, award winners, and customer satisfaction.15 The editors will consider articles presented at conferences, making this publication a possibility for LIS graduate students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is an online publication with Open Access Policy providing unrestricted access to published content indicating a larger audience beyond the LLAMA membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although headquartered in Chicago as part of the American Library Association,17 LLAMA and its membership is national in scope. The articles are domestic in nature, and the LLAMA Board of Directors all are from U.S. institutions.18 The publication is printed in English.19 Despite the fact that many LLAMA members manage libraries in ethnically diverse communities, the articles in the journal focus on general management issues that all administrators face, such as strategic planning, fundraising, library boards, and internet ethics, not community-specific issues.20

Reader characteristics: The commonality of LLAMA members is that they are at a managerial level within a library organization. It can be assumed that the majority of LLAMA members have been in the library business for a number of years, however no demographics are available. Unless they are a one-person operation (which could be the case for a school librarian), they hold supervisory roles within their organizations. Their interests are based on financial, human resource, building, and legal and ethical issues as they affect the success of their particular organizations. They are concerned with strategic planning, disaster planning, and facility planning.21 In looking over the editorials from recent issues, the overall value that can be attached to this journal would be one of empowerment. The content seeks to provide library managers with the tools needed to develop successful organizations out of preparedness rather than reactionary responses to a crisis.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Despite the fact that these are library managers, they may or may not have MLIS degrees, as some library managers followed business, not library, career tracks.23 Recent articles did not contain overly technical topics or LIS jargon, veering more toward business concepts.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience is more specific than €™American Libraries€™, which is directed toward all library personnel. In contrast, LL&M is designed for library managers and administrators. This could be an opportunity or a challenge for a writer. Things such as negotiating with a vendor, ergonomic work stations, and staff development are matters of concern to nearly any organization manager. Topics such as working with a library board, dealing with book challenges, and internet filters are problems that are specific to library management. But both categories have a place in this publication and therefore open up a host of possibilities for articles. However, these readers, as organization managers, most likely have very limited time to pursue professional reading. Authors for the journal need to be on top of the issues at the forefront of the managers’€™ daily lives in order to offer something new to say that is of value.

Last updated: June 12, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Leadership and Management,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 12, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560362802779/67509
  2. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm
  3. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management.”
  4. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management.”
  5. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Information for Authors,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/information/authors
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Information for Authors.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions,” accessed June 12, 2019 https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  12. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  13. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  14. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  15. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/issue/archive
  16. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
  17. Library Leadership and Management Association, Library Leadership & Management.
  18. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA,” accessed June 12, 2019, http://www.ala.org/llama/about
  19. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  20. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
  21. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA.”
  22. American Library Association, “Archives.”
  23. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA.”
  24. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
Continue Reading

Public Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Public Libraries

ISSN: 0163-55061

Website: Public Libraries magazine: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries; Public Libraries Onlinehttp://publiclibrariesonline.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Public Libraries is the official trade publication of the Public Library Association (PLA), a division of American Library Association (ALA), and thus reflects its standards. The magazine seeks to provide public librarians with the news and information they need to be as successful in their careers as possible.2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.3

Publisher: Public Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS professional news. This publication focuses on the public library workplace rather than on scholarly research.6

Medium: Print.7 Public Libraries Online, a complement to the printed journal, is available online.8

Content: Quality articles and information germane to all aspects of public libraries.9

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl

Types of contributions accepted: The following types of contributions are considered for publication:

  • Feature articles. Manuscripts should be 3,000-6,000 words.
  • €œVerso€ pieces, of no more than 1,500 words.
  • Vendor announcements. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)
  • Reviews of professional literature. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)11

Submission and review process: Public Libraries has a specific style guide that authors should adhere to before submitting manuscripts to the editor. Manuscripts are evaluated by the Feature Editor and persons knowledgeable about the topic of the work.12 All submissions are reviewed in a double-blind process to ensure that published papers are of high quality.13

Articles are accepted on a rolling basis and the evaluation process generally takes eight to twelve weeks. Articles are typically scheduled for publication in the order in which they are received.14

All submissions must be submitted through the online Public Libraries Editorial Manager. First-time authors will need to register. You may then submit your manuscript and track its progress through the system.15

Editorial tone: From the website: “Write in a clear, simple style. Use the active voice whenever possible. Avoid overly long sentences.”16

Style guide used: Consult the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. and the Random House Webster’€™s College Dictionary for questions about grammar, usage, or spelling.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an excellent publication for public librarians, LIS professionals or student authors interested in sharing unique knowledge or experiences germane to public libraries. This is a credible resource since it is published by the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association. Potential topics this publication may address include: career development, serving diverse populations in public libraries, and improving public programming.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Subscription accompanies membership in the Public Library Association (PLA),18 meaning that each issue of Public Libraries circulates to nearly 10,000 PLA members and subscribers throughout the entire United States and Canada.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLA is a division of the American Library Association, indicating that readers of this publication are primarily located throughout the United States.20 The information in this publication is printed in the English language.21 It is culturally focused on the U.S. and on library and information science issues relevant to American librarians working in the public library realm.22

Reader characteristics: Expect readers to be familiar with current library technologies and policies. Readers are likely working in a public library, and are knowledgeable of procedures and technologies related to their field. By subscribing the magazine, the readers are displaying a personal interest in bettering themselves and their knowledge of their chosen field. The majority of this publication’€™s readers include reference, children, youth, special collections, and technical librarians working in public libraries. Although most of the audience has an MLIS education, there are professionals who have worked in libraries for an extensive amount of time and may have gotten involved when a graduate degree was not required. Furthermore, this publication is appealing to LIS graduate students interested in learning more about issues in the public library realm. This publication is progressive insofar as it is concerned with ensuring that the general public, including the disadvantaged, has access to information, services and programs.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that this is a professional publication, most readers are already familiar with issues relevant to the library and information science profession. They will also be familiar with LIS jargon, specifically that used in public libraries.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Public Library‘s readers are professionally affiliated with both the American Library Association and the Public Library Association. Collectively, readers are very likely to be public library employees. Most read this publication to learn about national public library news, to build camaraderie within the field, and to gain insight about how they might approach issues within their own libraries. Considering this publication’s national audience, it is important to link unique experiences to national issues. For instance, an article about lending e-readers in one library would make connections to copyright or cost issues relevant to other libraries.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Public Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 11, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399522510/23515
  2. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries
  3. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Library Association, “Write for Public Libraries Magazine,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl
  6. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  7. Proquest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  9. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl/editorialguidelines
  12. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  14. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  15. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  16. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  17. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  18. American Library Association, “Subscribe to Public Libraries,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/subscribe
  19. American Library Association, “Advertise with PLA,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/advertise
  20. American Library Association, Subscribe to Public Libraries.
  21. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  22. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  23. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  24. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
Continue Reading

Voice of Youth Advocates

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

ISSN: 0160-4201

Website: http://www.voyamagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Focuses on library services to/with young adults (aka “teenagers” “adolescents,” typically youth of middle and high school ages). VOYA‘s policy is based on the following principles: specialize in young adult library service; intellectual freedom and equal access; and youth advocacy and youth participation.1

Target audience: Public librarians, school librarians and educators serving youth ages 12 to 18, paraprofessionals serving youth, publishers, authors of young adult books, and other young adult advocates.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The journal includes book reviews on fiction, nonfiction, and genre titles, as well as articles about YA services, programming, space design, and lists of award winners.7

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly publication.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Literary analysis, author interviews, research, practical project ideas, controversies, and new YA space redesigns or makeover profiles are accepted. Booklists and columns are usually planned by the editor, but new content suggestions are accepted as queries.9

Submission and review process: Short articles should be between 800 to 1,700 words and up to 3,500 words for longer pieces. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Information for specific column requirements is available on the website. Authors should query the editor before submitting manuscripts, to ensure the piece is suitable for the journal.10

Editorial tone: VOYA solicits articles written in an approachable style for practitioners serving YA users. The goal is to publish articles by authors who express enthusiasm in working with YA and who can speak from experience about YA services.11

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VOYA is a well-respected journal in the field of library and information services for young adults. The journal is written in an approachable style which may not meet tenure requirements for academic faculty. Also, this journal is intended for public and school librarians who work with YA and not academic librarians. Those interested in tenure may not want to submit manuscripts for publication to this journal.

The journal welcomes articles about new, progressive, informative, and controversial issues as they relate to youth culture. Authors who have experience in working with YAs and who can demonstrate enthusiasm for working with them through their writing are encouraged to submit manuscripts. VOYA‘s wide range of readers provides authors with a large audience which will provide them wide recognition in the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: VOYA has 6,000 subscribers. According to the last reader’€™s survey, each subscriber circulates the journal to 3.5 colleagues which means that the journal experiences a readership of 21,000 people.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published within the United States,13 but there is a possibility that there are subscribers outside of the country. The journal is printed in English.14 Due to wide readership, it is important that language remain clear of local jargon. This also means that all acronyms should be spelled out. Cultural consideration should also be taken into account. Pop culture references should be explained so that all readers will understand. This is very important for this journal since it focuses on young adults, who are very interested in pop culture.15

Reader characteristics: There is no statistical breakdown on the readers of this journal. However, the journal does say that the readers of this journal are public and school librarians, educators, authors of young adult books, publishers, and other youth advocates. The common interest among this group is young adults. However, they may not all be interested in this age group in the same way. School librarians may be more interested in the book review section and have marginal interest in programming, which public librarians are keen on. Publishers and authors might also be interested in the book review sections and the interviews with authors. The journal does not profess itself to be liberal or conservative, however, it does value intellectual freedom, young adults, literature for this group, and advocacy for YA resources, all of which lean more towards a progressive attitude. The journal often features articles about controversial topics, books, or authors.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the breadth of professions represented in this readership community, it is suggested that authors avoid using LIS specific jargon which may not be understood or interesting to lay readers.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal are a very diverse group in terms of language, geographic location, profession, and educational attainment. Authors should consider writing articles about new and interesting topics in the field of library services. However, the topics should not be scholarly in tone or esoteric. Authors should remember that the readers have different backgrounds and interests in young people.

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About,” accessed June May 6, 2019, http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  2. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  3. ProQuest, “Voice of Youth Advocates,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions,” accessed May 8, 2019, http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  10. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  11. Voice of Youth Advocates, “Submissions.”
  12. Voice of Youth Advocates, 2018, Media Kit, http://voyamagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/VOYA2018-mediakit_web.pdf
  13. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  14. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  15. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  16. Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
  17.  Voice of Youth Advocates, “About.”
Continue Reading

Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
Continue Reading

Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

ISSN: 2475-0158 (Print) 2475-0166 (Online)1

Website: https://www.alia.org.au/jalia

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is the flagship journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA).”2. “The Journal aims to stimulate discussion and inform practice by showcasing original peer reviewed research articles and other scholarly papers about, or relevant to, the Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions.”3

Target audience: “It is a quarterly publication for information science researchers, information professionals, related disciplines and industries.”4

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis5

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All Research and Research-in-Practice articles in JALIA have undergone double-blind peer review. Information-in-practice papers will undergo editorial screening.”6

Type: LIS scholarly journal

Medium: Print and Online7

Content: According to their website, this journal publishes, research papers; research-in-practice papers; information-in-practice papers; and book reviews.8 Research papers and book reviews make up the majority of the publication. Book reviews are accepted for any library related topic or resource and can range from personal digital archiving, marketing, genealogy, youth resources, and much more. If it is a topic a librarian might find useful, it has a chance of being published here. Research-in-practice and information-in-practice papers appear to be research papers that focus on practical applications. Examples can be seen by viewing the journal’s table of contents.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj21&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: “This journal accepts the following article types: Research papers; Research-in-practice papers; Information-in-practice papers; Book reviews.”10

Submission and review process: “Please ensure your manuscript is anonymised for peer review. A minimum of two files should be prepared for submission: 1) Title page (including title, author names and details, acknowledgements as well as funding and grant-awarding bodies) 2) Manuscript – anonymised (including title, abstract and keywords on first page; main text; references; appendices (as appropriate); table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages); figure caption(s) (as a list). If you are including tables and/or figures in your manuscript, please submit these as additional files headed ‘Tables’ or ‘Figures’. Please include a word count for your paper. A typical peer reviewed research paper for this journal should be more than 5000 and no more than 8000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical peer reviewed research-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2500 and no more than 5000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical information-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2000 and no more than 2500 words; this limit does not include tables, references, footnotes, figure captions, endnotes. For other types of submissions, please contact the editors.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly

Style guide used: “Please refer to these quick style guidelines when preparing your paper, rather than any published articles or a sample copy. Please use British (-ise) spelling style consistently throughout your manuscript. Please use single quotation marks, except where ‘a quotation is “within” a quotation’. Please note that long quotations should be indented without quotation marks.”12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association offers a variety of publishing opportunities for LIS authors. Whether it’s original research, advancements in professional practice, or book reviews, there are many different writing avenues to explore. As this journal focuses on Australian library and information research, potential authors should tailor their writing to this geographical area and take care to submit works that will be relevant to Australia and Southern Asia Pacific regions. That said, this journal also invites contributions from around the world. For the North American LIS researcher and author, this journal provides an opportunity to showcase original research to a global community. Additionally, this publication also publishes a wealth of book reviews.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not readily available for this journal. However, as the flagship publication for the ALIA, the journal is available to 5000 institutional members of the professional organization and therefore should be assumed has a wide audience.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A majority of readership will be information professionals from Australia, however, “ALIA welcomes anyone with an interest in libraries and information management,”14 so readership is likely diverse both in profession and location. This publication prints in English and requests British English style spellings be used.15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this publication will have a strong interests in library and information science research and many will be ALIA members. They are an educated and diverse group interested in staying on top of the latest research and resources for LIS fields.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although some readers may not be information science professionals, the majority work in LIS fields and would therefore be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is an internationally recognized publication that holds high standards for its published works. This journal reaches a wide audience of library and information professionals who are interested in current research in the field as well as relevant issues in their workplaces. Focus on LIS topics relevant to Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions will be prevalent but there is also opportunity for broader library science articles as well as reviews of a variety of LIS related books/resources.

Last updated: October 4, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  2. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  3. Journals
  4. Journals
  5. Journals
  6. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  7. Journals
  8. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  9. Journals
  10.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  11.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  12.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  13. “About ALIA,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 4, 2018  https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia
  14.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  15.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
Continue Reading