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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.1 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”2 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”3

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.4

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.8

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope9

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
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Journal of Hospital Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Hospital Librarianship

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/whos20/current#.UY5raz3nYms

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Hospital Librarianship “focuses on issues that are of vital interest and concern to hospital librarians.”1

Target audience: This journal is intended for “librarians and information specialists in the field of hospital librarianship.”2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and health facilities and administration, scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: According to the publication website, “The journal provides a forum for research strategies and reporting research results and quality improvement projects in hospital library settings, discussions of technological challenges and solutions, and articles on health care administration issues which have implications for hospital librarians such as managed care health care economics, hospital mergers, as well as patient safety and consumer health information.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=whos20&page=instructions#.VQ3chvnF8So

Types of contributions accepted: “Articles published in the Journal focus on research strategies, administrative assistance, managed care, financing, mergers, and more. The Journal also publishes articles and columns related to innovative strategies for transforming the healthcare environment, as well as up-to-date analyses and reviews of new products and services.”9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the editor, Carole M. Gilbert (carolemg@wowway.com).10 “Articles and columns are subject to peer review by the editor, column editors, members of the Editorial Board, and independent, anonymous expert referees. Articles are accepted or rejected based on topic and/or recommendation of peer reviewers.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly12 The editor is “committed to mentoring first-time authors and encourages hospital librarians of all backgrounds to submit articles to the Journal.”13

Style guide used: “References, citations, and general style of manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals. Electronic references should be prepared in accordance with the Columbia Guide to Online Style Scientific.”14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Writers will find that this journal offers an excellent opportunity to publish scholarly articles for a clearly defined field of study. With the strong support of editors who will “mentor new authors to produce a publishable manuscript,”15 this journal provides a forum for even first-time authors. There is great potential for an author to make an impact on the hospital  LIS community through publication in this journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available, but as this is a publication targeted to a specific LIS community, i.e. hospital librarians, it can be assumed that most hospital library workers would have great interest in its content.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an American journal that publishes in English only, but many articles are international in scope.16

Reader characteristics: It may be assumed that readers will have a high interest in medical and hospital librarianship. Most will have an MLIS or other advanced degree. Most readers will be employed in hospital libraries, and will consider the articles in this journal to be vital to their professional development. Readers will be interested in anything related to providing health information to both the clinical professional and the lay person.17 However, they may not have much interest in or knowledge of other types of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be very knowledgeable of all aspects of hospital librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience for this journal is highly motivated and knowledgeable of hospital librarianship. For authors with expertise in medical or hospital librarianship, an article published in this journal has the potential for reaching a large portion of their medical librarian peer group. The audience will most likely be interested in discovering information dedicated to their particular corner of the LIS profession. With the promised editorial guidance for new authors, and the guarantee of high interest from the reader, this journal offers real opportunities for the LIS researcher and author.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=whos20#.VQ3ABfnF8So
  2. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=whos20&page=instructions
  3. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426966044169/391563
  4. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426966044169/391563
  5. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426966044169/391563
  6. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426966044169/391563
  7. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=whos20#.VQ3ABfnF8So
  8. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426966044169/391563
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=whos20&page=instructions#.VQ3chvnF8So
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=whos20&page=instructions#.VQ3chvnF8So
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=whos20#.VQ3ABfnF8So
  12. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1426966044169/391563
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=whos20&page=instructions#.VQ3chvnF8So
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=whos20&page=instructions#.VQ3chvnF8So
  15. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=whos20#.VQ3ABfnF8So
  16. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/whos20/current#.VQ3pyPnF8Sr
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=whos20
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed May 17, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=whos20#.VQ3ABfnF8So
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Internet@Schools

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Internet@Schools

The original publication, Multimedia & Internet @ Schools, is no longer in print; it’€™s now Internet@Schools: An Educator’€™s Guide to Technology and the Web€™. Archives of the original, from 2000–2003, can be found here. Archives prior to 2000 can be found here.

Website: http://www.internetatschools.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A practical guide for educators on how to get high-performance learning from internet-based school products, services, and resources.1

Per the 2015 Media Kit: Internet@Schools is aimed at “tech-savvy and tech-curious K–12 educators of all stripes.”2 “Our mission is to keep these educators informed on internet-related ed tech news, products, services, trends, and tacticsthey need to accomplish their mission of preparing today’s students to become productive citizens in our increasingly technology-impacted world”3

€œTarget audience: €œEducators, including school librarians, technology specialists, teachers, and K-12 administrators. From their website: “€œfor our internet-savvy, information-hungry, technology-minded educator readers.”4

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional/Trade publication that provides information and news for LIS school librarians.7

Medium: Print & online.8

Content: Features, columns, and product reviews. Columns include Victor Rivero’s Tools for Learning Roundup, Stephen Abram’s Pipelines, Johanna Riddle’s Tech Effect, Mary Alice Anderson’s New Media Center, and Mary Ann Bell’s Belltones.9

Recent articles look at specific digital-textbooks; tools that help educators navigate the Common Core State Standards; a column on teacher-librarian instruction in LIS programs (pros and cons); online learning experiences; and Makerspaces -€“ open community labs where members gather to share resources, knowledge, networking, etc.10

Frequency of publication: Five times per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs

Types of contributions accepted: Letters to the editor, case studies, white papers and product reviews.12

Submission and review process: Contact the editor, David Hoffman: 10000 NE 7th Ave, Suite 330G, Vancouver, WA 98685
Phone: (360) 882-0988
Fax: (360) 882-9174
Email: hoffmand@infotoday.com13

Editorial tone: “€œThe magazine is written in plain talk by and for K-12 educators.”14

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Internet@Schools is particularly relevant for LIS authors studying or working in a school library setting, or for teacher-librarians. The publication covers a broad range of internet-based teaching tools, technologies and topics, and is a very informational and engaging publication that reaches educators, administrators, and decision makers in schools and school districts across the country.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Approximately 15,000 people per issue. From the Media Kit: “€œThe typical Internet@Schools subscriber shares his/her copy with at least two other educators.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not specific to any one location: articles cover all sorts of internet-based education topics, and reference U.S. and Canadian universities and LIS programs, as well as technology from other countries. Written in Standard English, easily readable.17

Reader characteristics: Subscribers of this publication are highly influential in the purchasing process, for schools and districts that plan to include technology-related products in their budgets. Internet@Schools readers are drawn from the whole spectrum of K-12 education and include state, district, and school level administrators; tech coordinators; media specialists; and classroom teachers. Directed towards educators and decision makers in their schools; content is written by practicing educators who have hands-on experience with the technologies they write about. Additional sponsored content is provided via case studies, white papers and product reviews that are also advertisements for specific companies or products.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A good number of readers will have LIS-specific knowledge as librarians and teacher librarians, but the educator/administrative/tech component might not be up on all the specifics. In any case, this is not a publication to flaunt LIS terminology -“ just make articles easily understood by any educator or administrator, and use “plain talk.”19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Internet@Schools is a valuable resource of the latest “internet-based” technologies for a variety of educators including, “directors/teachers, department chairs, district/school administrators, directors of A/V media service, directors of technology/technology coordinators, [and] library media specialists.”20 Authors will need to steer clear of LIS terminology by using “plain talk” that can be easily understood by the wide range of professions represented in the readership.21

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  4. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  9. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  11. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  18. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  19. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  20. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
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Journal of Library Innovation

Per the Journal of Library Innovation (JOLI) website, “The editors of JOLI ceased publication of the journal following the publication of the fall 2015 issue. Articles will remain discoverable and available as PDFs through aggregated databases, and the site will be available for an undetermined time.”

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library Innovation

Website: http://www.libraryinnovation.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “[The journal’s] mission is to disseminate research and information on innovative practice in libraries of all types.”1

Target audience: Librarians in all types of libraries.2

Publisher: Journal of Library Innovation.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4 Articles that appear in the “Featured Article”€ and “€œInnovative Practice”€ sections are peer reviewed. In some cases, invited submission may undergo editorial revision but not peer review. Book reviews and editorials are not peer reviewed.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6JOLI is an open access journal. Authors retain the copyright to their work under the terms of the following Creative Commons license: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 (United States).”7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Publishes “original research, literature reviews, commentaries, case studies, reports on innovative practices, and book, conference and product reviews…The journal also welcomes provocative essays that will stimulate thought on the current and future role of libraries in an Internet Age.”9

Frequency of publication: This journal premiered in 2010. It is published semi-annually.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: English language manuscripts for “Feature Articles” and “Innovations in Practice” sections covering topics of interest to library and information professionals committed to exploring innovative ideas and practices. Original research, literature reviews, commentaries, case studies, reports on innovative practices, and book, conference and product reviews. Articles may be theoretical, research-based, or of a practical nature. Editorials and reviews are written by invited authors.11

“Innovation in libraries can include, but is not limited to the following:

  • The discovery of unmet user needs.
  • The introduction of new services or the retooling of traditional services resulting in a better user experience.
  • Creative collaboration between libraries, or between libraries and other types of institutions, resulting in demonstrable improvements in service to users.
  • Implementing new technologies to improve and extend library service to meet user needs.
  • Explorations of the future of libraries.
  • Pilot testing unconventional ideas and services.
  • Redefining the roles of library staff to better serve users.
  • Developing processes that encourage organizational innovation.
  • Reaching out to and engaging library users and non-users in new and creative ways.
  • Creative library instruction and patron programming.
  • Finding new ways to make library collections or library facilities more useful to users.”12

Submission and review process: The editors recommend that prospective authors query before submitting work. No previously published submissions.13

Submit files in Microsoft Word or RTF files. Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point Arial font, and employ italics rather than underlining (other than URLs). Where available, provide URLs for references provided. All illustrations, figures, and tables should be placed within the text at appropriate points, rather than at the end.14

The review process takes a minimum of six to eight weeks. Authors are notified when a decision has been made.15

The section editors and managing editors evaluate submissions to determine that the content and topic are aligned with the scope and purpose of JOLI. Submissions that clear the initial review are subject to a single-blind review process, performed by at least two referees selected by the editorial board. Once referees complete their reviews, the section editor makes a recommendation to the managing editor before the author is notified of the decision.16

Editorial tone: No stated guidelines. Upon examination of several articles, “€œFeature” articles are written in clear, scholarly language. “Innovative Practice” articles are written in professional, clear language that is less formal.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition (2009).17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This young scholarly journal would be a good choice for unpublished graduate students with fresh, well-researched articles about innovative ideas, services, products, or programs in libraries. It would also be a good choice for information professionals interested in publishing articles on unconventional ideas or services implemented at their libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Because this journal is not subscription-based, circulation is difficult to determine. As of 2012 there were 1,296 registered readers.18

This journal is indexed in Directory of Open Access Journals, Google Scholar, The Informed Librarian Online, Library Literature and Information Full Text, and Library Literature, Information Science and Technology Abstracts (LISTA).19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is international, but most reside in the U.S.20 This journal accepts submissions in English. Because this journal is open access and available for an international readership, avoid regionalisms and be sure references to currency and location are clear.21

Reader characteristics: Most readers are librarians and are interested in innovative, thought-provoking theory and practices that stimulate thought about the library’€™s current and future role in an Internet Age. They value independent thinking and forward-looking practices that embrace technology.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because readers may be specialists in different areas within different types of libraries, technical jargon should be used moderately and terms should be explained when they are included in articles.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

No demographic information on readership is available at this time, but a review of selected articles indicates that readers are LIS professionals with an interest in library services, programs, and products that are exciting, different, and effective.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  5. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  7. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  9. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  11. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  18. P. Jones, personal communication, 9 May 2013
  19. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. P. Jones, personal communication, 9 May 2013
  21. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  22. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Business Information Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Business Information Review (BIR)

Website: http://bir.sagepub.com/

You can also visit the BIR blog, (where you can listen to BIR podcasts) or follow the journal on Twitter.

Purpose, objective, or mission: €œ”Business Information Review (BIR) deals with the provision and management of information, content and knowledge in organisations.”€1 It deals with information strategies and operational best practices in order to help businesses get the best value from exploiting information knowledge to their benefit. A primary goal of BIR is to highlight economic, social and technological developments that will affect organizations’€™ information needs.2

It is “€œthe only journal devoted entirely to the practice of business information provision.”3

Target audience: Business information professionals: managers, librarians, knowledge managers, researchers, analysts, consultants, print or electronic publishers.4

Publisher: Sage Publications.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional, with an emphasis on information, content and knowledge in organizations.7

Medium: Print and online access.8

Content: Articles, case studies and industry updates. The website and blog also offer podcasts.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (March, June, September, December).10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/manuscriptSubmission

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions should cover information and knowledge management within organizations. Articles will ideally be relevant to all sorts of info professionals – librarians, managers, publishers, information managers -€“ and are typically 3000-5000 words. Shorter articles are also accepted, such as interviews, product/service reviews and opinion pieces.11

Submission and review process: Submit a proposal first. Completed articles might be considered, with the understanding that editors may require changes. Editors review all submissions; some are reviewed by the editorial board members. Make sure to read the site’s author guidelines before sending anything for consideration.12

Email your proposal/article to businessinformationreview@gmail.com.13

Co-editors, as of 2016, are Claire Laybats, TFPL, UK, and Luke Tredinnick, London Metropolitan University, UK. To contact the editorial office, email: businessinformationreviewj@gmail.com 14

Editorial tone: Professional, somewhat formal while still engaging and interesting. Readable. BIR wants readers to really delve into topics and think about the relevancy of products/services/devices for their own business needs. LIS authors should note that content is provided by “€œinformation professionals, content, technology and service suppliers, academics and researchers and leading thinkers”€15 from within and outside the information world.16

Style guide usedSAGE Harvard reference style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have an interest in technologies and strategies applicable to the information side of the LIS world, this is a good place to consider submitting. The review attracts readers from a variety of professions, not only LIS practitioners, and would be a good place to present LIS-learned views to a larger audience that might not be aware of the particular information/knowledge management angle.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available for the actual publication; BIR Twitter page has 156 followers 17.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International, with primary editors based out of the U.K./Europe.18 Written in English using British/U.K. spelling.19

Reader characteristics: “€œBIR readers are to be found in the corporate sector, in government agencies and other public institutions, in private consultancy, and in universities and business schools.”€20€œBIR‘s international readership and authorship covers the corporate sector, consultancies and law firms, publishers and information providers, government and other public institutions, academia and the third sector.”21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as librarians and information management/knowledge professionals are a key part of BIR’€™s reading and author group. The publication is also directed towards managers and others in non-LIS professions22, so if you use LIS specific jargon or acronyms, make sure readers still understand what you are talking about.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

BIR readers are interested in knowledge management applications, processes and developments, all areas that LIS practitioners touch on, through study or professionally. BIR readership and authorship includes LIS professionals, making this an ideal publication to share information updates, trends, and applications, as far as they pertain to organizations.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  2. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  3. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  4. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Business Information Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411245980118/146294
  6. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  7. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  8. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  9. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Podcasts for Business Information Review. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://bir.sagepub.com/site/Podcast/podcast_dir.xhtml
  10. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  11. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  12. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  13. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  14. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  15. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  16. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  17. BIR Journal. (n.d.). Tweets (Twitter page). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from https://twitter.com/BIRJournal
  18. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  19. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=manuscriptSubmission
  20. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
  21. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). Aims and Scope. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=aimsAndScope
  22. Sage Publications Ltd. (2016). About the Title. Business Information Review. Retrieved from http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201673/title#tabview=title
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Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship (ISTL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship (ISTL)

Website: http://www.istl.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “ISTL publishes substantive content of interest to science and technology librarians. It serves as a vehicle for sci-tech librarians to share successful initiatives and innovative ideas, and to publish peer-reviewed or board-accepted papers, including case studies, practical applications, theoretical essays, web/bibliographies, and research papers relevant to the functions and operations of science and technology libraries in all settings. Through its columns ISTL also publishes reviews, opinions, and best practices.”1

Target audience: Librarians with an interest in science and technology in librarianship.2

Publisher: Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online, open access6

Content: The journal publishes refereed articles, opinion pieces, and reviews for electronic resources, books, and databases.7 Every issue has a theme. Examples of past themes include “Reference and More,” “Outreach and Marketing,” and “Facilities.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://istl.org/authors.html

Types of contributions accepted: Case studies, practical applications, theoretical essays, web bibliographies, and research papers relevant to the functions and operations of science and technology libraries in all settings. Columns provide reviews, opinions, and best practices.10

Submission and Review Process: Per the submission guidelines, “We welcome your article submissions and the editorial board is happy to work with new authors. If you have any questions about whether an article is appropriate for ISTL or how best to prepare your manuscript, feel free to contact one of the members of the editorial board.”11 Each section of this publication, specifically articles, book reviews, journal reviews, database reviews, and “webliographies,” has its own submission and format guide. For example, from the guide for non-refereed articles, “In general, articles of about 2,000 words seem to work well; however, if you need more space to describe your ideas, feel free to write a longer article.”12

Editorial tone: Academic13

Style guide used: CSE (Council of Science Editors) Style Guide14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is specialized and focused on a specific aspect of librarianship. While readers of the journal may be broad based, the authors published in the journal are active within each sub-field. Those new to the study or profession of science and technology librarianship will find this to be an ideal place to publish, as the journal and its editors are willing to work with first-time authors.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No exact numbers are available, but the journal is open access.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As ISTL is published in English16 in the United States but is available online, an international but primarily North American readership may be assumed.17

Reader characteristics: Readers of ISTL are academics and professionals in the science and technology world as it relates to librarianship. It is expected that the majority of readers share similar types of workplaces, jobs, levels of education, and professional interests. ISTL readers are like to be focused on a particular academic field within science or technology librarianship. As such, their interest in topics that fall outside of that field may be somewhat limited.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: ISTL readers will know a great deal about LIS topics and issues. They are interested in keeping current on the latest developments in their field of science or technology and will be highly familiar with LIS jargon.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience for Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship is interested in substantive discourse related to successful programs and materials for the delivery of information services. Potential authors need to be familiar with such topics in order to not only get published in this journal, but to also speak to the readers. The technical knowledge is at a very high level, but must also have an academic angle. The editors are willing to work with first time authors so it is likely that considerable  guidance will be provided to ensure a successful article.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
  2. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
  3. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405454750407/252523
  4. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405454750407/252523
  5. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405454750407/252523
  6. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405454750407/252523
  7. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
  8. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/previous.html
  9. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405454750407/252523
  10. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/authors.html
  12. “Instructions for Authors of Articles,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, Retrieved from http://www.istl.org/articles.html
  13. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405454750407/252523
  14. “Instructions for Authors of Articles,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, Retrieved from http://www.istl.org/articles.html
  15. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
  16. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405454750407/252523
  17. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
  18. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
  19. “About Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship,” Association of College and Research Libraries, Science and Technology Section, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.istl.org/about.html
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Code4Lib Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ)

Website: http://journal.code4lib.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, “the Code4Lib Journal exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.”1 It “aims to help engender collective understanding and the necessary support for improving library technology and digital services.”2

Target audience: The target audience includes anyone who is involved in the “wider library community” who has an interest in libraries and technology.3

PublisherCode4Lib. Publication began in 2007.4

Peer reviewed? Submissions to the journal are reviewed by a non-anonymous editorial committee of professional peers. The journal does not use a refereed process.5

Type: Although the editorial committee consists mainly of those involved in the academic library community, contents do not necessarily have the format of a traditional scholarly research article, and the journal does not use a traditional blind refereed review. Articles can vary in formality, and can include case studies and personal opinion pieces. Articles do not generally include extensive literature reviews. For these reasons, the journal is currently classed here as ‘professional news’. Articles tend to be focused on the practical application of the ideas presented.6

Medium: Code4Lib Journal is available online.7

Content: From the Call for Submissions, “the editorial committee is looking for content that is practical, demonstrates how to exploit technology to create digital library collections and services, or offers insight and forethought regarding the use of computers in any type of library setting.”8

The journal publishes articles on a multitude of subjects, as long as they support the mission statement, and is flexible with length (1,500 to 5,000 words is an approximate word count). The types of articles published in the journal include:

  • Case studies of projects (failed or successful), how they were done, and challenges faced.
  • Descriptions of projects in progress, project updates, and new project proposals.
  • Effective processes for project management.
  • Reviews/comparisons of software, frameworks, libraries, etc.
  • Analyses and case studies of using library metadata in technological application: novel applications or solutions, or unsolved challenges,
  • Thought pieces on the big problems associated with library and technology, ideas for new solutions, visions for the future.
  • Findings on user behavior and interaction with systems.
  • Best practices.9

Frequency of publication: It is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The types of articles the journal is looking for include:

  • Book & software reviews
  • Code snippets & algorithms
  • Conference reports
  • Opinion pieces11

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent in the form of either an abstract or a complete draft. Submit articles using the online form, or via email to journal@code4lib.org. Once submitted the article goes through an editorial process, and not a peer review.12

Editorial tone: “Writers should aim for the middle ground between, on the one hand, blog or mailing-list posts, and, on the other hand, articles in traditional journals.”13

Style guide used: From the article guidelines: “While articles in C4LJ should be of a high quality, they need not follow any formal structure or guidelines.”14 However, end notes and references should be cited using the Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a semiformal setting in which to discuss issues of technology in the library and information science world. It is a newer journal, which may make it less competitive than more established journals. The information in the journal is concentrated around technology, and its place within the library setting, so it would be a good place for anyone with an interest in this subject to find a home for one of their articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Since the journal is 100% online, there was no information on the exact circulation available.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editorial committee is based throughout the United States, but the writers come from both within and outside the United States.17 The journal is written in English, and although the editorial committee is American, not all of the contributors are. (Article guidelines note that articles should be written in good English, and that “American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these.”)18  Also, due to the online nature of the journal, people from anywhere in the world would have the ability to access the articles. Because of this, it would most likely be prudent to avoid the use of any language or content that was too culturally specific.

Reader characteristics: Code4Lib is a “volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff’.” From looking through the author information supplies with the articles, it appears that almost all of the contributors work in academic libraries, although their actual job titles vary quite a bit. These job titles range from web designer to information technology coordinator to systems librarian. While this information is about the writers, it goes to show that the journal is of interest to all different types of professionals involved technologies in libraries. Of course, they also all have a professional interest in the intersection of libraries and technology. Code4Lib is of interest to “technology folks in libraries, archives and museums to informally share approaches, techniques, and code across institutional and project divides.”19 The readers of this journal are likely to have established opinions about the place of technology in libraries. A look at the mission statement shows that the readers are likely to feel that technology holds a key position in the future of libraries.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of Code4Lib Journal would have a good knowledge and understanding of LIS topics and issues. They would also be familiar with library jargon. On top of that, due to the technical nature of the journal, they would also be familiar with most technical jargon.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The common thread running among these readers is an interest in, and a passion for, technology and its use within a library setting. Their level of technical knowledge would be rather high, and this would be an important thing for writers to keep in mind. In fact, it would also be a necessity for the writers of a proposed article for Code4Lib Journal to be technological experts. An important element of the journal is the inclusion of the actual coding used in the project being discussed, hence the name of the journal. That being said, the readers would most likely not only have an understanding of technology, but also experience with its application and creation.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  2. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  3. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  4. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  5. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Process and Structure. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/process-and-structure
  6. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Issue 25, 2014-07-21. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/issues/issues/issue25
  7. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  8. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  9. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  10. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  11. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  12. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  13. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  14. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  15. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  16. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  17. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Editorial Committee. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/editorial-committee
  18. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  19. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
  20. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  21. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
Continue Reading

FreePint

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: FreePint

Website: http://www.freepint.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: FreePint “gives access to content, community and consulting, on information sources, information technology and information value.”1 € Through regular free newsletters and updates, and subscription-based articles and reports, FreePint provides support on a variety of issues important to information professionals and workers.

Target audience: Workers in information industry including librarians, consultants, freelancers, writers, technology experts, and commercial companies. The site was started in 1997 as a free email newsletter, with Pint referencing “People Interested in Net Technologies.”2

Publisher: Free Pint Limited.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: Content focuses on providing “€œpractical tips and features aimed at individuals who find, use, manage, and share work-related information.”7 FreePint offers a paid subscription that includes “product reviews, industry insight and articles to support content purchases, information strategy, and to increase the value of information in your organisation.”8 The twice-monthly FreePint Newsletter provides the “latest tips and features about information practice, content and strategy, and highlights how FreePint raises the value of information in customer organisations.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice monthly free newsletter, with content uploaded daily to members with a paid subscription.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://web.freepint.com/go/about/contribute/

Types of contributions accepted: FreePint articles are based on real-world experience, and writers are encouraged to share their knowledge with peers. Per the contribution guidelines: “FreePint articles support the value of information in the enterprise and can be categorised by one or more of our topic categories.”11

“My Favourite Tipples” is always accepting submissions. Per their “Publish with FreePint” page, “Supply your 5 favourite websites in a brief item to appear in the FreePint Newsletter. Tipples are quick and easy to write, are among the most popular Newsletter feature, and provide an opportunity (through your byline) to build visibility for your company and expertise.”12

Submission and review process: Send a query to catherine.dhanjal@freepint.com13

Editorial tone: Informative. FreePint‘s “editorial processes help you state your ideas as clearly and cogently as possible.”14

Style guide used: UK Guardian style and UK spellings.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication has welcomed a variety of submissions and is known for working with authors. FreePint allows an author to gain visibility within the wider LIS community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Per a February 2012 press release, FreePint serves more than 80,000 readers across the globe through the newsletter email and the publication’€™s website, and has a global audience of over 100,000 information professionals throughout the entire network.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Per their site, FreePint is “an international organisation covering a range of “must have” information topics.” FreePint Limited is a UK-based company and reaches English-speaking readers. About one-third of readers reside in the UK while two-thirds of readers reside in other English-speaking countries, mostly the United States, Canada and Australia. The newsletter is written in English and uses British spelling, punctuation, and word usage. Because FreePint is a global publication, regional and cultural references should be kept to a minimum and explained where needed.17

Reader characteristics: As noted above, one-third of readers are in the UK while the rest are from primarily English-speaking countries. The gender breakdown and cultural affiliation of readers beyond this country information is not provided. In addition to those in the traditional library and information field, FreePint is “€œread by IT consultants, trainers, directors of small businesses, journalists, publishers, academics, and students in all fields and yes, by information professionals and knowledge managers too.”€ Readers in general will either possess, or be seeking, higher education and will work in some aspect of the information industry. Practical daily work issues take up most of the newsletter’€™s content, and readers will most likely be concerned about the information gained that can help them in their daily practice. Opinions, reviews, and letters to the editor are welcomed, but they are used primarily to inform readers about the use of some product or avenue of information sharing. Readers come from a variety of information backgrounds, including libraries, private businesses, and publishing, and authors should keep in mind the diversity of professional interests found among readers.18 FreePint‘s Vendor Services page notes that “As an unbiased observer regularly studying and analysing influences on both sides, FreePint Research is uniquely able to provide vendors with useful insight on emerging buyer needs, influences and challenges.”19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have extensive knowledge of information issues, but these issues may or may not be related to libraries. Many readers work in information environments but not necessarily library environments and library jargon should be kept to a minimum. General information jargon can be used, but where it denotes cultural or regional references, jargon should be fully explained.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Given the diverse readership, both in career and local, this publication offers an opportunity to inform a global audience of readers interested in information and knowledge management. Even if you just submit one article that gets published to the site, you’ll be added to the list of FreePint‘s “practicing professionals’ contributors,”21 where more people can find out about you and your LIS writing.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). About FreePint. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/about/
  2. Free Pint Ltd. (2016 Help:FAQS. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/about/help/faqs/
  3. ProQuest. (2016). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  4. ProQuest. (2016). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  5. ProQuest. (2016). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  6. ProQuest. (2016). FreePint. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412022762749/266909
  7. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). About FreePint. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/about/
  8. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). Topic Series. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/topic/series/
  9. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). FreePint Newsletter. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/newsletter/
  10. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). FreePint Subscription. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/sub/
  11. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). Publish With FreePint. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/about/contribute/
  12. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). Publish With FreePint. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/about/contribute/
  13. Free Pint Ltd. (2016). Publish With FreePint. FreePint. Retrieved from http://web.freepint.com/go/about/contribute/
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