Wiki Tags Archives: Privacy and security

Information for Social Change

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information for Social Change

Website: http://libr.org/isc/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An activist librarian organization that “examines the issues of censorship, freedom and ethics amongst library and information workers.”1

Target audience: LIS workers and practitioners.2

Publisher: Information for Social Change.3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional. The topics and informal style of the content may also appeal to civilian readers.5

Medium: Online6

Content: Documenting the control of information globally and also alternatives to the control of information.7

Frequency of publication: Semi-annually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libr.org/isc/call-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles between 500 and 2500 words. Longer articles may be excerpted with the full text made available from the author, according to the guidelines. Letters, review articles and poems are also accepted for publication.9

Submission and review process: Send an email to the editor at isc-journal@libr.org.10

Editorial tone: Simple and clear English. Views are radical and thought-provoking themes that promote debate.11

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS authors who are interested in radical librarianship that examines censorship, ethics and freedom, this journal would be a good choice. The journal suggests potential authors review past and current issues in order to gauge the interest.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not stated but British English style of writing is used.13 Website is in British English but it’s not stated as to whether that is the only acceptable version. This journal addresses global issues so it is safe to assume their readers are international. The organization holds events in association with progressive groups such as Third World Book Fair.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely progressive in their viewpoints. Readers are LIS professionals with progressive and radical views15 who are interested in finding channels in which to allow “unfettered and unmediated ideas” to circulate.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS terms and the profession is helpful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal most likely hold progressive viewpoints and feel strongly about the issues presented such as freedom of information and radical changes to the way information is controlled and disseminated. Authors who wish to submit to this publication should hold similar views or at least be extremely open to new ideas.17


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Information for Social Change. (2016). Welcome. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/
  2. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  5. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  7. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  9. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  10. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  11. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  12. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  13. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  14. Information for Social Change. (2016). Events. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/events/
  15. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  16. Information for Social Change. (2016). Policies. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/policies-submission-guide/#1
  17. Information for Social Change. (2013). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
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Library and Archival Security

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library & Archival Security

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wlas20/current#.UY5xYD3nYms

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library & Archival Security is a “multi-disciplinary journal dedicated to all aspects of security in libraries, archives and other information centers.”1

Target audience: “Librarians, scholars, and researchers concerned with security planning, policies, procedures, and strategies for libraries and archives.”2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: As per the website, “Library & Archival Security is devoted to providing information on all aspects of security in libraries, archives, and other information centers, including physical security; data and communications security; disaster preparedness and recovery; and studies of related social, legal, and ethical issues.”7

Frequency of publication: Biannually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlas20&page=instructions#.VTKlJpMsDqk

Types of contributions accepted: According to the website, Library & Archival Security “accepts original research and theoretical papers that address a wide variety of topics in archival security, including but not limited to patron privacy, theft detection and prevention, inventory methods, security systems and equipment, safety in libraries, legal and societal issues, challenges posed by digital collections and the Internet, the security and integrity of electronic records, networks and communications, and more.”9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted electronically to the Editor at lebreton@temple.edu.10 “All research articles in this journal have undergone rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and refereeing by at least two anonymous referees.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.12

Style guide used: The latest volume of The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and Archival Security provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles relating to all aspects of security in libraries, archives and other information centers. Because it covers a wide range of security topics, including “physical security; data and communications security; disaster preparedness and recovery; and studies of related social, legal, and ethical issues”14, this journal offers a myriad of opportunities for LIS authors interested in this field. The latest issue (Volume 26, 2013) features articles on libraries in Nigeria, Iraq and Egypt, so the opportunities for authors outside of North America are apparent.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The text of this journal is in English.16 As there is an international scope to some articles, it can be assumed that this journal reaches a global audience.17 Articles must be accessible to an audience outside of North America.

Reader characteristics: As the “editorial advisory board and review panel include practitioners and theoreticians in the fields of library and archival science, as well as professionals in the areas of security and disaster preparedness and recovery”18, the audience will be professionally varied. Most readers will be LIS professionals working in archives or libraries. As the focus of this journal is security preparedness in information centers, readers may hold managerial or supervisory positions in their institutions.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge level will high amongst the LIS professionals, but as the journal’s target audience also includes “scholars and researchers with an interest in security planning”19 specialized LIS knowledge may be minimal. Authors should keep LIS jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

These readers are professional scholars but are also managers, supervisors, and decision-makers. They want information that is both practical and scholarly.They will be looking for new ideas, case studies, and vigorously researched papers: in short, “articles of theoretical and practical importance.”20 This is an excellent opportunity for the LIS author with an interest in, and experience with, security issues in libraries to make an impact on the decision-makers of the library profession.

Last updated: April 18, 2015


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlas20#.VTKUX5MsDqk
  2. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  7. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlas20#.VTKUX5MsDqk
  8. Taylor & Francis. (2015). List of Issues. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wlas20#.VTKkrJMsDqk
  9. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlas20#.VTKltJMsDqk
  10. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlas20&page=instructions#.VTKmpJMsDqk
  11. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlas20#.VTKltJMsDqk
  12. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  13. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlas20&page=instructions#.VTKmpJMsDqk
  14. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlas20#.VTKltJMsDqk
  15. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Articles. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wlas20/current#.VTLGKpMsDqk
  16. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  17.  Taylor & Francis. (2015). Articles. Library & Archival Security. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wlas20/current#.VTLGKpMsDqk
  18. ABE-IPS. (2015). Library and Archival Security. ABE-IPS Books Online Journals. Retrieved from http://www.abe.pl/en/journal/6524/library-and-archival-security
  19. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Archival Security. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1429378362099/438860
  20. ABE-IPS. (2015). Library and Archival Security. ABE-IPS Books Online Journals. Retrieved from http://www.abe.pl/en/journal/6524/library-and-archival-security
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Library Hi Tech

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht

Purpose, objective, or mission: This international-scope journal focuses on computing and technology issues specifically for the library community, defining technology “€œto include the full range of tools employed by librarians and their customers”€.1

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals, as well as LIS researchers and lecturers; library senior management; LIS students and academics.2

Readers of the journal will be able to learn more about the potential of LIS technologies while finding out how to use the new technologies; explore the implications of tech changes; and stay informed of the latest LIS technology trends and developments.3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing, LTD.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online,7 with access available as part of a paid subscription to Emerald Library Studies eJournals.8

Content: From their website, topics covered in the journal include articles about integrated library systems, networking, strategic planning, policy implementation, security, automation systems, the role of consortia, resource access initiatives, architecture and technology, electronic publishing, library tech in specific countries, user perspectives on technology, how technology can help disabled library users, and library-related websites.9

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht

The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist.11

Types of contributions accepted: Original manuscripts/articles, 4000-8000 words, submitted in MS Word. See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Hi Tech topics.12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

The editor reviews each submission and decides whether it’s a good fit for Library Hi Tech. The submission is then sent to two independent referees for double-blind peer review. Based on the three recommendations and consultation with the Editorial Board members, the decision is made whether to accept, revise or reject the submission.14

A 2013 editorial reveals how long it takes a Library Hi Tech manuscript to go through peer review, and how authors can speed up the review time for their article by following the strict author guidelines.15

Editorial tone: Very professional and often technical, written in grammatically correct English with an emphasis on writing towards an intelligent, knowledgeable LIS audience.16

Style guide used: Harvard style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech is a wonderful resource for staying abreast of the latest tech developments in the LIS world, and for learning about how the technology is used in a variety of LIS settings, worldwide. It is professional and very interesting to read, working with LIS professionals and students to provide an in-depth perspective on the applications of these new and emerging technologies. Recent articles detail the “€œAccessibility of academic library websites in North America”, covering 56 library websites, design methods and accessibility; virtual reference and the link to librarian job satisfaction; and increasing content findability with SEO.18 The journal has a reputation for discovering hot topic items before they become mainstream: for LIS students, that means potential to write from personal knowledge and experience, while providing updates into current tech trends and issues. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE),  “€œa forum for editors and publishers of peer reviewed journals to discuss all aspects of publication ethics.”19 The journal takes a positive attitude towards LIS technologies, but thoroughly researches the pros and cons of systems and their applications in libraries and helpfulness in fulfilling library goals.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: More than 100,000 downloads per year on the Emerald site. Per the Library Hi Tech co-editor, the publication has “a worldwide audience with a strong focus in North America”.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although written in English,22 the journal is international in scope, with the editor hailing from Humboldt Universitat zu Berlin, Germany, and the co-editor from the Royal School of LIS, Denmark. The editorial advisory board is comprised of LIS professionals from universities across the globe, including the U.S., Spain, South Africa, Australia and Canada.23 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.24

Reader characteristics: Subscribers, writers and editorial staff are primarily LIS professional academics at universities across the world, and interested in how technology can work in LIS settings, trends and case study examples.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies. Articles are thoroughly researched and highly technical, written by professionals in the LIS field.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are passionate about technology in the LIS workplace, and would be interested to hear of emerging technologies from an LIS student point of view, case studies/examples on how technologies are being used in classrooms (virtual or not), and in library communities. If you have an example or a technology you’d like to research, this would be the perfect place to share your knowledge and experience.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  2. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  3. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  8. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  9. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  15. Greifeneder, E. (2013). 30 days to first decision: Time span in Library Hi Tech from submission to first decision. Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17082842
  16. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Table of Contents: Volume 31 Issue 1. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0737-8831&volume=31&issue=1
  19. Committee on Publication Ethics. (2014). Home. Retrieved from http://publicationethics.org/
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  21. E. Greifeneder, personal communication, 2013
  22. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  23. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Editorial Team. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lht&
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
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Reading, Writing, Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Reading, Writing, Research

Website: http://www.allpurposeguru.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the blog’€™s subtitle: “€œa librarian’€™s blog for anyone who needs to do research€…or otherwise wants to use the library.”1 David M. Guion is an All-Purpose-Guru, author, and librarian who writes this particular blog to help civilians understand how to make the best use of libraries.2

Target audience: Anyone who uses the library or needs research or writing tips.3 Laypeople as well as librarians will find the blog helpful.

Publisher: Reading, Writing, Research.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian blog.

Medium: Online; blog format.

Content: Posts about libraries, research, writing, and everything that falls under these general categories. David talks about spelling and punctuation; how the American public uses libraries; library privacy regulations; new technologies in libraries; and e-librarians and the use of robots in libraries, among other topics.5

Frequency of publication: It varies, but generally around one new post per week.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no specific guidelines at this point.

Types of contributions accepted: Per a comment in American Libraries Magazine to an article titled “€œWriting for Civilians“: the blog “€œwould be pleased to accept guest posts from other librarians with something to say to ‘civilians.'”

Submission and review process: Email David Guion directly at dmguion [at] allpurposeguru.com.7

Editorial tone: Very civilian-friendly. The posts are relevant to today’€™s library users and don’€™t talk down to the non-LIS crowd, but are written in a way that anyone can easily understand them.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a purely helpful, informational blog that anyone can read to get up-to-speed on current LIS issues, and to check in for help with library research tips. It’€™s ideal for LIS students, who can suggest posts about local library news (such as a post on Southern California and Nevada library systems helping residents with foreclosure information), library trends, and stories from the LIS trenches. Think about what you want library patrons to know about libraries: this is a great place to write to those patrons.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The blog is written in English and is generally US-centric, but the blog can be accessed by anyone with an internet connection.

Reader characteristics: Readers are interested in the library, and in reading about library resources, news, trends, and updates – local or nationwide. David Guion is a musician (trombone player) with degrees in performance and musicology; a certified lay speaker in the United Methodist Church; librarian; and a sustainability/environmental expert who loves cooking, writing, fitness, travel and, naturally, research.8

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The blog is written by a librarian of 12 years9, but is aimed at civilians who need library and research assistance. Write to those readers, rather than LIS professionals or students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS students could gain considerable insight into library patron’s needs and library use by regularly posting to the blog and following up on reader feedback. This is the only blog (that we know of) written by an LIS professional specifically for nonprofessionals10, and thus seems like a valuable resource to promote to other libraries and users.

Last updated: October 30, 2016


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Reading, Writing, Research,” Allpurposeguru.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.AllPurposeGuru.com/
  2. “About,” AllPurposeGuru.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.allpurposeguru.com/about/
  3. About.”
  4. Reading, Writing, Research.”
  5. Reading, Writing, Research.”
  6. Reading, Writing, Research.”
  7. “Contact me,” AllPurposeGuru.com, accessed October 30, 2016, http://www.allpurposeguru.com/contact-me/
  8. “About David,” AllPurposeGuru.com, accessed October 30, 2016,  http://home.allpurposeguru.com/about/about-david
  9. About David.”
  10. About.”
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San Diego Reader

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: San Diego Reader

Website: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: To cover all aspects of life in San Diego.1

Target audience: People living in, or visiting, the San Diego region.

Publisher: James E. Holman.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian weekly alternative newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: The Association of Alternative Newsweeklies (AAN) describes the content as follows: “Specializing in feature stories, the Reader covers San Diego life in general, with emphasis on politics and the arts and entertainment. The Reader publishes comprehensive listings of movies, events, theater, and music; restaurant and film reviews; and free classifieds.”4

Frequency of publication: Weekly.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/contact/

Types of contributions accepted: Their website allows for online submission (requires free registration) of articles in four specific categories: CD or concert review, neighborhood news story, travel story, waterfront story, or cover story.6 They also accept letters to the editor.7 Per their website: “Woo us with actual reporting, not a cover letter written to impress your creative-writing teacher.”8

Submission and review process: There are online submission forms for each type of story.9

Editorial tone: Informal but informative.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The San Diego Reader celebrates San Diego and its diverse people. It focuses on a variety of ordinary people and places within the county. The potential for publication of San Diego LIS authors by the San Diego Reader exists for a variety of reasons. A call for the commencement of construction on the new central library, designed a decade ago, could be shaped as a letter to the editor. Other issues which librarians and the Reader feel strongly about are equal access to information and censorship. A concise reporting of banned books week events may be framed as a neighborhood story.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 90,000 as of March 2015.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The focus of the Reader articles is on local San Diego life, politics, and entertainment. Its reach extends beyond San Diego County, (the sixth largest county in the United States) into under-represented Imperial County and Baja California.

Although the Reader is written in English, there is awareness that San Diego is a culturally diverse region. The tone is informal and direct, the vocabulary concrete and the sentence structure is not complex. The investigative articles usually feature five to ten San Diegans to show how the issue impacts different people from a variety of backgrounds. Frequently, the names of cities and communities, as well as local businesses, are used as examples, without bothering to explain a reference to readers outside the region.

Reader characteristics: Audience demographic are not available, but readers will be residents of the San Diego area. The publication is progressive; its coverage of local politics confronts issues critically. Its bias is inherent in its values. The attitude calls attention to those who exploit the average person. Some topics are intended to evoke outrage. The common man is valued most highly.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The level of knowledge of LIS issues will vary and it can be safely assumed that readers have the same level of LIS knowledge as the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Reader has a reputation for high-quality writing that the readers have come to expect, suggesting, even in the limited fashion that contributions are accepted, that quality of writing would play a role in acceptance. Living in San Diego would be important in order to convey the essence of the city and county to readers.

Last updated: November 1, 2016


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “San Diego Reader,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/
  2. “San Diego Reader,” Ulrichsweb, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1415817959160/559101
  3. San Diego Reader.”
  4. “San Diego Reader,” Altweeklies.com, accessed November 1, 2016, from http://www.altweeklies.com/aan/san-diego-reader/Company?oid=80
  5. “Archives,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/archives/
  6. “Contact Us,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/contact/
  7. “Letters to the Editor,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/letter-editor/
  8. Contact Us.”
  9. Contact Us.”
  10. San Diego Reader.”
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Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

Website: http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the official publication of LITA (the Library and Information Technology Association), ITAL is primarily concerned with keeping LITA members informed about the technologies that shape their workplaces and profession.1

Target audience: Members of LITA, primarily librarians and information professionals2

Publisher: Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: ITAL is an open-access, electronic-only publication.6 Full-text versions of all content published since 2004, as well as tables of contents and abstracts for earlier issues, are also available electronically.7

Content: ITAL “publishes material related to all aspects of information technology in all types of libraries. Topic areas include, but are not limited to, library automation, digital libraries, metadata, identity management, distributed systems and networks, computer security, intellectual property rights, technical standards, geographic information systems, desktop applications, information discovery tools, web-scale library services, cloud computing, digital preservation, data curation, virtualization, search-engine optimization, emerging technologies, social networking, open data, the semantic web, mobile services and applications, usability, universal access to technology, library consortia, vendor relations, and digital humanities.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

It is important to note, when perusing author information such as this, that specific types of submissions, such as book or software reviews, may require contact with someone other than the main editor. Failing to note such differences could result in a solid article or query being lost in the shuffle.

Location of submission guidelines: https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: ITAL accepts feature articles that contain original research or in-depth analysis of 3,000 to 5,000 words or longer. Communications of 1,000 to 3,000 words are also accepted, such as “brief research reports, technical findings, and application notes,”as well as tutorials and letters to the editor.10

Submission and review process: Individuals must submit original and unpublished manuscripts only. Manuscripts that are being considered elsewhere should not be submitted. Responsibility for the accuracy of the information falls upon the author of the manuscript. This includes references, URLs, and statistics.11

Articles are to be submitted online; registration and login are required.12

Editorial tone: Formal, with most articles including an abstract. Articles are evidence and research-based, written in language that is clear and direct.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style for notes and bibliography14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals or students focusing on the technical services side of libraries who can contribute to the community’€™s knowledge of emerging technologies should consider writing for this publication. Opportunity is also ripe for those with an understanding of technical services and public services who can explain complicated technical jargon and its importance to the uninitiated. A survey of recent articles includes usability of next-generation catalogs such as VuFind, the application of geographic information systems (GIS) in LIS research, widgets, interoperable catalog models, semantic web technologies, web design for patrons with disabilities, applying CIPA regulations and other issues. Tutorials included cloud computing and digitizing documents to make them accessible on the web. Articles and tutorials are pragmatic, so topics and information presented need to be relevant to professionals in their LIS workplace.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics not available, but as ITAL is an open-access, online publication a wide readership may be assumed.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LITA is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) and is therefore located in the United States,17 but subscribers come from all over the world. ITAL is published in English.18

Reader characteristics: ITAL is read by administrators, librarians, and information technologists interested in all aspects of information technology. These readers include library directors, systems managers and analysts, automation consultants, and both technical and public service librarians using technology to serve users.19

Readers are interested in subjects that include library automation, access to information through technology, digital libraries, electronic journals and electronic publishing, computer security, intellectual property rights, library consortia, technical standards, and software development. Articles display a strong emphasis on service orientation. Readers likely share this value.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This journal covers a broad spectrum of topics and issues relating to LIS subject matter, and most articles would be comprehensible to any librarian; specialized knowledge of technical services is usually not assumed.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because readers come from both technical and public services, papers should not be only technical in nature. Demonstrating how a technology can be leveraged to solve a human need, whether that is user experience or library operations, will be fundamental. In a survey of articles, many papers demonstrate the impact of technologies on libraries, the communities they serve, and on society. Authors also emphasize service orientation, a value readers likely share.

Last updated: May 7, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  2. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  3. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  4. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  5. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  6. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,  http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  7. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  8. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  9. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  10. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  11. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  16. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  17. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  18. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  19. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  20. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  21. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
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Slashdot

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Slashdot

Website: http://slashdot.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Slashdot is an online forum that provides “News for Nerds. Stuff that Matters.” This “stuff” includes stories on various aspects of technology, from discussing user’s rights online, to sharing ideas and news on various IT subjects. Content is submitted by readers, who can also assist editors in the selection of material by utilizing the site’s collaborative moderation system called “Firehose,” which contains RSS Feeds, story submissions, and journals which have color-coding to indicate popularity. Using the color spectrum scale, “Red is hot, violet is not,” users can tag and vote on entries, in addition to providing feedback.

Target audience: “Knowledgeable and tech savvy users.”1

Publisher: BIZX, LLC.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication. This is an online forum that publishes reader’s articles on various aspects of technology, in addition to providing an interactive networking environment. Although it is likely to appeal to techie librarians, the primary target audience is not librarians; thus, it would be considered a lay publication rather than an LIS publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Story sections are self-explanatory, with some exceptions: “Apache” (news about the Apache web server); “Apple” (news on all things Mac); “Ask Slashdot” (ask the readership any questions about software problems, hardware, jobs, etc.); “BSD” (news about “modern UNIXes derived from Berkeley’s distribution [like Free, Open and NetBSD]”); “Developers” (news that affects any aspect of programming, such as language, licensing, or techniques); “Features,” “Games,” “Geeks in Space” (not currently open for submissions, this was an audio broadcast provided by the editors); “Interviews”; “IT;” “Linux;” “Politics;” “Polls” (submit “thought-provoking 4-6 question polls to share); “Science;” and “Your Rights Online” (news and information on spam, privacy, and other issues affecting our rights online). Archived articles, book reviews, and job listings complete the content.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “The closer a submission is to featuring all the “perfect” characteristics, the better the chances are that it will run. While we will sometimes tweak submitters’ grammar, spelling and punctuation, attempt to fix broken links, and even edit with brackets and ellipses (in the interest of brevity, clarity and good taste), the nicer a submission starts out, the less tempted we are to hit “delete.” Not every Slashdot post is perfect — but the better they are, the better it is for everyone.”3 “A perfect Slashdot submission is: interesting, informative, clear, snappy, presented neutrally, submitted with appropriate topics, usually based on text and still images, labelled with an understandable, concise headline, well-linked, and grammatically correct.”4

Submission and review process: Use the Submit link located at the top right of website’s home page. Creation of an account is required first. This is a moderated site allowing administrators and editors to approve or remove posts.5

Editorial tone: Informal.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors with a technical bent will find the latest news, stories, and feeds on technology informative. This forum is an informal way to get stories submitted without a formal publishing process and allows for feedback from the target audience. Authors can pitch ideas and ask questions6, perhaps opening the discussion for more library and information science issues.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 3.2 million monthly unique visitors.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this publication is only available online, there is no central geographic location. It is likely that users are international. The publication is written in English and no information is provided on the possible cultural considerations of the audience. This matter could be important, as different countries may have varying technical standards that would need to be further investigated and considered, perhaps by reading further into archives and different sections to find out if any stories on international issues are submitted.

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers work in IT.8  The general audience of Slashdot may not seem the ideal audience for an LIS writing, as they have concerns that would not necessarily reflect the ethics, interests, or issues of LIS. However, with the future of LIS moving quickly with new technology, this audience could be a great source of objective information. The technical aspects of the profession could be introduced into this forum with a group who might have new ideas or strategies unknown to an LIS author.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This forum does not actively promote LIS subject matter, unless there is a newsworthy story to share. However, with the influx of technology influences on LIS, this would be an interesting forum to share LIS information and get feedback that might be more objective on emerging technology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writing and participating for this website would certainly not be a project for the light-hearted “LIS techie.” LIS authors with an avid interest in technology might be able to find middle ground with this publication on issues such as privacy concerns. The ability to collaborate with an audience with general technical backgrounds might open a dialog on the various ways that technology affects libraries.

Last updated: November 14, 2016


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “2016 Media Kit,” SlashdotMedia.com, accessed November 14, 2016, https://slashdotmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Slashdot-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  2. “Frequently Asked Questions,” Slashdot.org, accessed November 14, 2016, http://slashdot.org/faq/index.shtml
  3. “Submissions,” Slashdot.org, accessed November 14, 2016, http://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml?source=autorefresh
  4. Submissions.”
  5. Submissions.”
  6. Frequently Asked Questions.”
  7. 2016 Media Kit.”
  8. 2016 Media Kit.”
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