Wiki Tags Archives: Preservation

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCataloging & Classification Quarterly

ISSN: 0163-9374 (Print) and 1544-4554 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4

Purpose, objective, or missionCataloging & Classification Quarterly is an international journal providing information and discussion on the subject of bibliographic organization. It addresses the theory and practice of cataloging and classification from a historic as well as a contemporary approach. “In a rapidly changing field, it seeks out and fosters new developments in the transition to new forms of bibliographic control and encourages the innovative and the nontraditional.”2

Target audience: Library and information science professionals, specifically catalogers looking for information about current issues or librarians researching the management and use of bibliographic records or the principles of descriptive cataloging.3

Publisher: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6; however, because of its mixed content it also has characteristics of Because of its mixed content, however, it could also be classified as a hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. CCQ is a peer-reviewed journal and its contributors are researchers and experts within the cataloging and classification field which, according to Taylor & Francis website, CCQ emphasizes both “full-length research and review articles” along with “descriptions of new programs and technology relevant to cataloging and classification.”7 Most articles are research oriented, with extensive bibliographies.

Medium: Print and online. The online version will continue to be published eight times per year.8

Content: Per their website, CCQ features articles that consider “…the full spectrum of creation, content, management, and use and usability of both bibliographic records and catalogs. This includes the principles, functions, and techniques of descriptive cataloging; the wide range of methods of subject analysis and classification; provision of access for all formats of materials; and policies, planning, and issues connected to the effective use of bibliographic records in modern society.”9 Besides introducing innovations in bibliographic control, the journal also discusses theoretical backgrounds and analysis of bibliographic organization. Most volumes include both general articles and guest-edited articles that focus on specialized topics.10

Frequency of publication: The printed version is published twice annually. The online version has eight issues per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=0163-9374&linktype=44. This publication uses Scholar One Manuscripts for peer review. A guide to using this system is found at http://journalauthors.tandf.co.uk/pdfs/SubmitGuide_S1M_1.pdf

Types of contributions acceptedCataloging & Classification Quarterly accepts research articles and cataloging news articles of 10 to 35 pages, double spaced, as well as book reviews.12

Submission and review process: Per the publication website, CCQ “…receives all manuscript submissions electronically via their ScholarOne Manuscripts website.”13

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the tone of articles. Upon examination of several articles in an issue, it’s clear that the journal chooses formal, research-oriented features.14

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized publication that provides relevant news, information, and analyses of and about recent trends in cataloging and classification as well as historical perspectives of experts in the field. This journal is a very useful resource for LIS professionals who deal with bibliographic organization and technical services in their institutions. Persons who are experts in the field, archivists, or other librarians, as well as students interested in writing classification-oriented research papers may submit their work for publication. Articles involving information organization or collection management are only a small part of the breadth of literature that may be written about cataloging and classification. Other topics include “cataloging and preservation, cataloging for digital resources, cataloging for special collections and archives, classification and subject access, descriptive cataloging, education and training for cataloging and classification, the internationalization of cataloging, management of cataloging and related functions, maps and other cartographic and spatial materials, online retrieval, use and usability issues related to the catalog, use of catalog data by systems outside the OPAC.”16

This journal is abstracted in Cabells Education Technology and Library Science, CSA, EBSCOhost Online Research Databases, ERIC Education Resources Information Center, H.W. Wilson Indexes, IndexCopernicus, Informed Librarian, INSPEC, JournalSeek, Periodicals Index OnlineProQuest, SCOPUS, SwetsWise All Titles.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the editor-in-chief, Sandra K. Roe, 590 subscriptions were sold in 2008. “Of these, 350 were from institutions in the United States, 180 were from non-U.S. institutions, 55 were personal subscriptions in the U.S., and 5 were personal subscriptions outside the U.S.”18

Audience location and language or cultural considerationsCataloging & Classification Quarterly may be purchased online from Taylor & Francis and is available worldwide.19 This is an English publication and its primary readers reside in the United States. However, as evidenced by the diversity of its editorial board members based in different parts of the world, articles in the journal must also accessible to a international audience.20

Reader characteristics: No individual characteristics of the journal’s readers were available. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, however, describes its audience as, “academic; special adult.”21 Naturally, because Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal, its readers have similar interests in LIS topics and issues, particularly in bibliographic organization. The majority of subscribers are likely cataloging professionals and technical services librarians.22 As LIS professionals, subscribers of this journal likely support the development of cataloging and classification and have interests in other LIS issues.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this specialized journal are doubtless familiar with cataloging and classification, as well as other LIS issues. It may be assumed that the CCQ audience understands LIS jargon.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal that is geared towards the professional cataloger but is also of interest to LIS professionals or students that are particularly interested in bibliographic organization. Authors must keep in mind that these readers are most likely LIS professionals, graduates or students that are knowledgeable about issues in the field of cataloging and librarianship. They are looking for formal and scholarly articles pertaining to topics such as records description and access or classification systems used in special libraries. Research articles on such subjects are the most appropriate for this audience. The use of subheadings is recommended to focus the reader’s attention and show the author’s intention clearly. Authors are encouraged to broach other aspects of information science but, preferably, concentrate on the relationship and importance of these other subjects to cataloging and classification.

Last updated: November 20, 2016


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Cataloging & Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-1683340944
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  4. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  5. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  6. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  7. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  8. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  9. “CCQ Journal Home,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://catalogingandclassificationquarterly.com/
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  11. “CCQ Journal Home,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://catalogingandclassificationquarterly.com/
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  14. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  15. “Instructions for authors, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  16. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  17. “Abstracting and indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wccq20&page=instructions#.U9J08bFiND4
  18. S.K. Roe, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  19. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  20. “Editorial board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wccq20#.U9cg5LFiND4
  21. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  22. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  23. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  24. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
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ALCTS News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALCTS News

ISSN: “ALCTS News is an official publication of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association. It replaced the ALCTS Newsletter Online (ISSN 1523-018X) in September 2013; that publication replaced the ALCTS Newsletter (ISSN 1047-949X) in December 1998.”1

 Website: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ALCTS Newsletter Online is the official newsletter of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. The Newsletter is, from the ACLTS’ Publications & Resources: the “voice that reports ALCTS news and activities with summaries as well as brief articles focusing on problem solving and other topics of interest arising from members’ day-to-day activities on the job.”2

The ALCTS, according to their bylaws, “…will provide its members, other ALA divisions and members, and the library information and community” with “leadership and a program for action on the access to, and identification, acquisition, description, organization, preservation, dissemination of information resources in a dynamic, collaborative environment.”3

Target audience: ALA members and members of ALCTS.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

TypeALCTS Newsletter is a LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Online, with an archive of past issues.8

Content: Information and news on topics for those involved in library collections and technical services as well as events, updates, practices and developments in the field. Newsletters typically include letters from the editor, ALCTS news, ALA news, and calls for papers from related journals. There are frequent announcements for web courses and workshops at various sites and online.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about

Types of contributions accepted: Per the submission guidelines, “The primary focus…is to report the news and activities of ALCTS and its members.11 The secondary focus is “reporting activities of interest to the membership relating to practice and developments in the fields of library collections and technical services.”12

Submission and review process: From the Author Guidelines: submit manuscripts in Word format, single spaced (double spaced between paragraphs), with no highlighting, special fonts, or text effect other than bold or italic. Do not use page numbers, headers, or footers. Submissions may be sent as email attachments to alctsnews@ala.org. Most articles and reports are about 300-500 words; longer articles will be considered on an individual basis.13

Editorial tone: Tone appropriate for a professional publication.14

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.)15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, there is a reasonable assumption that non-members are permitted to submit written materials for publication on the newsletter. There certainly is potential for LIS writers to expand the knowledge in the areas of library collections and technical services.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ALCTS, as of 2013, has a membership of 3826, according to ALA Membership Statistics.16 However, the newsletter is open to anyone with access to the internet.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALCTS is a division of ALA, with a majority of its members located in the United States and smaller numbers in as many as 42 countries.18 ALCTS Newsletter is published in English19 and is written primarily for American librarians. It is an informal newsletter written for a more general audience of librarians with less jargon or scholarly terminology.20

Reader characteristics: No specific information could be located; however, since a majority of Library Resources & Technical Services readers are members of ALCTS, their characteristics would be similar: the majority work in academic and public libraries.21 Most members of ALCTS are particularly interested in collections, acquisitions, cataloging, classification, and preservation.22 Readers of this newsletter will have established opinions on library issues but are generally more interested in seeking scheduling information on workshops, seminars, etc. There is not much opportunity in this newsletter for sharing opinions or biases; short essays relevant to ALCTS might provide an opportunity for sharing values and attitudes on technical services functions.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is a highly informed and educated audience of technical services and collections librarians. They will have a full knowledge of library issues relating to cataloging, collections, preservation, and all the encompassing technical jargon.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of ALCTS Newsletter are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to ALCTS committee work, and other topics related to ALCTS, and have the skills necessary for writing book reviews on highly technical topics.

Last updated: April 20, 2016


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “About ALCTS News,” American Library Association, accessed March 18, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  2. American Library Association. (2014). Publications & resources. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources
  3. American Library Association. (2014). Bylaws. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about/governance/bylaws#3
  4. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  5. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  6. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  7. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  9. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  10. American Library Association. (2014). ALCTS Newsletter Online: Index of Issues. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/ano/
  11. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  12. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  13. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  14. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  15. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  16. American Library Association. (2014). ALA’s Membership Statistics by Division, 2000-Present. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/divisionstats#alcts
  17. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  18. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  19. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  20. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  22. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  23. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  24. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
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Family Tree Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Family Tree Magazine

ISSN: 1529-0298 (Print)1

Website: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A how-to publication for readers interested in family history and genealogy research.2

Target audience: It is directed toward beginner genealogists and family history enthusiasts.3

Publisher: F+W Media, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication. The publication describes itself magazine as a special-interest consumer magazine.6

Medium: Print magazine with online content and research tools.7

Content: Family Tree Magazine covers all areas of family history including ethnic heritage, family reunions, scrapbooking, oral histories and memoirs.8 A typical issue might include articles, lists of resources (including apps, websites, and databases), tutorials, and tips.9

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should appeal to a general audience: non technical enough for beginning genealogists but informative enough for seasoned researchers. New writers are encouraged to submit short pieces of new online resources for the Toolkit section, or short, amusing stories of “the lighter side of family history.” The editors caution that personal experiences or the histories of specific families are not accepted. 11

Submission and review process: Writers should query with a story idea; completed manuscripts are not accepted. Queries should be emailed to ftmedit@fwmedia.com only and include writing samples. Issues are planned at least six months in advance, with the December issue planned a year in advance.12

Editorial tone: The publisher says the tone is “bright, breezy, helpful and encouraging,” but warns writers never to talk down to the reader.13 The typical article has short paragraphs of two or three sentences with vocabulary that might be found in Good Housekeeping or Reader’s Digest.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be a good publication for reference librarians, adult services librarians and LIS students who are knowledgeable about genealogy and history resources. The editors specifically mention wanting articles about new reference materials, and past articles have focused on organizing research materials. They are also looking for how-to articles that will help beginners start their family history projects.14 Librarians have a good understanding of what questions patrons generally ask about family history research; those questions can be turned into simple, informative article ideas for this magazine.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 75,000.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This US based publication is distributed nationally on newsstands, through a retail sales program, for purchase as a download on their website, and by subscription.16 The editorial staff does not provide any statistics on geographic distribution of readers. Family Tree Magazine is printed in English.The editorial staff does not offer any information on ethnic orientation of its readers; however, they welcome articles on ethnic and cultural heritage. Feature articles on how to trace Caribbean, African American, Japanese and European roots and Latin American research have been published.17

Reader characteristics: The publisher provides a reader profile in its media kit. According to the profile, the average reader is 63 years old. The audience is largely female, and 89% of readers have education beyond high school. The readers are passionate about family history, averaging almost eleven hours per week on genealogy-related activities, with most of that time spent online.  On average they spend in excess of $500 a year on this hobby.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These readers will most likely have limited knowledge of LIS-related topics, so technical subjects as well as LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The comprehensive reader’s profile is a writer’s dream come true. That coupled with details from the editorial staff on what they are looking for should provide plenty of guidance on subject matter and writing style. LIS authors can look at the typical reader and see that the overwhelming number are well-educated women, aged 60 and older.19 Perhaps an article about organizing home office spaces (using the cataloging techniques that are familiar to a librarian) would be popular. And the fact that the majority use the Internet each day offers a whole range of possibilities for articles about researching online or how to evaluate a website. Readers who travel for their hobby will want to know about travel resource materials. The well-educated reader might want an online resource for translating family documents (like a birth certificate) that are in a foreign language. Those who are retired might be interested in historical picture books that they can read to their grandchildren to help them begin to learn about their heritage. The possibilities are endless.

Last updated: October 10, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Family Tree Magazine, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521894414381/310957
  2. “About Us,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/Info/About_Us
  3. About Us.”
  4. About Us.”
  5. “Writer’s Guidelines,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines
  6. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  7. About Us.”
  8.  “About Us.”
  9. “Family Tree Magazine March/April 2016,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.shopfamilytree.com/family-tree-magazine-march-april-2016
  10. About Us.”
  11. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  12. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  13.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  14.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  15. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  16. “2014 Media Planner,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/FTM_media_kit_2014.pdf
  17. “Article Index,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/ArticleIndex
  18. “2015 Media Planner,” Family Tree Magazine, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/2015_FTM_media_kit.pdf
  19. 2015 Media Planner.”
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Collection Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Management

ISSN: 0146-2679 (Print) and 1545-2549 (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Collection Management states that the publication “offers library professionals of all types crucial guidance in the fast-changing field of collection management, including the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”2

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/aboutThisJournal?journalCode=wcol20

Target audience: Librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries.3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Collection management covers topics on collection management, planning, allocation of resources, selection, and acquisitions, development of virtual collections, consortia, resource sharing, preservation, and other relevant topics8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t792303985~tab=submit~mode=paper_submission_instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per the publication website, “The journal welcomes articles that provide library professionals with crucial guidance about the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”10

Submission and review process: Collection Management does not require initial queries or proposals; it accepts completed manuscripts. Using the ScholarOne Manuscript software, Taylor and Francis offers an extensive website, Authors Services, that provides guidance beyond the submission guidelines for this specific journal and is full of helpful information.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, suitable for practitioners and academics in the LIS field.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Management is an authoritative and credible LIS scholarly publication. This peer-reviewed journal publishes articles on collection development and related topics. With this in mind, potential authors may contribute articles on a broad variety of topics, from electronic resource acquisitions to recreational reading collections to book preservation. Authors need to be certain they submit work that contributes to the body of knowledge on collection management.

The journal is indexed in Cabells Education Technology and Library Science, CSA, CSA Technology Research Database, EBSCOhost Online Research Databases, H.W. Wilson Indexes, Informed Librarian, JournalSeek, Periodicals Index Online, SwetsWise All Titles.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the United States, but has an international audience.15 The issues covered are of interest to librarians whether they are in United States, Taiwan, or Germany, with topics including how to manage collection development in a digital environment, selection versus censorship, and the use of circulation statistics and interlibrary loan data in collection management.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range from associate university librarians to assistant professors to electronic resources librarians. Often the audience will have earned several degrees: BA, MLS or MLIS, MA, and perhaps PhD. Readers often have supervisory functions with purchasing responsibility, either selecting or authorizing resources for purchase. Readers of Collection Management will most likely have several publications of their own in their portfolio and therefore expect to see well-thought-out and well-researched articles.17

The readers of Collection Management have the same professional interests in common, building their library collections in support of the research and teaching agendas of their parent institutions. They meet the challenge of changing technology, providing the latest publications, and staying within limited library budgets. Collection Management has well-researched theoretical and practical articles that help librarians of any rank succeed in their work. It explores “the future and emerging trends in the field and provides reviews of relevant books, technological resources, and software. This useful resource examines technological advances that help librarians manage and assess collections, such as electronic resource management modules, utilities that provide journal coverage data, and developments in the preservation of library materials.”18

Collection Management is geared towards librarians and information professionals who are interested in articles that help them understand how collection assessment tools and methods can help improve their overall resource management and planning for the future, including how to effectively use staff, facilities, and computing resources.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Collection Management is a peer-reviewed publication that focuses on collection development in college, university, and research libraries of all types. The main readers are librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries. These readers have a strong background on LIS topics and issues. Not only will they understand library jargon, but they will expect to find it in articles written for this journal.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors for Collection Management would do best to consider the education level of the audience and the journal’s reputation for addressing the challenges of their profession. Successful submissions will target current issues in collection management.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/934649605
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  4. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  5. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  6. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  7. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcol20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  9. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  14. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GIGLFiND4
  15. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  16. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wcol20#.U9GEeLFiND4
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  20. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
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Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information (Title changed from Archives and Museum Informatics in 2001.)1

ISSN: 1389-01662

Purpose, objective, or mission: Promotes the development of archival science as a scientific discipline. Per their website “…this journal is the only independent, international, peer-reviewed journal on archival science, covering all aspects of theory, methodology and practice, with appropriate attention to the non-anglophone world…”3

Websitehttp://www.springer.com/new+%26+forthcoming+titles+%28default%29/journal/10502

Target audience: The primary audience is researchers and educators in the field of archival science; a secondary audience is other professionals interested in recorded information.4

Publisher: Springer Netherlands5

Peer reviewed? Yes6 However, the journal website provides no information on the review process.

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Print and online, selected articles available open access8

Content: Articles cover all aspects of archival science theory, methodology, and practice; investigations of different cultures; comparisons of perspectives and practices worldwide; and the field of process-related information. The journal especially focuses on the comparison of procedures and techniques throughout the world, especially in non-English-speaking countries.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: See “Instructions for Authors” at http://www.springer.com/new+%26+forthcoming+titles+%28default%29/journal/10502

Types of contributions accepted: The publication focuses on the scientific aspects of the archival field. Articles deal with the creation, preservation and retrieval of archival information; the social, cultural and historical facets of archived information; and the theory and methodology of information generation and use.11

Submission and review process: Entire manuscripts are accepted through an online submission process.12 The site offers detailed information regarding submission guidelines13 and also provides “Springer Author Academy,” a series of online tutorials to help an author prepare a manuscript for publication.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly15

Style guide used: Publication has an in-house style guide, provided in the “Instructions for Authors” tab.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A review of previously published articles indicates that the majority of authors are from the LIS academic community. Archival Science is an international publication, and the authors are international as well. Faculty at U.S. institutions such as Simmons College, the University of North Carolina, and the University of Pittsburgh were represented with recent articles. There was no indication of graduate students’ work in the publication, suggesting this journal may only be an option for experienced authors from the academic community; however, the journal does offer mentoring through their online course (Springer Author Academy).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not provided.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an English-language journal published in the Netherlands. Due to its international audience, prospective authors should avoid regionalisms and ensure that any references, such as cultural and geographic terms, are clear to the reader.17

Reader characteristics: Readers are academics, well-educated within their field, and interested in promoting archival science as an autonomous scientific discipline. Interests span all aspects of archival science theory, methodology, and practice. While readers work in a variety of environments, including universities, governments, and museums, the journal is aimed at academics. Readers would likely not have an interest in LIS issues beyond those related to their work as archivists. Also, writing that focuses on local issues not applicable to another location would hold little interest for the average reader.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Archivists will most likely have a general understanding of how their work is related to the LIS field, but not all archivists will have an LIS degree. For example, archivists working for the United States federal government are not required to have an LIS degree.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in writing for this publication need to be secure in their knowledge and reputation in the archival profession, as the readers expect articles that are thought provoking and will add to their knowledge of the field.

Last updated: October 31, 2016


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 31, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  2.  Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523412328038/275476
  3. “Database Management and Information Retrieval,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  4. “Database Management and Information Retrieval/Aims and Scope,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016,  http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  5. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 31, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  6. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 31, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  7. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 31, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  8. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 31, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  9. “Database Management and Information Retrieval,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  10. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 31, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  11. “Database Management and Information Retrieval,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  12. “Database Management and Information Retrieval,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  13. “Database Management and Information Retrieval/Instructions for Authors,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  14. “Author and Reviewer Tutorials,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/gp/authors-editors/author-academy
  15. Archival Science: International Journal on Recorded Information, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 31, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402342686499/275476
  16. “Database Management and Information Retrieval/Instructions for Authors,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  17. “Database Management and Information Retrieval/Instructions for Authors,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  18. “Database Management and Information Retrieval,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
  19. “Database Management and Information Retrieval,” Springer, accessed October 31, 2016, http://www.springer.com/computer/database+management+%26+information+retrieval/journal/10502
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American Archivist, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The American Archivist

ISSN: 0360-9081 (Print) and 2327-9702 (Online)1

Website: http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of The American Archivist states it “seeks to reflect thinking about theoretical and practical developments in the archival profession.”2 It is the journal of the Society of American Archivists, so the focus is on the cultural, social, legal, and technological developments in North America in particular.3

Target audience: Archivists and special collections librarians.4

Publisher: Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS and History, scholarly7

Medium: Print and online open access; last six issues available to SAA members and subscribers only, or to the general public for a fee.8

Content: Includes research articles, case studies, commentaries on issues and practices of interest to the field, essays on international archival practices, annotated professional resource bibliographies, discussions of professional practice and initiatives, and letters to the editor on previously published articles and other topics of interest to the field.9

Frequency of publication: Semi-annual.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy

Types of contributions accepted: Original research articles, case studies, opinion and editorial pieces, articles concerning international practices or perspectives, professional resource bibliographies, and reviews of books, archival literature, finding aids, microfilm editions, exhibits, and computer software.11

Submission and review process: The preferred maximum length is 8,000 words for research articles and surveys, and 3,000 words for case studies and perspectives. These length requirements may be waived for certain articles in consultation with the editor. All articles should be accompanied by a 100-word abstract. Manuscripts are to be submitted electronically as email attachments in Microsoft Word, double-spaced and pages numbered throughout, with author’s name and address on the title page only.12

The American Archivist is a refereed journal. Each submission will be reviewed by two experts in the subject matter of the submission, and a final decision for publication will be based on their reviews. Final decision normally takes a minimum of three months.13

Acceptance for publication is usually on the condition that specified revisions be made. Once an article is accepted, author will send a short biographical statement and photo. Authors are given the opportunity to approve all editorial changes and to review page proofs for correction of printer’s errors. It usually takes a year for a submission to be seen in print.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition; for professional terminology refer to the definitions outlined in A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology by Richard Pearce-Moses.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If the author is looking for an avenue to enter the conversation of current, scholarly archival practices and the future of conserving information, this may be one of the more prestigious journals through which to pursue publication. Publishing in American Archivist is sure to have weight when interviewing for a position, or to fulfill tenure or promotion requirements for academic libraries or other scholarly institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The American Archivist circulates to around 6,000 members of the Society of American Archivists.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SAA members live and work all over North America. There is no specified or dominant culture or geographic area. This journal is mainly focused on North American archivists and their practices, and all articles are in English. However, this journal expresses a definite interest in the archival practices of their international colleagues, and specifically looks for articles on this subject.18

Reader characteristics: Highly educated individuals, most of whom have at least two university degrees. Most have history and/or library science graduate degrees. There are further specializations in every area imaginable, so a variety of interests are represented here. There is no information provided on age, gender, or ethnicity of the members. This audience works in a variety of professional settings, including universities and higher education, private corporations, nonprofits, historical societies, public and special libraries, art and history museums, religious organizations, and government agencies. Some specializations include acquisition and appraisal, business archives, religious archives, academic archives, museums, description (cataloging), electronic records, government records, manuscript repositories, oral history, preservation, reference and access, and visual materials to name a few. People may work by themselves with little to no assistance, or work in immense academic or private institutions with a fleet of colleagues and assistants. The most striking characteristic of American Archivist readers is that they love and believe in what they do. They are incredibly interested in their profession, and how to continue and expand it into the future. These readers are interested in practical approaches and ideas, as they are practitioners in the real world who are usually short on money, space, and time. Theoretical discussions with no practical applications would be of little value to them.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With extensive knowledge specific of their branch of LIS, these readers are well versed in the history of archiving and preservation and specific technologies and practices, and are often eager to discuss and debate new technologies and future practices in the field. They are familiar with both LIS and archival terminology, concerns, issues, and theories. Archival studies includes several different models used for appraisal, weeding, preservation, etc., which are also discussed in this publication. Not all readers will possess an LIS degree as some enter the field by way of a history or museum education and background.20

Conclusion: Reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this publication can be extremely intimidating for the new author and archival professional. Many of SAA’s members have been publishing in this journal (and others) for years, and their names are well-known and carry weight at conferences and national conventions. They have highly specialized and technical knowledge ranging over hundreds of topics, localities, and institutional settings. These readers are professional scholars and practitioners who value both theoretical and applied research in archival science. They will be looking for excellent academic writing, new ideas, or suggestive case studies with relevance to their own repositories. This is a high standard to meet. However, if an author feels he or she has something to add to the conversation of archival studies, this is the right forum. This is where the newest, most significant research, case studies, and experimental models in the field are disseminated and discussed.

Last updated: October 27, 2016


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-712559018
  2. “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist
  3.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist
  4.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist
  5. The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 27, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  6.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 27, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  7.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 27, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  8.  “The American Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist
  9. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  10.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 27, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  11. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  12. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  13. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  14. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  15.  The American Archivist, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed October 27, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401982746364/41437
  16. “Editorial Policy,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014, http://www2.archivists.org/american-archivist/editorialpolicy
  17. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  18. “Advertising Opportunities,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2014,  http://www2.archivists.org/advertising
  19. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
  20. “So You Want to Be an Archivist,” Society of American Archivists, accessed October 27, 2016, http://www2.archivists.org/careers/beanarchivist
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Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

ISSN: 2163-52261

Website: http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the official publication of LITA (the Library and Information Technology Association), ITAL is primarily concerned with keeping LITA members informed about the technologies that shape their workplaces and profession.2

Target audience: Members of LITA, primarily librarians and information professionals3

Publisher: Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: ITAL is an open-access, electronic-only publication.7 Full-text versions of all content published since 2004, as well as tables of contents and abstracts for earlier issues, are also available electronically.8

Content: ITAL “publishes material related to all aspects of information technology in all types of libraries. Topic areas include, but are not limited to, library automation, digital libraries, metadata, identity management, distributed systems and networks, computer security, intellectual property rights, technical standards, geographic information systems, desktop applications, information discovery tools, web-scale library services, cloud computing, digital preservation, data curation, virtualization, search-engine optimization, emerging technologies, social networking, open data, the semantic web, mobile services and applications, usability, universal access to technology, library consortia, vendor relations, and digital humanities.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

It is important to note, when perusing author information such as this, that specific types of submissions, such as book or software reviews, may require contact with someone other than the main editor. Failing to note such differences could result in a solid article or query being lost in the shuffle.

Location of submission guidelines: https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: ITAL accepts feature articles that contain original research or in-depth analysis of 3,000 to 5,000 words or longer. Communications of 1,000 to 3,000 words are also accepted, such as “brief research reports, technical findings, and application notes,”as well as tutorials and letters to the editor.11

Submission and review process: Individuals must submit original and unpublished manuscripts only. Manuscripts that are being considered elsewhere should not be submitted. Responsibility for the accuracy of the information falls upon the author of the manuscript. This includes references, URLs, and statistics.12

Articles are to be submitted online; registration and login are required.13

Editorial tone: Formal, with most articles including an abstract. Articles are evidence and research-based, written in language that is clear and direct.14

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style for notes and bibliography15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals or students focusing on the technical services side of libraries who can contribute to the community’€™s knowledge of emerging technologies should consider writing for this publication. Opportunity is also ripe for those with an understanding of technical services and public services who can explain complicated technical jargon and its importance to the uninitiated. A survey of recent articles includes usability of next-generation catalogs such as VuFind, the application of geographic information systems (GIS) in LIS research, widgets, interoperable catalog models, semantic web technologies, web design for patrons with disabilities, applying CIPA regulations and other issues. Tutorials included cloud computing and digitizing documents to make them accessible on the web. Articles and tutorials are pragmatic, so topics and information presented need to be relevant to professionals in their LIS workplace.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics not available, but as ITAL is an open-access, online publication a wide readership may be assumed.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LITA is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) and is therefore located in the United States,18 but subscribers come from all over the world. ITAL is published in English.19

Reader characteristics: ITAL is read by administrators, librarians, and information technologists interested in all aspects of information technology. These readers include library directors, systems managers and analysts, automation consultants, and both technical and public service librarians using technology to serve users.20

Readers are interested in subjects that include library automation, access to information through technology, digital libraries, electronic journals and electronic publishing, computer security, intellectual property rights, library consortia, technical standards, and software development. Articles display a strong emphasis on service orientation. Readers likely share this value.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This journal covers a broad spectrum of topics and issues relating to LIS subject matter, and most articles would be comprehensible to any librarian; specialized knowledge of technical services is usually not assumed.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because readers come from both technical and public services, papers should not be only technical in nature. Demonstrating how a technology can be leveraged to solve a human need, whether that is user experience or library operations, will be fundamental. In a survey of articles, many papers demonstrate the impact of technologies on libraries, the communities they serve, and on society. Authors also emphasize service orientation, a value readers likely share.

Last updated: May 7, 2017


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523477092994/48154
  2. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  3. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  4. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  5. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  6. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  7. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,  http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  8. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  9. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  10. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  11. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  17. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  18. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  19. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  20. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  21. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  22. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
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College & Research Libraries News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Research Libraries News

ISSN: 0099-0086 (Print) and 2150-6698 (Online)1

Website: http://crln.acrl.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: C&RL News provides timely coverage of the activities and policy statements for the Association of College and Research Libraries, as its official news magazine.2

Target audience: Members of the ACRL.3

Publisher: Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news magazine.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, “College & Research Libraries News (C&RL News) publishes articles, reports, and essays written by practitioners addressing philosophy and techniques of day-to-day management of academic library services and collections. C&RL News provides current information relating to issues, activities, and personalities of the higher education and academic and research library field. Information literacy, scholarly communication, technology, professional education, preservation, government actions that affect libraries, acquisitions, grants to libraries, product updates, and the business of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) are covered in C&RL News.”7

Frequency of publication: 11 monthly issues (July and August are combined).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/author.xhtml

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, essays, and reports.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted to the editor electronically. Only original manuscripts that have not been published will be accepted, however, exception may be given to previous items published in other institutional newsletters; length depends on type: articles should not be more than 2,000 words; “The Way I See It” essays may be 750 to 1,000 words; footnotes, charts and tables should be minimal; graphics should be included with submission. The author is responsible for obtaining permission for the use of any graphics. Please provide a brief caption and credit (if needed) for all images. Query first for “Internet Resources” column pieces and detail your experience and knowledge on the subject. If your query is approved you will receive special guidelines for manuscript preparation.10

Editorial tone: Practical, accurate, informative, and informal.11

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with C&RL News provides a strong foundation for both an author’s portfolio, in addition to allowing the author to be involved in a LIS association. Authors are not required to become ACRL members to publish with C&RL News; however, ACRL offers a variety of publication tools and resources, including wikis and other forums for information sharing that is important to the professional development of librarians, and LIS authors. C&RL News provides new LIS authors the potential to build their writing portfolio within a supportive, field-specific environment.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the ACRL website, the association has approximately 13,249 members. Since these members receive automatic subscriptions to the C&RL News, this would be a certain count towards the circulation. However, nonmembers can also subscribe to the publication, and the circulation total found on the advertising rates page notes the total circulation count at 13,685. Aside from members and nonmember single subscriptions, there may also be subscriptions by other libraries or related groups (educators) that may have an interest in receiving this publication.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, it may seem apparent that the publication is geared towards academic and research libraries in America. However, the subscription information provides rates and postal fees for subscriptions to Canada, Mexico, Postal Union of the Americas and Spain (PUAS) countries, and all other countries.15 The publication is printed in English, and as mentioned above, is a publication of a division of the ALA. The production office is in the U.S., and the majority of content is geared towards the “latest trends and practices affecting academic and research libraries and serves as the official newsmagazine and publication of record of ACRL,”16 so cultural considerations do not seem to expand beyond the U.S. However, content such as “Internet Resources,” that includes international websites, and stories on librarianship in other countries (Chalfoun, E. 2007. Beyond the border: Research in Maasailand. College & Research Libraries News. Vol. 68, no. 8: 522-523)17 present an awareness of how library trends and practices in other countries can affect U.S. librarianship.

Reader characteristics: In 2006, an electronic survey by McKinley Marketing, Inc., notes that ACRL members are 75% female, and 25% male. The majority of members are age 45-54, a total of 34%, with 28% of members being 55 to 64, 19% are 35 to 44, 14% are 25 to 34, 4% are over 65, and only 1% are under 25. The ethnic background of members, which could also be characterized in the previous category, as a “cultural consideration,” consist of 86% White/Caucasian; 5% African American; 3% Asian/Pacific Islander; 2% Hispanic; 1% Native American, and 2% listed as “other.” The audience will be comprised of members of the ACRL, who are professional librarians, staff, administrators, directors, educators in LIS, and students. The McKinley Marketing, Inc., survey from 2006 shows a wide array of professional interests and positions, with the largest group being directors or deans at 21%. Public services librarians follow at 18%, with remaining groups representing 5% and less in the roles of catalogers, branch heads, collection development, chief information officer, technical services, information educator, special collections, and “other.”18 This publication allows for more personal insights into the experiences of individual librarians with a personal essay column, called “The Way I See It,” and humorous anecdotes. Readers will be open to new perspectives on situations they might have encountered themselves.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the ACRL is a professional association of academic librarians and “other interested individuals,”20 the knowledge of LIS subject matter will be a given. Readers will not want definitions and descriptions of issues that they are familiar with — this audience expects to be informed on the current news, trends, and practices in academic and research libraries, as well as in the ACRL itself.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

An initial reading of this publication would not necessarily give a potential author the sense that the audience is mainly female, white, and over 35. The professional characteristics have a far stronger impact on the focus of stories, rather than appeal to a particular age, gender, or ethnic background. However, the homogeny of the audience may provide authors with the opportunity to introduce issues that would reflect the diversity of patrons that many librarians’ experiences.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  College & Research Libraries News, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-1598126628
  2. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). About C&RL News. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/about.xhtml
  3. ProQuest. (2016). College & Research Libraries News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411507704316/119300
  4. ProQuest. (2016). College & Research Libraries News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411507704316/119300
  5. ProQuest. (2016). College & Research Libraries News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411507704316/119300
  6. ProQuest. (2016). College & Research Libraries News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411507704316/119300
  7. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Instructions for Authors. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/author.xhtml
  8. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Instructions for Authors. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/author.xhtml
  9. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Instructions for Authors. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/author.xhtml
  10. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Instructions for Authors. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/author.xhtml
  11. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Instructions for Authors. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/author.xhtml
  12. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Instructions for Authors. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/author.xhtml
  13. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/
  14. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Advertising Information for ACRL Publications. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/advertisinginformation
  15. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Advertising Information for ACRL Publications. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/advertisinginformation
  16. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). About C&RL News. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/about.xhtml
  17. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). Table of Contents. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/content/68/8.toc
  18. American Library Association. (2014). Divisions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/groups/divs
  19. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). About C&RL News. College & Research Libraries News. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/site/misc/about.xhtml
  20. Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). (2016). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
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Information & Culture: A Journal of History (formerly Libraries and the Cultural Record)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information & Culture: A Journal of History

The journal has gone through a number of name changes:
1966-1972, Journal of Library History
 1972-1973, Journal of Library History, Philosophy, and Comparative Librarianship
1973-1987, Journal of Library History
1987-2006, Libraries and Culture
2006-2012, Libraries and the Cultural Record.1

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.infoculturejournal.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per journal website, Information & Culture “. . . publishes high-quality, peer reviewed articles on topics related to the history of information. The journal’s scope has broadened significantly in recent years to encompass the historical study of any topic that would fall under the purview of the modern interdisciplinary schools of information . . . However, the journal honors its (50+ year) heritage by continuing to publish in the areas of library, archival, museum, conservation, and information science history.”2

Target audience: Library historians and other scholars whose interests might relate to the history of information, such as historians of computing, labor, gender, economics, business, and politics; critical theorists, and scholars of cultural studies, science, and technology3

Publisher: University of Texas Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS and history, scholarly6

Medium: Print, with online subscriptions available.7

Content: The journal website states, “In keeping with the spirit of information studies, the work is human centered and explores the interactions of people, organizations, and societies with information and technologies. Social and cultural context of information and information technology, viewed from a historical perspective, is at the heart of the journal’s interests.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles10 and book reviews11 and book reviews

Among the content requirements are that an article be primarily historical in nature, take an interpretative, not merely descriptive approach, and have a clearly stated thesis supported by appropriately cited evidence.12

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email, accompanied by a cover sheet and abstract, in MS Word format. Authors are asked to provide the names of at least two potential reviewers.13 Submission includes an initial review by the editor, and, if accepted, a double blind process by at least two outside reviewers.14

Editorial tone: Scholarly15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors may find that it is a bit more difficult to get articles published in this journal as the acceptance rate is less than half. However, the journal is very prestigious. The editors state that “we do not yet have enough data to make an accurate forecast of acceptance rates. For the period April 2011-March 2012 our acceptance rate was 20.5%. We anticipate that the acceptance rate will stabilize at well below 50 percent of submitted manuscripts.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Exact submission numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is worldwide. However, based on the content of the articles, most readers most likely reside in North America, South America, and Europe. In past issues, there were articles about Mexico, France, and the United States as well as a review of a book in German. This indicates the editorial board expects reader interest to be broader than merely North America.18 The journal publishes articles in English,19 but the topics are wide ranging and are not necessarily limited to the English-speaking world.20

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are generally scholars and professionals in a variety of fields, but especially history and library science. This publication has a broad base of support in a variety of disciplines. Articles could easily fit under history, literature, art, and political science as well as library science.21 The professional interests of the readers of this publication would be generally academic and scholarly. It might fit those working in all manners of libraries, museums, and archives as well as both faculty and students at academic institutions. The journal strongly follows a particular historiography, that of social and cultural history. In this sense, it is far less likely that one would find an article that is based in political history or in reconstructing grand narratives.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS subject matter is very high when it comes to the historical aspects of the profession. Because other academics in other disciplines are actively participating in the creation and use of this journal,  knowledge of current information profession issues might not be as high as it is with other LIS-specific journals.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication are generally highly educated, scholarly, and professional. Potential authors need to be exact and precise and have expertise in the field. The journal, while overwhelmingly about library science topics, is also very rooted in historical study. The editorial staff and the readers are exacting in their quest for solid scholarship.

Last updated: May 6, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  2. “Information & Culture,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org
  3. “Information & Culture,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  4. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  5. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  6. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  7. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  8. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  9. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  10. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  11. “Book Reviews,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/book_reviews
  12.  “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  13. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017,  http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions
  14. “Peer Review Process,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  15. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  16. “Submissions,” Information and Culture, University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  17.  “Peer Review Process,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/submissions/peer_review
  18. “Archive,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/archive
  19. Information & Culture, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405693705579/114581
  20. “Archive,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/archive
  21. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  22. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
  23. “About,” University of Texas Press, accessed May 6, 2017, http://www.infoculturejournal.org/about
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Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America

ISSN: 0730-7187 (Print) and 2161-9417 (Online)1

Website: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/journals/journal/adx.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a peer-reviewed journal presenting issues of concern to librarians working within art history, art criticism, the history of architecture, archeology, and similar areas. The journal has established itself as a vital publication for art information professionals, acting as a forum for issues relating to both the documentation of art, and the practice and theory of art librarianship and visual resources curatorship.”2

Target audience: Art, architecture, and design librarians and visual resources curators.3

Publisher: University of Chicago Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Art and LIS, scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Articles and information relevant to art librarianship and visual resources curatorship in academic, special library, and museum settings.8

Frequency of publication: Semiannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttps://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146

Types of contributions accepted: According to the contributor guidelines, “Feature articles may take the form of theoretical or scholarly submissions, revisions of conference presentations, papers emphasizing library practice, descriptions of specific libraries or collections, interviews, or articles of a historical nature. Articles must relate to art librarianship, visual resources curatorship, or the documentation of art, and the writing style should be formal.” Published articles are typically 2,500 to 5,000 words, with a maximum of 8,000 words.10

Submission and review process: Authors should contact the content editor via email to discuss topic and abstract before submitting a manuscript. Submission deadlines are March 1 for the fall issue, and September 1 for the spring issue.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Professionals, academics, and graduate students seeking to establish themselves in the field of art librarianship will find an opportunity in this peer-reviewed publication.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation statistics available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an English-language journal published in the United States, with a North American focus.14

Reader characteristics: A subscription to Art Documentation is a benefit to membership in the Art Libraries Society of North America. It is assumed that readers have a shared interest in art, developing LIS skills, and supporting fellow art librarians. Workplaces would include art libraries with an interest in mentoring, networking, and developing best practices. Readers would have a professional interest in promoting access to art and art preservation.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers have an LIS degree. It is likely that many members of the ARLIS/NA also hold additional degrees in history or art.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writers need to consider the education level and very specific interest the readers share when writing for this publication. Authors are encouraged, as with any publication, to read past issues of the publication before querying the editor with a proposal.

Last updated: November 1, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed April 10, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  2. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  3. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  4.  Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  5. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  6. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  7. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  8. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  9. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  10. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  11. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  12. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  13. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  14.  “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  15.  “Art Documentation,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016 https://arlisna.org/publications/art-documentation
  16. “What Our Members Are Saying,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://www.arlisna.org/membership/what-our-members-are-saying
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