Wiki Tags Archives: Opinion

Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
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Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

ISSN: 2474-7459 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:  The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is the official journal of the American Library Associations’s Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF).2 It seeks to be at the center of all library related discussions on intellectual freedom and privacy issues.3

Website: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/index

Target audience: The primary audience for this publication are librarians, scholars, and researchers. However, given the nature of the content, it is likely that a wider audience of professionals, for example, those who work in education, technology, or other cultural institutes, will find the topics posed in this journal to be of interest and use.

Publisher: American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 606114

Peer reviewed? This publication welcomes both peer reviewed (research/feature) articles and non-peer reviewed (commentary) articles.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content:  The Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy (JIFP) replaces and expands on ALA’s Newletter on Intellectual Freedom (NIF) which was published from 1952 to 2015. As a reincarnation of the newsletter, it continues to cover book banning, legal controversies, and success stories in addition to its newer content, such as refereed essays, peer reviewed articles, book reviews, and opinion pieces.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy welcomes submissions related to intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and in the wider world.”9 According to their website, submissions can include:

Research articles/Features: These are original research articles submitted for peer review. Submissions should be 4,000-8,000 words and anonymized for double-blind peer review.

In addition to research articles there are also vast options for those who want to submit non-peer reviewed material which will be reviewed by the editorial staff. These include:

Commentaries: Shorter essays, think pieces, or general commentary on topical issues, controversies and emerging questions for the field. Non-peer reviewed articles and essays discussing or describing policies, practices, projects, law, and scholarship related to intellectual freedom and privacy. Personal accounts of censorship and intellectual freedom challenges. Opinion pieces and essays on current and topical issues. Commentaries are typically 500-1000 words.

Book Reviews: Reviews of recent books or publications relevant to the field. Reviews should be 800-1000 words.

Please note, per the journals guidelines, word count must include references.10

Submission and review process: Queries can be sent to Managing Editor Deborah Caldwell-Stone (dstone@ala.org) or Editor Shannon Oltmann (shannon.oltmann@uky.edu).11

Editorial tone: Peer-reviewed feature articles are expected to be scholarly, while commentaries, book reviews, and news items might take on a more conversational tone as long as their content is well researched and arguments are well supported.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style is required for all submission formats.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy provides much potential to LIS authors. Since this journal publishes both peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed articles, professionals with diverse backgrounds and various publishing goals will find  this a suitable journal to submit to. Intellectual freedom and privacy are some of the core principles libraries are built on, therefore, librarians of all areas are likely to have much to contribute to this publication. As a fairly recent publication, The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is actively seeking submissions and enjoys working with new authors. This is an excellent opportunity for LIS professionals to gain publishing credentials and be published in a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available for this publication, however, as a journal of the American Library Association, it can be assumed that a large portion of its 58,000 members are potential readers.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is international in scope and published in English.14

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers of this publication are likely librarians, scholars, researchers, and other LIS professionals interested in intellectual freedom, privacy, and related topics. Additionally, since intellectual freedom and privacy are topics that interest a diverse audience, readers are also likely to be professionals in other sectors such as business, technology, and education.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a scholarly journal of the American Library Association, strong knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed by readers coming from an LIS background. However, since this publication is likely to engage a wider audience, and also publishes non-research based articles, it might be best to also assume some readers will not be as familiar with library jargon and to keep it to a minimum or provide additional clarification.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy’s readers will be eager and open to learning about the most recent research and concerns regarding intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and around the world. Readers are educated professionals and advocates of libraries and their core principles.

Last updated: 11/14/2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, OCLC World Cat, accessed November 6, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/journal-of-intellectual-freedom-privacy/oclc/953205347
  2. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  3. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  4. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  5. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  6. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  7. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  8. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  10. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  12. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  13. “ALA Annual Membership Statistics,” AlA.org, accessed November 8, 2018, http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/annual_memb_stats
  14. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Political Librarian, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Political Librarian

ISSN: 2471-3155

Website: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/ and http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Political Librarian “is dedicated to expanding the discussion of, promoting research on, and helping to re-envision locally focused advocacy, policy, and funding issues for libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, scholars, practitioners, and graduate students, as well as those outside of the LIS discipline, who are interested libraries and tax and public policy.

Publisher: The Political Librarian is organized and published by EveryLibrary.2 It is hosted by the Washington University in St. Louis Open Scholarship site.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Not all articles are peer reviewed, but there is a section in most issues for those that are.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content:The Political Librarian publishes peer-reviewed articles, white papers, and editorials that focus on how funding issues, tax implications, budgeting, and broader economic policy affect libraries on the local level.4 Articles range from focused examinations, such as library budgeting strategies, to broader issues, such as tax reform and trickle-down economics.5 The journal is “at the intersection of local libraries, public policy and tax policy.”6

Frequency of publication: Two volumes each year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: PolicesFinal Manuscript Preparation Guidelines, and Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian.

Types of contributions accepted: The Political Librarian publishes opinions/first drafts, white papers, and peer-reviewed articles. The journal seeks a variety of perspectives, new voices, and lines of inquiry, and does not limit “contributors to just those working in the field of library and information science.” The journal invites “submissions from researchers, practitioners, community members, or others dedicated to furthering the discussion, promoting research, and helping to re-envision tax policy and public policy on the extremely local level.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts though the journal’s online portal. Initial submissions do not have strict guidelines to follow.8 However, accepted manuscripts need to follow the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.9

Editorial tone: The tone is professional. Clear guidelines are provided by the editorial team.10

Style guide used: The journal’s reference and citation style is explained in the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Political Librarian is a new journal (first published in 2015) that has a very particular focus: it is a “dedicated space where practitioners, researchers, and users [can] publish on frontline advocacy experiences, campaign strategy and research, and/or about tax and public policies impacting libraries on the local level.” The journal is a resource for examinations of the impact of tax and public policy locally and how policy affects library services and community outcomes and for new models of library funding and resources to educate stakeholders.12 LIS authors–professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students–who write about the intersection of libraries with tax and public policy will find a good fit with this journal.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available, but the number of downloads appears on each article’s title page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Political Librarian is written in English. The audience is mostly located in the United States, as US tax and public policy are primarily discussed.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students, as well as those outside the LIS community, who are interested in how tax and public policy affects libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a strong academic and practical understand of LIS subject matter, but there may be readers outside of the discipline for whom jargon or idiosyncratic terms should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should understand that readers have a particular interest in libraries and in public and tax policy, and they look for articles that both explain how libraries can survive and thrive in the current environment and how to advocate now for positive changes in the future. Readers also look for local analyses and examinations that may have implications on a broader scale.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


 

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Journal Home,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/.
  2.  The Political Librarian, everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/.
  3. “Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series,” Washington University Open Scholarship, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/peer_review_list.html.
  4. “Journal Home.”
  5. “Most Popular Papers,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/topdownloads.html
  6. “Volume 1, Issue 1 (2015),” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/vol1/iss1/.
  7. “Aims & Scope,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/aimsandscope.html.
  8. “Policies,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/policies.html.
  9. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/styleguide.html.
  10. “Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian,” everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/editorial-team-guidelines-political-librarian/.
  11. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.”
  12. Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, and Rachel Korman, “The Political Librarian: Foundations,” The Political Librarian 1, no. 1(2015): 7, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=pollib.
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Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
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Medium

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Medium

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://medium.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Medium is a free, open platform for people to read, write and share posts easily online. Posts can be organized into publications, which anyone can set up.”1

“Medium taps into the brains of the world’s most insightful writers, thinkers, and storytellers to bring you the smartest takes on topics that matter. So whatever your interest, you can always find fresh thinking and unique perspectives.”2

Target audience: Inquiring minds on the web. Medium publishes content across a vast array of topics to interest all sorts of readers.

Publisher: A Medium Corporation.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles of varying lengths.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Medium’s Write page has information on posting, editing, importing articles and more.

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on a plethora of topics, grouped into broad categories such as Technology, Culture, Entrepreneurship, Creativity and more. Anyone and everyone can post articles, granted they create an account on the website.

Submission and review process: This page directs authors to information on creating an account and writing and posting stories.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

See “Medium for Nonprofits, Explained” for suggestions. See also the SJSU iSchool’s Medium site. And you can search Medium for “libraries” and “librarians” to find lots of examples from other sources.

Given the sheer number of daily users on Medium, it could be a great place to submit writing, especially if you have never been published before. However, there are plenty of articles out there about how it can be difficult to get your work seen since there are so many postings per day, as well as how you can increase your viewer traffic.

The following articles may be helpful for those interested in posting on Medium:

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can read articles for free, but monthly subscribers get access to more content and curated collections.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in English, but read worldwide. The majority of readers are in the United States.4

Reader characteristics: According to statistics, the majority of Medium’s readers are college educated.5 The sheer amount of topics covered and the breadth of articles published shows that Medium readers are curious information seekers who have many interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. There are certainly articles written by LIS professionals, but they are often geared towards the general public. Examples: Three Lessons I’ve Learned About People from Being a Librarian and Google’s Slow Fade with librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Medium is a unique platform for writers in many ways, but its ‘clapping’ feature allows for readers to respond to articles, and in turn directly shows authors how widely read their work is. It can be difficult to increase readership across Medium, but there are plenty of third party websites that give you tips and tricks to improve visibility.

Last updated: April 4, 2018


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “What is Medium?” Medium.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://help.medium.com/hc/en-us/articles/225168028-What-is-Medium-
  2. “About,” Medium.com, accessed Marc 19, 2018, https://medium.com/about
  3. “Membership,” Medium.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://medium.com/membership
  4. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics,” Alexa.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/medium.com
  5. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics.”
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VINE Journal of Information & Knowledge Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems

ISSN: 2059-5891

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=vjikms

Purpose, objective, or mission: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is an international journal publishing work that considers “information and knowledge from a content management/library science perspective.” The journal highlights “the reality and need of organizations, both governmental and private, to operate in a highly interdependent world, where collaboration and knowledge/information are the predominant assets for getting things done; and, in many cases, critical for achieving competitive advantage.” The journal was formerly titled VINE.1

Target audience: Practicing professionals in the areas of information services, knowledge management services, and library management systems.

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content:VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems provides a combination of topical themed issues, well-researched, timely, unbiased articles, and practical overviews which can be applied in the workplace.” The journal “offers lively and topical coverage of developments in the field.” 5 The journal primarily publishes research papers, but conceptual papers, literature reviews, technical papers, and case studies are published regularly. Most issues are made up of individual articles, but themed, guest-edited issues regularly appear.6

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems accepts research papers, conceptual papers, literature reviews, technical papers, case studies, and opinion pieces that “consider information and knowledge from a content management/library science perspective.” The journal aims to publish new developments in the field of information and knowledge management, helping organizations stay current and competitive. The journal is international in scope.8

Submission and review process: This publication uses the ScholarOne Manuscripts system for submissions. A first review is performed by the editor, and acceptable manuscripts are sent for double-blind peer review to at least two independent referees.9 Emerald Publishing has a guide to help authors through the publishing process.10

Editorial tone: The tone of VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is academic and focused on the technology and research of knowledge management. As such, articles are technical, specific to the subject, and backed by studies.

Style guide used: Harvard style. This publication has detailed manuscript requirements, including style of references and in-text citations, which should be read carefully prior to submission.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the field of information and knowledge management. LIS authors best suited to this journal work and conduct research in this field and have particular knowledge of information management and its practical applications. The journal publishes articles from studies conducted around the world.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is published for the worldwide LIS information management community, and articles use technical terms specific to the discipline and high-level academic English. The editors are professors at universities in Hong Kong, Romania, Finland, and the United States, and editorial board members are from universities and companies from around the globe.12

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely LIS scholars and professionals working in knowledge and information management in the public and private sectors.13 Readers most likely have or are working on LIS master’s or doctoral degrees or are professionals with technical and practical information management expertise.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: This publication is aimed at information management professionals and scholars. Readers will expect a strong emphasis on information management techniques and principles. The readers of this publication likely have a strong background in technology and knowledge management terminology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The journal seeks to provide readers with articles, case studies, and opinion pieces that provide current, relevant insights into the issues that are shaping the future of information and knowledge management systems, enabling readers to compare their own experiences with an international audience of their peers. Readers will be highly informed, so authors should send articles that are well researched and add to the body of knowledge.

Last updated: March 26, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “Journal History,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018,
    http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=vjikms.
  2. “Recommend This Journal to Your Librarian,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/recommend.htm?id=vjikms.
  3. “Author Guidelines,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=vjikms.
  4. “Recommend This Journal to Your Librarian.”
  5. “Journal History.”
  6. For example, Special Issue: Knowledge Strategies: A New Connection between Strategic Thinking and Knowledge Management Capabilities, VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems 47, no. 4(2017), https://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/vjikms/47/4.
  7. “Volume List,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, https://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/vjikms.
  8. “Journal History.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “For Authors,” emeraldgrouppublising.com, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/authors/index.htm.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Editorial Team,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=vjikms.
  13. “Journal History.”
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I Need a Library Job (INALJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: I Need A Library Job (INALJ)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its seventh year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Information on guest blogging: http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207

Types of contributions accepted: Articles or interviews of any length (but at least 550 words) on all sorts of topics—archives, volunteering, diversity, resumes etc.5

Submission and review process: You must provide proof of identity in order to post an article or blog—use a professional work email address or have a LinkedIn connection or colleague vouch for you. A landscape orientation jpeg photo is required, as well as a personal bio. The bio can also be a link to your own site.

Submit photos, Word document of your article, bio and proof of identity to: articles@inalj.com.6

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: No style guide is used.7

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing. Naomi states that she does not publish any articles that are holiday related, since she has a back log to work through.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published in the past year span a broad range of topics–networking for reluctant networkers, the importance of saying “no” in the workplace and a q & a with Dr. Sandra Hirsch from SJSU’s iSchool. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. “Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed March 13, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. “About INALJ”
  4. “Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ is usually updated Monday-Friday.[4. “About INALJ.”

  5. “Write for INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207
  6. “Write for INALJ.”
  7. “Write for INALJ.”
  8. Write for INALJ.”
  9. “About INALJ.”
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School Libraries Worldwide

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Libraries Worldwide

ISSN: 1023-9391

Website: https://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official research journal of the International Association of School Librarianship, School Libraries Worldwide publishes professional, current research and scholarship on all aspects of school librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic researchers and public school librarians worldwide.2

Publisher: International Association of School Librarianship (IASL).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online with an IASL subscription; some articles have public access.4

Content: School Libraries Worldwide publishes new scholarly works and current research on all aspects of school librarianship from around the world. Most issues include a theme section with an editorial and several articles.5

Frequency of publication: Two times per year, January and July.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines for Contributors and Current Call for Papers (downloadable Word document).

Types of contributions accepted: School Libraries Worldwide invites new scholarly works, including research reports and reviews of research, on any aspect of school librarianship. Issues usually include a theme section; theme editors will occasionally call for submissions of personal narrative, commentary, and opinion papers.7

Submission and review process: Manuscript are submitted to the online journal system, where authors can track their papers through the review process. “The average turnaround time to first decision is about 60 days, with an approximate acceptance rate of 50%.” Submissions that are considered appropriate for the journal are blind reviewed by at least two members of the Editorial Board.8

The current Call for Papers should be consulted to note the theme and content of the upcoming issues, but content on school librarianship in general is always accepted.9

Editorial tone: Professional and accessible, with an understanding of the worldwide audience.10

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an ideal journal to submit different types of scholarship on school librarianship: practice, research study findings, reviews of studies, and personal experience (of the author or of students), in general or as the current theme allows. It is particularly fascinating to read accounts of triumphs and difficulties faced by those in school library positions in other countries and current onformation on programs, technologies, and practices that will be helpful in a variety of settings (rural, urban, university, grade school, etc.). Students are encouraged to submit work, and the open-access article per issue, one that covers a popular, engaging topic, is an exciting goal to reach for.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the official journal of IASL, School Libraries Worldwide is an English-language publication for an international audience. The submission guidelines firmly note that “authors need to be mindful of the international audience of the journal. In most cases, authors can use the library terminology that is used in their locale. However, when writing about schools and students, it is important to state the age of the students being educated in those schools.” The guidelines indicate that authors should explain terminology used to identify schools: lycee, high school, compulsory school, etc.12

Reader characteristics: Readers of the journal are interested in school librarianship and emerging thoughts and trends in the field. This is a positive journal exploring best practices and techniques that can benefit anyone working or studying school librarianship. Members of IASL include people who are concerned about school library media programs and services — librarians, school library media specialists, educators, publishers, and lay people. IASL is a worldwide organization that, in addition to providing an international forum for discussing school librarianship issues, works with other professional associations to provide guidance and development for school library programs. The overall goal is creating effective programs: this is a very professional, respected, positive publication that strongly believes in its mission and uses the journal to spread the education.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but as with the caution on explaining the age of students in the articles, authors should consider explaining any technical LIS jargon or regional terms.14

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in what you have to share concerning school librarianship. Articles range from international standards for school librarianship, to profiles of teacher librarians, to connecting teacher librarians and classrooms around the world. There is certain to be a topic that LIS students who are studying school librarianship will be able to research or write about for this publication of open, interested peers.

Last updated: March 7, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Guidelines for Contributors,” School Libraries Worldwide, accessed March 7, 2018, https://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/contributors.html.
  2. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  3. Homepage, School Libraries Worldwide, accessed March 7, 2018, https://iasl-online.org/publications/slw/index.html.
  4. Homepage.
  5. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  6. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  7. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  8. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  9. Homepage.
  10. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  11. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  12. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
  13. “Handbook of Organization,” iasl-online.org, accessed March 7, 2018, https://iasl-online.org/about/organization/index.html.
  14. “Guidelines for Contributors.”
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Reference Services Review (RSR)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Reference Services Review: Reference and Instructional Services for Libraries in the Digital Age (RSR)

ISSN: 0090-7324

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=RSR

Purpose, objective, or mission: Reference Services Review (RSR) “is a leading journal dedicated to the enrichment and advancement of reference knowledge and the improvement of professional practice.” Further, the journal “raises questions, explores new frameworks for user services, advances fresh analyses and research and proposes solutions to diverse operational issues facing librarians and information professionals.”1

Target audience: Librarians, information professionals, and LIS students, especially those interested in reference, instruction, and public services.

Publisher: Emerald Publishing.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: RSR articles “draw upon traditional areas of inquiry within the fields of information studies and education, as well as from newer interdisciplinary perspectives such as critical pedagogy” and relate to “all aspects of reference and library user services in a digital age.”4 RSR regularly publishes special issues, such as 2017’s two-part Transfer Students and Students in Transition.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted:  RSR publishes research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews. The author guidelines provide a description of each article type in the Article Classification section.6 Topics are wide ranging, including user research, instruction, digital services and software, assessment, management, and any topic relevant to improving and innovating reference services.

Submission and review process: Articles are submitted to RSR using ScholarOne Manuscripts. The editor reviews the manuscripts and sends those that are appropriate for the journal to at least one independent referee for double-blind peer review.7  Reviewers are “distinguished practitioners, managers, administrators, educators, and scholars from library and information studies and higher education, as well as other fields.”8 Additional manuscript requirements and a production cycle with approximate dates and deadlines for the current volume are available on the Author Guidelines page.9

Editorial tone: Professional and academic.

Style guide used: Harvard style in-text citations and reference list. Examples are provided in the Author Guidelines.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

RSR is a strong choice for librarians and information professionals looking to publish scholarship and research on topics relating to reference and readers’ advisory, instruction, information literacy, and public services. It is interdisciplinary in nature, so LIS authors who write from other disciplines or perspectives (for example, critical pedagogy) will find an outlet here. Furthermore, RSR is a leading journal that “provides a quick and efficient service to first-time authors.”11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: RSR “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: RSR is a North American English-language journal. It is widely abstracted and indexed.13 The editorial board consists of LIS professionals from North America, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Canada, so although the articles have an overall North American focus, the reach of the journal is international.

Reader characteristics: Readers include LIS practitioners, managers, administrators, educators, scholars, and students, with a wide range of professional interests in the area of reference services. RSR “is valued reading by the majority of North American library schools with its ‘au courant’ focus.”14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a high familiarity with terminology, trends, and best practices relating to reference services; they will also be LIS graduate students familiar with but learning about these topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A typical reader of this journal will be an LIS professional or graduate student looking for innovative approaches and thoughtful analysis that is written in an accessible style.

Last updated: March 6, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Aims & Scope,” Reference Services Review, accessed March 6, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=RSR.
  2. “Aims & Scope.”
  3.  “Author Guidelines,” Reference Services Review, accessed March 6, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=rsr.
  4. “Aims & Scope.”
  5. See Reference Services Review 45, no. 2 (2017), http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/rsr/45/2,  and 45, no. 3 (2017), http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/rsr/45/3.
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Aims & Scope.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Author Guidelines.”
  11. “Aims & Scope.”
  12. “Aims & Scope.”
  13. “Aims & Scope.”
  14. “Aims & Scope.”
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