Wiki Tags Archives: Opinion

Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
Continue Reading

Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”1

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,2 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.3

Publisher: Georgia Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.5 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.6

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.7 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,8 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online9

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.10

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”11

Frequency of publication: Quarterly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.13

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”14

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”15

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.16

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.17

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,19 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.21 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,22 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,23 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia24 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.25 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,26 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  4. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  7. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  9. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  10. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  11. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  12. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  13. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  14. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  15. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  16. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  17. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  18.  (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  19. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  20. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  21. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  23. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
Continue Reading

Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
Continue Reading

Strategic Library

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

Website: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Strategic Library assists administrators and managers in all types of libraries as they deal with day-to-day and strategic challenges”1 by focusing on “innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape.”2

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.3

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: As per their website, Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.8

An “Editorial Forecast” is accessible through their website that includes topics to “spark ideas”9 for possible submission. Broad topic areas include: Collections/Circulation, Community Leadership, Emerging Technologies, Fundraising/Budgeting, Legal Issues, and Strategic Planning.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly, from January to October.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/Write-for-Strategic-Library

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.12

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Use the Editorial Forecast as a guide.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.13

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.14

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, madavidson@charter.net15

According to the writer’s guidleines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”16

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional. Editors are looking for professional stories that “cover concepts, strategies, and technologies”17 that are important to the writers and their colleagues.18

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape. A recent issue (Issue 17, May 15, 2015) features articles written by public librarians, academic librarians, a private consultant, and representatives of a technology integration company.20

Examples of possible topics for the potential author are:

  • Has your library completed a five-year strategic plan in a new format?
  • Does that plan include renovations, new construction, or consolidations?
  • Have you embarked on an outreach program to the communities you serve?
  • How are you positioning next year’s library fundraising campaign based on what you learned last time?21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.23 Because the majority of the readership spans North America, regional colloquialisms should be avoided.

Reader characteristics: Readers are “executive decision makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty.”24 As such, readers are “experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”25

Strategic Library strives to offer a forum for the sharing of information and experience among the decision makers in LIS settings.26 Authoritative, instructive and innovative ideas and practice will appeal to this particular audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS jargon and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using a first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or others’ experiences with best practices are another option for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are motivated, experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). About Us. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775992
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Editorial Forecast. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Editorial-Forecast.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  13. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  14. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  15. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  16. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  17. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  18. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  19. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  20. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Issue 17. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://user-94545020520.cld.bz/SL-May15-1#9/z
  21. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  22. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  23. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Contact. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775945
  24. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  25. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  26. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  27. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
Continue Reading

REFORMA Newsletter

*Note:  REFORMA Newsletter last published in April 2014, and its current status is unknown. Please contact the wiki team if you have information about this publication so we can update this profile.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: REFORMA Newsletter

Website: http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2

Purpose, objective, or mission: To develop library services for the growing population of Spanish speakers and Latinos in the United States and abroad. REFORMA’s goals include:

  • Development of Spanish-language and Latino-oriented library collections
  • Recruitment of bilingual, multicultural library personnel
  • Promotion of public awareness of libraries and librarianship among Latinos
  • Advocacy on behalf of the information needs of the Latino community
  • Liaison to other professional organizations1

Target audience: Librarians and other professionals with an interest in library services to Latinos and Spanish speakers.2

Publisher: REFORMA.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news.5 The newsletter contains LIS professional news and information about developing and improving library services.6

Medium: As of 2012, REFORMA Newsletter is an electronic and virtual newsletter that is open to anyone.7

Content: The newsletter covers issues that concern information and library services for the Spanish speaking and Latinos. It contains book reviews, articles on issues concerning Latinos and the Spanish speaking, features about librarians in different Spanish speaking countries, interviews with authors, bilingual and Spanish language book lists.8

Frequency of publication: Updated as submissions are accepted.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: None available.

Types of contributions accepted: Artwork, opinion pieces, news briefs, features, reviews, and letters to the editor are accepted. REFORMA’s sections include News Articles, President’s Column, Chapter Updates, Adult Book Reviews, Children’s Book Reviews, Young Adult Book Reviews, Felicidades!, Letter from the Editor, and La Opinión.10

Submission and review process: Article submissions should be sent via email to the editor. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Please note that all submissions are subject to editing and revision due to space, grammar, and clarity.11

As of November 2012, editor Francisco Vargas put out a call for REFORMA editors, including coeditor, copy editor, and regular columnists. These volunteer positions are all virtual and require an average of 10 hours per week.12

Editorial tone: The newsletter does not indicate a type of editorial tone. The pieces in the newsletter are written in an approachable tone.13

Style guide used: No style guide indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The REFORMA Newsletter is well respected and widely read among librarians who provide services to the Spanish speaking and Latinos in the United States and other countries where Spanish is spoken. The level of diversity of topics offered through the newsletter allows librarians and others to explore a range of subjects for articles. However, it should be noted that the focus of the newsletter is on library services for Latinos and the Spanish speaking. Authors should keep this in mind when submitting a manuscript to this publication.

This publication is neither peer reviewed nor written in a scholarly tone. As such, it most likely will not meet any requirements for tenure. However, the articles are interesting and the authors of published work in the newsletter will have a far-reaching audience as this newsletter is distributed across the globe. Authors in the publication gain recognition within this community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: REFORMA Newsletter is open-access, online.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: REFORMA offices are located in the United States (Anaheim, California) with membership located throughout North America.15 This publication accepts submissions in “Spanish, English or Spanglish”16 suggesting authors need an understanding of Spanish-language and Latino cultural.

Reader characteristics: Writers can safely assume that readers of this newsletter, per their website, are committed to, “development of library services and programs that meet the needs of the Latino community; the establishment of a national information and support network among individuals who share our goals; the education of the U.S. Latino population in regards to the availability and types of library services; and lobbying efforts to preserve existing library resource centers serving the interests of Latinos.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have some knowledge of LIS topics, as they are working to provide library services to Latinos, but the level of knowledge will vary.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the mission of the organization and, possess a clear understanding of the needs of the membership. The readers will be interested in how to recruit Latino and Spanish speaking individuals into the library field, how to establish and maintain Spanish-language collections, and how to effectively lobby to secure and retain funding for library services for the Latino communities they serve.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  2. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  6. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  7. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  8. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  9. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  10. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  11. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  12. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  13. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  14. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  15. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  16. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  17. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  18. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
Continue Reading

Letters to a Young Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Letters to a Young Librarian

Website: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This blog offers “advice to those who are new (or even not so new) to librarianship from someone who has been doing this work for a while now.”1 The objective is to “break down the barriers between library schools & students and professional librarians.”2

Target audience: Library science graduate students and new professional librarians.3

Publisher: Jessica Olin.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Articles (ideas! advice! pep talks!) on all areas of librarianship. Examples from the last two months (March and April, 2015) include: a discussion of management vs. leadership, a reminder about patron privacy, and a description of and tips for whiteboard polling.8 Interspersed with the professional advice are “just for fun” posts.9 Guest posts are also included and welcomed.10

Frequency of publication: Very frequent, averaging 7-9 posts per month.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html

Types of contributions accepted: Olin poses this question to potential contributors: “Is there something you wish you’d known when you were a graduate student and/or a brand new to libraries?”12 “In some posts, you see the author’s philosophy of an aspect of librarianship. In others, the piece is about developing job skills. So long as it answers that basic question, pretty much everything is germane to this blog.”13

Writing on exactly the same topics that have already been covered, or approaching topics in the same way, will not be published.14

Submission and review process: Casual tone is required (no footnotes allowed). Posts should be between 500-750 words. Submissions will be edited by Jessica Olin. Send topic ideas to librarianjessica@gmail.com15

Editorial tone: Tone is casual and welcoming.16 “This isn’t an academic, refereed publication. It’s a conversation. That means personal pronouns are encouraged and footnotes/endnotes/etc. are not allowed.”17

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If this is your first foray into writing for your peers, this blog is an excellent place to start. As this is a blog specifically written for new librarians and library school students, you will be writing for peers and like-minded individuals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016, this blog has 254 followers.18 In addition, Olin has 2,222 followers on Twitter.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This blog is written in American English for a mostly North American audience.20

Reader characteristics: Readers seem to be mostly students or recent graduates with many and varied interests in the LIS world. As per the guest post guidelines, “this is a conversation.”21 Readers will expect informative and thoughtful posts written in an informal manner. As “posts need to be geared toward a general audience”22, readers represent all areas of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS issues could range from the first year LIS graduate student, to a professional librarian starting a career in the field. Don’t assume that the reader will understand LIS-speak; keep jargon to a minimum.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Letters to a Young Librarian want to learn about the profession in a way that is not taught at their graduate schools. They want first-hand accounts of first-time librarians. They are interested in everything from your philosophy of librarianship, to tips on networking. The possible topics are as varied as the profession.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  2. Olin, J. (2016). Why I Decided to Start a Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2011/06/why-i-decided-to-start-blog.html
  3.  Olin, J. (2016). About This Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-this-blog.html
  4.  Olin, J. (2016). About Me. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-me-with-contact-information.html
  5.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  6.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  7.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  8. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  9.  Olin, J. (2016). Just for Fun: Big Hero 6. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2015/04/just-for-fun-big-hero-6.html
  10. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  11. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  12.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  13. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  14. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  15. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  16. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  17. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  18.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  19. Twitter. (2016). Jessica Olin. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/olinj
  20. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  21. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  22. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  23. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
Continue Reading

Information for Social Change

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information for Social Change

Website: http://libr.org/isc/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An activist librarian organization that “examines the issues of censorship, freedom and ethics amongst library and information workers.”1

Target audience: LIS workers and practitioners.2

Publisher: Information for Social Change.3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional. The topics and informal style of the content may also appeal to civilian readers.5

Medium: Online6

Content: Documenting the control of information globally and also alternatives to the control of information.7

Frequency of publication: Semi-annually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libr.org/isc/call-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles between 500 and 2500 words. Longer articles may be excerpted with the full text made available from the author, according to the guidelines. Letters, review articles and poems are also accepted for publication.9

Submission and review process: Send an email to the editor at isc-journal@libr.org.10

Editorial tone: Simple and clear English. Views are radical and thought-provoking themes that promote debate.11

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS authors who are interested in radical librarianship that examines censorship, ethics and freedom, this journal would be a good choice. The journal suggests potential authors review past and current issues in order to gauge the interest.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not stated but British English style of writing is used.13 Website is in British English but it’s not stated as to whether that is the only acceptable version. This journal addresses global issues so it is safe to assume their readers are international. The organization holds events in association with progressive groups such as Third World Book Fair.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely progressive in their viewpoints. Readers are LIS professionals with progressive and radical views15 who are interested in finding channels in which to allow “unfettered and unmediated ideas” to circulate.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS terms and the profession is helpful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal most likely hold progressive viewpoints and feel strongly about the issues presented such as freedom of information and radical changes to the way information is controlled and disseminated. Authors who wish to submit to this publication should hold similar views or at least be extremely open to new ideas.17


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Information for Social Change. (2016). Welcome. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/
  2. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  5. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  7. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  9. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  10. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  11. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  12. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  13. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  14. Information for Social Change. (2016). Events. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/events/
  15. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  16. Information for Social Change. (2016). Policies. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/policies-submission-guide/#1
  17. Information for Social Change. (2013). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
Continue Reading

Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

Website: http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap

Purpose, objective, or mission: To provide opportunities to Pennsylvania librarians to share their knowledge on all areas of librarianship to other librarians in the state and beyond.1

Target audience: LIS professionals in Pennsylvania and internationally especially in the academic library field.2

Publisher: PALA College & Research Division/University of Pittsburgh University Library System.3

Peer reviewed? Research and Practice articles are subject to double-blind peer review. News and Commentary items are not peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Online and open access.6

Content: News, commentary and peer-reviewed journal articles on best practice of interest to academic libraries in Pennsylvania.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually. (Note: this is a new journal and the 2013 issue is the first one.)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions. Registration and login is required.

Types of contributions accepted: Items that have already been published or are under consideration for publication, either in print or online, will not be accepted. The journal focus and scope page states it will “consider all submissions that report original research (research articles), highlight innovative initiatives (practice articles), or discuss current trends/challenges (editorial/commentary). Each issue will also feature news items (collections, services, awards, events, etc.) from Pennsylvania’€™s libraries.”9

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted in 12-point font and use italics rather than underlining. The journal can accept articles in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF format.10 Specific formatting and submission requirements for each type of article can be found here: Submissions. Research and Practice articles are subjected to blind peer review and should have no identifying names or terms and include a 100 to 150 word abstract and a completed Submission Preparation Checklist. News articles do not have to follow peer review guidelines.11

Editorial tone: The publisher’s intent is to provide articles on a wide range of subject with a focus on academic libraries.12 A review of Research and Practice articles issue indicates there is a definite scholarly tone.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a place for Pennsylvania librarians to publish, in particular, in the academic field. As this is a new journal, it is an especially excellent place for new writers to submit articles and news items. As it’s open-access and online, the audience will not be limited to Pennsylvania readers. For example, one article published in the first issue addressed the topic of “Using Social Media to Promote International Collaboration.”

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is a new online open-access journal directed specifically to librarians in Pennsylvania librarians. No numbers have yet been determined.15

Audience location and location or cultural considerations: Pennsylvania, USA with an expected international audience.16 American English and American practices will probably be the focus; although, the editors do intend it to be read internationally.17

Reader characteristics: Readers will most likely be academic librarians in Pennsylvania. Biased towards research and articles written about academic libraries in Pennsylvania.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have LIS subject matter knowledge.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this publication is intended for academic and other librarians in the state of Pennsylvania only, the editors anticipate a wider audience including global interest. Therefore, authors should keep in mind that there is a potentially much wider audience than just a local one.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  2. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  4. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  7. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  10. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  11. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  12. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  13. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap
  14. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  15. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  16. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  17. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  18. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  19. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
Continue Reading

Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIS&T) (Previously the American Society for Information Science and Technology)

Website: http://www.asis.org/jasist.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website the stated purpose of JASIST is a “leading international forum for peer-reviewed research in information science.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals who are involved in or interested in the tools and techniques of information management.2

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Subject to single blind review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: This journal publishes original research on “…the production, discovery, recording, storage, representation, retrieval, presentation, manipulation, dissemination, use, and evaluation of information and on the tools and techniques associated with these processes.”7

Frequency of publication: Monthly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal welcomes rigorous work of an empirical, experimental, ethnographic, conceptual, historical, socio-technical, policy-analytic, or critical-theoretical nature.”9 Submitted articles should not exceed 36 pages. However, if an author has a longer paper, it may be submitted to the editor with a justification for the longer length which will be taken under consideration.10

Submission and review process: From the website: “Types of manuscripts: Various contributions are considered for publication: full-length research articles, occasional opinion papers (2,000-3-000 words on a topic that will stimulate debate), brief communications of 1,000-2,000 words, and letters to the editor. Letters and brief communications can generally be published sooner than full-length articles. All materials submitted will be acknowledged on receipt and (except for letters) subject to peer review. Opinion papers may be sent for review at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief. Articles are subjected single blind refereeing. Copies of the referees’ comments will be forwarded to the author, along with the editor’s decision.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly writing with properly formatted and cited references. A brief review of recently published articles indicate that the writing is formal and very informative.12

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (current edition).13

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors

This site appears to be an excellent choice for LIS authors who have prepared in-depth original research papers on the evaluation and dissemination of information. Recently published articles include the “effects of time delays and information presentation on search behavior” and subject terms for classificatory metadata.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Circulation: No information available on circulation numbers. This is the journal for the Association for Information Science & Technology which states “ASIS&T counts among its membership some 4,000 information specialists from such fields as computer science, linguistics, management, librarianship, engineering, law, medicine, chemistry, and education…”15

Geographic location: This is an international publication; however, the journal is published in American English.16

Language or cultural considerations: “Authors for whom English is a second language may choose to have their manuscript professionally edited before submission or during the review process.”17

Individual characteristics: Members of the Association for Information Science & Technology (formerly American Society for Information Science and Technology) are readers along with other interested LIS professionals.18

Professional interests and workplaces: Readers will, no doubt, come from a technical LIS background who have a strong interest in original research in emerging areas of interest.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are most likely LIS professionals with an interest in research and who have a thorough background in LIS terminology.20

Biases, values, and attitudes: Geared toward intellectual, educated readers.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As the journal is the publication for the Association for Information Science and Technology members who are described as “individuals who share a common interest in improving the ways society stores, retrieves, analyzes, manages, archives and disseminates information, coming together for mutual benefit,”22 authors who wish to write for this journal will need to be well-versed in information technology and interested in emerging trends in this field. Readers expect original research that “pushes the boundaries of knowledge in emerging areas of interest,”23 according to the JASIS&T website.

Last updated: October 10, 2014


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  2. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  3. ProQuest. (2014). Association for Information Science and Technology. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412979904237/41862
  4. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). JASIST. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/jasist.html
  5. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). JASIST. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/jasist.html
  6. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). JASIST. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/jasist.html
  7. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  8. ProQuest. (2014). Association for Information Science and Technology. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412979904237/41862
  9. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  10. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  11. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  12. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  13. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  14. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  15. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). About ASIS&T. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/about.html
  16. ProQuest. (2014). Association for Information Science and Technology. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412979904237/41862
  17. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  18. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  19. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  20. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  21. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  22. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). About ASIS&T. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/about.html
  23. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
Continue Reading

Bottom Line, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Bottom Line

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0888-045X

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly a journal on library finances subject to editor review only, The Bottom Line has “broadened its scope to become a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary journal . . . mainly focusing on the trading of information, information economics, and the business of information.”1

Target audience: The journal is “not only for library and information researchers, but also for micro-economists and education researchers, marketers and knowledge professionals in information organisations, the media, health care, and government.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS Scholarly5

Medium: Online; author has the option to receive print copies6

ContentThe Bottom Line publishes research and case studies on the financial and economic aspects of information and information practice, mainly focusing on the trading of information, information economics, and the business of information. Information is widely defined including, but not limited to: records, documents, files, learning objects, visual and sound files, data and metadata, and user-generated content.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl

Types of contributions accepted: The journal focuses less on the management of information than on the trading of it. The website lists the following areas of special interest:

  • The socio-legal, cultural, and technological aspects of the environment in which information is traded
  • The articulation and development of new information theories and models
  • The relationships between society and business, technology, knowledge categorisation and metadata; and individual, group and collective memory
  • The grey or black market and those who would exploit it, such as foreign government intelligence agencies, unscrupulous businesses, and cybercriminals.9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made online using the submission and peer review system ScholarOne Manuscripts. Emerald Group Publishing has a support center offering guidance on using the system.10.

Editorial tone: Scholarly11

Style guide used: Harvard citation style12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This interdisciplinary journal has a target audience of LIS professionals as well as marketers in information organizations, the media, government employees, and health care professionals. LIS authors whose professional and research interests include the social or legal issues that arise when members of these disparate fields share information will find a venue for their work in The Bottom Line.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Emerald Group Publishing is located in West Yorkshire, England. Its journals are written in British English for a worldwide audience.14

Reader characteristics: Reader demographics are not available. The content is targeted at LIS professionals, micro-economists and education researchers, marketers and knowledge professionals in information organisations, the media, health care, and government.15 Authors should assume a high level of education, but not necessarily in the LIS field.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the interdisciplinary nature of this journal, authors should assume a high level of education, but not necessarily in the LIS field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writers for The Bottom Line will impact a broad audience that extends beyond the LIS community to “micro-economists and education researchers, marketers and knowledge professionals in information organisations, the media, health care and government.”16 LIS authors whose work concerns information economics and how information is traded and monetized will reach a targeted audience through publication in this journal. For such authors, The Bottom Line offers an opportunity to add to the body of knowledge in the new cross-disciplinary field of information economics.

Last updated: November 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  2. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  3. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  4. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  5. “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  6.  “Emerald Publishing Services,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/services/publishing/index.htm
  7.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  8. “The Bottom Line: Volume List” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/bl
  9.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  10.  “The Bottom Line: Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl
  11.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl

    The publisher of this journal offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, for non-native English-speaking authors.[12. “The Bottom Line: Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl

  12. “The Bottom Line: Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=bl
  13.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  14. “About Emerald,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/index.htm
  15.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
  16.  “The Bottom Line,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed November 14, 2016, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=bl
Continue Reading