Wiki Tags Archives: Open access

The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.1 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”2 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”3

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.4

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.8

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope9

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”1

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,2 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.3

Publisher: Georgia Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.5 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.6

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.7 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,8 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online9

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.10

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”11

Frequency of publication: Quarterly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.13

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”14

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”15

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.16

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.17

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,19 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.21 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,22 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,23 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia24 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.25 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,26 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  4. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  7. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  9. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  10. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  11. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  12. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  13. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  14. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  15. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  16. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  17. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  18.  (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  19. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  20. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  21. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  23. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
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Library Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”1

Target audience: “Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”7

Content: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”8

Included in every subscription is an annual Chinese supplement.9

Frequency of publication: 9 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 3000 and 6000 words in length.11

The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

Emerald publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that your submission is complete.14

As per the Author Guidelines: “Each paper is reviewed by the Editor and, if it (is) judged suitable for publication, is evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.”15

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. There is a strong international component to the selection of articles in each issue. While the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas”, there is a practical tone in the sharing of issues concerning individual libraries.16

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17

References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a highly informative publication in the field of library management. The articles in this journal explore a wide range of issues in various types of libraries worldwide. In the current issue alone (Volume 36 Issue 4/5), articles topics include: e-reserves in a Manila library; social welfare information management in Nigerian libraries; academic library leadership; and promotion and tenure for academic librarians.19

LIS authors, whether professional librarians, or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into  current issues in library management, and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

International authors also have an excellent opportunity to publish research on issues important to their particular geographical area.20 Of particular interest to Chinese authors is the annual Chinese supplement — an excellent avenue for publication.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English23, yet is international in scope. While the editor and book review editor are located in Australia, the editorial advisory board comprise professionals worldwide; including, the U.K., Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and South Africa.24

Emerald offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, that offers “expert Language Editing services for non-native English-speaking authors, and…discounts to authors planning to submit to Emerald’s journal(s).”25

The annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”26, with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”27

Reader characteristics: Readers are senior managers and academics from across the globe. As this journal has an international scope, the audience will have diverse cultural experiences. Despite this, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior managers and academics.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, diverse, academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience.

Last updated: June 24, 2015


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  10. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  15. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  19. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  22. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Editorial Team. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  27. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  28. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  29. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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Library and Information Research (LIR)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Library and Information Research

Website: http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir

Purpose, objective, or mission: Among others, this publication’s goals are to “encourage reporting of research by practitioners” and to “raise awareness of new tools, books, and funding opportunities for research.”1 The majority of information is centered in the UK and Ireland.2

Target audience: This publication is written by and for members of the Library and Information Research Group and all parties interested in current research topics in library and information science.3

Publisher: Library and Information Research Group4

Peer reviewed? Both. “Refereed research papers” are peer reviewed, while other research articles and other types of writing are not peer reviewed.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6 Both peer-reviewed and research articles are submitted for publication and all are connected to the LIS world.7

Medium or mode of distribution: Online only.8

Content: The journal consists of research articles ranging from 2000-7000 words, editorials, reports, and book reviews.9

Frequency of publication: This journal is published three times a year,10 in spring, summer and winter issues.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All sections of LIR are open to submission except for editorials.12 Submission guidelines may be found at http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Journal articles (for both peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed sections) are accepted for submission, as well as reports on events and conferences and book reviews.13

Submission and review process: Deadlines are set for authors who have preferred issues in which they might wish to publish. Free registration is required for authors who wish to submit and review.14 Authors are asked to follow the submission guidelines before submitting their article to ensure it meets the journal’s standards.15

Editorial tone: Formal and very technical. According to the guidelines “All authors are encouraged to conclude their paper with a section describing the practical applications of their research, i.e., answering the “so what?” question. What effect should your work have on the LIS practitioner or the research community? Is there anything the community should be doing differently as a result of your research? Have you identified areas for future research? If so, please state them here.”16

Style guide used: Harvard-style references. Examples are given in the guidelines.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and Information Research has a great deal of potential for LIS researchers and authors. As an open-source journal, it allows for a great number of readers. Its scope as a “research into practice”18 journal presents both new information and future possibilities through long and short articles, as well as links to other resources, including new books. Both student readers and authors can benefit from this type of publication while in the prime of their research.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is an open-access, online-only journal,19 and thus circulation increases daily. The editor could not be contacted in order to discern daily or overall hits to the LIR or Library and Information Research Group sites.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is produced in the  UK,20 so it is probable that the majority of readers and writers can be found there, but as LIR is an open-access journal,21 readers can be found across the globe. Readers will be more likely to use British English than American English.22 Most readers, however, will be able to understand both. Due to the nature of the writings, colloquialisms and unexplained cultural references are not expected.

Reader characteristics: The majority of the readers will be interested in the LIS field and likely work in libraries or other research institutions in some capacity. The majority of the articles and papers written for this publication are from an objective viewpoint, and should not present strong biases. However, the idea of “research into practice” is very strong in all aspects of the journal, and thus a forward view of research and its possibilities should be present.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will often be students and scholars in the LIS field. LIS jargon, unless decidedly specialized, should not have to be explained in depth.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important aspect of this journal that one must consider when writing is its impartiality to opinion. The editors of this publication believe strongly in research and the presentation of that research. It may be assumed that, particularly when reading the refereed papers, the readers, your peers, will feel the same. Even when writing a book review, writing should be straightforward and technical in its appearance. Writings on action, historical, evaluation and any other type of research should be understandable for your peers.

While this journal, as web-born, does not likely have an extensive readership, it is still a useful place to present research and ideas to your peers and have them in turn present theirs to you. As an American LIS writer presenting an American understanding to a majority-UK audience, new ideas may be formed from intercontinental collaboration.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  3. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  5. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  7. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  9. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  11. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  14. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  18. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  21. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  22. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  23. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian provides “€œa forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS).”1 It publishes critical perspectives in librarianship that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive issues within the profession.3

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly. This journal aims to provide critically relevant information in an academic setting.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Full text of articles are available online, previous to and including the Winter/Spring 2009 issue.8

Content: From the website: “€œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice yearly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”11

Submission and review process: Submit electronic files only via e-mail in rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word (.doc). Prints and digital images are welcome; if digital, provide 300 dpi grayscale TIFF (.tiff) files no larger than 5X7 inches. The editors reserve the right to edit all manuscript submissions before publication.12

Submit manuscripts to Kathleen de la Peña McCook at klmccook@gmail.com or Susan Maret at iecologie@yahoo.com.13

To submit a book review contact:

Michael Matthews
Watson Memorial Library, Room 311-D
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
Natchitoches, LA 71497
318-357-441914

Papers are published under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives 2.0 license, which places work in the public domain.15

Editorial tone: The articles are both innovative and present alternative views to typical librarian publications. Social justice, racism and other topics that may be considered controversial are published.The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.16

Style guide used: Submissions in your favorite citation style such as Chicago, MLA, APA, Harvard, Turabian are accepted. The style of choice has to be used consistently throughout the paper.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

According to the Progressive Librarians Guild, every library issue embodies a political value choice–and its publication, Progressive Librarian, aims to unearth those propositions and discuss them openly.18 Progressive Librarian rejects the proposition that contemporary libraries are value-neutral information markets, embracing the older idea that librarianship is a profession firmly for the people,€ a democratic force that promotes intellectual inquiry and an informed citizenry.19 It aims to publish articles and promote discussion that defend and extend the library as a free public sphere that makes independent democratic civil society possible.€ Accordingly,the Progressive Librarians Guild is opposed to commercial and business interests that threaten the free flow of information.20 If you are interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and how politics informs professional practice, consider writing for this publication.

A survey of past articles included cultivating freedom of expression within the workplace, Mexican libraries, the internet, and titles such as, “€œCataloging the Path to a New Dark Age: a taxonomy of the Bush administration’s pervasive crusade against scientific communication.” Papers that tie LIS issues, concepts, practices or history to women’s, workers’€™ or civil rights; education; culture; environmental protection; social welfare or insurance; and supporting the public sector in general will be welcomed here. For LIS students, the Progressive Librarian’€™s Guild presents the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize, which annually awards the best student paper about an aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are approximately 400 subscribers, 25% being libraries. Accordingly, it is difficult to gauge total readership–but certainly over 400.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is international in readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, though there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.23 As with any scholarly article, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.24

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.25 The readership is made up almost entirely of librarians, librarian graduate students, or library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice, and how politics informs LIS practices.26 Readers are probably liberal. They are interested in activism, the struggle for social justice, and how politics can inform LIS practices.27

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have a basic understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about commonplace news and events in the LIS world, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues or events others may not be familiar with.28

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication and its readers stand within the American Progressive tradition, hearkening back to FDR’€™s New Deal and representing a spectrum of views that moves left from New Deal-type reformism to much more radical positions and approaches.29 In late February of 2011 the Progressive Librarians Guild issued a statement in support of the Wisconsin employees who protested against proposed cuts to union benefits and health care.30 Progressive Librarian is one of the only journals in the LIS field to report on and document labor activism within the library profession.

This readership values the working class and the public sector, and is concerned with how the LIS profession can support and advance these causes. The journal is characterized by an interest in and/or commitment to socialism, anti-capitalism, feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism, labor advocacy, cultural democracy, ideology-criticism, radical social movements, anti-imperialism and holds skeptical/critical views of technological issues.

Papers that view library and information issues in this framework will be welcomed—whether they offer collection development practices for sex education materials, suggestions for communicating with right-wing colleagues or patrons, or advocate international library rights.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  2. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  3. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  8. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  9. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  11. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  12. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  13. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  14. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  15. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  16. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  17. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  18. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  19. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  20. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  21. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). 2014 Braverman Award Winner Announced. Retrieved from http://progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml
  22. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  23. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  24. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  25. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  26. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  27. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  28. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  29. Progressivism in the United States. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressivism_in_the_United_States
  30. Davey, M. & Greenhouse, S. (2011, February 16). Angry demonstrations in Wisconsin as cuts loom. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/17/us/17wisconsin.html?_r=0
Continue Reading

Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

Website: http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap

Purpose, objective, or mission: To provide opportunities to Pennsylvania librarians to share their knowledge on all areas of librarianship to other librarians in the state and beyond.1

Target audience: LIS professionals in Pennsylvania and internationally especially in the academic library field.2

Publisher: PALA College & Research Division/University of Pittsburgh University Library System.3

Peer reviewed? Research and Practice articles are subject to double-blind peer review. News and Commentary items are not peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Online and open access.6

Content: News, commentary and peer-reviewed journal articles on best practice of interest to academic libraries in Pennsylvania.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually. (Note: this is a new journal and the 2013 issue is the first one.)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions. Registration and login is required.

Types of contributions accepted: Items that have already been published or are under consideration for publication, either in print or online, will not be accepted. The journal focus and scope page states it will “consider all submissions that report original research (research articles), highlight innovative initiatives (practice articles), or discuss current trends/challenges (editorial/commentary). Each issue will also feature news items (collections, services, awards, events, etc.) from Pennsylvania’€™s libraries.”9

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted in 12-point font and use italics rather than underlining. The journal can accept articles in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF format.10 Specific formatting and submission requirements for each type of article can be found here: Submissions. Research and Practice articles are subjected to blind peer review and should have no identifying names or terms and include a 100 to 150 word abstract and a completed Submission Preparation Checklist. News articles do not have to follow peer review guidelines.11

Editorial tone: The publisher’s intent is to provide articles on a wide range of subject with a focus on academic libraries.12 A review of Research and Practice articles issue indicates there is a definite scholarly tone.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a place for Pennsylvania librarians to publish, in particular, in the academic field. As this is a new journal, it is an especially excellent place for new writers to submit articles and news items. As it’s open-access and online, the audience will not be limited to Pennsylvania readers. For example, one article published in the first issue addressed the topic of “Using Social Media to Promote International Collaboration.”

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is a new online open-access journal directed specifically to librarians in Pennsylvania librarians. No numbers have yet been determined.15

Audience location and location or cultural considerations: Pennsylvania, USA with an expected international audience.16 American English and American practices will probably be the focus; although, the editors do intend it to be read internationally.17

Reader characteristics: Readers will most likely be academic librarians in Pennsylvania. Biased towards research and articles written about academic libraries in Pennsylvania.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have LIS subject matter knowledge.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this publication is intended for academic and other librarians in the state of Pennsylvania only, the editors anticipate a wider audience including global interest. Therefore, authors should keep in mind that there is a potentially much wider audience than just a local one.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  2. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  4. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  7. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  10. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  11. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  12. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  13. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap
  14. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  15. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  16. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  17. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  18. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  19. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
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Electronic Green Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Electronic Green Journal

Website: http://escholarship.org/uc/uclalib_egj

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The main goal of the EGJ is to assist in international scholarly communication about environmental issues. In order to meet this goal, the journal strives to serve as an open and active forum of communication about environmental issues, as well as an educational environmental resource, including both practical and scholarly articles, bibliographies, reviews, editorial comments, and announcements.”1

Target audience: Electronic Green Journal is geared toward information consultants, environmentalists, ecologists, regional planners, publishers, booksellers, educators, librarians, students, and others interested in environmental issues.2

Publisher: University of California at Los Angeles Library3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: Environmental Studies and LIS, scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: International environmental information7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions may not be previously published or simultaneously submitted to another publication. Scholarly manuscripts from all fields and countries related to environmental issues are accepted. No specific information is given as to length of manuscripts.9 Book reviews of up to 600 words are also accepted.10

Submission and review process: Authors must register with the website first. Manuscripts are to be written in English and submitted online. Specific requirements for manuscript submission including abstract and formatting instructions can be found at http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines. Before submitting a manuscript, potential authors should ensure it complies with preparation checklist on the Submission Guidelines page. All feature articles are reviewed by experts in the particular field. If necessary, articles will be edited by journal staff.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly12

Style guide used: The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Authors are advised to consult the Purdue Online Writing Lab for additional assistance.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an interdisciplinary publication with a broad readership that includes librarians and students. LIS authors whose research encompasses environmental concerns and who wish to reach a global audience should consider submitting to this journal.14

Authors interested in writing book reviews are invited to choose from a selection of titles and produce a review of no more than 600 words.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated. As the Electronic Green Journal has been an open-access publication since 1994, it likely serves a fairly large international audience.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As an open-access online journal written in American English, Electronic Green Journal serves a diverse, well-educated, and professional  international community interested in environmental topics.17

Reader characteristics: This journal serves the global community and is written for information consultants, environmentalists, librarians, educators, students and all who are interested in “worldwide environmental topics.” According to the website, environmental issues cross disciplines and borders, so readers will likely be progressive and liberal, and come from a variety of backgrounds.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since readers come from a variety of disciplines, authors are well-advised to include descriptions of any specific LIS terms and subject.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

By publishing in the Electronic Green Journal, authors may expect to reach a politically liberal, professionally diverse, and international audience interested in environmental issues.20

Last updated: April 22, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  2. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  3. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  4. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  5. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  6. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  7. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  8. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  9. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  10. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  11. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  13. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  14. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  15. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  16. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  17. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  18.  “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  19. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  20. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”1

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”2

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”3

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”10

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”11 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.12

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”13

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”14

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”15

Editorial tone: Academic16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,18, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”19

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26920

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.21

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”22 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”23, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.24 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  5.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  10. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  13. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  20. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  21. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  22. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Journal of Library Innovation

Per the Journal of Library Innovation (JOLI) website, “The editors of JOLI ceased publication of the journal following the publication of the fall 2015 issue. Articles will remain discoverable and available as PDFs through aggregated databases, and the site will be available for an undetermined time.”

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library Innovation

Website: http://www.libraryinnovation.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “[The journal’s] mission is to disseminate research and information on innovative practice in libraries of all types.”1

Target audience: Librarians in all types of libraries.2

Publisher: Journal of Library Innovation.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4 Articles that appear in the “Featured Article”€ and “€œInnovative Practice”€ sections are peer reviewed. In some cases, invited submission may undergo editorial revision but not peer review. Book reviews and editorials are not peer reviewed.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6JOLI is an open access journal. Authors retain the copyright to their work under the terms of the following Creative Commons license: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 (United States).”7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Publishes “original research, literature reviews, commentaries, case studies, reports on innovative practices, and book, conference and product reviews…The journal also welcomes provocative essays that will stimulate thought on the current and future role of libraries in an Internet Age.”9

Frequency of publication: This journal premiered in 2010. It is published semi-annually.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: English language manuscripts for “Feature Articles” and “Innovations in Practice” sections covering topics of interest to library and information professionals committed to exploring innovative ideas and practices. Original research, literature reviews, commentaries, case studies, reports on innovative practices, and book, conference and product reviews. Articles may be theoretical, research-based, or of a practical nature. Editorials and reviews are written by invited authors.11

“Innovation in libraries can include, but is not limited to the following:

  • The discovery of unmet user needs.
  • The introduction of new services or the retooling of traditional services resulting in a better user experience.
  • Creative collaboration between libraries, or between libraries and other types of institutions, resulting in demonstrable improvements in service to users.
  • Implementing new technologies to improve and extend library service to meet user needs.
  • Explorations of the future of libraries.
  • Pilot testing unconventional ideas and services.
  • Redefining the roles of library staff to better serve users.
  • Developing processes that encourage organizational innovation.
  • Reaching out to and engaging library users and non-users in new and creative ways.
  • Creative library instruction and patron programming.
  • Finding new ways to make library collections or library facilities more useful to users.”12

Submission and review process: The editors recommend that prospective authors query before submitting work. No previously published submissions.13

Submit files in Microsoft Word or RTF files. Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point Arial font, and employ italics rather than underlining (other than URLs). Where available, provide URLs for references provided. All illustrations, figures, and tables should be placed within the text at appropriate points, rather than at the end.14

The review process takes a minimum of six to eight weeks. Authors are notified when a decision has been made.15

The section editors and managing editors evaluate submissions to determine that the content and topic are aligned with the scope and purpose of JOLI. Submissions that clear the initial review are subject to a single-blind review process, performed by at least two referees selected by the editorial board. Once referees complete their reviews, the section editor makes a recommendation to the managing editor before the author is notified of the decision.16

Editorial tone: No stated guidelines. Upon examination of several articles, “€œFeature” articles are written in clear, scholarly language. “Innovative Practice” articles are written in professional, clear language that is less formal.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition (2009).17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This young scholarly journal would be a good choice for unpublished graduate students with fresh, well-researched articles about innovative ideas, services, products, or programs in libraries. It would also be a good choice for information professionals interested in publishing articles on unconventional ideas or services implemented at their libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Because this journal is not subscription-based, circulation is difficult to determine. As of 2012 there were 1,296 registered readers.18

This journal is indexed in Directory of Open Access Journals, Google Scholar, The Informed Librarian Online, Library Literature and Information Full Text, and Library Literature, Information Science and Technology Abstracts (LISTA).19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is international, but most reside in the U.S.20 This journal accepts submissions in English. Because this journal is open access and available for an international readership, avoid regionalisms and be sure references to currency and location are clear.21

Reader characteristics: Most readers are librarians and are interested in innovative, thought-provoking theory and practices that stimulate thought about the library’€™s current and future role in an Internet Age. They value independent thinking and forward-looking practices that embrace technology.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because readers may be specialists in different areas within different types of libraries, technical jargon should be used moderately and terms should be explained when they are included in articles.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

No demographic information on readership is available at this time, but a review of selected articles indicates that readers are LIS professionals with an interest in library services, programs, and products that are exciting, different, and effective.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  5. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  7. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  9. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  11. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  18. P. Jones, personal communication, 9 May 2013
  19. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. P. Jones, personal communication, 9 May 2013
  21. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  22. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Collaborative Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collaborative Librarianship

Website: http://www.collaborativelibrarianship.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The publication website identifies three mission points: To “promote sharing of ideas, best practices, opportunities, challenges and successes involving collaborative librarianship; sustain an open-access journal where professional librarians can publish articles (peer- and non-peer-reviewed) on a range of subjects relevant to librarianship, but that involve collaboration at their core; to promote sharing of ideas, opportunities, challenges and successes involving new kinds of partnerships, joint projects, and innovative approaches to collaboration that benefit all members within in the information supply chain.1

Target audience: LIS professionals, LIS instructors, and LIS students2

Publisher: Independently published, and sponsored by the Colorado Library Consortium, the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Regis University, and the University of Denver3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: The publication’€™s website indicates that it provides articles relating to a wide range of issues including library-to-library cooperation; sharing resources and expertise; library-to-business partnerships; local, regional, national, and international collaboration; professional, consortium and association partnerships; the history of library collaboration; open access and online availability; better and best practices.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts for submission field reports that focus on innovative collaborations and address best practices. Field reports are usually 2,500 to 4,000 words in length. The journal also accepts scholarly articles on library collaborations at the local, national, or international level that approach their topics historically, quantitatively, qualitatively, analytically, theoretically, philosophically, or practically. Published scholarly articles are usually of at least 5,000 words.   9

Submission and review process: Individuals submitting articles for review must first register with the journal.10 The submission may not be under consideration for publication by another publisher nor have been previously published. Submissions should include an abstract of approximately 200 words, a title, list of authors and affiliations, an introduction, the body of the paper, conclusions, and references. Submissions should adhere to the style guidelines provided on the website and uploaded as Microsoft Word files. 11

Editorial tone: Depending on the section, articles may be scholarly or more professionally informal.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors will find Collaborative Librarianship an appealing avenue for publication. Because collaboration is increasing across the LIS community,  professional interest in innovative ideas on this topic is high. Since the publication is a venue for both practical and scholarly articles, authors may expect to reach both professional and academic audiences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication does not provide details on circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is sponsored by library consortiums and universities in Colorado, and part of its mission is to meet goals identified at the June 2008 general meeting of the Colorado Academic Library Consortium, including the promotion of the knowledge infrastructure of Colorado; the maintenance and development of the Colorado library system; and the transmission of lessons learned in the Colorado library community to the rest of the United States.14 The publication is written in English.15

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide information about individual characteristics about the readers. Persons of interest can subscribe via email to receive notification of new issues. The publication is geared toward librarians located in both the education and professional fields. The journal appears to be content neutral, appealing to readers interested in the collaborative aspect of the LIS field.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers work in the LIS field, authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because collaboration exists over practically, if not entirely, all fields in the LIS profession, potential authors can view Collaborative Librarianship as a great source for potential publication. While some readers may not be directly involved in an author’s particular LIS field, collaborative ideas can be shared and valued.

Last updated: March 20, 2017


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About this Journal/Mission Points,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  2. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  3.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  4. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  5. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  6. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  7. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  8. “About this Journal/Publication Frequency,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  9. “About this Journal/From-the-Field Reports and Scholarly Articles” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  10. “About this Journal/Submit Article” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalcommons.du.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dcollaborativelibrarianship&context=collaborativelibrarianship
  11.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  12.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  13.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  14. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  15. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  16. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  17. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
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