Wiki Tags Archives: Non-English language publications

Library Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”1

Target audience: “Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”7

Content: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”8

Included in every subscription is an annual Chinese supplement.9

Frequency of publication: 9 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 3000 and 6000 words in length.11

The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

Emerald publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that your submission is complete.14

As per the Author Guidelines: “Each paper is reviewed by the Editor and, if it (is) judged suitable for publication, is evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.”15

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. There is a strong international component to the selection of articles in each issue. While the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas”, there is a practical tone in the sharing of issues concerning individual libraries.16

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17

References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a highly informative publication in the field of library management. The articles in this journal explore a wide range of issues in various types of libraries worldwide. In the current issue alone (Volume 36 Issue 4/5), articles topics include: e-reserves in a Manila library; social welfare information management in Nigerian libraries; academic library leadership; and promotion and tenure for academic librarians.19

LIS authors, whether professional librarians, or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into  current issues in library management, and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

International authors also have an excellent opportunity to publish research on issues important to their particular geographical area.20 Of particular interest to Chinese authors is the annual Chinese supplement — an excellent avenue for publication.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English23, yet is international in scope. While the editor and book review editor are located in Australia, the editorial advisory board comprise professionals worldwide; including, the U.K., Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and South Africa.24

Emerald offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, that offers “expert Language Editing services for non-native English-speaking authors, and…discounts to authors planning to submit to Emerald’s journal(s).”25

The annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”26, with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”27

Reader characteristics: Readers are senior managers and academics from across the globe. As this journal has an international scope, the audience will have diverse cultural experiences. Despite this, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior managers and academics.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, diverse, academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience.

Last updated: June 24, 2015


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  10. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  15. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  19. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  22. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Editorial Team. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  27. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  28. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  29. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

Website: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Library and Information Science aims to serve as a forum for discussion of problems common to librarians and information scientist; to introduce new concepts, systems and technology; to report leading events worldwide; and to promote the development of Chinese library and information services.1

Target audience:
• Chinese and Chinese-American information professionals
• Information professionals interested in Chinese library and information services
• Those interested in problems common to librarians and information scientists, especially in the areas of new technologies and concepts.2

Publisher: Graduate Institute of Library & Information Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Republic of China and the Chinese American Librarians Association, U.S.A.3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts undergo a double-blind review, and the editor and associate editor are responsible for the final selection of content.4

Type: LIS scholarly.5

Medium: Web-based.6

Content: The journal contains articles that discuss problems common to librarians and information scientist; introduce new concepts, systems and technology; report leading events worldwide; and promote the development of Chinese library and information services.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually in April and October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts manuscripts of original research and reviews of monographs, books, and reports about library and information science. Manuscripts may not exceed 10,000 words (not including notes, tables, and forms of data) and those in English must be typed in MS Word.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must have a title page including the name of the article, author name, title, affiliation, email address, and postal address. Author information may not appear on the manuscript itself, as JLIS engages in double-blind review of manuscripts. Articles presented at a conference must include the name, place, and date of the conference.10

The body of a manuscript must be preceded by a 100-150-word abstract and 3-8 keywords, and followed by references and bibliographies. Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese. Each illustration or table should be numbered and have a brief caption.11

Editorial tone: Formal, academic.12

Style guide used: Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an authoritative and credible journal that would be an appropriate publishing avenue for practitioners and student authors. The journal is indexed or abstracted in Index of Chinese Periodicals, Library Literature, PAIS, Information Science Abstracts, Library & Information Science Abstracts.14

 

Audience Analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not provided, but the journal is available online.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers are mostly located in the United States and China. Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese.16

Reader characteristics: Readers will have the same characteristics as most librarians, but there will be a higher emphasis on services, technologies and innovations for Chinese speakers. Readers will expect to find information that is immediately relevant to Chinese communities.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with LIS subjects, and may be expected to understand jargon in the field.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal appear to be information and library science researchers and practitioners. Contributors can expect the readers to be well versed in LIS knowledge and terminology.

Last updated: September 6, 2015


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  2. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  3. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  4. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  5. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  6. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  7. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  8. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  9. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  10. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  11. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  12. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  13. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  14. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  15. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  16. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  17. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  18. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
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REFORMA Newsletter

*Note:  REFORMA Newsletter last published in April 2014, and its current status is unknown. Please contact the wiki team if you have information about this publication so we can update this profile.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: REFORMA Newsletter

Website: http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2

Purpose, objective, or mission: To develop library services for the growing population of Spanish speakers and Latinos in the United States and abroad. REFORMA’s goals include:

  • Development of Spanish-language and Latino-oriented library collections
  • Recruitment of bilingual, multicultural library personnel
  • Promotion of public awareness of libraries and librarianship among Latinos
  • Advocacy on behalf of the information needs of the Latino community
  • Liaison to other professional organizations1

Target audience: Librarians and other professionals with an interest in library services to Latinos and Spanish speakers.2

Publisher: REFORMA.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news.5 The newsletter contains LIS professional news and information about developing and improving library services.6

Medium: As of 2012, REFORMA Newsletter is an electronic and virtual newsletter that is open to anyone.7

Content: The newsletter covers issues that concern information and library services for the Spanish speaking and Latinos. It contains book reviews, articles on issues concerning Latinos and the Spanish speaking, features about librarians in different Spanish speaking countries, interviews with authors, bilingual and Spanish language book lists.8

Frequency of publication: Updated as submissions are accepted.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: None available.

Types of contributions accepted: Artwork, opinion pieces, news briefs, features, reviews, and letters to the editor are accepted. REFORMA’s sections include News Articles, President’s Column, Chapter Updates, Adult Book Reviews, Children’s Book Reviews, Young Adult Book Reviews, Felicidades!, Letter from the Editor, and La Opinión.10

Submission and review process: Article submissions should be sent via email to the editor. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Please note that all submissions are subject to editing and revision due to space, grammar, and clarity.11

As of November 2012, editor Francisco Vargas put out a call for REFORMA editors, including coeditor, copy editor, and regular columnists. These volunteer positions are all virtual and require an average of 10 hours per week.12

Editorial tone: The newsletter does not indicate a type of editorial tone. The pieces in the newsletter are written in an approachable tone.13

Style guide used: No style guide indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The REFORMA Newsletter is well respected and widely read among librarians who provide services to the Spanish speaking and Latinos in the United States and other countries where Spanish is spoken. The level of diversity of topics offered through the newsletter allows librarians and others to explore a range of subjects for articles. However, it should be noted that the focus of the newsletter is on library services for Latinos and the Spanish speaking. Authors should keep this in mind when submitting a manuscript to this publication.

This publication is neither peer reviewed nor written in a scholarly tone. As such, it most likely will not meet any requirements for tenure. However, the articles are interesting and the authors of published work in the newsletter will have a far-reaching audience as this newsletter is distributed across the globe. Authors in the publication gain recognition within this community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: REFORMA Newsletter is open-access, online.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: REFORMA offices are located in the United States (Anaheim, California) with membership located throughout North America.15 This publication accepts submissions in “Spanish, English or Spanglish”16 suggesting authors need an understanding of Spanish-language and Latino cultural.

Reader characteristics: Writers can safely assume that readers of this newsletter, per their website, are committed to, “development of library services and programs that meet the needs of the Latino community; the establishment of a national information and support network among individuals who share our goals; the education of the U.S. Latino population in regards to the availability and types of library services; and lobbying efforts to preserve existing library resource centers serving the interests of Latinos.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have some knowledge of LIS topics, as they are working to provide library services to Latinos, but the level of knowledge will vary.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the mission of the organization and, possess a clear understanding of the needs of the membership. The readers will be interested in how to recruit Latino and Spanish speaking individuals into the library field, how to establish and maintain Spanish-language collections, and how to effectively lobby to secure and retain funding for library services for the Latino communities they serve.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  2. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  6. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  7. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  8. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  9. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  10. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  11. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  12. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  13. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  14. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  15. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  16. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  17. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  18. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”1

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”2

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”3

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”10

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”11 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.12

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”13

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”14

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”15

Editorial tone: Academic16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,18, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”19

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26920

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.21

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”22 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”23, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.24 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  5.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  10. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  13. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  20. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  21. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  22. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
Continue Reading

La Opinión

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: La Opinión

Website: http://www.laopinion.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission:La Opinión is the leading Spanish-language daily newspaper in the country, reaching 2 million monthly readers in print and online. La Opinión was founded in 1926 in Los Angeles to provide daily news and information to a Hispanic population that has grown to become the nation’s largest, its audience is active, involved and engaged.1

Target audience: Latino communities of Southern California and beyond.

Publisher: ImpreMedia, LLC.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: General information relevant to Latino citizens of the Southern California area. Includes varied content such as: sports, entertainment, business, lifestyles, Latin American news, U.S. news, world news, and special sections. This newspaper further includes information at the global, national, state, and local levels.

Frequency of publication: Daily.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no submission or author guidelines. Editors at La Opinión are responsible for accepting outside content for individual sections, for all but the Main News section, which does not generally accept guest author contributions. Sections that do accept contributions are Sports, Entertainment, and Op-Ed (which might be the sole place for LIS content in this publication).

Types of contributions accepted: Community event announcements and information relating to the specific section of the paper you’d like to contribute to.

Submission and review process: Check the website or print publication to find the name of the editor for the specific section you’d like to write for. Email addresses are usually firstname.lastname@laopinion.com. Writers are paid for their contribution, with pay determined on a case by case basis. Articles are generally submitted in Spanish; they can be submitted in English, with translation services for the final published article.

Editorial tone: Informational and informative, with focus on issues that affect the Los Angeles Latino community.

Style guide used: Not available.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newspaper lends itself to publishing local LIS related issues. LIS practitioners and students living in the covered area should consider including local library events.

Library-themed articles or letters may be published in this newspaper; however, they must be focused on local library issues and should be void of technical library jargon in order to fully reach Latinos in the Los Angeles area.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication reaches 2 million readers monthly.5

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: La Opinión reaches the Los Angeles area market, which has a total population of about 18 million, per the 2011 census.This newspaper is written in Spanish and offers information with a Latino perspective.

Reader characteristics: Readership is split fairly evenly between men and women, and readers have an average household income of $59,191.6 Since the paper is written in Spanish and targeted toward Hispanic communities, it is safe to assume that readers are Hispanic or Latino.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is a civilian newspaper and a knowledge of LIS subject matter should not be assumed. Avoid technical jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors must provide readers information relevant to Latinos. Articles about library programs and issues that affect Latino communities would be welcome in this publication.

Last updated: December 11, 2016


References

Show 6 footnotes

  1. La Opinión,” impreMedia.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://www.impremedia.com/#la-opinion
  2. La Opinión,” LaOpinion.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://laopinion.com/
  3. La Opinión.
  4. La Opinión.
  5. La Opinión.
  6. “Our Audience,” impreMedia.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://www.impremedia.com/#audience
Continue Reading

LIBREAS: Library Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBREAS: Library Ideas

Website: http://libreas.eu/

Note: the site is written mostly in German; if not fluent, use a translator to view content. Google Chrome is the easiest browser to use to translate content.

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBREAS: Library Ideas, is an open access online journal œthat deals with contemporary issues in LIS.1

The site began as a student project intended in part to bolster the presence of the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany, which was endangered in 2003. The staff, which eventually graduated and entered a professional career, desired “€œan interface between the young savages and the old hands,” a public place to exchange ideas and information between old and young, academic and professional. It is a journal that the writers want to read themselves.2

Target audience: LIS new professionals, and the public audience, with particular attention to Germany and Europe.3

Publisher: Published at the Berlin School of Library and Information Science at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, by LIBREAS-Verein.4

Peer reviewed? No formal peer-review process; content is reviewed by the publication’s editors.5

Type: An LIS professional publication, although some articles are more scholarly.6

Medium: Online. You may also follow LIBREAS on TwitterFacebook, and Tumblr.7

Content: Editorials; articles and essays under topics like Theory, Practice, and Projects, about LIS-related news & events, and LIS-content book reviews. Some issues also include podcasts and photo galleries.8

The site also includes a blog. For more information on the blog, see the About page.9

Frequency of publication: Irregularly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libreas.wordpress.com/category/libreas-call-for-papers/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles and essays related to any aspect of LIS.11

Submission and review process: Send a short sketch of your idea or an abstract via email to the editors.12

Editorial tone: Information presented with a fresh, often wry perspective. LIBREAS is open, fresh and also controversial, in order to leave room for development, to recognize niches in order to unfold trends out of them.13

Style guide used: None specified: but citations should be uniform and formatting should be minimal, as anything beyond structural formatting is lost in the conversion to an online format. Essays should be written in MS Word, LibreOffice or OpenOffice Writer, with a German and English abstract.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a wonderfully envisioned and executed site that aims to bridge generations and LIS academics and professionals, all with a touch of humor and humility. The articles are interesting and well written and apply to LIS practitioners across the globe, not just from Germany. From a 2012 issue’€™s editorial, LIBREAS editors €œsee themselves as part of a culture of communication in the library and information science and library practice.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. The journal is an open access, online publication.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LIBREAS is published at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany,17 and most of its contributors and editors are from Germany.18 Written in German (easily translatable using a Google Chrome browser or add-on on other browsers) and partly in English, the journal references U.S. and world culture frequently, so writers from other countries should not feel intimidated.19

Reader characteristics: Editors and writers consist of scientists and library scholars, LIS professionals and students, academic and otherwise. Anyone with an interest in information.20

LIBREAS aims to continue a discourse and keep LIS relevant in academic and professional circles, but also in the community at large. (Community being initially specific to Berlin, but encompassing the entire online world reading this journal.)21 They also encourage open access journals in the LIS field as a way of promoting more discourse. From LIBREAS 21: It “€œis important to us that a large number of colleagues bring to the library and information science debate that they also demand accountability and transparency in decisions on libraries and library infrastructure that, if necessary, call for more level of debate. And not just in the LIBREAS, but also in all other publications and forms.”22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but authors should not assume that readers will have a working knowledge of complicated LIS terminology. As it is an open access journal, the information is easily available to anyone.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIBREAS was created from an idea of forging old and new to create a dialogue amongst LIS professionals and academics. It is passionate, but not overwhelmingly so; and articles are interesting, usually with a philosophical or larger world-view slant that will appeal to LIS and non-LIS readers alike.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  2. B. Kaden, M. Kindling, and M. Schulz, personal communication, 12 April 2013
  3. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Libreas: Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  5. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Libreas. Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  7. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  8. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  9. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). About/Impressum. Retrieved from http://libreas.wordpress.com/about/
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Libreas. Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  11. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  12. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  13. B. Kaden, M. Kindling, and M. Schulz, personal communication, 12 April 2013
  14. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  15. editorial LIBREAS. (2016). Failure in the writing workshop: From the editors of LIBREAS. Library Ideas. LIBREAS: Library Ideas, 20. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/ausgabe20/texte/04redaktion01.htm
  16. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  17. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Libreas: Library ideas. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403884346140/611030
  18. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). Autorinnen und Autoren der LIBREAS 2005-. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/autorinnen/
  19. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  20. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  21. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
  22. Vierkant, P. (2012). Visualizing open access. LIBREAS. Library Ideas, 21. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/ausgabe21/texte/05vierkant.htm
  23. LIBREAS. Library Ideas. (2016). AutorInnenhinweise. Retrieved from http://libreas.eu/authorguides/
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Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association (JCHLA/JABSC)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association (JCHLA) / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada (JABSC)

Website: http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/journal/jchla (French language edition at same link, click on upper right hand button “French”)

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “‘The Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association (JCHLA) / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada (JABSC) is a forum for the provision of increased communication among health libraries and health sciences librarians.”1

Target audience: Canadian information professionals involved with health libraries.2

Publisher: Canadian Health Libraries Association3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: Publishes research articles, case reports, reviews and opinion pieces of interest of health library professionals.7

Frequency of publication: Triennial.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: Publishes research articles, case reports, program descriptions, reviews and opinion pieces, of interest to health library professionals, such as traditional LIS topics of funding, access and technology, as well as topics specific health libraries field such as consumer health information services, primary health care reform and implications of electronic health records.9

Submission and review process: Manuscript submissions only accepted online via email attachment to editor. All work submitted reviewed and edited for publication. Extensive information provided in JCHLA Instruction to Authors pdf doc including manuscript length, construction, formatting of charts and illustrations and footnotes.10

Editorial tone: Formal and scholarly.11

Style guide used: National Library of Medicine’s Citing Medicine.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Authors interested in establishing themselves in the LIS field in Canada or health libraries and are skilled in producing solid research papers would find opportunities at this publication. This publication is aimed at Canadian information professionals in the health libraries field, but there is no mention of authors being exclusively Canadian or practicing in Canada. (The only exception is the JCHLA membership requirement for the Student Paper Prize detailed below.) The publication accepts submissions in either English or French, but the editors will not provide translations.13

The journal offers an annual competition, Login Canada Student Paper Prize. “Currently enrolled students in accredited master’€™s programs in library science or library technician programs are eligible to enter the competition. Personal or Institutional membership in the Canadian Health Libraries Association is required.”14 Per their website, “The Login Canada Student Paper Prize is awarded annually to the library and information science or library technician student who submits the best unpublished paper on health sciences librarianship to the competition. Research papers, program descriptions and review articles are eligible for the prize…The Login Canada Student Paper Prize includes publication in JCHLA, a certificate and a cheque for $500.00.”15

Per their site, this publication “is indexed in Library and Information Science and Technology Abstracts (LISTA) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). JCHLA is also indexed in Informed Librarian Online.”16 Their website offers citation figures for each article (provided by CrossRef) under the “Most Cited Articles” tab in the side menu.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation not available. Journal is benefit of membership in Canadian Health Libraries Association / Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada, but is also open access online.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Canada.19 Publication is bilingual, accepts submissions in either English or French, however authors outside of Canada will need to be able to write using Canadian English and be aware of the spelling variations. Also, while the relevance of many LIS topics span North America, even the world, consideration needs to be given to ensure the submission is relevant specifically to information professionals working in Canadian health libraries.20

Reader characteristics: The association and publication do not provide any description of the readers other than they are professionals in the “health sciences library field.” Due to the specificity of the publication one could assume that the reader has a keen interest in the details of their field, a desire to improve their work and the reputation of their profession. Readers are interested in providing accurate health services information and comfortable with the technology in use to provide health library services. It would be safe assume the majority of the readers are employed in health science libraries. Readers, given the specific focus of this publication, would have limited interest in general LIS topics or work considering LIS issues only relevant to readers in the United States.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since the membership, the readers, of this publication are called professional librarians and, a librarian in Canada as in the United States, needs to hold a Master’s level degree in library science, it is safe to assume that readers have a basic understanding of LIS subject matter.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers, as professional librarians working in health libraries, interested in increasing their knowledge and promoting the field of health science libraries, will expect to find well-researched, informative articles that will support them in their work. As a Canadian publication, readers will expect authors to demonstrate their understanding of the Canadian workplace culture and knowledge of the government’s role in their work. Authors hoping to be published in this publication would be well served by reading the publication and the author guidelines to ensure they understand the expectations of the editors and readers.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/journal/jchla
  2. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Canadian Health Libraries Association. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Canadian Health Libraries Association. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Canadian Health Libraries Association. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Canadian Health Libraries Association. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  7. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  8. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/journal/jchla
  9. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  10. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  11. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  12. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  13. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  14. Canadian Health Libraries Association. (2014). Login Canada Student Paper Prize. Retrieved from http://chla-absc.ca/node/290
  15. Canadian Health Libraries Association. (2014). Login Canada Student Paper Prize. Retrieved from http://chla-absc.ca/node/290
  16. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). About the journal: indexing. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/page/jchla/editors
  17. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/journal/jchla
  18. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/journal/jchla
  19. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Canadian Health Libraries Association. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  20. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  21. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
  22. Canadian Health Libraries Association of Canada. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://pubs.chla-absc.ca/userimages/ContentEditor/1377011501166/JCHLA_Instructions_to_authors.pdf
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IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations) Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: IFLA Journal (International Federation of Library Associations)

Website: www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal (1992-2002 archived at http://www.ifla.org/V/iflaj/index.htm)

Purpose, objective, or mission: “IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”1

Target audience: Library professionals around the world, especially those interested in library services in developing areas2

Publisher: Sage Publications3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online open access6

Content: The journal publishes articles on “library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#submission-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”9 Though the journal publishes primarily original research, case studies on successful and unsuccessful projects and opinion pieces on library issues are also accepted.10 Articles should be between 3,000 to 8,000 words and accompanied by an abstract of no approximately 150 words. Authors whose primary language is not English should not be inhibited from submitting, as correction of minor errors and revision to standard English is considered standard editorial procedure.11

Submission and review process: IFLA requests submissions be sent as an email attachment, preferably as MS Word document. Expect approximately six weeks for the editorial committee to review submissions.12

Editorial tone: The tone of IFLA Journal is academic,13 but attempts to use unbiased language to make examples and practices applicable to library staff from around the world.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors wishing to convey current and upcoming library innovations to developing areas, this journal is well regarded. It presents issues that smaller libraries and countries are dealing with as compared to the United States and Europe. Well-researched articles about procedures that have been tested at large libraries are highly valuable to librarians in developing countries. Some services may be beyond the technology of small countries, but writers should strive to keep the theories simple and useful.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific numbers provided, but the journal is promoted to IFLA members16 and is available online.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in the United Kingdom,18 but the editorial board is international.19 Although most articles are published in English, some are published in other major languages such as Spanish, Russian, French, or German, when appropriate.20 Potential authors should take care to describe a specific system or local procedure, because the reader may be familiar with LIS terms in general but not with local practice.

Reader characteristics: While most librarians in the United States are women, the author should keep in mind that some restrictions are put on women in other countries so this demographic may be different among IFLA Journal readers. Librarians in most countries have college or graduate degrees, and are considered professionals. Though many readers of IFLA Journal work in libraries in developing countries, there is a genuine desire to learn about practices in major libraries throughout the world. In terms of education and professional skills, there may be emphasis placed on less technical aspects of librarianship.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It may be assumed that the readers of this journal understand LIS jargon and current issues. Despite the scholarly tone of the journal, library services are still developing in some countries, so discussion of current-generation digital technologies and digital information may have to be explained or simplified.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors for IFLA Journal should be prepared to do academic research into their topics, and to thoroughly study the region or country they are addressing. Readers might range from a librarian or teacher in a one-room school in Kenya with limited resources to a LIS professor in Germany with digital access.23 An author from the United States should be careful not to “preach” about advanced services which may not be relevant to developing countries. The members of IFLA are likely to be curious about policies and practices that are successful in other regions, especially when discussed in factual, not proscriptive way.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  2. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/
  3. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  4. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  5. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  6. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  7. “IFLA Journal/Description,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal
  8. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  9. “IFLA Journal/Aims and Scope,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#aims-and-scope
  10. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#ARTICLETYPES
  11. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  13. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  16. “Membership,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/membership
  17. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  18. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  19. “IFLA Journal/Editorial Committee,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal/editorial-committee
  20. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  22. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  23.  “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
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Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association

Website: http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, Notes is the journal of the Music Library Association and since 1934 has offered “its readers interesting, informative, and well-written articles in the areas of music librarianship, music bibliography and discography, the music trade, and on certain aspects of music history.”1

Target audience: Primarily music librarians, but also musicologists, musicians, and music lovers.2

Publisher: Music Library Association, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly. Notes is a top-tier humanities scholarly journal. It is peer-reviewed, and contributors are almost exclusively academic music librarians and/or musicologists preeminent in their field. This is a publication primarily by and for scholars.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Issues typically contain an editorial section, general articles on music and music librarianship,7 and reviews of books, periodicals, and media materials.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors

Types of contributions accepted: According to the journal’s submission guidelines, “Notes welcomes submissions of interesting, informative, and well-written articles in the areas of music librarianship, music bibliography, the music trade, and discography, and on certain aspects of music history.”10 Unsolicited reviews are not accepted, but persons who wish to become reviewers for the publication “are invited to send a curriculum vitae and a statement delineating their special areas of interest and competence to the appropriate editors.”11

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted in electronic form as an email attachment. A brief author note should be included as the fist (unnumbered) note. The article should be followed by an abstract of not more than 250 words. Manuscripts are first read by the editor for “general suitability,” and then are subjected to a double-blind peer review process. Once a submission is accepted, the author is informed of the conditions governing that acceptance.12

Editorial tone: Not specified.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As the quarterly journal of the Music Library Association, Notes clearly belongs to the library and information science literature. Music librarianship, however, is still largely the domain of librarians who are also scholars in the field of musicology–they have advanced degrees, teach, and publish in both disciplines. As such, publishing in Notes is only an option for LIS authors with a great deal of expertise in both librarianship and some area of musicology, such as music history, music theory, or the music trade. Being published in Notes would be a huge boost to the career of any LIS author who could manage it, and it would be sure to impress almost any tenure committee.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to Editor Jim Cassaro, 2,200 copies of each issue of Notes are printed; 2,000 of these are sent to Music Library Association members (individual and institutional) and individual subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Notes is the quarterly journal of the Music Library Association.15 According to a profile of that organization’s membership that was published in Notes, as of 2000 93% of MLA’s members work in the United States, so the bulk of this publication’s readers are American.16 That said, according to Cassaro the publication is “global in nature, and certainly in its readership.”17 The journal is published in English, but foreign languages (especially the musical languages: French, German, Italian, and Latin) are often included in quotes, citations, reviews of foreign-language materials, etc.18

Reader characteristics: According to the profile of MLA’s membership cited above, the average age of MLA members is just over 49 years old with a standard deviation of 12.5 years (meaning 2/3 of MLA members are between the ages of 37 and 61). Of the 213 members responding to the survey, 54% were female, and 44% male (the remaining 2% chose not to respond to this question). A demographic study of the readers of Notes would likely yield similar results. “Most MLA members have undergraduate education in music, but with a fairly wide spread of actual majors. However, those MLA members who pursue graduate work (in addition to the MLS) have a much narrower focus, and tend to specialize in musicology. 206 MLA members (97%) had at least one graduate degree. 134 (63%) had either the MA or MM, and 43 (20%) had a doctorate in music.”19 From this we can extrapolate that most readers of Notes share a professional interest in music and/or musicology.

According to the same profile, MLA members work:

  • In academic/conservatory libraries (58%)
  • In public libraries (13%)
  • In other types of libraries (archives, etc.) (12%)
  • As educators (7%)
  • In publishing (3%)
  • Retired (13%)

(Note: 18% of respondents indicated multiple categories)20

The readership of Notes likely includes many scholars and students in music, musicology, and related fields from outside the LIS professions, too.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Of the MLA members who responded to the surveys used in the profile cited above, “147 (69%) had an accredited MLS, and 7 (3%) had a doctorate in library science.”21 The majority of the readers of this publication can therefore be said to be familiar with LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Notes readers are a very educated group of people who typically have advanced degrees in both library science and musicology. It’s reasonable to assume that they expect a comparable expertise from the publication’s authors, so Notes is probably a venue that should be left for authors with that kind of background. Writers who do publish in Notes can assume that their readers are familiar with the terminology of both the music/musicology and LIS fields. According to Editor Jim Cassaro, the publication is including more articles on music librarianship itself than ever before, so that’s a good body of subjects for prospective authors to draw on.22 Scholarly language is appropriate for this publication.

Last updated: October 31, 2014


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  2. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  5. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  7. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  8. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Where to Send Materials for Review. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notesmaterials
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  10. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  11. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  12. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  13. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes: Information for Contributors. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notescontributors
  14. Cassaro, J. (2008) Personal communication. Received September, 2008
  15. Music Library Association. (2014). Notes, The Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/?page=Notes
  16. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  17. Cassaro, Jim. (2008) Personal communication. Received September, 2008
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Music Library Association. Notes. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402525129373/50046
  19. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  20. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  21. Lesniaski, D., Cherubini, T., Coldwell, C., Griscom, R., Fisken, P., Koth, M., McBride, R., & Richardson, C. (2000). A Profile of the Music Library Association Membership: Report of the Working Group Surveying Music Library Personnel Characteristics. Retrieved from http://library.music.indiana.edu/tech_s/mla/person/notesarticle.htm
  22. Cassaro, J. (2008) Personal communication. Received September, 2008
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