Wiki Tags Archives: Non-English language publications

Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

ISSN: 2369-937X

Website: http://www.cjal.ca

Purpose, objective, or mission: Published by the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL), the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship seeks to publish articles that are relevant to academic librarians and the profession of academic librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic librarians, both within and outside of Canada.

Publisher: The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL).2

Peer reviewed? Yes. However, book reviews and review essays are not.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles that address academic librarianship from diverse perspectives. “Submissions must present substantive analysis of a topic. Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”4

Check the journal’s calls for papers and reviews for the latest information on special issues.

Frequency of publication: “Articles and book reviews are published on a continuous basis and combined into one volume at the end of each calendar year.”5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal welcomes submissions for book reviews and articles and review essays. Book reviews should be about 1,000 words in length, whereas articles should be 3,000 to 6,000 words, and no more than 10,000.6

Submission and review process: First, create a username and password for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. You can register here.

Once you are ready to submit, be sure to read through the Author Guidelines to make sure you have formatted your work properly and included all necessary information.

“Submissions are reviewed first by an editor to confirm that the submission is appropriate for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. This step typically occurs within two weeks of submission. This editorial review considers questions such as:

  • Is the submission within the Aims and Scope?
  • Is the submission readable and within the desired word count?
  • Has the submission been published elsewhere?
  • Has the submission document been anonymized?”

“When the editor has determined that the submission is appropriate to be considered for publication, he/she contacts potential reviewers. Editors do not also serve as reviewers. Each submission is normally reviewed by two reviewers. Reviewers are asked to submit their reviews within four weeks.”

Finally, the editor will consider any recommendations and comments made by the reviewer, and will confer with the author.7

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: The most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Keep in mind that publication submissions are not limited to Canadian librarians, but articles relevant to the country’s LIS field are encouraged and welcomed. According to the journal’s Focus and Scope section, “Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”9 Recently published articles are on topics such as the recent trend of libraries hiring consultants and 20th century postwar Canadian libraries.

The CJAL could also be a good outlet for reviews on LIS books written in the last three years. Look at the Book Review Guidelines section of the Editorial Policies for more information.
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is open access, so anyone can read current and archived issues.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: All articles are published in both English and French.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians who are members of the Canadian Association of Academic Librarians. Therefore, readers are likely well versed in current LIS topics, especially how they relate to the field of academic librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors who are interested in publishing in this journal should look into CAPAL to learn more about the journal’s readership. The association’s About page states that they differ from other library associations in that CAPAL “is an advocacy group focused on the individual and the profession.”10

Readers are librarians who are well versed in LIS topics, particularly as they relate to academic librarianship. If you have a book review or well researched LIS article that is relevant for academic librarians (particularly in Canada), then this may be a good venue for your writing.

Last updated: April 21, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Editorial policies,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial policies.”
  3. “Editorial policies.”
  4. “Editorial policies.”
  5. “Editorial policies.”
  6. “Submissions,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 17, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  7. “Editorial policies.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “About,” CAPALibrarians.org, accessed April 20, 2018, http://capalibrarians.org/contact-us/
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Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

ISSN: 2038-1026

Website: https://www.jlis.it/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information (JLIS.it) is an international academic journal that publishes research and theory in library, archives, and information science.1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, academics, and students from around the world who are interested in research and theory in both LIS and archival science.

Publisher: JLIS.it is published by the Università di Firenze Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo and is hosted by the University of Macerata, CSIA.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: JLIS.it publishes research articles, contributions, and reports on various topics of interest to the library, archives, and information science international communities. Regular sections are Essays, Contributions, and Reports & Reviews.4 The journal also publishes conference proceedings, such as EURIG2017,5 and special issues, such as a 2017 issue on classification.6

Frequency of publication: JLIS.it publishes three issues a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JLIS.it publishes innovative research relevant to the library, archives, and information science fields; brief contributions on a variety of related topics; and conference reports and reviews. The 2015 Manifesto states that the journal aims to “emphasize the integration between LIS and Archival science on the level of projects and profession” nationally and internationally and to consider the theoretical and methodological traditions of each discipline.8 The 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal encourages stepping away from the strictly academic and “mixing knowledge, methods, and different scientific and technical languages.” The journal also encourages writing that theorizes beyond the institutional and traditional.9

Submission and review process: JLIS.it uses OJS, an automated web-based system, for manuscript submission, tracking, and review.10 Authors should check that their manuscripts comply with the Submission Preparation Checklist11 and follow the Section Policies.12 Each manuscript is reviewed by an editor and if appropriate is sent to two reviewers for double-blind peer review; authors are usually contacted within nine weeks of submission.13

Editorial tone: The tone is academic, and articles are in Italian or English.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) citations and references.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JLIS.it is a highly regarded international journal that publishes articles in LIS and archival science and in the intersection of the two disciplines; the journal pushes for new and nontraditional approaches to these disciplines in theory, research, and practice. LIS authors that study the international stage of LIS or archives, or who perform research that resonates internationally and pushes traditional boundaries, may find a good fit here. Further, the 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal is an “ideal place” for contributions from those new to the profession, so student writers may have a chance at publishing in a prestigious journal. The journal is “a sort of lab for studying and researching what is new in LIS; a place for militant librarianship, with strong observations on the changes that the digital culture is bringing to cognitive processes and to professional practices.”15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article displays metrics.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JLIS.it publishes articles in Italian and English. It is written for an international audience, so regional terms or practices should be explained. The editors and editorial board members are mostly from Italian universities and institutions, but the Scientific Committee members are from all over the world.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are professionals, scholars, and students in the fields of LIS and archival science.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a solid knowledge of LIS and archival science; however, readers are from all over the world and from many different types of institutions in LIS and archival science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should consider that readers are LIS and archival science professionals and scholars from all over the world who are interested in the latest developments in both fields as well as how the disciplines relate to each other and how they are shaping and responding to profound changes brought on by the new digital culture. The audience probably expects high-level research and interesting, novel approaches to theory and practice.

Last updated: April 7, 2017


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Journal Sponsorship,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/journalSponsorship.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 9, no. 1 (2018), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/787.
  6.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 8, no. 2 (2017), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/775.
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Manifesto” (2015), Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science no. 1 (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.4403/jlis.it-11080.
  9. “Manifesto” (2010), JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/pages/view/manifesto.
  10. “Submissions,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018 https://www.jlis.it/about/submissions.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Editorial Policies.”
  13. “Editorial Policies.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. “Manifesto,” 2010.
  16. “Editorial Team,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/index.php/jlis/about/editorialTeam.
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
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The Conversation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Conversation

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://theconversation.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Begun as a project in 2014, The Conversation publishes articles written by Ph.D candidates and university-affiliated researchers. Their aim is to promote access to high quality information and to strive for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues.1

For more in depth information, take a look at their charter.

This wiki profile is for The Conversation’s U.S.-based website, but there are additional sites specific to audiences all around the globe.

Target audience: Members of the general public interested in reading high quality, academic articles who may not otherwise have access to them.

Publisher: The Conversation US, Inc.

Peer reviewed? Yes.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Academic articles of varying topics–arts, culture, science, technology, medicine and many more.

Frequency of publication: New articles published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://theconversation.com/us/pitches

Types of contributions accepted: The Conversation focuses on three priority areas:

  • “Timely, evidence-based analysis of issues making the news
  • Articles explaining new research and its significance for a non-expert audience
  • Timeless, plain English ‘explainers’ of complex issues”2

Submission and review process: There are three steps to becoming published: verification of institute, educational history/qualifications and the creation of a website account.3

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This could be a great outlet for publishing scholarly articles and research, granted that authors are researchers affiliated with an institution. MLIS students should keep in mind that they do not qualify for publication. The Conversation asks that you do a keyword search to see what has already been published on your topic.4

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This profile is geared towards readers of the U.S.-based site, but The Conversation has websites for readers in Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Indonesia, as well as an additional “global perspectives” site.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Conversation has a global audience.

Reader characteristics: All published articles feature a comments section with lively debates among readers. Thoughtful, well developed comments are the norm. Anyone can sign up to comment on articles, but full names are required to help maintain a transparent forum. Click here to read about The Conversation’s community standards for readers and commenters.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

From glancing over the reader characteristics mentioned above, you can guarantee that, if published by The Conversation, your article could very well feature a lively debate among commenters from all over the world. Authors will find a higher level of engagement with readers, and will be able to see how their audience responds to their work–a feature not usually seen with publication of scholarly articles.

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 14, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/who-we-are
  2. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  3. “Become an author,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 29, 2018, https://theconversation.com/become-an-author
  4. “Pitch an article.”
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Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

ISSN: 0363-3640 (Print) and 2224-1574(Online).1

Website: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The purpose of this journal is to contact practitioners and scholars in the field of library science and information science at home and abroad to discuss issues in library science and information science, introduce relevant new technologies, and report on important activities in the field of library science and information science. And to seek the development of library information and information business.”2

Target audience:
• Chinese and Chinese-American information professionals
• Information professionals interested in Chinese library and information services
• Those interested in problems common to librarians and information scientists, especially in the areas of new technologies and concepts.3

Publisher: Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA).4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: “Discusses problems common to Chinese and Chinese-American librarians and information scientists; introduces new concepts, systems, and technologies; announces worldwide symposia and other important professional events; and seeks other ways to promote the development of Chinese library and information services.”8

Frequency of publication: Semiannually in April and October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: 

http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts a variety of submissions, including literature reviews, book reviews, practical research, general discourses, library business and communication pieces, etc. Submissions should be a maximum of 20,000 words in Chinese and a maximum of 15,000 words in English.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be accompanied by a title page with the Chinese and English titles, author name, the institution the author is affiliated with, email address, abstract, and keywords.11 Before submitting to the journal, authors have the option to send their manuscript to meiwu@ntnu.edu or create an account through the site at this link.12

As for the review process, each manuscript is reviewed by a minimum of two anonymous reviewers. To be considered for publication, authors must make the corrections (or provide an explanation for why they’re not accepting the changes) within one month and send the revised manuscript back to the journal.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly/formal.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JLIS is an excellent publishing avenue for practitioners and student authors, especially Chinese and Chinese-American authors. The journal gives authors the opportunity to present information specific to this population, as well as information which affects librarianship as a whole. Additionally, JLIS is indexed by the Taiwan Humanities & Social Sciences Citation Index Database (TCI-HSS), DOAJ, LISA, PAIS, and Ulrich’s, offering authors multiple avenues for visibility.16

 

Audience Analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not provided.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of readers live in the United States and China. 17 Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese.18

Reader characteristics: Readers will have the same characteristics as most librarians but will expect more emphasis on services, technologies, and innovations for Chinese speakers. In other words, readers will expect to find information immediately relevant to Chinese communities.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because the bulk of this publication’s audience members are information professionals,20 authors can expect readers to be very familiar with LIS subject matter, including jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will expect authors to not only be fluent in Chinese, but also be familiar with Chinese culture and how it influences librarianship. Additionally, readers will expect authors to present meticulous yet compelling research which promotes the development of Chinese librarianship.21

Last updated: March 15, 2018


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  2.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  3.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  4.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 14, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  5.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  6. Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  7.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  8. Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  9.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  10. “Document Style,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/thesisStyle
  11. “Document Style,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/thesisStyle
  12. “Soliciting Methods,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions
  13. “Soliciting Methods,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions
  14. Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  15. “Document Style,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/thesisStyle
  16. “Index Unit,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  17.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
  18. “Soliciting Methods,” Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/notes/submissions
  19. Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  20. Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Social Education of the National Taiwan Normal University and the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), accessed March 15, 2018, http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  21.  Journal of Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 14, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521078816848/648883
Continue Reading

Library Management (LM)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

ISSN: 0143-51241

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”2

Target audience:Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”8

Content: “The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright”9

Frequency of publication: Nine times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews, 3000 to 6000 words in Microsoft Word format.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Management topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13 Also, while the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas,” many articles have a practical tone when addressing individual libraries.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Management is a highly informative publication which explores topics pertaining to libraries all over the world. For instance, in volume 39, issue 3/4, the topics covered include the economic crisis as it pertains to public libraries in Greece, agricultural libraries in Northern India, and a SWOT analysis of Jamaican academic libraries.16 The journal should also be of particular interest to Chinese authors, due to its annual Chinese supplement.17

LIS authors, whether professional librarians or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into current issues in library management and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, however, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English and published in the UK but is international in scope.19 The editor lives in Australia, while the editorial board members live in various countries throughout the world, including the UK, Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and South Africa.20

To ensure international voices have an opportunity to be heard, Emerald offers an editing service, Peerwith, which offers help with “language editing and translation.”21

Also, the aforementioned annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”22 with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”23

Reader characteristics: Most readers are senior managers and academics. Due to the journal’s international scope, its audience will have diverse cultural experiences. However, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because of this publication’s primary focus on LIS managers, readers are likely to have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LM’s audience is a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough, and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience. Ideally, authors should hold LIS managerial positions themselves to enhance their credibility in the eyes of their readers.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  4. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  5. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  6. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  7.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  10. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  13.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  14. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Steve O’Connor, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Management 39, no. 3/4 (2018).
  17.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  18. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  19. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  20. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  21. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  22. “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  23.  “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  24.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  25.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
Continue Reading

Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

ISSN:1911-9593

Website: http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Partnership is the journal of The Partnership organization, which is “Canada’s national network of provincial and territorial library associations.” The journal “promotes the exchange of ideas about libraries, librarianship, and information science among practitioners across all library sectors.”1

Target audience: Canadian librarians and library workers and LIS professionals, archivists, scholars, researchers, and students. Although the journal is published by The Partnership, a network of Canadian library associations with more than 7,000 people, it is an open-access journal, so its audience is not limited to members.2

Publisher: The Partnership: The Provincial and Territorial Library Associations of Canada (Ontario, Canada).3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts submitted to the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.5

Content: Regular sections in Partnership include Editor’s Comments, Innovations in Practice, Theory and Research, Conference Spotlight, Professional Development, The Roundtable, Book Reviews, Viewpoints, Profiles, and News and Announcements.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Partnership accepts “original, unpublished manuscripts in French or English on a broad range of topics relevant to library and information science practitioners in all library sectors.” The editors “encourage submissions which consider the Canadian context, but this is not a necessary condition for acceptance to the journal.”8 Each section has its own editorial guidelines in terms of topic, word count, tone, and approach.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the journal’s website.10 Manuscripts for the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo a double-blind peer-review process, usually within two months of submission.11

Editorial tone: The tone depends on the section; it is overall scholarly but not overly formal.

Style guide used: APA (6th edition), with a modified style for online articles and documents.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This open-access journal appears to be an excellent opportunity for Canadian LIS authors, as it is written for the Canadian LIS community. LIS authors outside of Canada are not excluded by the guidelines, but they should ensure their work meets the needs of the Canadian readers.13 The many sections–theory, pedagogy, practice, professional development, reviews, and library news–cover a huge variety of content and offer writers many opportunities for submitting work that ranges from scholarly to practical to reflective.14  There are a few must-read articles and editorials for authors submitting to Partnership, especially “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership15 and editorials reflecting on the journal’s past and future.16 Furthermore, the journal “provides a chance for librarians and library workers to be editors and reviewers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to a 2013 editorial that tabulates the journal’s statistics and information, in December 2012, Partnership had 763 readers registered on its website.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  This is a Canadian bilingual publication (English and French) for librarians and information professionals of Canada. Authors would need to ensure their work meets their needs and explains any cultural or language differences.

Reader characteristics: Overall, Partnership has a very broad spectrum of readers in the Canadian library and information professions: librarians, library works, scholars, researchers, practitioners, and students. It can be safely assumed the readers are interested in promoting successful libraries and acquiring knowledge to allow them to succeed in their own work. The authors and content of the publication suggests that the majority of readers are working in all types of libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The journal works to connect members of the Canadian library community,19 and the journal’s sections are variously academic, reflective, and newsy. Readers probably have a range of LIS knowledge, from the practical to the academic.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should first take into consider how their work is broadly or specifically related to libraries and library scholarship in Canada. Furthermore, readers come to this journal to read on a a wide range of current topics in the library profession: research, pedagogy, professional development, and current news and profiles. Readers work at every level of the Canadian library profession and in all types of libraries.

Last updated: February 19, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “What is The Partnership?” ThePartnership.ca, accessed February 19, 2018, http://www.thepartnership.ca/web/PARTNERSHIP/About/PARTNERSHIP/About.aspx?hkey=57981e1d-6cc7-4b09-822e-ebdfd7f2e3b2.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Submissions,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/submissions.
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Information for Authors,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/information/authors#.WouLFRPwZUM.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “Editorial Policies.”
  15. See David Fox, “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership,Partnership 8, no. 1 (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v8i1.2692.
  16. See Robin Bergart, Leanne Olson, and Nathalie Soini, “Editorial: Charting the Course of Partnership,Partnership 12, no. 1 (2017): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v12i1.3976, and Jennifer Richard, “Celebrating 10 Years of Canadian Librarianship through the Partnership Journal,” Partnership 11, no. 1 (2016): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i1.3682.
  17. “Journal History,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/history#.WouedhPwZUM.
  18. David Fox, “Get Published!”
  19. “Journal History.”
Continue Reading

Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association (JCHLA/JABSC)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association (JCHLA) / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada (JABSC)

ISSN: 1708-68921

Website: https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla (French language edition is at the same link; click on the drop-down menu under “Language”)

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The purpose of the journal is to provide a forum for librarians and other information professionals to share research and information related to health sciences librarianship.”2

Target audience: Canadian information professionals involved with health libraries.3

Publisher: Canadian Health Libraries Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: The journal covers a wide variety of topics relevant to Canadian health science libraries including, but not limited to, distance services, databases, electronic medical records, healthcare reform, health literacy, grants, and many more.8

Frequency of publication: Three times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Publishes research articles and program descriptions (peer-reviewed), as well as reviews, opinion pieces, and columns (non-peer-reviewed).10

Submission and review process: Authors must first create an account with the journal’s website before submitting a manuscript.11 The journal does not accept previously published submissions or simultaneous submissions. Additional, the journal asks that all manuscripts be submitted in Microsoft Word format with 12-point font and italics instead of underlining. Additionally, authors should provide URLs where available. Next, all tables, figures, and illustrations should be placed at the end of the manuscript. Lastly, if submitting a research article or program description, authors need to follow the instructions for ensuring a blind review.12

As for the review process, two peer reviewers are assigned to research articles and program descriptions. These reviewers provide feedback to the author within two to three weeks of the original submission date. Feedback focuses on originality, how up-to-date the topic is, writing quality, the suitability of the methods and analysis sections, and the accuracy of the article as a whole.13

Editorial tone: Formal and scholarly.14

Style guide used: National Library of Medicine’s Citing Medicine.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Researchers interested in establishing themselves in the LIS field of Canadian health libraries should seriously consider submitting to this publication. Additionally, information professionals working for health libraries in general should give this publication a second look, as there is no mention of authors being exclusively Canadian or practicing in Canada. (The only exception is the JCHLA membership requirement for the Student Paper Prize, which is detailed below.) The publication accepts submissions in either English or French, but the editors will not provide translations.16

The journal offers an annual competition, the JCHLA/JABSC Student Paper Prize. Students must be “currently enrolled in accredited master’s programs in library science or library technician programs.”17 Additionally, the prize “is awarded annually to the library student who submits the best unpublished paper on health sciences librarianship to the competition. Research papers, program descriptions and review articles are eligible for the prize.”18 The winning paper is published in the journal, and the winner receives a certificate, free membership in the Canadian Health Libraries Association, and free registration to the CHLA/ABSC conference.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available. However, it is safe to say that the journal is read by the 250 members of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada.20 Additionally, the journal is also freely accessible online.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Canada22 The publication is bilingual and accepts submissions in either English or French; however, authors outside of Canada need to write using Canadian English, being aware of spelling variations. Also, authors should take steps to ensure their submissions are relevant specifically to information professionals working in Canadian health libraries.23

Reader characteristics: It can safely be assumed that the majority of this publication’s readers are employed in health sciences libraries, interested in accurate health services information, and comfortable with the technology used to support health library services. Readers, given the specific focus of this publication, would have limited interest in general LIS topics or LIS issues relevant only to readers in the United States.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:

Readers are likely familiar with the various library databases referenced throughout the journal (LISA, LISTA, PubMed, etc.), Web 2.0 concepts and how they pertain to health sciences libraries, etc. Furthermore, most readers likely possess a graduate or post-graduate degree in library science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As professional librarians working in health libraries, readers of this journal will expect to find well-researched, informative articles on the latest trends in health libraries. As a Canadian publication, readers will expect authors to demonstrate understanding of the Canadian workplace culture and knowledge of the government’s role in their work. Non-Canadian authors interested in submitting articles to this publication should thoroughly read the author guidelines to ensure they understand the expectations of the journal’s editors and readers.

Last updated: February 8, 2018


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “The Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association,” University of Saskatchewan, accessed February 8, 2018, https://library.usask.ca/ejournals/view.php?id=111089815741000
  2.  Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada, University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/index
  3. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada, University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/index
  4.  Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 8, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  5. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 8, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  6. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 8, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  7. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 8, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  8. “Author Guidelines,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  9. “Archives,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/issue/archive
  10. “Author Guidelines,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Online Submissions,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#submissionpreparationchecklist
  13. “Peer Review Process,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  14. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 8, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  15. “Author Guidelines,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16.  “Author Guidelines,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  17. “JCHLA/JABSC Student Paper Prize,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://chla-absc.ca/jchla_jabsc_student_paper_priz.php
  18. “JCHLA/JABSC Student Paper Prize,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://chla-absc.ca/jchla_jabsc_student_paper_priz.php
  19. “JCHLA/JABSC Student Paper Prize,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://chla-absc.ca/jchla_jabsc_student_paper_priz.php
  20. “Welcome to CHLA/ABSC,” Canadian Health Libraries Association, accessed February 8, 2018, https://www.chla-absc.ca/
  21. “Open Access Policy,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/editorialPolicies#openAccessPolicy
  22.  Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 8, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404849046132/530077
  23. “Author Guidelines,” University of Alberta Libraries, accessed February 8, 2018, https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/jchla/index.php/jchla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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REFORMA Newsletter

*Note:  REFORMA Newsletter last published in April 2014, and its current status is unknown. Please contact the wiki team if you have information about this publication so we can update this profile.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: REFORMA Newsletter

ISSN: 0891-88801

Website: http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2

Purpose, objective, or mission: To develop library services for the growing population of Spanish speakers and Latinos in the United States and abroad. REFORMA’s goals include:

  • Development of Spanish-language and Latino-oriented library collections
  • Recruitment of bilingual, multicultural library personnel
  • Promotion of public awareness of libraries and librarianship among Latinos
  • Advocacy on behalf of the information needs of the Latino community
  • Liaison to other professional organizations2

Target audience: Librarians and other professionals with an interest in library services to Latinos and Spanish speakers.3

Publisher: REFORMA.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6 The newsletter contains LIS professional news and information about developing and improving library services.7

Medium: As of 2012, REFORMA Newsletter is an electronic and virtual newsletter that is open to anyone.8

Content: The newsletter covers issues that concern information and library services for the Spanish speaking and Latinos. It contains book reviews, articles on issues concerning Latinos and the Spanish speaking, features about librarians in different Spanish speaking countries, interviews with authors, bilingual and Spanish language book lists.9

Frequency of publication: Updated as submissions are accepted.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: None available.

Types of contributions accepted: Artwork, opinion pieces, news briefs, features, reviews, and letters to the editor are accepted. REFORMA’s sections include News Articles, President’s Column, Chapter Updates, Adult Book Reviews, Children’s Book Reviews, Young Adult Book Reviews, Felicidades!, Letter from the Editor, and La Opinión.11

Submission and review process: Article submissions should be sent via email to the editor. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Please note that all submissions are subject to editing and revision due to space, grammar, and clarity.12

As of November 2012, editor Francisco Vargas put out a call for REFORMA editors, including coeditor, copy editor, and regular columnists. These volunteer positions are all virtual and require an average of 10 hours per week.13

Editorial tone: The newsletter does not indicate a type of editorial tone. The pieces in the newsletter are written in an approachable tone.14

Style guide used: No style guide indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The REFORMA Newsletter is well respected and widely read among librarians who provide services to the Spanish speaking and Latinos in the United States and other countries where Spanish is spoken. The level of diversity of topics offered through the newsletter allows librarians and others to explore a range of subjects for articles. However, it should be noted that the focus of the newsletter is on library services for Latinos and the Spanish speaking. Authors should keep this in mind when submitting a manuscript to this publication.

This publication is neither peer reviewed nor written in a scholarly tone. As such, it most likely will not meet any requirements for tenure. However, the articles are interesting and the authors of published work in the newsletter will have a far-reaching audience as this newsletter is distributed across the globe. Authors in the publication gain recognition within this community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: REFORMA Newsletter is open-access, online.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: REFORMA offices are located in the United States (Anaheim, California) with membership located throughout North America.16 This publication accepts submissions in “Spanish, English or Spanglish”17 suggesting authors need an understanding of Spanish-language and Latino cultural.

Reader characteristics: Writers can safely assume that readers of this newsletter, per their website, are committed to, “development of library services and programs that meet the needs of the Latino community; the establishment of a national information and support network among individuals who share our goals; the education of the U.S. Latino population in regards to the availability and types of library services; and lobbying efforts to preserve existing library resource centers serving the interests of Latinos.”18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have some knowledge of LIS topics, as they are working to provide library services to Latinos, but the level of knowledge will vary.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the mission of the organization and, possess a clear understanding of the needs of the membership. The readers will be interested in how to recruit Latino and Spanish speaking individuals into the library field, how to establish and maintain Spanish-language collections, and how to effectively lobby to secure and retain funding for library services for the Latino communities they serve.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Reforma Newsletter, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521739224894/201093
  2. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  3. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  7. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  8. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  9. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  10. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  11. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  12. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  13. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  14. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  15. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  16. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  17. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  18. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  19. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

ISSN: 1712-44411

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”2

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”3

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”4

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Online8

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”11

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”12 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.13

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”14

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”15

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”16

Editorial tone: Academic17

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,19, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”20

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26921

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.22

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”23 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”24, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.25 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523478909052/597635
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  9. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  18. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  19. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  21. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  22. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  25. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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